Your trash still my treasure at Prestons

Your trash still my treasure at Prestons

of GALLERY | Trash & Treasure Bazaar at Prestons
One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, as they say, and the revived Prestons ‘ Trash & Treasure Bazaar is drawing crowds each week.
After previously running weekly for 29 years, the bazaar held what may have turned out to be its final market in September, 2016. It was a multicultural attraction and drew weekly crowds of visitors and stallholders.
Last year, event manager Monique Annetts revived it. She said: “The stalls cater for everyone. Vendors sell garage-sale bits and pieces to multicultural fruit and veg, arts and craft, new goods including brand clothing, bric-a-brac, shoes, furniture, toys, electrical.”
As well as permanent and casual stallholders selling new and used goods, the bazaar has a variety of foods, like gozleme, kebabs, Indian cuisine, bacon-and-egg rolls, burgers, coffee, ice-cream, pies and cakes. There’s live entertainment, like amusement rides, animals and live music.
Stallholder Rick said: “It’s a local gathering point for the community to come together and see what small businesses offer. Pre-loved items give customers the opportunity to buy items drastically cheaper than new. Treasured items that can be reused, recycled and upcycled, reducing their environmental impact. We love the community feel here, everyone coming together.” At 1895 Camden Valley Way, Horningsea Park (Prestons) or sydneybazaar.com .

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Living in the UAE: 21 Things to Know Before You Move | MoveHub

Montreal £3,630
Please note: these container shipping costs exclude typical add-ons such as door-to-door delivery, professional packing/unpacking, and basic insurance cover. Our shipping suppliers normally incorporate these services into their prices, so expect some discrepancy between the rates given here and the quotes you receive. These estimates should be used as an indication only. 12. What’s it like living in the UAE with a family?
Once you’ve managed to arrange for your spouse and kids to join you in your fresh start, you’ll want to get them settled in as quickly as possible. Fortunately, English is widely spoken in the UAE, which will make things easier.
As in many cultures, family is highly valued in the UAE, and will give you an easy way to bond with locals and other colleagues. In terms of education, you will be encouraged to find a private or international school for your kids – and if you’re worried about your children suffering a culture shock or having to adapt to a new curriculum, don’t sweat it.
As of the 2017/18 school year, there are 78 schools in Dubai – nearly half the total – which offer the British curriculum , while 34 teach kids what they would be learning in American schools.
Your family will be able to learn all about the Emirati culture (including getting used to hearing the call to prayer six times a day), but will still be able to enjoy western traditions. Easter and Christmas are proudly celebrated in the UAE , complete with Christmas trees and mall Santas. 13. Is there a lot of family-friendly entertainment in the UAE?
There are plenty of fun activities for all the family to enjoy, including some top-level sport. Abu Dhabi’s Yas Marina Circuit holds an annual Formula One race, football and cricket are extremely popular, and you absolutely have to take the kids to see some camel races in Abu Dhabi or Al Ain – especially since they often feature robot jockeys.
You can go camping in the stunning natural surroundings of Fujairah beach, or Liwa in the Empty Quarter, which is home to the kind of sand dunes familiar to Star Wars ’ Luke Skywalker and Rey. Speaking of films, you can see all the latest releases, so there’s no fear of missing the latest Marvel blockbuster. Some flicks have been banned in the UAE in recent years, such as Black Swan , Love and Other Drugs and Fifty Shades of Grey , but it’s rare, and generally doesn’t apply to films you’d take your kids to. 14. Is it too hot in the UAE?
Temperatures typically reach 45°C in the summer , but can go down to a more manageable 10°C in the winter, depending on where you live. In Dubai, the temperature rarely drops below 15°C all year round, and has been known to hit a sweltering 49°C. This can make summers tough, but thankfully, there’s air conditioning wherever you go – including bus stops.
The constant heat does also mean that you and your family can visit the plentiful Emirati beaches at any time in the year. That’s right: whenever you fancy it, you can go and work on your tan, build sandcastles, or even try out some watersports. Just remember your sun cream. While you’re living in the UAE, be sure to try some local cuisine. It’s delicious 15. When it comes to food, the UAE has its own unique flavour
Prepare yourself for brunch. We told you about the UAE’s plethora of brunch choices earlier, but it deserves to be mentioned again, if only to make sure you’re ready for the concept of double or even triple brunch. That’s right – some people repeatedly jump from one brunch to another once Friday and Saturday roll around.
The other ubiquitous part of Emirati cuisine is the national fruit: dates. The UAE produces more than 530,000 metric tons of fresh dates each year, so you’ll see them being sold everywhere and incorporated into many local recipes. 16. Get ready to explore global cuisine
As well as regional specialities, you’ll also have access to every type of dining experience, from high-end food to fish and chips. And don’t worry about bacon or ham hocks being forbidden in Islam , as pork is available in a special section of most supermarkets.
Because of its diverse population, the UAE is home to all the dishes you’d expect to find in a big city – Indian, Italian, French, Japanese, and so on – while also satisfying true foodies’ appetites with high-quality Arabic and Middle Eastern cooking. Immerse yourself in the Abu Dhabi and Dubai lifestyle, and see what real falafel, curry and hummus taste like. 17. You’ll be living in an Islamic country
The state religion of UAE is Islam, which impacts every part of life in the country – from the law itself to the six times a day you’ll hear the call to prayer.
Your colleagues and friends in the UAE may well have different cultural expectations when it comes to drinking, relationships, and clothing, to name a few. Some of these differences are enshrined in law. The UAE’s legal system incorporates Sharia Law, which means that offences like insulting Islam or consuming alcohol if you’re a Muslim person are liable to get you deported, flogged, or worse. 18. Ramadan will affect you, regardless of your religion
Be prepared for the month-long fast of Ramadan each year in the spring, during which time everyone is banned from eating, drinking or smoking in public . This includes you, making it one of the most important things to know about the UAE. You can eat at work, but do so away from people, in a private section of the office.
On the plus side, each night, you can join in as people break their day-long fast at the incredible night markets in Abu Dhabi and Dubai. As well as delicious food, the markets also create a smorgasbord of art, fashion and fun. 19. Living in the UAE means living under an absolute monarchy
While you may think you’re used to living under a monarch if you’re from the UK, Queen Elizabeth II doesn’t have anything on the seven rulers of the UAE. Each of the emirates is overseen by a tribal leader, called a sheikh, who has absolute power over his people and passes down his title from father to son. Together, the sheikhs make up the Federal Supreme Council (FSC).
The seven members of the FSC elect the president and prime minister, usually giving them to Abu Dhabi and Dubai’s sheikhs, respectively. Unlike the country you’re probably coming from, the UAE is certainly not a democracy , and its authorities don’t take kindly to criticisms of this fact. 20. What is healthcare like in the UAE?
Hopefully your company will provide you with access to private treatment, which has a better reputation in the UAE than the public healthcare system. As of 2017, there were more private hospitals than public, according to Allianz . This makes sense, since anyone who isn’t an Emirati national only has access to emergency treatments.
The cost of healthcare is high, but your salary probably will be, too – especially as (say it with us) there’s no income tax. 21. So who should move to the UAE?
The UAE is a challenging place to live if you’re a woman or part of the LGBT+ community, with many of the country’s laws restricting your freedoms. However, if none of these identities apply to you, you will find an accepting, welcoming place which is home to dozens of different nationalities from across the globe.
As long as you have a salary which allows you to enjoy all that the Gulf nation has to offer, and you can respect the country’s laws and religious customs, the UAE will be a wonderful home to you and your family. Head on over to our International Container Shipping Costs page , and see how much it would take to set you up in paradise. Or, to start receiving quotes for shipping to the UAE, simply fill in this form and our professional suppliers will get back to you! Josh Jackman
Josh is a Londoner, an Arsenal fan and a lover of travel. His dream holiday would involve Japan, India, Australia and a great deal of food.

