Why are so many Malaysians from Penang settling in Hong Kong? – Nation

Why are so many Malaysians from Penang settling in Hong Kong? – Nation

HONG KONG (SCMP): When Cheah Cheng Hye left his hometown of Penang in northern Malaysia in 1974 for a higher paying job with The Standard newspaper in Hong Kong, his plan was to stay a few years until he saved enough money to buy his family a house.
Unable to afford a flight, Cheah – 20 at the time – travelled to Hong Kong on a cargo ship. These days he is the proud owner of a BMW with a special licence plate that reads “Penang”. He is also the founder of one of Asia’s largest independent asset management firms, Value Partners.
Like Cheah, many Penangites have left in search of greener pastures as part of a nationwide trend that has seen an estimated 1 million Malaysians living and working abroad. The diaspora has increased rapidly since the 1980s and continues to rise, according to the World Bank’s Malaysia Economic Monitor.
About 15,000 Malaysians now live in Hong Kong, according to the Consulate-General. Though the Consulate does not record what state they come from, Penangites are widely thought to be the largest group in the city.
“Better career opportunities, higher income and quality of life are decisive factors influencing Malaysians who leave,” said Hwok-Aun Lee, a Senior Fellow with the ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore who studies labour and social policy in Malaysia.
As in the case of Cheah, whose move meant an immediate 500 per cent pay rise, the higher salaries Hong Kong has to offer have long been a beacon for Malaysians seeking to work abroad.
Chess Yip first came to Hong Kong in 1987 to work as a flight attendant. Now, more than 30 years later, she has returned to the city to work as a service associate at a Southeast Asian restaurant.
“Like many others, I came for economic reasons,” said Yip. But what drew her back to Hong Kong was something different. “It is so much more diverse and global, more cosmopolitan,” said Yip, now a mother of two teenage sons.
A year after she first arrived in Hong Kong, her childhood sweetheart joined her, though they returned to Penang in 1999 to raise their children. “I always wanted to come back. I liked Hong Kong because I found it very organised and the people are much more straightforward, kind of like me,” she said.
The two cities also share a common past. George Town, the capital city of Penang, was founded in 1786 by Francis Light as a free port for the British East India Company. Its location along the Malacca Strait made it a popular landing spot for immigrants from all over Asia and particularly southern China.
“For some older Penang Chinese, there are strong cultural links and family links too,” said Cheah. “People from these two places can instantly recognise many similar elements,” he added.
But when the state’s free port status was revoked in 1969, its economy took a hit. Today, George Town’s laid-back lifestyle and its Unesco World Heritage Site in the city centre draw in the tourists but are less attractive to professionals, who find the city lacking in career opportunities.
“Until 1985, Penang had more college graduates than Kuala Lumpur but not as many jobs, so Penang exported skilled labour to the nearby British colony of Hong Kong,” said N. Balakrishnan, an entrepreneur who was educated in Penang and spent more than two decades in Hong Kong.
Balakrishnan says the similar colonial history means the two places share professional and business standards based on the British model, making it easy for those in accounting, medicine and law to work in Hong Kong.
“After five years in medical school and another year’s residency in the hospital, you’re used to the system,” said 61-year-old Philip Beh, an associate professor of Pathology at HKU. For him, staying in Hong Kong after completing medical school at the University of Hong Kong was a no-brainer – and not just because he married a woman from Hong Kong.
However, Beh had another, more pernicious reason for leaving – he was 11 when the bloody May 13 race riots between ethnic Chinese and Malays broke out in 1969, mainly in Kuala Lumpur, where Beh was studying at the time. Urban areas with larger Chinese populations were also affected, including Penang and Malacca.
The riots led to the death of 200 people, according to official records, but unofficial accounts from Western diplomats put the death toll higher, at 600. Most of the dead were ethnic Chinese.
“After that, everything changed. As a Malaysian Chinese, suddenly you realise you’re not welcome anymore,” Beh said.
Following the riots, the government at the time proposed the New Economic Policy in 1971, an affirmative action plan meant to eradicate poverty, particularly among the Malays who were forced into making a living through subsistence agriculture under British rule.
Fleeing Discrimination
Under the NEP and later the 1991 National Development Policy implemented by Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad during his first stint in power from 1981 to 2003, the ethnic Chinese and Indians living in Malaysia began to face increasing discrimination in Malaysia. Many chose to leave, sparking worries of brain drain in the country.
In 2010, then Prime Minister Najib Razak’s promise to undo race-based affirmative action policies was embraced by many non-Malays, but he later backtracked on the pledge. Hwok-Aun Lee says the dashed hopes for reform of many Malaysians, particularly Malaysian Chinese, may further fuel the brain drain.
“This is what I would call a vicious loop of hollow promises and overzealous expectations,” said Lee. “The failure of the country to have a candid, measured and critical conversation on race-based policies further polarises Malaysians and perpetuates this cycle of false promise and dashed hope.”
Whether the new government will be able to reverse the current exodus of talent, Lee thinks those that left are likely monitoring developments at home before making a decision. “Returning home carries more weight because it is more permanent, and also may entail financial sacrifice,” said Lee.
The World Bank’s Malaysia economic monitor estimates almost 90 per cent of the Malaysian diaspora in Singapore are ethnic Chinese. From that, Lee says, it can be deduced the percentage of ethnic Chinese in the global Malaysian diaspora is disproportionately high.
However, the discrimination and lack of opportunity faced by Chinese Malaysians has also made them more resilient, says Gan Khai Choon, who co-chairs the Malaysian Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong and Macau with Cheah Cheng Hye.
Ethnic Chinese make up most of the population on Penang Island – Penang state also includes Seberang Prai on the Malay Peninsula – according to the last census in 2010.
“They’re more hungry, more flexible and more hardworking,” said Gan, who is also from Penang. “It is a fact of life that Malaysians, and Penangites in particular, are probably the best employees at a management level,” said Gan.
Gan also says people from Penang have an added advantage over other migrants – they come from a state which is home to several of Malaysia’s oldest schools, including the Penang Free School, founded in 1816, as well as Convent Light Street School, the oldest girls’ school in Penang, founded in 1862.
This has led to Penangites becoming globally competitive, and in Hong Kong, many of them find a place in multinational corporations, law firms and as faculty members of Hong Kong’s universities.
Yet despite their successes, the people of Penang who have found their fortune in Hong Kong remain loyal to their hometown, Gan says. “You feel a sense of belonging to Malaysia. In fact, some of us are even more passionate about Penang than those living in Penang,” said Gan.
Cheah Cheng Hye agrees. “There are a number of social causes that have benefitted from the flow of money sent home by Malaysians living in Hong Kong,” he said.
Hong Wrong?
Hong Kong, however, also has its drawbacks. Chess Yip notes the rising cost of living in Hong Kong is making it harder to save money. Cheah says overcrowding and air pollution are other negatives.
Indeed, some people turn to Penang as an escape from Hong Kong’s high costs and crowded streets. Many who have worked in Hong Kong for years return to seek comfort and luxury in the streets of George Town.
Mariam Lim, originally from the mining town of Ipoh in Perak state, northwest Malaysia, has retired comfortably in Penang after working in Hong Kong as a human resources manager for multi-national corporations for 11 years.
“When I was working in Hong Kong, I always had to remember to leave for a Hong Kong antidote,” she joked. “I love Penang, my friends are here, the people are nice and it’s culturally very rich. My family isn’t too far away either in Kuala Lumpur and Ipoh, I didn’t have second thoughts about coming home,” she added.
Lim’s sentiments are shared by Hongkongers looking for a quieter place to retire, and the Malaysia My Second Home scheme, which grants foreigners 10-year visas to live in the country, has made Penang one of their top choices.
Some of them are retired Hong Kong policemen, who declined to be interviewed, wanting to keep a low-profile.
“Initially I thought I would promote Kuala Lumpur when I was asked by my Hong Kong clients where to stay in Malaysia, but they like Penang,” said Sam Choong, a lawyer who works with applicants of the Malaysia My Second Home scheme.
“It’s a dream for them to have a more tranquil, holiday island style life and they have more space,” said the agent, who has offices in both Penang and Kuala Lumpur.
Lorinna Gehrig, who was born and raised in Hong Kong but married a Swiss husband, first made her way to Kuala Lumpur, before being convinced by people at the Embassy of Switzerland in Malaysia to retire in Penang.
“When I first arrived in Penang, we were staying at the Eastern & Oriental hotel and sitting outside looking at the Malacca Strait, it felt like Hong Kong 40 years ago,” said Gehrig. “And I was thrilled to hear the Indians here speaking fluent Cantonese,” she gushed.
Gehrig has been living in Penang since 2007. Property prices were a huge draw for her. Along with an apartment, she and her husband Stefan Gehrig bought a row of heritage shophouses in George Town, where they have invested in a cafe, a boutique hotel and an art gallery. “For the same price, I can get a place 10 times the size of a Hong Kong property,” she said. She also appreciates how accepting Penangites are of her mixed marriage, saying: “No one looks at us strangely here.”
For the Penangites that have left, their hometown continues to call to them.
Pathology professor Philip Beh, who has been away from Malaysia for more than 40 years, finds himself dreaming of Penang’s world-famous cuisine. “My taste for the food never diminishes,” he said.
While Cheah Cheng Hye insists he can never fully retire from running his company, he hopes to spend more time in Penang. “When world-class opportunities in cities like Hong Kong, London and Singapore are available, it is hard to resist when we’re younger. But I think Penang has a good environment, apart from a few traffic jams here and there.” – SCMP

