Why is food such a sensitive subject? – BBC News

Why is food such a sensitive subject? – BBC News

Image copyright Getty Images Earlier this week, a restaurant in New York made headlines for rather unfortunate reasons.
Lucky Lee’s, a new Chinese restaurant run by a Jewish-American couple, advertised itself as providing “clean” Chinese food with healthy ingredients that wouldn’t make people feel “bloated and icky the next day”.
It told Eater website : “There are very few American-Chinese places as mindful about the quality of ingredients as we are.”
It prompted a fierce backlash on social media from people who accused the restaurant of racist language, cultural appropriation, and a lack of understanding of Chinese food.
The restaurant’s Instagram account was besieged with thousands of angry comments, including some which questioned the credentials of a white couple running a Chinese restaurant – as well as comments from defenders who accused the “online slacktivists” of being easily offended, and targeting the restaurateurs simply because of their race.
The whole debate became so polarised that ratings site Yelp placed an “unusual activity” alert on the restaurant’s page after it was flooded with both positive and negative reviews, many seemingly from people who hadn’t actually been to the restaurant.
Lucky Lee’s has since issued a statement saying that it was not “commenting negatively on all Chinese food… Chinese cuisine is incredibly diverse and comes in many different flavours (usually delicious in our opinion) and health benefits”.
It added that it would “always listen and reflect accordingly” to take “cultural sensitivities” into account.
The owner, Arielle Haspel, told the New York Times : “We are so sorry. We were never trying to do something against the Chinese community. We thought we were complementing an incredibly important cuisine, in a way that would cater to people that had certain dietary requirements.”
Image copyright Lucky Lee’s The uproar is the latest in a series of rows over food and cultural appropriation.
US celebrity chef Andrew Zimmern came under fire for saying that his restaurant Lucky Cricket would save people from the low-standard “restaurants masquerading as Chinese food that are in the Midwest”. Critics accused him of being patronising towards smaller restaurants run by immigrant families, and he later issued an apology .
Meanwhile, in the UK, supermarket chain Marks and Spencer was accused of cultural appropriation after it produced a new vegan biriyani wrap, despite the Indian dish normally being served with rice and meat.
And Gordon Ramsay’s new London restaurant , Lucky Cat, was criticised for selling itself as an “authentic Asian Eating House” – despite not having an Asian chef.
When did food become such a sensitive topic – and why does it provoke such strong reactions from both sides of the debate?
Food can be closely linked to identity For many people – particularly those from ethnic minority backgrounds – food can be both personal, and political.
Second and third generation immigrants often have “a sense of loss of their own culture – their attire is western, their language is western, and food is almost the last of the cultural domain that they retain a vivid memory of”, Krishnendu Ray, a sociologist and professor of food studies at New York University, tells the BBC.
Many Chinese Americans have talked about their experiences growing up – for example when classmates would make fun of the food in their lunch boxes.
Luke Tsai, a food writer in the San Francisco Bay Area, says: “We grew up in the US with a sort of in-between status of our identity. Were we American? Were we Chinese? It was hard to find acceptance in a lot of mainstream culture.
He remembers being “slightly ashamed” of Chinese food when he was younger – “I didn’t want to bring Chinese food for my lunch at school – I wanted a sandwich or pizza to fit in.”
Image copyright Alamy “People would say: ‘Why are you eating that smelly thing? That’s gross!'”
“But for many of us as we got older, we remembered the food our parents cooked us, and it became a great source of nostalgia for us – in a way, embracing that was embracing the Asian, immigrant side of our identity.”
Many Chinese restaurants deliberately adapted their menus to serve more fried foods or thickened sauces because those were items a “mainstream white audience” were more familiar with, he adds.
“The reason that they opened those restaurants was not because they couldn’t cook their ‘true’ Chinese food, it was because that was what they did to survive and cater to their audience.
“So to see that flipped around nowadays, and have a white restaurateur open a restaurant and say ‘we’re not like those Chinese American restaurants you know about, we’re serving clean Chinese food… is particularly hurtful and offensive for a lot of people.”
‘Racist’ chopsticks Burger King ad pulled Are food bloggers fuelling racist stereotypes? Whose problem is cultural appropriation? There’s also a historical context to this. In the 1880s, the US passed legislation barring Chinese workers from immigrating to the US. Only a few categories were exempt – including restaurateurs – and historians say this contributed to a boom in Chinese restaurants in the US.
Yet “American exposure to Chinese food has mostly been cheap Chinese food”, and the cuisine has been associated with “a kind of disdain” due to the presumption that it is associated with “cheap ingredients and mostly untrained labour”, says Prof Ray.
“Very few Americans realise or know that China probably had the most sophisticated food culture in the world at least 500 years before the French did.”
Whose food is it anyway? Some of the sharpest criticism on both sides has been around ownership.
Some negative social media comments about Lucky Lee’s have focused on the fact that the owners are white – while critics have responded that it would be ridiculous to suggest that only Chinese people are allowed to cook Chinese food.
Francis Lam, host of The Splendid Table radio programme, believes that a lot of the furore around cultural appropriation and food is due to a “disconnect in the conversation”.
“I think if you’re a chef or restaurant owner, it’s fair to say you probably put a lot of yourself into your business, and don’t want to hear it when you think people are saying ‘you’re not allowed to do that’.”
However, he thinks that for those opposed to cultural appropriation, the issue is “not about who’s allowed or not allowed to do things”, but rather about the manner in which things are done.
“If you are going to promote yourself as someone who cooks or sells food from a culture you didn’t grow up in, I would say it’s also your responsibility to make sure you’re doing it in a way that truly respects the people who grew up in the culture – and the people who frankly invented some of the things you’re doing.”
Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Andy Ricker says chefs need to be respectful – but also need a thick skin Andy Ricker, an award-winning chef and bestselling cookbook author, spent 13 years learning about Thai cuisine, familiarising himself with ingredients and the language, before starting the restaurant chain Pok Pok.
He is recognised as an expert in northern Thai cuisine – and his approach has been praised by Asian chefs and food critics. However, others have also questioned why a white chef is being seen as the authority on Thai food, rather than a Thai one.
He suggests chefs should “be aware that language is important”, and try “to be as accurate and faithful as you can”.
“I can’t say that I’m making authentic food because I don’t have any claim to that.”
The most important thing for chefs like him, he says, is to “be respectful and not claim anything is yours. Don’t apply labels to food – don’t just add chillies, basil and peanuts to something and call it Thai, or put something in a sandwich and call it Banh Mi… you’re playing to clichés which is not a good look”.
He also says it’s crucial for chefs to “grow a thick skin – it doesn’t matter what’s in your heart or how careful you are about what you say, there’s going to be people who just aren’t having it.”
Meanwhile, Chris Shepherd cooks a range of cuisines at UB Preserv in Houston, Texas, but says highlighting and cherishing the cultures that inspired him is important to him.
Image copyright Julie Soefer Image caption Chris’s dishes include “boudin siu mai” – a take on a type of Chinese dumpling His restaurant’s bills come with a listing of his favourite local restaurants, and the message “we’d love to have you back at UB Preserv, but we politely request that you visit at least one of these folks first”.
He acknowledges that his restaurant attracts more funding and publicity than many small businesses, but says his goal is to “get people who wouldn’t normally go” to those places, or try different cuisines, to “visit these restaurants and become part of this community”.
Why is it hard to separate food and politics? These days, there seems to be constant debate about identity politics, and an endless stream of incidents provoking outrage. It can certainly feel tempting to keep politics out of food.
But commentators argue that the food business, like any other business, is linked to power structures and privilege – and it’s not a level playing field for everyone.
“If you’re opening a business you’re already engaging with the public, making decisions about who you’re going to hire, who can afford to eat at your restaurant, what your staff is going to look like – there’s hundreds of decisions you’re making that will have an impact on society,” Mr Tsai says.
Meanwhile, Prof Ray says that his research suggests some ethnic minority chefs may face specific barriers.
“There is a tendency to ‘ghettoise’ Chinese, Mexican and Indian American chefs into cooking ‘their own food’, whereas white chefs tend to find it easier to cross boundaries”, and are seen as “artistic” when they do.
Image copyright REY LOPEZ Image caption Kwame Onwuachi, 29, has been nominated for awards for his cooking Kwame Onwuachi says in his memoir that, during a casting session, a television producer told him that US audiences would not be prepared to see a black chef like him doing fine dining.
Similarly, chef Edourdo Jordan has previously told GQ that some people found it hard to believe he was the owner of a restaurant serving French and Italian food.
Mr Ricker agrees that white chefs face some advantages when cooking in the West.
“Of course in white dominant culture, white people always get away with more than other people. But I would say this too – if you’re a westerner trying to cook in Thailand you’re faced with a massive amount of scepticism and sometimes downright derision…. I think it’s human nature for the dominant culture to pigeon hole people who’re not of their culture.”
It all comes down to money These perceptions also have financial implications that affect restaurants’ bottom lines.
In one study, Prof Ray found that dishes from certain cuisines were seen as more prestigious, enabling restaurants to charge more.
For example, an average meal at a Zagat-listed French or Japanese restaurant cost about $30 more than an average meal at a Zagat-listed Chinese or Southern restaurant in 2015, his research found.
Chef Jonathan Wu encountered this when he opened a high-end Chinese restaurant, Fung Tu, in New York.
The restaurant received excellent reviews, with Bloomberg calling the food “genius” , and the New York Times giving it a two-star, “very good” review .
Image copyright Paul Wagtouicz Image caption One of the dishes at Fung Tu – egg whites poached in a broth with Toona sinesis leaves But Mr Wu says he received a lot of “blowback” for its prices, with complaints that the restaurant was “too expensive for what it is”.
Fung Tu closed down in 2017, and was reopened as Nom Wah Tu, a dim sum restaurant with lower prices.
Mr Wu says there is still an “expectation that Chinese food is cheap”.
He compares how hand-made Chinese dumplings are sometimes sold for “five for a dollar”, whereas a high-end plate of ravioli can sell for “$45 a plate”.
“If you tried that for a plate of dumplings, people would freak out.”
Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Which would you pay more for? Are things changing? In a way, the whole cultural appropriation debate is also “a symptom of a very visible, assertive, middle and professional class” of people from ethnic minorities in the US, says Prof Ray.
And US perceptions of Chinese food could be radically different in 20 years’ time, due to China’s economic rise, and a growing Chinese middle class presence in US cities.
Prof Ray says a similar process happened from the 1980s with Japanese food, as the culture became associated with affluent immigrant groups or businessmen.
In the meantime, the cultural appropriation debate is likely to continue – but not everyone thinks that’s a bad thing.
“We’re experiencing growing pains in this whole conversation, but the bigger picture is that it’s amazing to see how the American palate has widened, and there is a greater market acceptance of different stories and backgrounds,” says Mr Lam.
“These conversations can seem frustrating and tiresome, but you have to have them.”
Mr Ricker agrees. “There’s a lot of angst, anger and defensiveness out there, [but] it’s important that people understand the sensitivity around food and culture, because they’re very powerful things. I don’t think it’s comfortable for anybody, but it’s certainly necessary.”