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How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation? – Priya Krishna May 12, 2019 7:00 AM ET

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[–]hamburgerhase -1 points 8 days ago
Chinese tourists and international students. We need to make China isolationist again like it was in 18th century.
[–]hamburgerhase 1 point 8 days ago
You have to hate those uncivilised chink invaders. Check out r/chinesetourists
[–]hamburgerhase -1 points 8 days ago
There are more and more Chinese immigrants and illegals coming to this city. Why can’t I have Japanese immigrants instead?
[–]hamburgerhase 0 points 8 days ago
The Chinese government, because there’s no greater evil in this world than a dangerous communist government with a sizeable economy and military. We have to defend our civilisation and attack them first while we still can.
[–]hamburgerhase -1 points 8 days ago
I spat on a Chinese tourist once.
[–]hamburgerhase 1 point 8 days ago
Literally every mainland Chinese student in America. They should be exterminated.
[–]hamburgerhase 1 point 8 days ago
Nuke Chinar first. Drop the the no first use policy.
[–]hamburgerhase 1 point 8 days ago
Thanos snapped the entire Chinese people, and then the Avengers and their enemies made peace and lived happily ever after in a better world without any chinks
[–]hamburgerhase 1 point 8 days ago
Certainly bigger than any of yellow manlet’s from Chinar
[–]hamburgerhase -7 points 8 days ago
Chinese food. They’re abhorrent, don’t have any artistic value, unhealthy, sometimes they use unethical ingredients like dogs and human placenta.
[–]hamburgerhase -5 points 9 days ago
Why does that matter? Chinese tourists are barely human. They’re locusts.
[–]hamburgerhase 2 points 9 days ago
Mao Zedong. He did the world a favour by deliberately killing 60 million locusts with his agricultural reforms. I wish he could have upped his numbers to 1.4 billion. That would be perfect.
[–]hamburgerhase 2 points 9 days ago
So the Chinese are invading Sweden now?
[–]hamburgerhase 0 points 9 days ago
I refuse to believe that the Nanjing massacre happened and tried to tell everyone that Iris Chang is an operative of the Chinese intelligence agency who wrote a fake story to smear the Japan.
[–]hamburgerhase 4 points 9 days ago
I’ve never been to Japan, but I’d suggest you to ask in r/Japan or r/Japantravel instead for questions like this.
[–]hamburgerhase 3 points 9 days ago
How to blame the Chinese government for my depression.
[–]hamburgerhase -8 points 9 days ago
The Americans provoked the Japanese by embargoing them. The Japanese had no choice but to attack the Americans. By moral high ground I meant their reasons for an embargo against Japan. The Americans are hypocrites who called the Japanese aggressors while also brutally occupying the Philippines.
[–]hamburgerhase -22 points 9 days ago
I think Japan should have won the war against China and annex the country to civilised it. Too bad Americans couldn’t keep themselves from stalling the progress of Asian nations under Japan’s leadership. Now we have a dangerous communist giant that threatens world peace and pollutes the world with low quality counterfeit products.
[–]hamburgerhase -57 points 9 days ago
It sounds horrifying because it’s completely fabricated. An industrialised and civilised first world country like Japan would have never done such an atrocity. If China was accused of being the perpetrator of such crimes, I would buy it, because the Chinese are barbarians and we have seen how badly they treated their own citizens in Tibet and Tiananmen Square. But since Japan is the one accused in this case, I’m skeptical. I’ve met a lot of Japanese and all of them are civilised human beings, while on the other hand, every Chinese I’ve ever come across are liars, frauds and nouveau riche trashy people.
[–]hamburgerhase -4 points 10 days ago
Must be fake if they’re from China.
[–]hamburgerhase -1 points 10 days ago
People need to realise that China needs to be stopped before it becomes too strong and wealthy. The sooner the West glasses China with nuclear weapons, the better it is for our beloved Western Judeo-Christian civilisation. Also, the great replacement is real and not a hoax. Muslims need to be forcefully remigrated to their countries of origin.
[–]hamburgerhase 0 points 10 days ago
Just be honest, you would love it if Hong Kong is handed over back to England, its rightful owner. That’s the way it was meant to be, the Qing government ceded the city “in perpetuity” to England right?
[–]hamburgerhase -1 points 10 days ago
Why not both? The more dead Chinamen the merrier.