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Commit the sin of Food, sin of Entertainment & sin of Drinks at the newly opened Lounge & Kitchen “SIN CITY” Sajid Qureshi ‘s BRAND NEW STAGE- LOUNGE- KITCHEN , “SIN CITY”A Fashionable soirée, Rohit Verma’s Las Vegas Fashion show and performance by Raghav Angel Eyes.

No comments Commit the sin of Food, sin of Entertainment & sin of Drinks at the newly opened Lounge & Kitchen “SIN CITY” Sajid Qureshi ‘s BRAND NEW STAGE- LOUNGE- KITCHEN , “SIN CITY”A Fashionable soirée, Rohit Verma’s Las Vegas Fashion show and performance by Raghav Angel Eyes.
Spearheaded by Sajid Qureshi (Inbox Pictures)
Address- 5th Crystal Point Mall, New link Road, Azad Nagar, Andheri West, Mumbai.
Time: 7:00 pm- 1:00 am
Highlights: –
1) One stop destination for Stage- Lounge- Kitchen
2) Huge space to accommodate three sections- Lounge, Club & Casual Dinning
3) International & National, Live Bands during the weekdays & weekends.
4) Bringing Global Cuisine,
5) A splash of Persia, China, America, India & many more other beautiful countries to “SIN CITY” in their interiors,
6) Vintage- Retro style interiors,
7) Designer Rohit Verma showcased his all new Las Vegas collection at the launch of Sin City,
Claudia opened the show,
9) Giorgia Andriani showstopper,
10) Singer Raghav’s performed live, the voice behind chartbuster song (Angel Eyes).
For all the party enthusiast of Mumbai, commit the sin of food, sin of entertainment & sin of drinks at the newly opened Lounge & Kitchen “SIN CITY”. An electrifying venue that reinforces the spirit of celebration & at the same time lets you unwind, reload & recharge with your friends.
The launch of “SIN CITY” saw the very fashionable domiciles of Mumbai and amongst those some of the regular faces of the social circuit including – Poonam Dhillon, Rajkumar Santoshi, Debina Banerjee, Krishna Hegde, Sandip Soparkar, Shrabani Mukherjee, Aziz Zee, Jesse Randhawa, Kashmira Shah, Yaaneea Bharadwaj, Vahbiz Dorabjee, Khalid Siddique, Dj Sheizwood, Kamaal R Khan, Prashant Virender Sharma, Vishal Singh, Eijaz Khan, Ranjit Rodrigues, Aashka Gowda, Rajeev Paul. Rakesh Paul, Saru Maini, Ssumier Pasricha, Shaleen Bhanot, Mrinal Deshraj, Rehan Shah, Ananya Dutta, Sanjay Chhel, Vahbbiz Dorabjee, Krishna Abhishek, Bob Brambhatt, Hansa Singh, Kishori Shahane, Nisha Rawal and Karan Mehra, Munisha Khatwani, Kashmeera Shah, BR Shetty, Dr.Sharmila Nayak, Mishti Mukherjee, Brinda Parekh, Bobby Darling, Madhuri Pandey, Brinda Parekh, Pankaj Soni, Swati Loomba, Aziz Zee, Leena Mogre, Vikas Verma, Nibedita Pal, Ankit Bhatla, Giaa Manek, Rajesh Khattar, Munisha Khatwani, Rajeev Khinchi, Santosh Kumar Acharya, Kishori Sahane, Sherrin Varghese, Haimanti Bhattacharya, Nivedita Basu, Utkarsh Gupta and many more.
Show hosted by Sandhya Shetty performance by Raghav Angel Eyes
“SIN CITY” will soon establish itself as the ‘place to be’ in the city. The concept of Sin City is to provide an entertainment, clubbing, social as well as party joint and restaurant venue at Andheri. We intend to heavily utilize entertainment-oriented marketing in an effort to withstand the perpetual shift in trends and cater to as large a client base as possible” Sajid Qureshi (Inbox Pictures).
Designer Rohit Verma showcased his all new collection inspired by the city of sins “Las Vegas”. The creations will spell bold & sexy in rich colors of black, gold & bronze. Each piece will convey the skill & inspiration. Models wore beautiful jewellery by Kaypee Jeweller.
While Claudia opened the show, Giorgia Andriani walked the ramp as the showstopper
Rohit Verma says “The mood board of my collection is completely starry & glamorous. This collection is inspired by Las Vegas, city of sins & dedicated to the lounge & kitchen Sin City”
Food & Drinks: – The place boasts of a brilliant bar & kitchen with an exhaustive menu of different ‘global cuisine’ delights like Persian, Chinese, Mediterranean, Indian, American. “SIN CITY” redefines the city’s vibrant social scene with unique tailor made cocktails, an extensive international wine-by-glass menu and an array of delectable food from across the globe catering to eclectic tastes of guests. “SIN CITY” will have an in-house mixologist who will ensure that every guest is served customized cocktails to suit their palates experimenting on an array of flavours and spirits contrary to the mainstream cocktails.
It promises to transport gourmands as a mid-night party spot and a captivating experience for the connoisseur, serving eclectic Multi cuisines like Mishwi , Bombay Vadapav Melba Toast, Palamuru Chicken Olivette, Saffron Paneer Alfredo, Chicken Popcorn, Crispy Water Chestnut And Bamboo Shoots ,Garam Achar, Creme Brulee & different brands of liquor in all shapes and sizes at inexpensive rates specially curated menu to indulge in gastronomical delights.
Ambiance: – Sprawled over 9,000 square feet, “SIN CITY” offers three different sections Lounge, Club & Casual Dining best suited for the mood of the guests. The entrance of the lounge gives high energy zone vibes. A large well-lit & well done lounge & club section dominate the space with two huge stages to welcome live artists, international & national Djs during the weekends.
“SIN CITY” aims at having collaborations with future innovators of the nightlife industry and musicians from across the globe. They assure patrons memories that could last a lifetime & experiences that will blow your mind.
A team of well-travelled geniuses bring a splash of Persia, China, America, India & many more other beautiful countries to “SIN CITY” in their interiors. The aesthetic of the place will introduce Mumbai to something never-seen-before.
The interior of the club section is a blend of comfortable lounge in a classic vintage retro setting. The grey & beige tones are offset with black & gold hues giving the guests a modern-yet-old vintage retro vibe.
That’s not it! The state-of-the-art décor and contemporary ambience at the city’s newly opened lounge will play background to the luxury experience will be equipped with audio, lighting and video systems, serving the need for a true entertainment venue.
“SIN CITY” is synonymous with urban lifestyle. It has deeply looked into every aspect of space planning, presentation etc. while designing the place.
Hospitality:-The warm welcome by the staff of, “SIN CITY” lent the guests their first few moments of comfort, it is committed to providing the consumer the highest level of hospitality services. The lounge aims to create a niche for them and set new benchmarks in quality, efficiency and service.