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23,000-sq.-ft. farmers market announced for New Horizon Mall

A new farmers market has been announced as a second anchor tenant at the multi-cultural New Horizon Mall just north of Calgary.
Prairie Horizon Fresh Market is the latest announcement adding a western touch to the largely Asian-themed mall, which has been slow to attract businesses and customers to its 500 new storefronts since opening last spring.
Only 74 stores have opened to date. But things are slowly improving.
It’s hoped the 23,000-square-foot farmers market will bring lots of new customers to the mall. It will employ around 150 people.
The mall features hundreds of small retail units that were sold like condos, rather than being leased to businesses and entrepreneurs.
Owners of the new market space, Ken and Tracy Aylesworth, are no strangers to the farmers market business. The couple owned the Symons Valley Ranch Farmers Market that was destroyed in a fire in 2017 and ran the Avenida Food Hall & Fresh Market in the south of the city.
New Horizon Mall is situated next to CrossIron Mills off Highway 2 just north of Calgary. (Dan McGarvey/CBC) Ken was also general manager of the Calgary Farmers Market before it relocated to its new location off Blackfoot Trail.
“We’ve been involved in the industry for a number of years but this is a phenomenal opportunity,” said Ken Aylesworth.
Aylesworth says the indoor, year-round market will have a prairie town feel and will include fresh produce from local suppliers.
Vendors will range from fruit and veg to ethnic specialties including Mexican, Asian and Indian cuisine, alongside bakeries and everything from a coffee store to pies and ramen noodles.
“It’s a really interesting opportunity for our traditional vendors to start mixing with the really rich culture in this part of the city,” said Tracy Aylesworth.
General manager of New Horizon Mall, Scott Smith, hopes a farmers market will bring people in numbers to the mall, which has had a slow start to life since opening in May 2018. (Dan McGarvey/CBC) “There’s an opportunity for this mix of western cultures and cultures from around the world that will come to visit this mall,” she said.
Two weeks ago, the mall announced a Chinese department store, Best Shop, as its first major anchor tenant. The 15,000-sq.-ft. store should be open by June.
The mall’s general manager, Scott Smith, says more people visiting the mall will hopefully speed up progress.
“It’s a food market that we haven’t seen in north Calgary for a couple of years. So we’re excited and it’s going to drive a lot of traffic,” said Smith.
“These kinds of announcements help build momentum and excitement, and we’re going to start to see a lot more visitors to the mall,” Smith said.
Prairie Horizon Fresh Market is expected to open later this summer.

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23,000-sq.-ft. farmers market announced for New Horizon Mall

23,000-sq.-ft. farmers market announced for New Horizon Mall Social Sharing Calgary 23,000-sq.-ft. farmers market announced for New Horizon Mall A new farmers market has been announced as a second anchor tenant at the New Horizon Mall just north of Calgary. Social Sharing Prairie Horizon Fresh Market expect to open this summer Dan McGarvey · CBC News · Posted: Apr 11, 2019 4:56 PM MT | Last Updated: April 12 Ken and Tracy Aylesworth are behind the new Prairie Horizon Fresh Market that will open this summer off the QE2 Highway just north of Calgary.(Dan McGarvey/CBC)
A new farmers market has been announced as a second anchor tenant at the multi-cultural New Horizon Mall just north of Calgary.
Prairie Horizon Fresh Market is the latest announcement adding a western touch to the largely Asian-themed mall, which has been slow to attract businesses and customers to its 500 new storefronts since opening last spring.
Only 74 stores have opened to date. But things are slowly improving.
It’s hoped the 23,000-square-foot farmers market will bring lots of new customers to the mall. It will employ around 150 people.
The mall features hundreds of small retail units that were sold like condos, rather than being leased to businesses and entrepreneurs.
Owners of the new market space, Ken and Tracy Aylesworth, are no strangers to the farmers market business. The couple owned the Symons Valley Ranch Farmers Market that was destroyed in a fire in 2017 and ran the Avenida Food Hall & Fresh Market in the south of the city. New Horizon Mall is situated next to CrossIron Mills off Highway 2 just north of Calgary. (Dan McGarvey/CBC)
Ken was also general manager of the Calgary Farmers Market before it relocated to its new location off Blackfoot Trail.
“We’ve been involved in the industry for a number of years but this is a phenomenal opportunity,” said Ken Aylesworth.
Aylesworth says the indoor, year-round market will have a prairie town feel and will include fresh produce from local suppliers.
Vendors will range from fruit and veg to ethnic specialties including Mexican, Asian and Indian cuisine, alongside bakeries and everything from a coffee store to pies and ramen noodles.
“It’s a really interesting opportunity for our traditional vendors to start mixing with the really rich culture in this part of the city,” said Tracy Aylesworth. General manager of New Horizon Mall, Scott Smith, hopes a farmers market will bring people in numbers to the mall, which has had a slow start to life since opening in May 2018.(Dan McGarvey/CBC)
“There’s an opportunity for this mix of western cultures and cultures from around the world that will come to visit this mall,” she said.
Two weeks ago, the mall announced a Chinese department store, Best Shop, as its first major anchor tenant. The 15,000-sq.-ft. store should be open by June.
The mall’s general manager, Scott Smith, says more people visiting the mall will hopefully speed up progress.
“It’s a food market that we haven’t seen in north Calgary for a couple of years. So we’re excited and it’s going to drive a lot of traffic,” said Smith.
“These kinds of announcements help build momentum and excitement, and we’re going to start to see a lot more visitors to the mall,” Smith said.
Prairie Horizon Fresh Market is expected to open later this summer.