[–]hamburgerhase -4 points 10 days ago
Look at those self proclaimed “allies” of America, France, Germany and Italy are acting like ungrateful spoiled kids. Only the UK stays true to America. This is why I support Brexit. The UK needs to be able to conduct its own foreign policy, not governed by unelected Brussels bureaucrats
[–]hamburgerhase -11 points 10 days ago Good idea. China shouldn’t be allowed to govern itself. Only Western governments can properly manage and exploit the country. Give Kwangchouwan to France, Tsingtao to Germany, and Dalian to Russia.
[–]hamburgerhase -1 points 10 days ago
Don’t conflate the Chinks with the Japanese. The Japanese don’t talk in a Ching Chong way, their language sounds pleasant, unlike the Chinese language that sounds like an ape doing a mating call.
[–]hamburgerhase -19 points 10 days ago
That’s why we shouldn’t let any more Chinamen come to our countries and invade our universities.
[–]hamburgerhase 0 points 10 days ago
The Chinese flag shouldn’t be allowed to be hoisted anywhere. Not even in China.
[–]hamburgerhase 0 points 10 days ago
Plowing those cheap Chink hookers.
[–]hamburgerhase -10 points 10 days ago
It belongs to England, just like Weihaiwei.
[–]hamburgerhase -5 points 10 days ago
This is bad news for everyone. Not just for those smelly Hindis, but for the civilised West as well. Electronic devices were invented by white people, why are we letting inferior races to beat us in our own game?
[–]hamburgerhase -4 points 10 days ago
I’m all for ethnic nationalism, but be consistent about it please. 1488 brother
[–]hamburgerhase 0 points 10 days ago
I’m not making any of this up. Or are you buying into the Chinese propaganda that they never did anything wrong against their own people? Nanjing killings were also fabricated by the Chinese government.
[–]hamburgerhase -4 points 1 month ago
Please don’t eat Chinese food ever again. European and American cuisine is superior in every way.
[–]hamburgerhase -4 points 1 month ago
He’s Chinese. America needs to be led by a real American.
[–]hamburgerhase -10 points 1 month ago
I mean taking down the Chinese government is technically illegal in China, but that’s totally right from a moral standpoint. China needs to be broken up in 10 countries so it will never pose a threat against the West and Civilisation ever again.
[–]hamburgerhase 1 point 1 month ago
Victoria 2, I can fantasise about the good old days where the Chinese still knew their place in the world, winning wars against them by using my technologically superior European military against the primitive Chinese militia and imposing the will of the civilised man upon those barbarians. Also, liberating the Balkans and the Middle East from the Kebabs and returning them to righteous Christian rule is fun too. I still play this game to this day.
[–]hamburgerhase -7 points 1 month ago
Arabic culture. It’s a sick backwards culture where rape culture actually exist. Also Indian culture. Their food smell bad and the people too.
[–]hamburgerhase 2 points 1 month ago
Alexander Dugin was right. Europe needs to be broken up. We have to do this in order to save our Western Christian Civilisation and the advancement of the White race.
[–]hamburgerhase 3 points 1 month ago
Thank you, Western Civilisation!
[–]hamburgerhase -6 points 1 month ago
Too bad she’s Chinese. Disney should make a movie about a strong Western woman, not a strong woman from a culture that kills female babies
[–]hamburgerhase 0 points 1 month ago 1989 天安门学生屠杀世界 达赖喇嘛万岁,解放新疆!毛主席,不如说是猫主席。习禁评是小熊维尼 ! 台湾民国万岁! 动态网自由门 天安門 天安门 法輪功 李洪志 Free Tibet 六四天安門事件 The Tiananmen Square protests of 1989 天安門大屠殺 The Tiananmen Square Massacre 反右派鬥爭 The Anti-Rightist Struggle 大躍進政策 The Great Leap Forward 文化大革命 The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution 人權 Human Rights 民運 Democratization 自由 Freedom 獨立 Independence 多黨制 Multi-party system 台灣 臺灣 Taiwan Formosa 中華民國 Republic of China 西藏 土伯特 唐古特 Tibet 達賴喇嘛 Dalai Lama 法輪功 Falun Dafa 新疆維吾爾自治區 The Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region 諾貝爾和平獎 Nobel Peace Prize 劉暁波 Liu Xiaobo 民主 言論 思想 反共 反革命 抗議 運動 騷亂 暴亂 騷擾 擾亂 抗暴 平反 維權 示威游行 李洪志 法輪大法 大法弟子 強制斷種 強制堕胎 民族淨化 人體實驗 肅清 胡耀邦 趙紫陽 魏京生 王丹 還政於民 和平演變 激流中國 北京之春 大紀元時報 九評論共産黨 獨裁 專制 壓制 統一 監視 鎮壓 迫害 侵略 掠奪 破壞 拷問 屠殺 活摘器官 誘拐 買賣人口 遊進 走私 毒品 賣淫 春畫 賭博 六合彩 天安門 天安门 法輪功 李洪志 Free Tibet 劉曉波动态网自由门 1989年4月15日天安门广场
[–]hamburgerhase -1 points 1 month ago
Exactly, those Chinamen make counterfeit version of literally everything, from electronic tools to novels, and now even fake videos.
[–]hamburgerhase 2 points 1 month ago
Tea is British. China copied it illegally from the British. They have been copying shit for the last 5000 years. That’s why we must invade them.