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British Daily’s Article Calling Jackfruit ‘Ugly Pest-Plant’ Irks Indian Twitterati

An article published on website of The Guardian has angered people The article called jackfruit “spectacularly ugly, smelly.. pest-plant” The author called jackfruit a bland and “gross-looking lump of fibre”
Jackfruit is a popular fruit in India and we have a longstanding tradition of turning the yellow fleshy fruit into a number of dishes like biryanis , curries, chips and even jackfruit ice-cream . Jackfruit, also known as katthal , is a popular summer fruit in India and it is a common sight to see the yellowish green fruit on trees in the coastal state of Kerala. In fact, the state has a special connection with the fibrous fruit, which is also known as ‘ chakka .’ In fact, Kerala named jackfruit as its official state fruit last year, following a boom in the sale and demand of the fruit around the world. However, the fibrous fruit is making headlines for a something else nowadays. It all started with a popular British daily calling the fruit “a spectacularly ugly, smelly, unfarmed, unharvested pest-plant native to India.”
The article titled, ” Jackfruit is a vegan sensation – could I make it taste delicious at home?” was published on the website of the British daily The Guardian on March 27th, 2019. The article talks about jackfruit becoming a ‘vegan sensation’ as far back as 2017 and the fruit appearing in restaurant chains and eateries around the world. The writer went on to address jackfruit as a “gross-looking lump of fibre – fat, spiky and green, it could have been animated for a bit part in Monsters, Inc,” and said that it tasted of “nothing” and was too bland to be deemed tasty.
Take a look at Guardian’s tweet about jackfruit: Jackfruit is a vegan sensation – could I make it taste delicious at home? https://t.co/FTUM3VCaaC — The Guardian (@guardian) March 27, 2019
The article also declared that in India, “Some people ate it, but only if they had nothing better to eat.” Needless to say, the article didn’t sit well with scores of Indians who pointed out jackfruit has been an important part of the cuisine that we have grown up eating. A lot of people on Twitter accused the writer of ‘whitewashing’ the use of jackfruit as a food and called for better researched articles. People from Kerala were especially irked with the article and expressed their displeasure about the article on Twitter.
Also Read: 6 Remarkable Benefits of Jackfruit Seeds
Take a look at few of the tweets: Really? @guardian @zoesqwilliams Just because the West has discovered it doesn’t mean it wasn’t eaten (and relished) before. And no: a food item doesn’t win the lottery just because it’s now trendy in London #colonialhangover https://t.co/R8QpW9qDeZ pic.twitter.com/VPAJzUcRcu — Priyanka (@priyankalind) March 28, 2019 it has been relished as fruit, jam, chips, as part of curries/thorans, for generations in Kerala. There are entire food festivals held just around this fruit, for God’s sake! Ignorance should be no excuse for casual racism, it reeks more than jackfruit. or durian (heard of that?)— Sruthi Ramakrishnan (@Sruthi_writes) March 29, 2019 Wow. This article is hot garbage from the first sentence out. The millions of south and south-east asians who don’t have access to a wrap at Starbucks have been enjoying fresh, juicy and flavorful jackfruit for centuries.— Richard Fleming (@walkingtogitmo) March 31, 2019 This is ridiculous. We don’t eat jackfruit because ‘there is nothing better to eat’. And most of your recipes sound disgusting. It’s a vegetable, with brilliant coastal preparations that we have been eating and looking forward to eating since my childhood. So much ignorance.— rujuta (@ObliqueRays) March 31, 2019 @jackfruit the ubiquitous ‘chakka’. I remember in Kerala , starting summer this vegetable /fruit found its way into every dish that you had to run mile to avoid getting it in your plate .Every part was food, unripe ripe, pericarp, seed ,pulp, chammini…— sarath chandran (@pockyarsarat) March 28, 2019
Some people shared their own recipes of sweet and savoury delicacies prepared by using jackfruit, in response to the thread. Malayali cuisine has a several delicious ways of cooking the jackfruit and in the recent years, health experts have also praised the fruit for its energy boosting benefits. Kerala government has been taking concerted efforts to re-brand the fruit to push it on a global scale as well.
What do you think about The Guardian’s take on jackfruit? Let us know in the comments section below!