Read More…

Why is food such a sensitive subject? – BBC News

Whose problem is cultural appropriation?
There’s also a historical context to this. In the 1880s, the US passed legislation barring Chinese workers from immigrating to the US. Only a few categories were exempt – including restaurateurs – and historians say this contributed to a boom in Chinese restaurants in the US.
Yet “American exposure to Chinese food has mostly been cheap Chinese food”, and the cuisine has been associated with “a kind of disdain” due to the presumption that it is associated with “cheap ingredients and mostly untrained labour”, says Prof Ray.
“Very few Americans realise or know that China probably had the most sophisticated food culture in the world at least 500 years before the French did.” Whose food is it anyway?
Some of the sharpest criticism on both sides has been around ownership.
Some negative social media comments about Lucky Lee’s have focused on the fact that the owners are white – while critics have responded that it would be ridiculous to suggest that only Chinese people are allowed to cook Chinese food.
Francis Lam, host of The Splendid Table radio programme, believes that a lot of the furore around cultural appropriation and food is due to a “disconnect in the conversation”.
“I think if you’re a chef or restaurant owner, it’s fair to say you probably put a lot of yourself into your business, and don’t want to hear it when you think people are saying ‘you’re not allowed to do that’.”
However, he thinks that for those opposed to cultural appropriation, the issue is “not about who’s allowed or not allowed to do things”, but rather about the manner in which things are done.
“If you are going to promote yourself as someone who cooks or sells food from a culture you didn’t grow up in, I would say it’s also your responsibility to make sure you’re doing it in a way that truly respects the people who grew up in the culture – and the people who frankly invented some of the things you’re doing.” Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Andy Ricker says chefs need to be respectful – but also need a thick skin
Andy Ricker, an award-winning chef and bestselling cookbook author, spent 13 years learning about Thai cuisine, familiarising himself with ingredients and the language, before starting the restaurant chain Pok Pok.
He is recognised as an expert in northern Thai cuisine – and his approach has been praised by Asian chefs and food critics. However, others have also questioned why a white chef is being seen as the authority on Thai food, rather than a Thai one.
He suggests chefs should “be aware that language is important”, and try “to be as accurate and faithful as you can”.
“I can’t say that I’m making authentic food because I don’t have any claim to that.”
The most important thing for chefs like him, he says, is to “be respectful and not claim anything is yours. Don’t apply labels to food – don’t just add chillies, basil and peanuts to something and call it Thai, or put something in a sandwich and call it Banh Mi… you’re playing to clichés which is not a good look”.
He also says it’s crucial for chefs to “grow a thick skin – it doesn’t matter what’s in your heart or how careful you are about what you say, there’s going to be people who just aren’t having it.”
Meanwhile, Chris Shepherd cooks a range of cuisines at UB Preserv in Houston, Texas, but says highlighting and cherishing the cultures that inspired him is important to him. Image copyright Julie Soefer Image caption Chris’s dishes include “boudin siu mai” – a take on a type of Chinese dumpling
His restaurant’s bills come with a listing of his favourite local restaurants, and the message “we’d love to have you back at UB Preserv, but we politely request that you visit at least one of these folks first”.
He acknowledges that his restaurant attracts more funding and publicity than many small businesses, but says his goal is to “get people who wouldn’t normally go” to those places, or try different cuisines, to “visit these restaurants and become part of this community”. Why is it hard to separate food and politics?
These days, there seems to be constant debate about identity politics, and an endless stream of incidents provoking outrage. It can certainly feel tempting to keep politics out of food.
But commentators argue that the food business, like any other business, is linked to power structures and privilege – and it’s not a level playing field for everyone.
“If you’re opening a business you’re already engaging with the public, making decisions about who you’re going to hire, who can afford to eat at your restaurant, what your staff is going to look like – there’s hundreds of decisions you’re making that will have an impact on society,” Mr Tsai says.
Meanwhile, Prof Ray says that his research suggests some ethnic minority chefs may face specific barriers.
“There is a tendency to ‘ghettoise’ Chinese, Mexican and Indian American chefs into cooking ‘their own food’, whereas white chefs tend to find it easier to cross boundaries”, and are seen as “artistic” when they do. Image copyright REY LOPEZ Image caption Kwame Onwuachi, 29, has been nominated for awards for his cooking
Kwame Onwuachi says in his memoir that, during a casting session, a television producer told him that US audiences would not be prepared to see a black chef like him doing fine dining.
Similarly, chef Edourdo Jordan has previously told GQ that some people found it hard to believe he was the owner of a restaurant serving French and Italian food.
Mr Ricker agrees that white chefs face some advantages when cooking in the West.
“Of course in white dominant culture, white people always get away with more than other people. But I would say this too – if you’re a westerner trying to cook in Thailand you’re faced with a massive amount of scepticism and sometimes downright derision…. I think it’s human nature for the dominant culture to pigeon hole people who’re not of their culture.” It all comes down to money
These perceptions also have financial implications that affect restaurants’ bottom lines.
In one study, Prof Ray found that dishes from certain cuisines were seen as more prestigious, enabling restaurants to charge more.
For example, an average meal at a Zagat-listed French or Japanese restaurant cost about $30 more than an average meal at a Zagat-listed Chinese or Southern restaurant in 2015, his research found.
Chef Jonathan Wu encountered this when he opened a high-end Chinese restaurant, Fung Tu, in New York.
The restaurant received excellent reviews, with Bloomberg calling the food “genius” , and the New York Times giving it a two-star, “very good” review . Image copyright Paul Wagtouicz Image caption One of the dishes at Fung Tu – egg whites poached in a broth with Toona sinesis leaves
But Mr Wu says he received a lot of “blowback” for its prices, with complaints that the restaurant was “too expensive for what it is”.
Fung Tu closed down in 2017, and was reopened as Nom Wah Tu, a dim sum restaurant with lower prices.
Mr Wu says there is still an “expectation that Chinese food is cheap”.
He compares how hand-made Chinese dumplings are sometimes sold for “five for a dollar”, whereas a high-end plate of ravioli can sell for “$45 a plate”.
“If you tried that for a plate of dumplings, people would freak out.” Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Which would you pay more for? Are things changing?
In a way, the whole cultural appropriation debate is also “a symptom of a very visible, assertive, middle and professional class” of people from ethnic minorities in the US, says Prof Ray.
And US perceptions of Chinese food could be radically different in 20 years’ time, due to China’s economic rise, and a growing Chinese middle class presence in US cities.
Prof Ray says a similar process happened from the 1980s with Japanese food, as the culture became associated with affluent immigrant groups or businessmen.
In the meantime, the cultural appropriation debate is likely to continue – but not everyone thinks that’s a bad thing.
“We’re experiencing growing pains in this whole conversation, but the bigger picture is that it’s amazing to see how the American palate has widened, and there is a greater market acceptance of different stories and backgrounds,” says Mr Lam.
“These conversations can seem frustrating and tiresome, but you have to have them.”
Mr Ricker agrees. “There’s a lot of angst, anger and defensiveness out there, [but] it’s important that people understand the sensitivity around food and culture, because they’re very powerful things. I don’t think it’s comfortable for anybody, but it’s certainly necessary.” Related Topics

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An Eater’s Guide to Philadelphia