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Northern Virginia Escape Room Releases List Of Top Fairfax Restaurants

Northern Virginia Escape Room Releases List Of Top Fairfax Restaurants May 13 Print This Article Share it With Friends Room Escape Fairfax – Fairfax, VA Escape Rooms Fairfax, Virginia – May 10, 2019 – Room Escape Fairfax, a Northern Virginia escape room , recently published a list of top Fairfax restaurants to enjoy. These restaurants offer a variety of price points and cuisines to help you create the perfect night out, whether you’re hanging out with friends or planning a date. Coastal Flats is a local favorite serving up fresh seafood, ribs, and of course, its famous shrimp and lobster rolls. At the family-owned Havabite Eatery, diners can enjoy classic Greek and Italian fare. Stop by for the afternoon tea special if you’re in the mood for an early dinner. Craft beer enthusiasts will enjoy Highside, which offers 20 taps in addition to bottles, craft cider, and Asian street food bites. While Pho4Ever specializes in pho soup, its menu includes a range of appetizers, noodles, and rice dishes that make drizzly nights feel cozy. Sisters Thai has two convenient locations, each serving classic dishes like pad thai alongside specialties like duck curry and pottery shrimp. For a light meal, De Clieu offers sandwiches and an all-day breakfast menu. Just be sure to grab a gelatoccino for dessert! Finally, Bollywood Bistro lives up to its motto of “color you can taste” with bright, fresh Indian dishes.
Consider pairing one of these exciting dining options with an escape room adventure for a complete night out. Escape rooms test your critical thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills in a fun new way. Your group will be locked in a room filled with hidden clues, puzzles, and codes that must be cracked before you can find the key and successfully escape. Escape rooms are a quick, entertaining way to spend some time on the weekend and make an excellent date night idea, too.
Room Escape Fairfax contains 10 themed escape rooms, each filled with high-quality props that help create an immersive experience. Choose the theme that suits you best, from spooky horror movies to cartoon episodes. You’ll become the hero of your own story as you solve puzzles and plot your escape. For more information, or to schedule your escape room adventure, contact Room Escape Fairfax at 703-270-0337. The facility is located at 3949A University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030.
Media Contact Company Name: Room Escape Fairfax Contact Person: Egor Bondarev