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History of Indian Food

nareshdadhich Leave a comment
History of Indian Food
Weare Vaishnavite by tradition and so our food is non onion non garlic vegetarian food. My mother used to prepare food in the kitchen where we kids were not allowed to enter before we took bath.The food prepared would be offered to God ( a few photos and statutes of Maa Durga, Satyanarayan, Shiv ji, Ram, shaligram and others constitute of what we call deity)in the puja room and then we were served that food.In Vaishnavism God is revered in human form.There are temples where Deity is treated like a child or a human being and is taken care of as if Deity is human. As our God would take only satvik ( pure vegetarian non garlic non onion food) and not rajsik or tamsik food we were also told not to touch such food.But I had friends who used to eat all kinds of food including meat and eggs.
Why people eat different types of food and from where ingredients from food came. I used to wonder from where different types of foods emerged and became part of our daily lunch or dinner.What our forefathers used to cook and eat.Historically when did new cuisines enter our kitchen? How food habits developed in different communities and regions?These are some of the questions that haunted me for long.Fortunately I came across an excellent book which quenched my queries about evolution of food in India.The book “Feasts and Fasts :A History of Food in India” (2015) is written by Colleen Taylor Sen.She is a well known food historian who has written extensively on food including her famous “Curry:A Global History”.
Before reading this book I had no idea that Delhi Sultanate (1206-1526) introduced pulao,biryani,kebabs,samosas and halwa(my favourite)in India.When Portuguese came to India in sixteenth century and established themselves in Goa,they introduced tomatoes, potatoes, chillies, peanuts, pineapples, cashews and other things.Then what are the indigenous items of food.She informed us,”Plants indigenous to India include lentils (such as urad, mung and masur dal), millet, aubergines, many tubers, pumpkins, melons and gourds, mangoes, jackfruit, citrus fruit, ginger, turmeric, tamarind, and black and long pepper. India is also the home of domesticated chickens.” She further clarified that “Spices indigenous to India are ginger, turmeric, tamarind, black (also called round) pepper (Piper nigrum), curry leaves (Murraya koenigii), pippali or long pepper (P. longum), green and black cardamom (which grew wild in the Western Ghats, sometimes called the Cardamom Hills) and holy basil or tulsi (Ocimum sanctum), although the last is not used as an ingredient, perhaps because it is sacred to the deity Vishnu and worshipped by many Hindus. Sesame seed (Sesame indicum), one of the oldest oilseed crops, was domesticated very early.”
Many spices which we use today are not of Indian origin.She said,”Other spices arrived from Western Asia very early on, including cumin, fenugreek, mustard seed, saffron and coriander. Asafoetida (hing), the dried gum from an underground rhizome (widely used by orthodox Hindus and Jains as a substitute for garlic), originated in Afghanistan, which is still a major producer. Cinnamon from Sri Lanka, cassia from South China, and cloves and nutmeg from Indonesia reached India from the third century CE onwards. Cloves were not grown in India until about 1800”. Even paan arrived from South east Asia and soon became part of Indian culinary and social life.Chillies were brought from the New World in the sixteenth century and quickly became assimilated into the cuisine as a replacement for long pepper. In Indian languages, the word is an extension of the word for pepper; for example, in Hindi, kali or hari mirch, meaning black or green pepper.
Food in Indian scripture has a special place.It is regarded as essential for creation and sustenance for life.In Taitiriya Upanishad praise for food is evident.
Ode to Food
From food, verily creatures are produced Whatsoever creatures dwell on the earth.
Moreover, by food, in truth, they live Moreover, into it also they finally pass For truly, food is the chief of beings;
Therefore, it is called a panacea Verily,
they obtain all food Who worship Brahma as food From food created things are born.
By food, when born, do they grow up. It is both eaten and eats things Because of that it is called food
India also enriched other cultures in food while interacting with them.With the coming of Alexander rice reached Greece where like spices it was initially valued as a medicine.The chicken, first domesticated in India, reached Greece by the early sixth century BCE via the Persian Empire. Interestingly wine is also of foreign origin.Wine made from grapes came to Persia from Greece at about the same time, and from there went to Afghanistan and eastern India.While searching for writing on food in ancient India we find that not much is a available. Arjun Appadurai,(an Indian American Anthropologist) explains,”while gastronomic issues play a critical role in Hindu texts, culinary issues do not. That is, while there is an immense amount written about eating and feeding, precious little is said about cooking in Hindu legal medical or philosophical texts . . . Food is principally either a moral or medical matter in traditional Hindu thought.” Tobacco was also introduced by the Portuguese in the Deccan. A courtier brought tobacco to Akbar’s court, together with a jewelled hookah. (The hookah may have been invented at Akbar’s court by a Persian physician, Abu’l-Fath Gilani, who perhaps got the idea from a primitive version using a coconut shell as the base that had been used to smoke opium and hashish.Coffee had reached India by the early seventeenth century, since it is mentioned by Edward Terry in 1617.Tomatoes were also of Spanish origin and came to Indian in early sixteenth century via Philippines, China and Japan.Potatoes were a replacement for indigenous tubers, Marathis still use the Portuguese word batata for potatoes. Britishers introduced tea drinking for anglicised elites.It became a mass consumption item only in 1950s when Indian Tea Board launched an advertising campaign to popularise tea.In the last two three years small towns and cities along with metro cities have witnessed a boom of sophisticated tea shops along with coffee shops,where in young people spend their time in a cosy atmosphere gossiping.Another British contribution to India was beer. A popular beverage among the English in India from the early seventeenth century. In 1830 the first brewery was set up in the Solon District of Himachal Pradesh (it is still in operation). By 1882 there were twelve breweries in India.
Interestingly Mahatma Gandhi’s Recommended Daily Diet was also mentioned in the book.That comprises of :
800 ml (2 lb/ 1 ½ pints) cow’s milk
175 g (6 OZ) cereal
75 g (3 OZ) leafy green vegetables
150 g (5 OZ) other vegetables
3 tbsp ghee 2 tbsp sugar Fruit according to taste and budget
2 litres (5 lb/ ½ gall.) water or other liquid
The book is an interesting reading and those who have interest in knowing about food habits of our ancestors also should read this.
April 1,2019

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Кроссворд english speaking countries