An Eater’s Guide to Philadelphia Unofficial, highly opinionated information about eating and drinking in the City of Brotherly Love Flipboard This historic city, one of the biggest in the U.S., isn’t satisfied with a specialty or two. It’s the home of dripping cheesesteaks and meatballs in red gravy — and some of the best vegan options in the country. It’s a city of neighborhoods, each with something different. Use this guide to seek out the best Philly has to offer. Welcome to the Birthplace of America Jogging up the Rocky steps, a cheesesteak in each hand, might fulfill a tourist’s Philadelphia fantasies, but focusing on the city’s most famous foodstuffs (cheesesteaks, soft pretzels, water ice ) would be missing out. Philly boasts Italian dishes from every part of the boot, nationally acclaimed Israeli and vegetarian fare , Asian cuisines from Japan to Indonesia , new American standouts , elegant French bistros , and much more. The land William Penn designed as a place of freedom has welcomed waves of immigrants from different regions throughout its 336 years, and that shows in the food in its biggest city. As the site where the Founding Fathers drafted the Declaration of Independence, Philly’s historical sights draw scores of tourists every year. More recently, the city’s rebirth as a cultural destination with world-class museums and theaters and a lively downtown has given visitors other reasons to make the trip. A night out in Philly can mean hitting up a local dive, bringing an inexpensive bottle of wine to a cozy neighborhood cafe, or dressing up for a sought-after reservation at a James Beard Award winner’s hotspot. As far as that cheesesteak goes, take your pick . Jim’s Steaks on South Street B. Krist for Visit Philadelphia Where to Start on Eater Philly’s Best Maps Eater is the place to go for frequently updated guides about everything from the hottest restaurants to the best rooftop bars . Short on time? Here are some of the top destinations on Eater’s most popular maps. Hottest Restaurants: Among the hottest new restaurants in Philly, Alpen Rose in Center City is an intimate, upscale steakhouse from prolific restaurateur Michael Schulson. Heading south to the Queen Village neighborhood, Fiore is serving up modern Italian dishes (don’t skip dessert). To the north of Center City, everyone is talking about the pies at Pizzeria Beddia in Fishtown. Essential Restaurants: Since eating at all 38 essential restaurants in Philly in one go isn’t an option, start with Vedge . Yes, it’s vegan. Go anyway — if you can get a table. In Fishtown, Lebanese destination Suraya draws diners for man’oushe in the morning, kebabs, grilled fish, and arak cocktails at night, and rose-pistachio crullers anytime. Bars: From neighborhood dives to candlelit cocktail spots , it’s not hard to find a bar in Philly . For an awe-inspiring beer selection, go to Monk’s . In the mood for a dive? Bob & Barbara’s it is. Excellent cocktails can be had at Hop Sing Laundromat . In the warmer months, outdoor drinking on a rooftop or patio or in a beer garden is the thing to do — or cool off with a frozen cocktail . In winter, get cozy at a bar with a fireplace . BYOBs: Thanks to unusually strict liquor laws, many restaurants in Philly choose to forgo liquor licenses altogether and let customers bring their own bottles . Pick up a bottle of red and head to Russet for expertly prepared farm-to-table fare or weekends-only Mr. Martino’s Trattoria for classic Italian dishes. Zahav in Society Hill Alexandra Hawkins Brunch: Is it even Sunday if there’s no brunch? The wait is worth it at essential brunch restaurant Sabrina’s , which has five locations (the original is in South Philly). Or choose one of the new brunches in town. Getting an early start? Grab a quick bagel or egg sandwich . Vegetarian and Vegan: Herbivores have no trouble finding dedicated options here. Philly restaurants catering to vegetarians and vegans range from retro diner The Tasty to stylish bar V Street . Cheesesteaks: The debate over which cheesesteak shop puts out the best version of the famous sandwich will last forever. In the meantime, diners won’t go wrong at Jim’s Steaks on South Street or Sonny’s Famous Steaks in Old City. For the full tourist experience, Pat’s King of Steaks and Geno’s Steaks are musts. Even those avoiding meat or dairy , or both, can get a cheesesteak. Sandwiches: Cheesesteaks and sandwiches are two different things, and Philly is serious about both. The classic is the roast pork with broccoli rabe and provolone, found at DiNic’s in Reading Terminal Market and John’s Roast Pork in South Philly. Philadelphia Food Neighborhoods to Know Philadelphia is a city of neighborhoods, and many are associated with certain styles of food. Read on for details of the key restaurant ’hoods in Philly — and where to eat in each. Center City: The heart of the city, also called Downtown, includes the Historic District (locally known as Old City ), the swank Rittenhouse Square area, the overlapping, restaurant-packed Gayborhood , Midtown Village , and Washington Square West neighborhoods, and the business district. In Old City , start with breakfast pastries or lunchtime sandwiches on ridiculously good bread at High Street on Market . At night, head to Royal Boucherie for a cocktail before digging into spicy Sichuan dishes at Han Dynasty or Israeli mezze and lamb at Zahav (plan ahead — tables get booked well in advance). Either should be followed by a ice cream cone from the charmingly old-timey Franklin Fountain . Moving west to the Gayborhood/Midtown Village, choose from five restaurants from Marcie Turney and Valerie Safran , including retro Midwestern fare at Bud & Marilyn’s . In Rittenhouse Square, expect a line during lunchtime at fast-casual hotspot Goldie . Come evening, imbibe a classic cocktail at the speakeasy-esque Franklin Bar before dinner at James Beard Award winner Greg Vernick’s eponymous restaurant . Should I go to Reading Terminal Market? Shutterstock Absolutely. This riot of mouthwatering cuisines, enticing smells, glowing neon signs, and food-seeking shoppers is a quintessential Philly destination . The railroad that lent the market its name is long gone but Reading Terminal has held one to become one of the oldest continually operating farmers’ markets in the country. The first tenant to sign a lease, back in 1892, was Bassetts Ice Cream, and it still does a brisk business in the market today. Eighty-some other stalls sell farm-fresh produce, cheese, and meat, traditional Pennsylvania Dutch fare like whoopie pies and soft pretzels, Jewish deli sandwiches, Cajun-style po’boys, Middle Eastern mezze, Chinese noodle soups, and more. For a filling Philly-favorite lunch, make a beeline to DiNic’s for a roast pork sandwich, capped off by a doughnut from Beiler’s or cannoli from Termini Bros. The market is indoors and there are seating areas. South Philly: This huge, primarily residential neighborhood south of Center City is divided up into several sections. Large pockets of it are historically Italian , and there are enough red gravy Italian-American restaurants in Philly to overfeed a person for life (that’s a good thing). Sandwich shops and pizza joints offering cheesesteaks, hoagies, and slices dot the neighborhood. Vietnamese pho shops and bakeries cluster along Washington Avenue, Cambodian restaurants are farther south, and Mexican eateries are scattered throughout the area. At the southern end of South Philly is where to find the sports stadiums . But most visitors venturing south of South Street in search of food and drink will find themselves in Bella Vista , Queen Village , or Passyunk Square . Within Passyunk Square is one of Philly’s hottest restaurant strips: East Passyunk Avenue , a diagonal stretch lined with restaurants (and cute independent shops) for about half a mile. Hit up ITV or Townsend for classy cocktails or Pub on Passyunk East (“Pope”) or Stogie Joe’s for beers before sitting down to Malaysian sate and nasi lemak at Sate Kampar (it’s BYOB). Other standouts include Perla , also a BYO restaurant, for modern Filipino fare, and Le Virtu for Italian. West Philly: The area of West Philadelphia just over the Schuylkill River from Center City is University City , home to the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University — which means a lot of fast-casual eateries catering to the college crowd. A food court with outposts of Goldie , Kensington Quarters , and Little Baby’s Ice Cream opened in 2018. Also in University City, Walnut Street Cafe is a solid choice morning, noon, or night. Moving away from the river, the options get more diverse . Go for mouthwatering Ethiopian fare at Abyssinia , Laotian and Thai curries and rice dishes at Vientiane Cafe , craft beer and pub grub at Local 44 , or halal Senegalese meats at Youma . Chinatown: Philly’s Chinatown is relatively small for a major city, but it packs a lot in. Make your way through Chinese hand-pulled noodles at Nan Zhou , dim sum at Tom’s Dim Sum , Japanese ramen at Terakawa , Vietnamese spring rolls at Vietnam Restaurant , or Korean sundubu jjigae at Dae Bak inside food hall Chinatown Square . After dinner (or during happy hour ), cross your fingers and hope to get into one of the best cocktail bars in the city, Hop Sing Laundromat . Vietnam Restaurant in Chinatown Facebook Fishtown and Northern Liberties: Historically a blue collar neighborhood, Fishtown ’s gentrification has earned it comparisons to trendy Brooklyn neighborhoods. It’s the cool new kid in town, offering Lebanese flatbreads and kebabs at market/cafe/restaurant Suraya and inventive riffs on Asian dumplings and noodle bowls at Cheu Fishtown . Burgers at Kensington Quarters and pho at Stock are also reasons to make a Fishtown stop. (There’s a post-apocalypse-themed restaurant/virtual reality lounge too, for whatever that’s worth.) Between Fishtown and the Historic District lies Northern Liberties, another hip, artsy area with a 70,000-square-foot brewery and taproom courtesy of Philly-favorite Yards Brewing Co. Northeast Philly: This sprawling neighborhood is broken up into several smaller sections with a wide range of cuisines — Eastern European, Jewish , Indian, Italian, Vietnamese, Portuguese, and more. One of the biggest draws for food-seeking outsiders in the un-touristy ’hood is Brazilian barbecue at casual spots like Taste of Brazil . For American barbecue, head to Sweet Lucy’s Smokehouse . In Northeast Philly and craving a cheesesteak ? Swing by Steve’s Prince of Steaks (there’s another location in Center City) or Joe’s Steaks + Soda Shop (there’s also one in Fishtown). A Philadelphia Glossary of Terms Cheesesteak A sandwich consisting of sliced or chopped steak and melted cheese (traditionally Cheez Whiz) on a long roll. Adding fried onions is acceptable. Wit A request to have onions added to a cheesesteak. “One, Whiz, wit” = One cheesesteak with Whiz and onions. Hoagie A submarine sandwich. Scrapple A breakfast staple made of pork, cornmeal, flour, and spices formed into a loaf and then sliced and fried. Water ice Often pronounced “woo-der ice,” this frozen flavored dessert — a mix of water, sugar, and, usually, fruit — is known as Italian ice outside of Philly. A hoagie from Wawa

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Gander tasting the world — and raising money to feed hungry kids

Reem Saliba Al Baquen doesn’t think of herself as much of a chef, but she hopes that by sharing her favourite foods, she’ll teach others about her culture. Born in Jordan, Al Baquen is one the organizers of the Gander Rotary Club’s International Food and Tasting Fundraiser event.
“It’s nice to see different cultures together. And that’s why we’re doing the food event, to have people learn about our different food and culture,” she said. “And at the same time we’re doing it for a good cause.”
Melissa Tobin/CBC More Al Baquen will be cooking a fusion of Middle Eastern dishes. With the help of other volunteers, there will be cuisines from more than 15 different cultures represented in Gander — like Indian, Jamaican, Polish and Syrian — taking part in the event.
The money raised will support a lunch program for Gander’s four schools.
The lunch program was started in November of last year by the Salvation Army after they learned some kids were missing school because they had no food at lunchtime.
When word got out about the program, donations to the Salvation Army’s food bank from business and other community members began to happen, and the Gander Rotary Club got involved.
Melissa Tobin/CBC More There are 150 tickets for the tasting. Al Baquen hopes it’s something they can continue to do annually.
She moved to Newfoundland almost eight years ago with her Armenian husband. She says she never started to cook until she moved to Canada and missed the taste of home. It’s often hard to find the ingredients to the foods she loves, she said.
David Newell/CBC More Story continues “Some stuff I find at Co-op or Dominion. But other stuff … certain spices, I have to buy it from Toronto or Jordan when I go there.”
Things like rice vermicelli, the spice-blend zaatar and Arabic coffee.
But she leaves her favourites dishes for her visits home.
“There’s some Arabic food that’s Jordanian — you’d be preparing it for two days, especially the vine leaves and mansaf. But the taste is worth it.”
David Newll/CBC More And healthier than some of the foods she’s used to here.
“We don’t use lots of fats. And it’s usually based on vegetables.”
The Gander Rotary Club’s International Food and Tasting Fundraiser is Saturday from 3 to 6 p.m.
David Newell/CBC More Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