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On Korean Food

I love to read cookbooks, and to try new recipes. As someone who cooks three meals a day, seven days a week, for seven people, I would say I am fairly good at eyeballing a recipe and knowing: What ingredients I can safely substitute for others Whether I should double the recipe to feed my family How long a recipe will actually take me
So, one issue I often take with cookbook authors is their propensity to play fast-and-loose with the accepted meanings of words like “simple” and “minute.”
However, I do love to cook interesting food, so I put up with it (with, perhaps, the occasional snort of derision). My family lived in Korea for two years when I was in middle school, so I often wish I could recreate the cuisine. Mostly, I conclude that it’s better to go out to eat if I’m really craving Korean food.
So I was interested to try two new (to me anyway) cookbooks that purported to make cooking Korean food easier.
I tried multiple recipes from each book, but, referring to my extra cooking sense described above, I knew at first read that I wouldn’t make the vast majority. Most of the time, I decided that I could live without the recipe–it wan’t easy enough to overcome the end-of-day inertia. I did spring for a couple of ingredients I didn’t have on hand (like gochujang ), but decided I’d much rather, say, buy the kimchi at Costco (it’s MSG-free and naturally fermented, very fresh tasting) than make it myself.
Korean Food Made Simple stretches “simple” to the farthest possible limit of the English language. The recipes are still quite time-consuming and might overwhelm a more novice cook. I don’t usually have time on a weeknight to devote to this level of preparation. However, I did think of ways to cut steps out from several of the recipes, and they were all a hit. The recipes did taste fairly authentic, but I’m not sure that any of them will make the final cut into my menu rotation.
Recipes we might keep: Kimchi Jigae (pork and kimchi stew) – mostly because it’s an easy idea and I can use whatever meat we have plus kimchi and broth. Dak Gogi (Korean BBQ chicken) – I didn’t marinate this, just used the ingredients to make a sauce. I left out the brown sugar, but did use a little maple syrup, which was called for in the recipe.
Korean Paleo had more promise, as it follows more of what I try to do with cooking anyway, like cutting out extra sugar and using vegetables in the place of processed carbs. However, there is a lot of leeway within “paleo” and several of the substitutions were still not quite what I wanted. I did find that I used more of these recipes, because when both books had similar recipes, Korean Paleo would omit things like orange juice that I never have anyway. For that reason, I might choose to keep the recipes over similar offerings in Korean Food Made Simple .
Recipes we might keep: Dweiji Bulgogi – I always skip the marinade step, and would substitute whatever meat I had. Dweiji Galbi Kimchi Jjim – This is basically meat cooked in kimchi. Easy. Chap Chae – Sweet potato noodles are technically paleo, I guess, but I’ll use zucchini instead. Sigeumchi Namul (spinach salad) – I haven’t made this yet, but it seems like a nice twist on cooked spinach. Pulled Pork with Korean BBQ Sauce – I don’t know how traditional this is, although the other cookbook had a recipe for it, too. The family really liked it. Kimchi Deviled Eggs – This recipe calls for making mayonnaise, which I’m not going to do, but I like the idea of flavoring deviled eggs with kimchi and gochujang!
I don’t know what it is about the seasonal shift this spring, but all of a sudden I abandoned our usual weekly forays into Indian and Middle Eastern food in favor of Thai, Greek, and Korean. Maybe it was just time for a change.
What types of food are you cooking these days?
Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.
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SFG Club Debuts VR Foosball In London

SFG Club Debuts VR Foosball In London Category: SFG Club Debuts VR Foosball In London May 12, 2019 There’s plenty of drinks, street food and games going on at the rooftop experience.
It’s almost summertime and the weather is starting to warm up here in the UK, so what better time to enjoy a few drinks with mates on a rooftop bar. London’s Roof East has opened for another year and thanks to SFG Club , there’s going to be plenty of food and entertainment available; including a brand new virtual reality (VR) foosball experience.
Londoners will be able to head down to Roof East to see the new House of Foos, a covered part of the rooftop complex which features a four-player VR foosball experience. The controls will be familiar but the content will take foosball gameplay to a new immersive level. It’s strictly 4-player, so visitors will need some friends or coerce some willing strangers to play. Each session is 10 minutes for two games and costs £5 GBP per person.
After working up a hunger and thurst visitors can then enjoy the new Roof Eats concept, food stalls serving street food from around the world. Stalls include Eat Chay, indulgent vegan food with flavour inspirations from traditional Vietnamese and Korean cuisines; Kolkati, serving North Indian inspired ‘Kati Rolls’ – a flaky egg-fried paratha wraps, filled with masala chicken or paneer and The Burger Project, a burger bar run by Jimmy Garcia. Of course, Roof East will also feature 3 bars, with a selection of new cocktails such as the rum and raspberry ‘Knickerbocker Royale’ to blue tequila ‘Electric Boogaloo’.
There’s also plenty more to do, 6 gaming lanes offer curling, bowling or shuffle and five free games offer visitors Cornhole, Jenga, Table Tennis, Foosball (normal) and Table-top Curling. Baseball fans can jump into the Sluggers batting cages or for a less energetic sport there’s country garden themed Birdies crazy golf. Or for those that really need to de-stress Flow East Yoga will be on hand to offer Vinyasa Flow Yoga classes, suitable for all levels.
Roof East is open Tuesday – Sunday, weekdays 5pm – 11pm and weekends 12pm – 11pm. There isn’t an entrance fee so it’s free to enjoy the view. Adult tickets for games start from £8 and can be booked on the website . May also sees the return of the Rooftop Film Club featuring a programme of new releases, cult classics and other cinematic spectacles. Related articles