※ Download: Кроссворд english speaking countries
What Japan has to offer: is like stepping into a neatly made time machine. Government of the Netherlands. Constitutional Court of South Africa.
Countries where English is a official language Country Region Primary language? Retrieved April 28, 2011. Once you’re done in Berlin, simply book a train ticket to your next destination with , the national rail service whose site is also available in, of course, English.
ENGLISH SPEAKING COUNTRIES – My Government: The Government of Malaysia’s Official Portal. Note this includes speakers of an English creole.
If you went to American public schools, you probably speak a second language about as well as you do algebra. Twangy Spanglish makes telenovelas more of a hoot, and menu-grade French makes Montreal even slinkier voulez vous coucher avec moi? Ah, but there’s the rub: English is the world’s unofficial second language, with some estimates claiming that 1. Tons of those folks are clustered in the usual roster of foreign lands — the UK, Australia, Canada, Ireland, Jamaica, New Zealand, Oregon. Elsewhere, you may have to work harder to be understood, but you can always find people ready to meet you on your linguistic turf when you’re on their soil. A language barrier won’t keep you from taking an adventure in these 13 countries; included with each is the percent of people who speak English, per some. Take a trip anywhere on this list and you’ll swear they’ve been practicing for your arrival. Because unlike you since taking German in 10th grade, they have been. Tanzania How many people speak English: 10% What it’s like as an English speaker: English is widely spoken in this former British colony, especially in the cities and in the tourism industry. Most everyone you interact with will speak your language, which is mildly embarrassing until you remember that you saw The Lion King a few times back in the day. Tanzania has dozens of safari parks, including the world’s largest and its most famous one. Time your visit right and you can catch the annual migration of 1. But if hiking to an airplane’s cruising altitude doesn’t sound like your idea of a vacation, head to to do nothing but lie on your back all day, drink from coconuts, and watch really tall Maasai Mara dudes herd cows on the beach. Buying a house, getting a job, starting a company, and making friends, although challenging, proved doable for an Anglophone. This is because most Germans are proud of their English and love using it when possible. Try out your German to someone in Berlin, and quite often they’ll reply in English. It’s taught from an early age, and like English, it’s a Germanic language, with many similar principles. It is also the language of academia and international business, which thrives in the leading European country. What Germany has to offer: In Berlin, like many of the other big cities — Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich — English will get you far. Go on a guided tour, eat some schnitzel, go hiking, or hit up your , and you’ll meet so many young, friendly Germans wanting to perfect their already impeccable English, you’ll forget that you’re in a country that invented such words as quietscheentchen rubber duck and streichholzschächtelchen match lighters. Once you’re done in Berlin, simply book a train ticket to your next destination with , the national rail service whose site is also available in, of course, English. Beyond America’s 50-year occupation 1898-1946, when Uncle Sam built hundreds of English-teaching schools, basketball courts, and Hollywood movie theaters , Filipinos also celebrate English words by singing, everywhere, all the time. They invented karaoke and perfected live music, a legacy of the lounge and rock bands that sprang up around Vietnam-era military bases that needed entertaining. Base towns became live Western-music hubs, and that scene remains a huge reason to visit this ultra-friendly tropical country. What the Philippines has to offer: The Philippines is all about variety in landscapes and personality. It’s traditional yet faddish, Asian in character but Western in disposition. If you make only one stop: Hit the Hobbit House, a Downtown Manila institution. Gritty and gonzo, it’s their version of CBGB — an everyone-aboard live-rock club — with the distinct twist of being staffed by little people. Slovenian culture blends all these neighboring influences, so it’s no surprise Slovenians love language. Over-the-top friendly locals who speak impeccable English make Slovenia the stuff of road trip and hitchhiking dreams. Asking for directions might turn into 30 minutes of shooting the bull about attractions and Slovenian history, which might carry into drinks at the bar or even an invitation for a home-cooked meal. What Slovenia has to offer: The capital Ljubljana which looks impossible to pronounce, but actually comes out rather naturally in a native English accent is just a two-hour drive from Venice and about a four- to five-hour drive from Vienna, Budapest, and Split. It’s easy to sneak Slovenia into a Eurotrip itinerary and you should definitely do it — if for no other reason than the greenery and sidewalk cafes of Ljubljana or the breathtakingly blue waters and open skies of Lakes Bled and Bohinj. Everything about the place feels like the end of the Earth, an otherworldly, largely hermetic kingdom as far removed from America as one could imagine. Yet a casual stroll down the street punctuates this hazy dreamscape with the realization that while you recognize almost nothing from home, pretty much everyone around you is speaking English. They’re asking you for pens, demanding to know what’s up with the presidential election as if we have a clue , proudly showing you around their remote cliffside dwellings where they politely force you to drink yak butter tea , and just generally wanting to hang out. What Nepal has to offer: We ended up going to Nepal on a whim after we missed our flight to India , and it was the best decision we ever made. With towering mountains including Mount Everest — maybe you’ve heard of it? I was also pleasantly surprised how friendly most attitudes are towards Americans at least when we were there , as one night our pale gringo looks were all we needed to instantly ingratiate ourselves with beaming Kathmandu locals and earn a round of free drinks in the process. We felt like kings looking out at an entire bar smiling at us, and pretty much all they wanted to do was talk to us and find out more about America and yes, what Tom Cruise is like. But scratch beneath the surface and you’ll find friendly, curious people who just want to know a little more about you. And, especially when it’s all being done in English, what more can a traveler ask for? Restaurant staffs, shopkeepers, random folks on the street — everyone’s eager to chat with Americans, a novelty to most, since we haven’t been able to visit in over 50 years. Use your street smarts and beware of hustlers, though. Everyone is friendly, but some are working an angle to get you to a music performance or into one of those sweet old cars driving along the Malecon. Don’t be scared — you’re safe. Just don’t believe every guy who tells you the Buena Vista Social Club is playing on a Monday night. BVSC retired a few years ago. Some of the members have passed away. They are not playing tonight, or any other night this week. What Cuba has to offer: Food, dancing, rum, cigars, and yes, those pre-1960-embargo American classic cars. They’re a cliché by now but, truly, they are freakin’ amazing, and as taxis not a bad deal when you want to get around Havana. Don’t believe what anyone may tell you about the food being bland. It is perfectly seasoned and a dream come true if you love rice, beans, and piles of meat. Avoid the hotels and government-run restaurants in favor of paladores privately run restaurants, usually in someone’s home or what used to be their home for the best food in all of Havana. The three-flight walk up to the rooftop bar will give you an inside look at local and expat life in this city. When in doubt, write it out. All you need to get around is to show people your destination in Romanized writing or in kanji. Most taxis have GPS and if you give them the address or show them the Japanese address on your phone, they’ll get you there. Most places these days have English menus on hand, with pictures galore. At every turn, you’ll find Japanese people who feel apologetic for not being able to speak better English, and who go the extra kilometric mile to help you out. English signage now abounds on the streets of Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto, and in train stations everywhere. If you need help, ask the station master or policemen stationed at huts in front of every station and they’ll happily guide you, sometimes even accompany you. I recently had an Osaka train station employee walk me from the station exit to the gym I was looking for after he decided my Kanto Japanese was the equivalent of not really understanding Japanese. Osaka and Tokyo have different dialects. What Japan has to offer: is like stepping into a neatly made time machine. You can jump to the future in the robot restaurant, or explore the past in the beautiful temples of Kyoto or the Art Deco mansions of the imperial family at Tokyo’s. Gaze upon of neon from 52 floors up in the observatory of the Mori Art Museum or lose yourself in the mystical inner gardens of Meiji Jingu shrine. The really classy ones have rental costumes — from both the ancient past and the future. Armenians get languages: The country enjoys a 98% literacy rate, and most Armenians under 30 speak English with flair — often with a British accent many attend schools there and it percolates. Although Americans rarely visit Armenia, Europeans do, so instead of translating a dozen languages for them, road signage, menus, and venues are also in English. Chances are high you’ll meet someone who knows where you’re from they all have relatives living in the States , and you probably already know someone with Armenian roots. Eighty percent of Armenian surnames end in either -ian or -yan — think Washingtonian, Smithsonian, or OK, sure, Kardashian. What Armenia has to offer: Picture ancient Europe but cooler and way cheaper. This Connecticut-sized country has thousands of mind-boggling monasteries and churches, several of which are uncrowded. High living is low-cost; you can go to a for the price of a movie ticket, while cabs, cafés, wine, beer, and groceries are enjoyed at 1960s US prices. It’s also on the legendary Silk Road, with one still-standing Armenian motel, Orbelian’s Caravanserai, built in 1331, where road-warrior merchants and their caravan-pulling animals rocked medieval happy hours, and so should you. Hindi and English are both official languages, and you’re likely to hear the latter spoken fluently everywhere — and truth be told, it does sound amazing in a charmed lilting accent. You’ll have very little trouble communicating with locals, especially in big cities. Even in backwoods villages, you may be surprised — for example, gassing up your motorbike at some highway stop and asking the station attendant for directions. He’ll give you in-depth instructions, from all the turns right down to the number of kilometers. What India has to offer: India’s diversity doesn’t stop at its rambling list of dialects and languages. Every region has its own unique landscape, cuisine, and pastiche of social, cultural, and religious norms. Goa’s famous for its gorgeous beaches and spicy dishes from Portuguese influence. Ladakh has its mesmerizing rocky outcrops, fresh mountain air, and spiritual vibes. Kerala’s covered in dreamy backwaters and churches — Syrian Christians settled here thousands of years ago. Seriously, no wonder Indians spend so much time being tourists within their own country. There’s a lot to explore. That’s right, amigos, they didn’t used to call it British Honduras for nothing. The national language of the dreamy Caribbean snorkeling mecca in the northeastern corner of the subcontinent is actually English, and most everybody there speaks it. That includes a sundry amalgam of Spaniards, Mayans, Garifunas, and even Mennonites. And while many of them also speak an English-based Creole, that’s pretty comprehensible, too. With Australia’s Great Barrier Reef hanging on to life by a thread, Belize’s reef system off Ambergris Caye is now part of the world’s largest, with all the toothy sharks, kitchen table-sized manta rays, and coiling octopuses that come with it. Inland, you can’t toss a tamale without hitting a Mayan temple, and the southeast coast down in Hopkins is ideal for kicking back with a rum punch and taking drum lessons from a Garifuna man whose ancestors’ slave ship sank near St. Oh, and fresh conch and lobster! And swimming with whale sharks! The national language is still Urdu and its many dialects — but the official language in Pakistan is English, meaning that government correspondence is increasingly done through English. Pakistan has a small but growing expat community — mostly Brits, a handful of Americans. They live mainly in Islamabad, the federal capital, but you can find native English speakers in Lahore and even a few in Karachi. Most Urdu-speaking Pakistanis know their way around English, but learning some basic Urdu may help you save money and earn respect in a culture that deeply values its heritage. What Pakistan has to offer: For Westerners looking for a relatively open, liberal environment, start in Karachi, the coastal cosmopolitan megalopolis. But if you’re inclined toward natural beauty, exceptional , and adventure, there is no better trip than to go from Islamabad to Gilgit or Skardu via the Karakoram Highway — one of the world’s highest paved international roads, 15,000ft high and aimed straight at China. Trekkers and climbers who catch a wild hair and want the road trip of a lifetime, find a driver or a guide who speaks English but is a native Urdu speaker, as navigating can be tricky, especially through the many security checkpoints. The accents can be thick, but everyone is pretty easy to understand and happy to chat with you, especially if you want to talk soccer: Singaporeans are huge English Premiere League fans. Pick your bar wisely as you may get a whole crowd of Manchester United red fans who do not appreciate your Chelsea blue walking into their pub. Nowhere else in the world, outside of England, can you get this kind of footie experience. What Singapore has to offer:. Lots and lots of food. Hotels and booze and aren’t cheap, but Singaporeans know how to eat, eat well, and eat for less than you ever thought possible. Head to East Coast Park or any of the hawker centers to taste your way around Asia. Little India is one of the best places to grab Indian and, oddly enough, Turkish food. Visit a Buddhist temple, pick up flowers outside of a Hindi temple, or simply watch the cargo ships float by while you soak up life in one of the financial capitals of Asia, likely while snacking. Today, all official documentation, signs, and even newspapers are available in English, and nine out of 10 Maltese speak the language. This approach to internationalization led to the establishment of English language centers in Malta, attracting many foreigners to the island to study. It’s the most English you’re going to get between mainland Europe and Africa. What Malta’s got to offer: Before the British got there, Malta had a succession of imposing rulers dating back thousands of years. For you, now, that means Malta’s a trove of world history, littered with Greek, Persian, and Roman architecture. Visitors compare the capital, Valletta, home to Baroque cathedrals and art, to an open-air museum. Also look for religious festivals throughout the year with brass bands and fireworks and an abundance of rich Mediterranean food. And between Sicily and Libya: sun, sun, and more sun.