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Thai Heritage & Vegan – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Thai Heritage & Vegan – Thai Heritage & Vegan on Central Avenue
Who among us hasn’t learned at least one thing about Thai culinary heritage from The Big Bang Theory? In a 2011 episode, for example, we learned that according to Thai tradition the last morsel of food, the greng jie , goes to the most important person in the room. At least that’s what Sheldon tells Penny when she reaches for the last remaining dumpling. Thanking everyone for the honor, she devours the dumpling. Sheldon’s retort: “ I’ve seen pictures of your mother. Keep eating .” Some of us learned that Thai food is meant to be eaten with forks not chop sticks though in Thailand, they don’t put the fork in their mouth. It’s simply a tool to put the food on a spoon which then goes into the mouth.
We also learned that Sheldon, the quirky wunderkind with an obsessive compulsive tendencies orders mee krob and chicken satay with extra peanut sauce on Mondays. Every Monday! As an adventurous diner with polygamous culinary tendencies, the concept of ordering the same meal repeatedly is galling. When expressing my intolerance towards monogamous (monotonous?) diners to my Kim, she quickly knocked me off my high-horse, reminding me that whenev er we dine at a Thai restaurant I almost always order a curry dish. Whether it be Penang curry, Masuman curry, yellow curry pumpkin curry, curry with catfish or Kristen Currie (if she was on the menu), it’s invariably a curry dish our server ferries to our table. Kim suggested my next curry meal should come with crow. Thai Heritage Dining Room
In truth, curry is a dish to which I graduated after having explored the myriad of other Thai food options. While Thai restaurant menus are replete with zesty, spicy, flavorful dishes, curry dishes are the pinnacle of deliciousness. Curry is Thai food self-actualized, Thai food as good as it possibly can be–complex, bold, pungent and aromatic. Curry satisfies my need for balance and order with sweet, savory and piquant notes in perfect proportion. It’s layered with comforting richness and soul-warming flavor. So why deprive myself?
My Kim also chided me for calling some aspects of Thai cuisine across the fruited plain “Americanized,” recalling that she’s never heard me complain about the portion size of my curry being too small. Americans–me included–tend to like prodigious portion sizes which, in the land of the brave, are easily twice or thrice the portion size served in Thailand. She urged me to remember a wise Thai aphorism: “ eat Thai food like the Thai do…sparingly .” Grrr, I hate that she’s always right, but she is my conscience and my buffer. Chef Onuma Thongthip and our lovely server
the first instantiation of Thai Heritage in 2016 it took only a brief perusal of the menu to recognize that Thai Heritage may be the Albuquerque restaurant in which my every order might not be curry-centric. In the appetizer section alone, there were a number of dishes heretofore not seen on Duke City Thai restaurant menus. The genesis of these appetizers is the Issan Province in northeast Thailand. Issan dishes are characterized by incendiary chilies, pungent fish sauces, lip-pursing sour bites and flavorful sauces.
Sadly, Thai Heritage was short-lived at its Montgomery location. In 2018, it reopened on Central Avenue in the Nob Hill district east of The University of New Mexico between Solano Drive and Aliso Drive. Signage is a bit confusing. Scrawled just above the entrance to the restaurant are the words “Thai Vegan.” The doors below signage for “Thai Heritage” are locked. Chef Onuma Thongthip explained the restaurant is now named “ Thai Heritage & Vegan .” Indeed, portions of the menu are strictly vegan. Fried Papaya Salad
Issan dishes are still strewn throughout the menu including two salad dishes Thai food aficionados will recognize: larb (chopped chicken, mint, basil and red onions dressed with lime juice and ground red chilies) and papaya salad (shredded papaya mixed with garlic, lime juice, chilies, tomatoes and ground peanuts). It’s certainly a menu that deserves serious exploration. Your explorations will reveal several dishes—such as orange chicken and pineapple fried rice–more closely associated with Chinese restaurants than with Thai eateries. You’ll find that noodle dishes outnumber rice dishes by a wide margin. You’ll delight in seeing eight desserts on the menu, more than at just about any other Thai restaurant in town. Alas, there are only four curry dishes including a tempting pumpkin curry. Nonetheless, this is a menu in which even those of us who’ve tried everything (or think we have) will find something new.
Owner-chef Onuma prepares every meal to order which means you’ll experience fresh Thai flavors at their alluringly aromatic best. As the name implies, Thai Heritage celebrates authentic Thai recipes handed down over generations. The gracious chef, a smiling, peripatetic presence strives to give her guests the experience of the fundamental Thai tastes in every meal you order, the harmonious combination of sour, sweet, salty and spicy. over-emphasis of near cloying Thai food in the city’s Thai restaurants, the promise of balanced flavors should excite you. Steam Curry Dumplings
17 December 2016 : Since first experiencing the transcendent papaya salad at An Hy Quan , Albuquerque’s premier Vietnamese vegetarian restaurant, we’ve craved the deeply satisfying balance of flavors in that dish. We often wondered if those flavors translated well to the frying process. Leave it to Thai Heritage to answer that deeply existential question for us. Yes, the menu does include a Fried Papaya Salad . Fried very lightly, a passel of shredded papaya is indeed infused with the flavors we love in its fresh counterpart—piquancy from Thai chilies, pungency from fish sauce, sweetness from sugar, savory notes from garlic and sour notes from lime juice. Sprinkled with finely crushed peanuts and garnished with sliced tomatoes and green beans, it’s a very enjoyable starter.
12 April 2019: Curry cravings can be assuaged early at Thai Heritage with an order of the restaurant’s fabulous steamed curry dumplings (six crescent-shaped vegetarian dumplings in a green curry sauce). It’s an idea whose time has come. Not only can you luxuriate in the rich, deeply satisfying and nuanced flavor of green curry, you’re spared the monotony of any sort of dipping sauce. Pay close attention to the complex flavors of the curry and you’ll agree there’s more flavor there than you’d find in five dipping sauces. The dumplings are light and delicate though you’ll certainly want more than six. Spicy Noodles
17 December 2016 : In small part because my Kim got tired of me referring to Pad Thai, her favorite Thai dish, as “Pad Boring,” she tends to order more adventurously…and perhaps because she got tired of me proclaiming my love for it, she never orders curry. Ordering more adventurously doesn’t mean departing too far from noodles though it may mean ordering something that bites back. Spicy Noodles are a safe—and surprising (considering her heat level preference for green chile borders on “wimpy”) choice. This dish (stir-fried flat noodle with basil, bell peppers, onion, carrots and pork) is actually quite good though the incorrigible mad scientist in me wonders what it would be like smothered in curry.
12 April 2019 : This is usually the portion of my review in which I wax poetic about the latest curry dish to enrapt me…and by now you’re probably thinking “enough with the curry.” After a long and careful deliberation aided by my Kim’s encouragement, I ordered a non-curry dish (and it didn’t kill me to do so). Thai Heritage’s rendition of spicy eggplant (eggplant, onion, garlic, sweet basil and bell peppers with pork and chili paste) is a superb dish even though it’s not nearly as “spicy” as its name would imply. The melange of perfectly steamed al dente vegetables render your protein choice (pork or chicken) unnecessary. That’s especially true of the tender, soft-fleshed sweet-savory flavors of the eggplant. It’s eggplant for people who think they don’t like eggplant. Consider it disloyalty to my beloved curry if you will, but this is a dish you’ll find on my table again. Spicy Eggplant
17 December 2016 : With eight dessert options available, you’d think picking one would be a challenge. Not so! Whenever mangoes with sweet sticky rice are on the menu, it’s soon at our table. We’re at the very tail end of mango season so mangoes aren’t at their peak of sweetness, but even a “semi-sweet” mango is delicious. Besides, the sweet sticky rice goes so well with mangoes that are just a bit on the green, tart side. Mangoes and sticky rice are one of the things we miss most about summer.
17 December 2016 : Picking two desserts wasn’t much more of a challenge than picking just one. That’s because the dessert menu includes roti . Described on the menu as a Thai-style pancake, it’s more akin to a circular flatbread. Roti is enjoyed everywhere from India to Malaysia. The roti at Thai Heritage is wholly unlike any roti we’ve ever had. Instead of resembling (to some extent) Indian naan, it resembled—both texturally and in terms of flavor—a very think puff pastry drizzled with chocolate. While enjoyable, it’s certainly not what we expected. Roti
It really is hard to “eat Thai food like the Thai do…sparingly.” When restaurants such as Thai Heritage prepare it so well, you’ll want to eat sizable portions. Perhaps the biggest compliment I can pay this October addition to the Duke City dining scene is that it got me to order something other than curry…and I loved it.
Thai Heritage Restaurant 3804 Central Avenue, S.E., Suite B.