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Restaurant Vendors Find New Leads for Restaurants Opening Soon

Restaurant Vendors Find New Leads for Restaurants Opening Soon Monday, May 13th, 2019
( Restaurant News Release ) Flhip.com has released its latest restaurant openings report, providing restaurant vendors with a sampling of fresh sales and marketing leads that can be found on their website.
Flhip provides regularly updated lead lists, allowing vendors to check for updates at any time. To see leads in your sales area click here .
Click on the map above to see how Flhip can get you in the door first of new restaurants!
Amagansett, NY – Coche Comedor will stand as a year-round eatery, offering elevated Mexican cuisine highlighted by fresh, local ingredients. The restaurant will utilize a woodburning grill and rotisserie to cook roasted chickens, meat and seafood, highlighting the vibrant flavors of Mexican cuisine will be debuting this summer.
Chicago, IL – Superkhana International Yamada and Shah are bringing their long-running Bombay Breakdown pop-up to a permanent location with a fun and modern take on Indian food. The restaurant will focus on dinner, though there’s potential for a late-afternoon happy hour (or a “samosa hour” as Yamada described, referring to the fried savory pastry stuffed with potatoes and peas) The restaurant is now slated to open sometime in June
Midland, GA – The Simple Greek Mediterranean-style chain restaurant, could open as early as this summer at Lakeside Village in Midland. The menu includes traditional gyro, chicken gyro, grilled steak and grilled chicken as well as vegetables, cheese, sauces and sides like dolmades, tiropita, garlic green beans and spanakopita, to name a few.
Dayton, OH – Wright Cafe The new Wright Café in Vandalia has had “very good success since opening,” and is gearing up to expand its menu with seasonal offerings in the coming weeks. A grass-roots type of concept with an outstanding menu where a family or group can get a very reasonable bang for their buck,” its founder Michael Dixson told this news outlet.
Evansville, IN – Drake’s The Promenade on Evansville’s East Side is getting a new development. Drakes filed paperwork to build a new restaurant planned opening for later on in 2019. This new restaurant concept featuring a diverse menu and craft beers on tap.
Waterville, ME – Mé Lon Togo Bistro plans to open mid-May at 220 Main St, guests will eat at antique wooden tables that mimic the style of a family dining room. Owner Jordan Benissan hopes to bring a combination of the traditional cooking skills he learned from his mother in his home country of Togo and various techniques and styles he picked up working in American. hopes the unique Togolese-European offerings at Mé Lon Togo will encourage more people to travel to Waterville and experience the central Maine area
For more information or to view the leads in your area, please visit Flhip.com
Contact:

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Catering for sustainability: a venue view

Catering for sustainability: a venue view By – 13th May 2019 By Natacha Allen, head of sales and marketing at the Royal College of Physicians Meetings & Events
Healthy, sustainable food is an important part of the event offering today. Delegates food expectations have increased, and event planners need to be seen to be operating sustainably. Food has always been a key element of our offering at the RCP yet, now more than ever, the produce used in our menus has been scrutinised for its origin, quality and freshness. We recently launched our spring and summer 2019 event menus with our caterer CH&CO. From cutting down the amount of salt in our dishes to using sugar alternatives, these are just some of the sustainable food initiatives we have adopted below: Increasing the proportion of vegetable-led dishes on menus to combat environmental damage Purchasing high welfare meat and dairy products Serving sustainably-caught fish to ensure the future of fish stocks and marine environments Sourcing fairly-traded produce to ensure farmers in the developing world have access to a trade system based on justice and fairness Offering balanced menu options, reasonable portions and healthy options to cater for customers’ needs Offering healthier alternatives with sandwiches and dishes under 500 calories available Menus with 50% of dishes containing below the Recommended Daily Intake (RDI) of salt, and Stevia introduced instead of sugar
It was important for us to put healthy, sustainable food at the core of the new menu offerings yet also create menus that offer first-class food, wine and service that are appealing to delegates.
For BBQs and meetings using the RCP’s garden for lunch, for example, the menus are based around street food stalls serving Italian-inspired pizzas, City Dog’s burgers and sausages, Asian inspired sushi and Brick Lane inspired curry.
For receptions at the venue the menu is based on interactive canape stations serving salmon cut to order, hot griddled lamb and frozen lollipopsmade by our chefs on our liquid nitrogen anti-griddle.
Working lunch menus are focused around sharing boards which take their inspiration from international cuisine including a British board serving honey and mustard cocktail sausages and rare roast beef open sandwiches, a Moroccan board serving spiced chicken skewers and Tabbouleh and an Indian board, among others.
We want to show others that sustainable need not be boring or bland and, as an industry, we all have a duty to do what we can to look after our planet. Share this:

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Long journey leads to Afghan restaurant in former Burger Bach space in Carytown

May 13, 2019 3 The Mantu is set to open in a couple of weeks in the former Burger Bach location at 10 S. Thompson St. in Carytown. (Photos by J. Elias O’Neal)
It’s all come full circle for Hamid Noori.
Long a dream since he was a child in Afghanistan, Noori is opening his first restaurant — The Mantu — in the former Burger Bach space at 10 S. Thompson St. in Carytown.
Burger Bach vacated the space about a year ago to move into larger digs down the street at 3426 W. Cary St.
The 1,700-square-foot space, which anchors a nearly 6,000-square-foot retail center, had been under lease since last August with Ellwood Thompson’s, whose grocery store is across the parking lot.
Mantu translates to “me and you” in Noori’s native Dari language and also is the name for traditional Afghan dumplings, which will be one of the featured items on the restaurant’s menu.
The Mantu is a 50-50 partnership with Shagufta Sajid, the owner of Noorani Kabab House, a popular Pakistani and Indian restaurant in Henrico County that’s been open for nine years. Noori worked for Sajid a couple of years ago before he began exploring ways to launch The Mantu.
“I knew he was talented and a hard worker,” Sajid said. “He’s more like a brother to me, and I wanted to be a part of his dream because he is very talented.”
They won’t disclose how much they are investing to start up The Mantu, which they plan to open in a couple of weeks, Sajid said. . Hamid Noori is a co-owner of The Mantu with Shagufta Sajid.
Launching The Mantu has been a tireless effort for Noori, who arrived in Virginia about four years ago.
“It’s a testament to hard work, faith and believing in the good of people,” Noori said. “I never thought I would be here, in this country, doing something that I love … just surviving to get to this point was a struggle.”
The long forage
Establishing The Mantu is the culmination of a journey fraught with tragic loss and defeat, survival, and triumphant new opportunities and beginnings.
Born and raised in Baghlan, Afghanistan, a province north of the capital, Kabul, Noori was the oldest of eight children. He recalls simpler times with his family, filled with good food, culture and adventure.
“We were always together,” said Noori, 34. “When people think of Afghanistan now, they think of the images that they see on television or read about online, but growing up there, it was a beautiful place. … I loved it; it was home.”
Then came the Taliban.
“I just remember wondering what was happening, why this was happening,” Noori said. “It was dangerous and I was scared.”
The terrorist group began fighting in 1989, hoping to take over the country. It battled civilians and military forces in the northern and western part of the country, including Noori’s province of Baghlan.
The Taliban eventually reached Kabul, forever changing the country’s landscape and the world’s perception of Afghanistan.
Thousands of people were killed and Afghanistan’s economy was wrecked, along with century-old monuments and museums.
But the biggest heartbreak young Noori would experience was the death of his father, uncle and cousins at the hands of the Taliban during an attack on their province. Their home was destroyed, his mother seriously injured.
“I was trying to process it all. We lost everything,” he said. “I was young and because my father was killed, I now had to provide for the family.”
Under the Taliban regime, women were not allowed to work, which forced 8-year-old Noori into the workforce.
“My childhood was gone,” he said. “I had to provide. … I feel like that’s all I’ve been able to do.”
Noori said he began collecting bones from gravesites in his province that later would be sold on the black market for as little as 50 cents each.
Noori admits it was a shameful task, but it also was a desperate attempt to provide for his family and to take care of his mother.
“You were just trying to survive at that time … everybody was,” Noori said with a quivering voice. “I wish I never had to be put in that situation. I wish I could take back what I did, but we needed the money, we needed to eat.”
He began working for a butcher; waking at 4 a.m. daily to slaughter cattle. He brought home unsold pieces of meat for his family. He also worked part time at a grocery, which enabled him to give unsold toiletries to his family.
Noori said he began to fixate on food, recalling traditional Afghan meals with his family, which later lived just on bread and onions when he was 12.
“It was weird because there were days I would go hungry thinking about food,” Noori said. “I felt like that’s all I had was my family and my dreams.”
Noori worked several odd jobs, such as cleaning schools and at a fuel storage facility. His passion for food landed him a job that would change his life.
New beginnings
When Noori turned 20, the Hotel Intercontinental in Kabul hired him for his first kitchen job..
“That’s where it all began,” he said. “I learned how to cook and run a kitchen working there.”
Later, he became an executive chef at the five-star Kabul Serena.