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idli street Tirupati-Now in Tirupati – idli street – Medium

idli street Tirupati-Now Open idli street 28 South Indian Restaurant in Prakasam Road, Balaji colony, Tirupati
About us
Traditional South Indian Treat
www.idlistreet.com Idli street now offering Traditional South Indian delicacies now in Tirupati at Vijayavani Towers, Prakasam Road.
Welcome to Idli Street, a Traditional South Indian Food Now in Tirupati . At Idli Street, We endeavor to cater a distinctive menu to food conscious customers and outshine the magnificence of traditional south Indian cuisine. Glorifying the importance, vitality and overall richness of nutritional value hidden in south Indian cuisine, fueled up by the authentic new recipes artfully originated by our chefs,
www.idlistreet.com We aim to cater people irrespective of their age, ethnicity, region or religion.Giving south Indian food a Traditional new taste and showing it to the world in a new light is our primary motive.
Idli street is established to give a new colour and glamour to the south Indian cuisine (breakfast).
Idli Street’s menu presents various types of idli, dosa and many other mouth melting South Indian delicacies which can be consumed at any meal of the day, either for breakfast and brunch or for lunch and evening snacks.
Each recipe has its own delicacy, deliciousness, Richness with untamed nutritional value that nourishes the body and soul with substantial energy to work effortlessly and efficiently to carry out your work throughout the day.
Our Menu Includes:
Any time Breakfast Mid day Meals ( Lunch Varieties) Mouth melting Chinese Cuisine Evening Special Menu ( Veg and Non Veg) Mocktails Kids Specials Traditional Veg and Non veg Delicacies.
we believe in
“ Eat Healthy and Live Strong”
For more info visit us at www.idlistreet.com
call us on 8143650999 for a franchise
Reach us at info@idlistreet.com
A brand of JFC Food Consulting LLP

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This year Edesia gets ‘Too Indian’ for Navratri

This year Edesia gets ‘Too Indian’ for Navratri 01/04/2019
Remember your childhood days when you used to binge on to mom made Navratri special food irrespective of the fact that you are fasting or not? Well, food has a special power to transport to you to a specific place, time or memory. Keeping this in mind, chefs at Crowne Plaza Today New Delhi Okhla are celebrating ‘Too Indian Navratri’.Delve into the authentic feast as Edesia; multi cuisine restaurant at the hotel is serving lip smacking satvik flavours this that reminds you of your mom’s kitchen.
Relish the classic fare which includes Khatta Meetha Kaddu, Samak Ke Chawal ,Sabudana Khichdi, aloo raita, plain curd, kuttu ki Puri, Sabudana papad, singhare halwa, Sabudana kheer, fresh cut fruits, and sweet/salted lassi, Shakarkandi ki chat, Paneer pakoda and Aloo ki Tikki ,Ram laddo, vrat special salad available both in a Thali and ala carte.
What: Too Indian Navratri
Where: Edesia at Crowne Plaza Today New Delhi Okhla
When: 6th April to 14th April 2019
Price: 999 INR plus taxes (per person Related Posts Team Crowne Plaza Pune switches off for earth hour Dine for a whiskey-inspired dinner with Salt Water Cafe A Fine French Dining Experience by Chef Roxanne at ALBA

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Insurgents at Burger Rebellion ready to fry, fry again