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The 14 Most Unique Hotels in the World

The 14 Most Unique Hotels in the World Avital Andrews @avitalb SmarterTravel
After you’ve been traveling a while, every hotel begins to look the same—unless, that is, you’ve booked a much more unusual place to stay. For those who’ve gotten bored of the standard overnight setup, here are 14 of the most unique hotels in the world. Treehouse: Treehotel, Sweden
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Kids don’t think twice about sleeping in a treehouse, but as adults, we forget how much fun it is. Revive that childhood magic at Sweden’s remarkable Treehotel , which consists of seven living pods suspended in tall pines up to 20 feet above the forest floor. (You get into them via ladder, suspended bridge, or electric stairs.)
Choices include an abode that looks like a humongous bird’s nest, one shaped like a UFO, and the reflective “Mirrorcube.” Guests get enchanted views of the woods, the Lule River, and (at the right time of year) the aurora borealis. From September to March, the hotel’s employees give guided northern lights tours; all year long, you can eat at the on-site restaurant, which specializes in northern Swedish cuisine, and explore the 600-person village of Harads.
Justin Nicholas
In late 2018, the Conrad Maldives Rangali Island , already known as an extraordinary place to stay, debuted a two-story, three-bedroom undersea residence with a modern, domed design and 24-hour butler service. But the Muraka’s most impressive feature is its full, glassy immersion in the Maldives’ mesmerizing ocean life. World-class architects and engineers teamed up to construct the unique hotel room in Singapore; they then transported it to the Maldives, anchoring it in the middle of the Indian Ocean. The only catch: The Muraka costs $40,000 per night.
Those of us not stocked with that level of disposable income can have a meal at the Conrad’s undersea restaurant, Ithaa . Or travel instead to Key Largo, Florida, to stay at Jules’ Undersea Lodge —named after Mr. Verne, natch. You’ll have to scuba dive down to this strange guest room, at the bottom of a fish-filled lagoon.
Other undersea suites around the world include those at Tanzania’s Manta Resort , Dubai’s Atlantis, The Palm , and Singapore’s Resort World Sentosa . Bali’s Bambu Indah resort has a glass-bottomed room that lets its guests observe the sea life below. And coming soon, supposedly: Fiji’s 40-foot-deep Poseidon Undersea Resort .
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By now, everyone knows about Sweden’s remarkable Icehotel and its frozen brethren: Quebec’s Hotel de Glace , Norway’s Snowhotel Kirkenes , and Ice Hotel Romania —all artist-sculpted hotels that arise gorgeously every winter, only to melt away in summer.
But if you’re more interested in finding out what it’s like spend the night in a real-life igloo, head to Finland for a stay at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort , 150 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Most images of it show its rows of glass-domed “igloos,” which are eminently worthwhile in and of themselves, particularly for their unobstructed view of aurora borealis. For the true igloo experience sans quotation marks, however, opt for one of the property’s dozens of actual snow igloos, where you’ll find calm, quiet, and a sleeping bag to keep you toasty in the room’s below-freezing temperature.
Traveling farther south? Iglu-Dorf lets you experience igloo living in Switzerland , Germany , and Austria .
Yays
What to do with an old crane? Why, turn it into a hotel, of course. This is exactly what a company called Yays did with a retired Figee—it commissioned Dutch designer Edward van Vliet to create a stylish interior for a three-story apartment with vertiginous views over the IJ River. The crane operator’s box was left intact, so guests can still hear his recorded stories play.
Apparently, transforming cranes into hotels isn’t a one-off thing to do in the Netherlands: There’s also the 164-foot-high Crane Hotel Faralda , as well as the Harlingen Harbour Crane , whose movement you can control yourself.
Should you find yourself getting hooked on overnighting in industrial contraptions, you can continue on to sleep on a decommissioned oil rig at Malaysia’s Seaventures Dive Rig , in a granary at New Zealand’s SiloStay , in a wine barrel at the Netherlands’ De Vrouwe van Stavoren Hotel , or in a drainpipe at Austria’s Das Parkhotel .
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At the 12-room Giraffe Manor , one of the unique hotels in Africa’s Safari Collection, the welcoming employees teach each guest how to feed giraffes. This is because the elegant property, built in 1932 at an elevation of almost 6,000 feet, is home to a herd of endangered Rothschild’s giraffes who are fond of stretching their long necks into the hotel’s large windows for a snack. Every guest room is stocked with giraffe food so that when you receive the inevitable long-necked visitor, you can nourish it appropriately. (For a similar experience, but with elephants instead of giraffes, book at Zambia’s Mfuwe Lodge .)
If you can’t get out of the U.S. but still want to sleep where animals dominate, you have at least one option in Texas— The Lodge at Fossil Rim —and three in California: Safari West in wine country, Vision Quest Safari B&B at the Monterey Zoo, and Farm Sanctuary , which also offers accommodations in upstate New York .
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Everyone loves a good theme. And while amusement parks are famous for making good use of them, it’s harder to find hotels that are themed through and through. In Canada, Edmonton’s Fantasyland Hotel is in a shopping center, but that’s hardly the most unique thing about it. True to its name, Fantasyland offers 120 fantasy-themed rooms, and you choose your surroundings. Options at this novelty hotel include rooms that look like a spaceship, a gas station, Polynesia, Rome, the Arabian desert, and a prison cell. Plus, the attached mall has a waterpark, thrill rides, miniature golf, and a bowling alley.
Other unique hotels with hyper-themed suites include Denver’s Curtis Hotel ( Star Wars rooms and Star Trek and Ghostbusters suites), New Hampshire’s Adventure Suites (room names include “Motorcycle Madness,” “Dragon’s Lair,” and “Cupid’s Corner”), and Fort Worth’s Western-themed Stockyards Hotel , where Bonnie and Clyde once slept in a suite that bears their names.
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Idaho’s Dog Bark Park Inn is on virtually every list of the world’s most unique hotels for good reason: It’s shaped like a dog. Also, everything inside the homey B&B is over-the-top dog-themed, including the pillows, the bedrest, the books, the cookies, the board games and puzzles, the curtains, and the canine chainsaw art (also sold in the on-site gift shop) handmade by the property’s welcoming mom-and-pop owners. More than a quirky roadside attraction—though it’s that, too—”Sweet Willy,” built in 2003, is made from wood, metal, and stucco. And yes, you can bring your own pup.
If you’d rather sleep inside a Trojan horse, book at Belgium’s uber-whimsical La Balade des Gnomes .
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If you’ve ever had the craving to sleep in a cave, put Turkey’s magical Cappadocia region on your bucket list. There, many of the unusual hotels are carved right into the land’s ancient stone. There are plenty of cave hotels to choose from in Cappadocia, including the lovely Seraphim Cave Hotel , but Ottoman Cave Suites , in a town called Goreme, is perhaps the most unique hotel of the bunch. Its dramatic, Ottoman-themed rooms feature velour furnishings, Turkish art, and—the distinguishing feature—scalloped stone walls and ceilings of cool, hollowed-out volcanic stone.
Elsewhere in the world, you can also stay in Grand Canyon Caverns ’ cave suite, at Kokopelli’s Cave in New Mexico, and at Switzerland’s Felsenhotel La Claustra .
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Train buffs will be pleased to learn that the world has a set of unique inns situated in retired locomotives. Pennsylvania’s Red Caboose Motel , for example, has turned the world’s largest privately owned collection of cabooses into a quirky hotel that’s surrounded by Amish farms, with an on-site dining car called Casey Jones’ Restaurant, and the impressive Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania just down the road. The sleeping quarters resemble basic motel rooms—except that they’re set in real caboose cars.
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Here’s a line from Helga’s Folly ‘s website: “If expecting a regular hotel experience, best look elsewhere, thank you.” This is an understatement. One of the world’s truly weird hotels, this property in Kandy, Sri Lanka, is covered from top to bottom in psychedelic hand-painted art, skeletons, wax-dripped candelabras, and a clutter of other creepy-cool decor. Staying here is guaranteed to make you feel like you’ve stepped into a Tim Burton movie. If you’re not quite up for a full-on overnight, you can visit just for dinner.
For other properties approaching this level of wackiness, check out Vietnam’s Crazy House and Chile’s hobbit-like Montaña Mágica Lodge .
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The recent opening of the Angad Arts Hotel in St. Louis is good news for anyone who’s ever wished they could sleep in their favorite art museum. At the Angad, there’s striking artwork throughout, pop-up performances, a musical playroom, and a refined David Burke eatery. You choose which color you want your guest room to be saturated with: a bold red, green, yellow, or blue. Calling itself an “incubator for the arts,” this unique hotel is in the city’s Grand Center Arts District, surrounded by more than 40 thriving arts venues.
Art lovers can also stay at Japan’s Benesse House , which displays original works by Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, Yayoi Kusama, and David Hockney, as well as Florida’s Art Ovation Hotel , or any of the 21c Museum Hotels .
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Miami’s Villa Casa Casuarina , better known as the Versace Mansion, has been many things: Gianni Versace’s over-the-top villa, a rundown apartment building, and the home of the Standard Oil heir Alden Freeman, who built the property in 1930 as a replica of Christopher Columbus’s son’s house. It became a murder landmark in 1997 when the famous fashion designer was gunned down on the mansion’s front stairs. After that, it was the backdrop for FX’s American Crime Story television series—then, finally, a hotel. Spanning its three palatial stories are 10 bedrooms, including the aptly named “Extravagant Villa Suite,” where Versace himself slumbered. Overnight guests can luxuriate amid hand-painted frescoes, a fountain courtyard, hand-carved wood doors, elaborate mosaics, Italian marble, opulent furnishings, and a swimming pool lined with 24-karat gold.
If your particular interest is staying at hotels that are owned by celebrities, there’s also Australia’s Palazzo Versace (owned by Gianni’s sister, Donatella), Florida’s Costa d’Este (Gloria and Emilio Estefan), Morocco’s Kasbah Tamadot (Richard Branson), Belize’s Blancaneaux Lodge (Francis Ford Coppola), Italy’s Palazzo Margherita (also Coppola), Utah’s Sundance Resort (Robert Redford), Dublin’s The Clarence (Bono), and two in Carmel, California: Cypress Inn (Doris Day) and Mission Ranch (Clint Eastwood).