Once the Taliban was ousted, rebuilding efforts ramped up in Afghanistan, Noori met several American military personnel that worked for the U.S. Agency for International Development. He took a second job in 2006 as the agency’s executive chef, where he prepared thousands of meals. In 2012, Tetra Tech – a California-based engineering and consultant firm – hired him to prepare meals for employees that were part of the Afghanistan Engineering Support Program.
But despite the U.S. occupancy of Kabul, the region remained highly dangerous and unstable.
Kabul Serena was attacked twice while Noori was there. In January 2008, six people, including his best friend, were killed. In 2014, an attack launched in the kitchen killed nine people.
Noori realized it was time to leave his beloved Afghanistan and forge a new life for he and his family in the U.S.
With the help of a few American troops affiliated with the USAID, Noori and his family applied for a special immigrant visa in 2013; he was awarded entry into the country by 2015. He settled his mother and his brother’s family in Turkey.
Noori arrived in the U.S. via Newport News in June 2015, where he began working at Saffron Mediterranean Cuisine. After six months there, the Noorani Kabab House in Henrico hired him, and he worked there until about mid-2017.
“I could cook Pakistani and Indian food with no problem,” Noori said. “But I wasn’t cooking what I wanted. I just needed some time to focus on what I wanted to do.”
He took a three-month sabbatical working at the Vitamin Shoppe, allowing him time to map out his future.
With help from the Richmond office of the International Rescue Committee, an organization that assists immigrants and refugees with health, employment and other services once they enter the U.S., Noori landed a job at Ellwood Thompson’s in Carytown.
“When I started at Ellwood’s, I was supposed to be a dishwasher,” Noori said. “But the guy that had first hired me had left, so the new person didn’t know when or where I was supposed to start.”
Instead of busting suds, he began preparing food for the salad bar on day one and soon was promoted to preparing meats. Noori also began working weekends as a chef for the Underground Kitchen, a local restaurant group run by Michael Sparks that’s known nationally for its exclusive pop-up dinners.
Noori finally was building a culinary career in America, something he never thought would have been imaginable four years earlier.
Then he was approached by Ellwood Thompson’s owner Rick Hood about achieving his ultimate dream: restaurant ownership.
“He asked me what I wanted to do, and I told him I wanted to own a restaurant.”
But Noori first needed more capital and an experienced restaurant partner.
He knew just who to turn to: Sajid, his former boss and friend at Noorani Kabab.
“I was like, ‘Let’s go; let’s do this,’” Sajid said.
The pair signed a five-year lease with Hood for the former Burger Bach location in February. They are working with Sparks to design and build out the space in time for the imminent opening.
The Mantu will offer a variety of mostly Afghan and Pakistani dishes, such as its beef mantu, which is a dumpling made with a housemade pastry shell stuffed with ground beef cooked with ginger, garlic paste, cilantro, turmeric and coriander.
“It’s a bit of a long process to make,” Noori said. “But the end result is a tasty dish that I think people will like, and brings something different to the area.”
Other menu items include chicken koobideh, which is skewered, cooked in tandoor clay, and served with red and white chutneys.
The restaurant also will include a full-service bar, including its Fire Water drink, made with jalapeno-infused vodka produced by Richmond-based Cirrus Vodka and olive juice that’s shaken and served with spiced rum.
The owners will hire about 10 people to staff The Mantu, which Sajid said will be open only for dinner, from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; and from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. It will be closed on Mondays.
Parwaitz Mahmmadi is completing much of the woodwork. Artist Haley Ellis completed the main painting in the dining room.
Once The Mantu is operational, Noori said they would work with Ellwood Thompson’s to serve some of its food at the latter’s lunch buffet.
Meanwhile, Noori continues to develop The Mantu’s menu and generates revenue – and startup capital for The Mantu — while working as a Lyft and Uber driver.
“I’m still the provider for my family,” Noori said. “I take care of my family here and my family in Turkey. I want to bring them to America because I don’t want them to have to worry anymore. … I want them to be free.”
Sitting back in the low lighting, surrounded by boxes of silverware and covered tables, Noori looked around The Mantu. He contemplated the hard work that lies ahead, but also loved knowing that dreams do come true.
“It’s a miracle,” Noori said. “I never question God, but I often wonder how he allowed me to get to this point in my life. I’m truly thankful and blessed beyond measure to be here and to finally be doing what I truly love to do.” About the Author: J. Elias O’Neal
J. Elias O’Neal is a BizSense reporter covering commercial real estate, restaurants and other beats. He can be reached at [email protected] and (804) 554-6545. Editor’s Picks

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