Insurgents at Burger Rebellion ready to fry, fry again Posted Four of the five business partners behind Burger Rebellion stand outside their soon-to-open Corunna location. From left are: Chad Ouellette (holding Koah Ouellette, 2), Dan Slade, Nathan Colquhoun and Robb Armstrong. Missing is Chris Lewis. Cathy Dobson
Cathy Dobson
The local restaurant industry is experiencing a flurry of moves and expansions this spring.
Just a year ago Burger Rebellion began serving upscale pub fare at the Refined Fool brewery on London Road. Now, says owner Chris Lewis, those burgers will soon be available at two more locations, one in downtown Sarnia, the other in Corunna.
“It’s part of my job to grow the company,” Lewis said. “We knew we wanted to stay in Lambton County and began looking for space that would be good for us.”
When the Corunna Restaurant at 391 Lyndoch St. closed in February, Burger Rebellion found its next location. George and Helene Tsaprailis had operated a successful business there for 46 years before retiring, proving the location works with the right product and work ethic.
Lewis oversees day-to-day operations for Burger Rebellion, with partners Nathan Colquhoun, Dan Slade, Robb Armstrong and Chad Ouellette.
The five local men started the business in a seasonal food truck parked at Front and Davis streets. None has a food and beverage background – Lewis has a religious studies degree and a Masters in international development – but diners responded to their everything-fresh-and-made-from-scratch approach.
“At London Road, we’ve figured out what we didn’t know and ironed out the kinks,” said Lewis. “We learned a lot of lessons this year about staffing numbers, inventory control and making sure you have enough food prepped.”
When the Corunna location opens, likely in late April, the brand will have its first stand-alone restaurant with some significant menu tweaks.
For instance, the Corunna Burger Rebellion will serve breakfast, offer a banquet hall for 40, and sell conventional beer brands in addition to Refined Fool craft beer. The core menu of burgers and fries will be augmented with salads and nachos.
The restaurant is getting a facelift with fresh paint, modern fixtures, lots of shiny steel and new flooring. It will have seating for 120 people and employ about 15.
Shortly after, in early May, Lewis expects Burger Rebellion’s third location to open. It will occupy the former Republik Eatery at 211 Christina Street N. The building fronts both Christina and Front streets with a kitchen in the centre and a patio on Christina.
The downtown Burger Rebellion will open up simultaneously with the new location for Café Mexico, another restaurant Lewis owns with Colquhoun, Slade and other investors.
Café Mexico opened at 410 Front St., across from Centennial Park, in November of 2017. It’s doing well, says Colquhoun, but the partners feel it’s just outside what most Sarnians consider the downtown.
“We need to be closer to downtown and all that’s happening there,” he said. “Business was great in the summer but slowed a little in winter.”
Mexico will share the former Republik building with Burger Rebellion but face Front Street. The two establishments will share one kitchen but have distinctly different styles, separate dining rooms and bars.
Mexico’s offerings will expand, said Colquhoun.
“We’ve been restricted by the size of our kitchen and bar at our current location and want to have a bigger cocktail, drink and food menu.”
Meanwhile, Indian fare joined the downtown’s restaurant options a month ago.
Sitara Indian Cuisine, which has operated at 1308 London Rd. the past seven years, now has a second location called Sitara Downtown, at 138 Cromwell St.
Owner Manjit Singh says he has seating for 20 as well as a busy takeout service, that’s ready in five to 10 minutes and caters to the office crowd.
Sitara Downtown is open 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Monday to Thursday; 11 a.m.- 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays.
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Tea, chillies and takeaway: what food choices reveal about British Muslim identity

Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons licence. Tastes change over generations. Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock Messenger
Food. We all need it and we all eat it. But what does it tell us about who we are? This was one of many questions I explored in recent research focused on the evolution of Muslim identity in the West.
Given that most British Muslims today are either migrants or the children of migrants , I wanted to understand how their identity changes, not just as it moves across continents, but also as it passes along generations. And so, along with other markers of cultural identity such as language and dress, I examined the types of food eaten by hundreds of respondents over 18 months of fieldwork conducted across the UK and Europe.
Take tea. It’s a straightforward beverage that’s ubiquitous in everyday British life. Yet how it’s brewed matters. South Asian culture, which encompasses around two-thirds of the British Muslim population , frequently distinguishes between “Desi chai/tea” and “English tea”. Fancy a cuppa? Wayne Dsouza/Shutterstock
Desi chai refers to equal amounts of milk and water boiled on a stove together with a teabag and sometimes flavoured with spices such as cinnamon, cardamom or ginger, whereas English tea refers to boiling water from a kettle poured onto a teabag usually with a splash of milk. First-generation South Asian migrants almost exclusively sip the former and, based on my research, often look askance at the latter. On one occasion, for example, I heard an elderly British Pakistani haughtily dismiss English tea as no more than “weak, flavoured water”.
Their offspring, on the other hand, often drink both English as well as Desi chai (or, as it’s sometimes called, “masala tea”) indicating the emergence of an ambidextrous cultural identity informed by ethnic roots as well as social context.
Let’s take another example. The Naga pepper, cultivated in Bangladesh, is one of the hottest chillies in the world. Imran*, a young British-born Bangladeshi I interviewed, told me how a “chilli-eating competition” of sorts developed when an uncle visited his London home from Bangladesh. Both he and his father, who’d been resident in the UK for over two decades, felt obliged to participate in a display of bravado.
After two bites, Imran rushed from the room gulping copious amounts of milk to soothe his burning tongue. While his dad continued stoically on, tears streaming down his face, it was his Bangladeshi uncle who won the day. The implication in Imran’s story was that his family’s time in England had diminished their capacity to enjoy hot chillies – an important emblem of Bangladeshi culture. When visiting Bangladesh later that year, Imran recounted that the ladies of the village had mockingly called out: “As you’re from London, we’ll have to cook without chillies or you’ll start crying!” Too hot to handle. Julie Clopper/Shutterstock.com The sociology of the palate
In 1979, the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu famously argued that dominant social groups bolster their “cultural capital” by defining their tastes in opposition to the perceived uncouthness of the hoi polloi. In other words, Bourdieu argued that snobbery is socially constructed.
In my own analysis, I’ve introduced a new twist on his use of the word “taste” by defining it literally – with reference to the flavours felt in the mouth. Just as people’s aesthetic or artistic preferences are determined in no small measure by social factors, so too are the proclivities of their gustatory glands. In other words, socialisation has a physiological dimension. I call this the sociology of the palate.
During my research, it quickly became possible to distinguish between the tastes of first-generation migrants and their British-born offspring. So pronounced did this difference become, I named it the distinction between the “old guard” and the “avant-garde”. To illustrate with a generalisation: the old guard, I found, prefer oily curries and chapattis, while the avant-garde have a penchant for takeaways or other quick and easy foods such as noodles. On one occasion, I recall observing a group of young Muslims gaze in bewilderment at an elderly Indian “uncle” as he tore up a slice of pizza and dipped the pieces in his lamb karahi like naan bread. Food and shifting identities
Food, as the researchers Atsuko Ichijo and Ronald Ranta point out in a fascinating recent study , is also a symbol of national identity. Haggis, for example, often conjures images of kilts and tartan while hummus evokes Middle Eastern exoticism. Yet in 2001, the former British foreign secretary, Robin Cook, claimed that chicken tikka masala is not just the most popular but also “now a true British national dish” – winning its place alongside older classics such as bangers and mash, Yorkshire pudding or fish and chips. This tells us that even national identity, far from being static and inflexible, is a moveable feast. Human palates – and the identities they signify – evolve, chameleon-like, to reflect changing social and cultural conditions often brought into sharp relief by migration.
Let’s return to Imran, the young British-born Muslim of Bangladeshi origin. Growing up, he told me he despised the overpowering smell of shutki in his home – a type of dried fish popular in Bangladeshi cuisine. But several events in his teenage years triggered an introspective journey in which he reassessed his relationship with both his faith and ethnic culture. To the delight of family elders, he began during this period not only to pray regularly but also to eat shutki . For Imran, this was a conscious choice to signal a reaffirmation of his Bangladeshi Muslim heritage. Dried fish: sparking a journey of introspection. Leonardo Martin/Shutterstock
Muaaz, another British-born Muslim of Bangladeshi ancestry I interviewed, had a different relationship with food. During the course of a religious retreat I undertook with him, he served an Italian bolognese proudly declaring he’d cooked it without using a single Asian spice. For Muaaz, unlike Imran, this was a conscious choice to signal a shift from an old continent to a new one. Both Imran and Muaaz are committed Muslims, but the practice of their faith went hand-in-hand with different forms of cultural expression.
The type of food dished up on a plate can tell us more than just the culinary preferences of the diner then. It can offer a window into human identity. And as the type of food on the plate changes – both as it shifts across continents and moves along generations – it’s a reminder that identity is never fixed, but subject to the constant pushes and tugs exerted by the forces of society and culture.
* Names have been changed to protect the anonymity of the interviewees.