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A Brief Summary On The History Of Thai Cuisine

By Karen Sullivan
Thai cooking was the national food from Thailand. Thai culinary places accentuation on delicately arranged dishes with solid fragrant segments and a hot edge. Culinary expert portrays Thai cuisine Everett as illustrating multifaceted design, tender loving care, surface, shading, taste, and the utilization of fixings with therapeutic advantages, just as great flavor, just as consideration being given toward the nourishment appearance.
Australian gourmet specialist David Thompson, a specialist on nourishment, sees that not at all like numerous other cuisines, cooking rejects effortlessness and is around the manipulating of different components to make an agreeable completion. In 2017, 7 dishes showed up on a rundown of a World fifty Best Sustenance. It is an online survey of thirty five thousand individuals worldwide through CNN Mobile.
This is the ascent of agribusinesses, for sample, Charon Handbook food, in 1980. Customarily, fish, scavengers, and shellfish assume an essential job into the eating routine of Thai persons. Anna Orleans of The Lord and one distinction saw in the book English Tutor at Siamese Court during 1870. The brook is wealthy in angle of incredible quality and flavor, for example, was found within the vast majority.
And couple of different societies, for example, the individuals, who are ongoing entries from Yunnan Region, China. Customarily, most ethnic individuals ate with hands correspond the general population from India. Chopsticks were fundamentally utilized within Thailand for consuming Chinese style soups, and Chinese, Japanese, also Korean eateries.
Coconut milk was one of the significant fixings utilized in focal food. Northeastern is catering to the driver level, comparative in culture toward Laos and furthermore affected by Khmer food. The best fixing is most likely matured fish. Northern nutrition of cooler valleys or forested piles of any good countries is managed by the previous Kingdom and home of most of northern Thailand.
And it was now structure most of Chinese. Such dishes incorporate rice porridge, steamed buns, singed rice noodles, and stewed pork by rice. The Chinese likewise presented the utilization of any work aimed at cooking, the procedure of profound fricasseeing and frying dishes, a few kinds of noodles, matured bean glue, soy sauces, or tofu. The foods of India and Persia were brought first by brokers.
Territorial varieties will, in general, correspond to bordering states, frequently having the equivalent social foundation or ethnicity on the two flanks of the outskirt, just as atmosphere and geology. Northern nutrition imparts dishes to San State inside Burma, northLaos, and furthermore with Yunnan Territory in China, though the cooking of northeastern is like which of south Laos, and was additionally affected.
This is from Cambodia toward its southor by Vietnamese culinary to the east. South Thailand, with numerous dishes which contain liberal measures of coconut exploit and new turmeric, shares that practically speaking through Indian, Malaysian, also Indonesian cuisine. Notwithstanding these territorial foods, there is additionally imperial cooking which can follow its past back toward the cosmopolitan royal residence food of this kingdom.
It, or rice, is presently 2 of the most imperative fixings in Thai cookery. Amid the Columbia Trade, Portuguese and Spanish boats brought new foodstuffs after the Americas comprising tomatoes, corn, papaya, pea eggplants, pineapple, pumpkins, cashews, and peanuts and by the individuals who began settling of extraordinary waterways of Asia in making some custard.
About the Author:
Get a detailed overview of the things to consider before choosing a restaurant and more information about an excellent Thai cuisine Everett restaurant at http://www.mukilteothairestaurant.com now.

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Bizarre, Bawdy and Brave: The Survivors’ Tales of Magellan’s Round the World Horror Story

Bizarre, Bawdy and Brave: The Survivors’ Tales of Magellan’s Round the World Horror Story By Itxu Díaz Reblog MADRID—Probably you’ve never tried to eat a rat. Every now and then rodents, roasted or raw, turn up as gruesome cuisine in horror films, but they’ve never established themselves on modern menus. Five hundred years ago, however, survivors of the voyage of Fernando Magallanes, as we call him in Spain (Fernão de Magalhães in his native Portugal, Ferdinand Magellan in English) had to resort to eating rats to avoid the greater evil of eating each other, a practice with which they’d grown rather familiar on their travels. Such was the very bitter end of the first circumnavigation of the globe. Right now is a good time, with all the acts of quincentennial commemoration that have cropped up in Spain and Portugal, to look back on a what was, in truth, una aventura de locos . It’s also important to realize that Magellan’s expedition was the birth of what we now call “globalization.” Let’s see. April 2019. It took me fewer than 10 seconds to circle the world on Google Earth . If King Charles I of Spain had had such a tool in the year 1519 it would not have been necessary to charter five ships and subject 239 men to all kinds of misfortunes. But of course it was necessary. Spain needed to discover a way west to the Far East to facilitate its trade routes—if that could be done—and the world needed to know once and for all its true identity as a sphere. In 1519 that fact still was far from clear. Christopher Columbus had tried to sail west to China 27 years earlier, but he didn’t get there. Not even close. As P.J. O’Rourke once put it, “Columbus discovered Caribbean vacations.” Magellan knew what the Far East really looked like. He had sailed previously around the tip of Africa on an eastward heading that took him to the Malay Peninsula. Now he intended to come at it from the other side if—a big if—the globe really was a globe. Of the five ships and 239 men that sailed from Seville in southern Spain in 1519, only one ship and 18 men returned. They were 18 heroes, no doubt, but above all 18 witnesses. A few months ago, crossing the waters of the Atlantic in a small boat and amazed by the spectacle of the dolphins playing in her wake, I could not stop thinking about the things those first explorers might have seen and experienced. Once back on land, I gathered all the available direct documentation I could find. There was the detailed account in the diary of the Venetian Antonio Pigaffeta , one of the survivors; there was the chronicle of the trip made by another of them, the pilot Francisco Albo; there was the letter to King Carlos from Juan Sebastián Elcano, who completed the voyage after Magellan himself was killed. I read the interview Maximilian Transyvanus conducted with the crew of the Victoria ; the book of Ginés de María about the discovery of what’s now called the Strait of Magellan; and the General Archive of the Indies, which is a hugely valuable source for reconstructing the darker side of that history, because its accounts are hugely human. Death as Destiny Reading the documents that are preserved, there is only one thing certain: those men were sailing toward death. Most knew it. Most were sure of it. Survival would be a miracle. In this 21st century, that level of incalculable risk is hard to fathom. Today’s entrepreneurs gamble with their money not their lives. Half a millennium ago, the Spanish Crown played with its money, to be sure, but the heroes of the Magellan expedition gambled with their existence. It was an expedition financed by the monarchy in Madrid but it was also an international enterprise: the two leaders were a Portuguese (Magellan) and a Spaniard (Juan Sebastián Elcano) while the crews of the five ships were made up of men from 10 different nationalities, including Spaniards, Portuguese, Italians, French, and Greeks. The vessels that originally set sail were Magelllan’s flagship, the Trinidad ; the slightly larger San Antonio , the Concepción , the Victoria , and the Santiago. Four months after leaving Spain they touched the Americas, specifically South America, where today we’d find Rio de Janeiro. There the Venetian, Pigaffeta wrote in his diary of a place plagued by “an infinite number of parrots.” The locals were fascinated by the steel axes and knives offered by the Europeans, technology they had never seen, and promised the adventurers “one and even two of their daughters” in exchange. Story continues This led to some observations that were both bawdy and bizarre. “The young women often came on board to offer themselves to the sailors in order to obtain some present: one day one of the prettiest also went up, undoubtedly with the same objective, but having seen a nail the size of a finger and believing that nobody was watching, she took it and very quickly placed it between the two lips of her sexual organs.” The chronicler recalls that an anthropological debate was unleashed among the crew: Did the girl do it to try to hide it and steal it or simply to decorate herself in some fashion? That would not be the last of Pigafetta’s sexual observations. The Brazilian chiefs known as caciques allowed the adventurers to celebrate mass on land and many of the locals ended up converting to Christianity, which was as alien to them as the axes and the knives. More importantly, they heard about the the dignity of human life and the concept of mercy, both of which, according to the chroniclers, were scarce in those parts (and subsequently scarce as well under the regimes of the Iberian colonizers). The first attempt to find entry to the South Sea failed. The passage was not really an open road: it turned out to be the estuary of the Río de la Plata, the silver river, which led to some considerable, and dangerous, frustration among the mariners. In March 1520, near the southern tip of South America after eight months of navigation, when we now know they only needed a few days to reach Antarctica and pass through the strait there before bad weather would set in, Magellan decided to winter in the Bay of San Julián. Food was growing scarce. The cold grew severe. Morale was bad and getting worse. Many of the crews in Magellan’s little armada were tired of the voyage, complaining about the distribution of food, but Magellan, who had decided to keep to his westward course or die trying, demanded that they show the courage needed to carry the expedition forward. This was a delicate moment. Magellan had ordered that food be rationed as much as possible, but he gathered his men and harangued them, telling them they still had plenty on board. They had good fishing and good hunting, firewood, water, as well as supplies of “biscuits and wine.” They didn’t trust him, didn’t believe him, and his speech did little to calm the mutinous atmosphere. At night, the cabals and conspiracies grew. The captains of all the ships except the Santiago , which was oblivious to what was happening, rose up against Magellan and demanded that he return to Spain. The Portuguese admiral knew that on the flagship Victoria there were many crewmen on his side and decided to charge that ship, kill its mutinous captain, and recover the obedience of the crew. He condemned to death Quesada, the captain of the Concepción , and banished and abandoned Juan de Cartagena, who was in charge of the San Antonio , the epicenter of the uprising. Magellan finally settled the matter by judging the mutineers in a court martial and pardoning some 50 of them. This was less a matter of Christian mercy than maritime pragmatism. He needed them to continue the expedition successfully. Days later, Magellan lost the ship Santiago , wrecked among the rocks at the mouth of what is now known as the Santacruz River near the southern tip of South America. The crew managed to save themselves but they stayed two months at the site of the wreck trying to collect the supplies that floated up. Two castaways from the Santiago had made it back to the rest of the expedition to deliver news of the ship’s sad end. They walked for a week, eating wild plants and raw seafood and were in rough shape. “They arrived so disfigured by hunger and their travails that their friends did not recognize them,” says Ortega. Expeditions were mounted taking food to the survivors of the Santiago, writes Pigaffeta, but the trip was exhausting. Even though the distance was only about 100 miles, the path was full of thorns and weeds and they “had nothing to drink but ice.” Giants and Rats In the middle of winter the Magellan expedition discovered on the coast “certain Indians” of “great stature.” “We saw a giant who was on the shore, quite naked, and who danced, leaped, and sang, and while he sang he threw sand and dust on his head,” writes Pigafetta. “Our captain sent one of his men toward him, charging him to leap and sing like the other in order to reassure him and show him friendship. Which he did. Immediately the man of the ship, dancing, led this giant to a small island where the captain awaited him. And when he was before us, he began to marvel and to be afraid, and he raised one finger upward, believing that we came from heaven. And he was so tall that the tallest of us only came up to his waist.” The friendship with these Indians allowed the explorers to stock up on firewood and food—including the meat of the llama-like guanacos—and thus alleviate their suffering. These huge Indians were called Patagonians. In October 1520, after wintering, Magellan ordered the ships San Antonio and Concepción to advance along a route “that looked like an arm of the sea.” They had found the strait but they did not know it. Once again, despair and dissension set in. The San Antonio , the biggest ship in the fleet, left the expedition in secret. Meanwhile, Magellan had sent a boat through the canal to discover if it had an outlet to the sea. It did. Euphoric, they baptized the point at which they entered the strait the Cape of 11,000 Virgins, after the legend of Saint Ursula and her martyred companions. Her feast day was October 21. The westernmost point of land they called the Cape of Desire. Then they set sail across the vast ocean they called “the peaceful sea,” the Pacific. Now the true horrors set in. After sailing for “three months and 20 days without taking on board provisions or any other refreshments,” Pigafetta tells us, they “ate only old biscuit turned to powder, all full of worms and stinking of the urine which the rats had made on it, having eaten the good. And we drank water impure and yellow. We ate also ox hides which were very hard because of the sun, rain, and wind. And we left them four or five days in the sea, then laid them for a short time on embers, and so we ate them. And of the rats, which were sold for half an écu apiece, some of us could not get enough.” A strange disease–scurvy–was spread among the crew: their gums swelled to the point of overwhelming the teeth in both jaws, preventing them from eating. A score of sailors died of the disease, as did a Patagonian giant who had joined them and was cared for by Pigaffeta. Such was the harshness of that part of the journey that the chronicler wrote, “I believe that nevermore will any man undertake to make such a voyage.” Death of Magellan In the spring of 1521 the expedition landed on the island of Zubu (now Cebu) and reached an alliance with its king, who converted to Christianity and swore allegiance to the king of Spain. With that, all the inhabitants of the island were baptized, they demolished their idols and put an end to their “strange ceremonies.” Among those rituals, the Italian chronicler notes, when a chief died in Zubu, he was watched over at home accompanied by “the most respected women of the place.” The main wife “sets her mouth, her hands and her feet to those of the dead man. And while the other woman is cutting off the hair, the latter one weeps. And when she has ceased cutting, the latter one sings.” The ritual lasted five days. It also surprised the adventurers that the natives of these islands had their foreskins “closed with a small cylinder of gold” and “never remove this ornament, not even during intercourse.” As one of the chroniclers wrote with unusual humor, given the harsh circumstances: “Despite such a strange device, all women preferred us over their husbands …” Later in the voyage, Pigafetta listened to the many tales told by Moro pilots helping steer the Victoria through shallow seas. From them he learned that, “When the young men of Java are in love with any gentlewoman, they bind certain little bells with thread under their foreskin.” That is, between the penis and the foreskin. “They go beneath their loved ones’ window and, making pretense to urinate and shaking the member, they ring the little bells until their loved ones hear the sound. Then they come down immediately, and they take their pleasure, always with those little bells, for their women take great delight in hearing those bells ring within.” But before they could leave Zubu, a new and devastating tragedy befell them. Magellan wanted to seal the alliance with the king of Zubu by attacking the neighboring island of Mactan, whose king was an enemy of Zubu and would not convert to Christianity. Magellan led his men ashore, where they burned some 30 houses belonging to the locals, who vastly outnumbered them and who counter-attacked relentlessly. Forced back into the water, Magellan and his men continued fighting knee-deep in the sea, but the artillery on board their ships was out of range and useless. A poisoned arrow hit Magellan in the leg, then a spear caught him in the arm, then another spear, and he went down surrounded by the enemy, according to Pigafetta. “All at once rushed upon him with lances of iron and of bamboo and with these javelins, so that they slew our mirror, our light, our comfort, and our true guide. While those people were striking him, he several times turned back to see whether we were all at the ships. Then, seeing him dead, as best we could we rescued the wounded men and put them into the boats which were already leaving.” On April 27, 1521, Magellan died at the age of 41, but his body was never recovered. Afterward several more the men were lost when they were offered a friendly feast only to be betrayed and killed. Having reduced the number of survivors, those who remained decided to reduce the number of ships to two, setting fire to the Concepción , sailing on aboard the Trinidad and the Victoria . On the way to the Moluccas, they chose Juan Sebastián Elcano as their leader. In November 1521 they arrived at the spice islands, the Moluccas, which the Portuguese had reached earlier via the Indian Ocean, and which had been Magellan’s goal all along. They had sailed west, halfway around the world on uncharted seas, to reach them, and they received honors from King Almanzor. The following month, with the ships loaded with cloves, they were preparing to return to Spain but the Trinidad began taking on water, and had to stay behind for repairs, eventually turning back east across the Pacific toward Panama. The Victoria continued west toward Africa and beyond, to Spain. In the midst of strong winds, it took Victoria seven weeks to get past the Cape of Good Hope. Seven weeks in which a good part of the crew, sick and hungry, demanded Elcano land in Mozambique, where the Portuguese had established themselves. But despited Magellan’s nationality this was not a Portuguese expedition and Elcano was not about to let himself, his men and his hugely valuable cargo fall into their hands. He forced everyone to continue the route to the west. After two months without seeing land and a score of deaths on board, they were forced to land on one of the Cape Verde islands, another Portuguese outpost, in search of water. Elcano sent 13 men to try to move the Portuguese governor by telling them of his extreme situation. They were arrested and the Portuguese tried to attack the Victoria . Elcano, who was following the negotiations, then ordered the anchor raised, abandoned the 13 men, and sailed on “with imponderable despair,” according to one of the chroniclers. On September 6, 1522, emaciated, hungry, sick and exhausted from fatigue, after a voyage of almost three years, the Victoria with Elcano in command arrived back in Spain at the port of Sanlúcar de Barrameda with the 18 survivors on board. They had completed the first circumnavigation of the globe in history, of that there was now no doubt. Only fools, fantasists or fanatics would deny it. They did not disembark until the next day when they were towed up the Guadalquivir River to Seville. As crowds gathered to receive them, the 18 walked, “each carrying a candle in his hand,” to the chapel of the Virgin in the old Cathedral of Seville to whom they had pledged their faith during the worst moments of the voyage. The Beginning of Globalization That September of 1522 the world changed forever. The expedition had established the dimensions of Earth, had discovered the Strait of Magellan, had crossed for the first time the largest ocean in the world, which they called Pacific because in its waters they did not suffer storms, had confirmed the spherical nature of the planet and discovered there were different zones of time, had found archipelagos of the Pacific large and small, including the Philippines, and had revealed that all the seas are connected to each other in a global world. They had broken the endurance record on the high seas, had traveled half the planet without stopping, and they had opened the way for communication on a planetary scale. The fifth centenary of the adventure is a good time to remember the solemnity and transcendence with which Juan Sebastián Elcano wrote the day of his return in a letter addressed to the king who had funded the adventure, and who had become in the meantime Holy Roman Emperor Carlos V, the most powerful sovereign in Europe or, indeed, on Earth: “Your Majesty will know better than anyone that what we ought most to value and hold on to is that we have discovered and sailed the whole roundness of the world, that going to the West, we have returned from the East.” Translated from the Spanish and edited by Christopher Dickey. Some of the quotations are extracted from R.A. Skelton’s translation of Magellan’s Voyage: A Narrative Account of the First Circumnavigation, by Antonio Pigafetta.

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