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HOT NEW TABLES April 2019: New Restaurants In Hong Kong

HOT NEW TABLES April 2019: New Restaurants In Hong Kong 1 April, 2019 Eat & Drink HOT NEW TABLES April 2019: New Restaurants In Hong Kong From Wagyu tsukemen and modern Cantonese snacks, to high-end omakase, here’s where we’re eating this month.
Because Hong Kong’s dining scene is ever changing, we want to give you a heads up about all of the latest restaurants that have opened in our city this month . There’s a real global mix of cuisines, with Japanese, Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese and Indian all featuring, along with some good old-fashioned steaks. If you aren’t already hungry, you will be by the time you finish reading this post.
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Known for its Michelin Star in LA, Sushi Zo is often rated as the best omakase dining experience in Bangkok, New York City and Tokyo , and is coming to Hong Kong’s Tai Kwun this spring. This Japanese concept promises to bring a high-end omakase experience to the city . With just two reservation-only sittings per day for a maximum of 14 people ( at 6pm to 7:45pm and 8pm to 9:45pm, daily ), the 18-dish menu will be priced at $2,500 per person. Offering diners an extremely theatrical and personalised experience , all dishes will be prepared and served directly in front of guests at a stylish sushi bar. The medley of ever-changing dishes will be based around the freshest fish and ingredients, flown in daily from Japan .
Sushi Zo , 01-LG103, LG1/F, Block 01, Tai Kwun, 10 Hollywood Road, Central, Hong Kong
Opened at the end of March, Mashi No Mashi is the latest restaurant to open from the team behind the renowned Wagyumafia . Serving up dishes that are a little more budget friendly compared to its sister resto, Mashi No Mashi will specialise in Tsukemen ( dipping noodles ). Diners can expect to feast on the likes of Wagyu tsukemen, Wagyu gyozas and Wagyu Donburi – and with David Beckham already having tried the restaurant for himself, we’re sure it’s going to be hugely popular with ramen lovers across the city. Mashi No Mashi is open now every Tuesday to Sunday from 6pm until it’s all out of ramen and gyoza!
Mashi No Mashi , Shop 1B, G/f, Guardian House, 32 Oi Kwan Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong, www.facebook.com/Mashi-No-Mashi
Previously known as Hullett House, the now renamed House 1881 has just unveiled five new dining concepts . Serving up everything from Cantonese fine-dining, to steaks, afternoon tea and craft beer and cocktails, the new restaurants and bars have something to offer everyone in the heart of Tsim Sha Tsui .
Fortune Villa will be serving authentic dim sum crafted from traditional recipes and locally-sourced ingredients, including signature items such as Baked Abalone Puff with Diced Chicken and Steamed Bean Curd Rolls with Duck Web.
Originally the property’s horse stables, Stable Steak House will offer guests a selection of steaks from around the world , including premium A5 Wagyu beef from Japan and other signature dishes, including beef consommé and lobster bisque.
Located above Stable Steak House, Stable Bar will serve a comprehensive menu of artisanal cocktails, spirits and wines . The bar also boasts the largest gin collection in Kowloon, with 102 types of gin from around the world.
Situated in the main heritage building, Café Parlour is where to head for afternoon tea . The all-day eatery will serve a signature afternoon tea set, homemade cakes and pastries, light snacks and Indian fare.
Lastly, The Sergeant’s Bar ( formerly a watering hole for police officers and visiting sailors ) is set to be a laid back drinking destination, serving craft beers, themed cocktails and bar snacks .
House 1881 , 2A Canton Rd, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong, www.1881heritage.com
If you’re looking for a new spot away from the hustle and bustle of the city, and where your furry friends are very welcome, head to newly opened Mint & Basil in Tung Chung. The menu consists of MSG-free Thai and Vietnamese classics , curated by Thai Executive Chef Saksit and includes favourites such as Tom Yum Soup, Pad Thai, Char-grilled Minced Beef in Betel Leaf and Lamb Shank Curry – not forgetting the obligatory dessert of Mango Sticky Rice. Perfect for enjoying al fresco, the restaurant features a spacious outfoor dining area, complete with waving palm trees .
Mint & Basil , Shop K, G/F, Seaview Crescent, 8 Tung Chung Waterfront Road, Tung Chung, Hong Kong, www.facebook.com/mintandbasiltungchung
New to the Central area comes Lee Ho Sing, a modern Cantonese takeaway and snacks eatery . Translated directly to mean “You’re So Smart”, the new restaurant draws inspiration from Hong Kong’s unique cosmopolitan culture to reinvent traditional street food . Menu items include Signature Salted Egg Yolk Chicken Nuggets ( $38 ), Truffle Cheese Chicken Wings ( $38 ), Homemade Curry Bowl ( $33 ), along with specialty drinks such as the Red Bean Ice Cream Float ( $28 ) and Grass Jelly Coconut Milk Drink ( $28 ). Sure to be a hit with those who live or work in Central, a quick, affordable lunch can be found at Lee Ho Sing, with the 63° Egg Flat Noodles with X.O. Sauce, a snack and a drink costing just $55 . The interior design is also set to draw in crowds, complete with artistic designs murals and numerous “Insta-worthy” spots, including Lee Ho Sing’s lion mascot.
Lee Ho Sing , Shop 2, 2/F, 8 Lyndhurst Terrace, Central, Hong Kong, www.facebook.com/LEEHoSingbyZS
Soon to open on Elgin Street, Cardamon Street will be bringing its own unique take on Indian cuisine to Hong Kong. Infusing international favourites such as tacos and burgers with modern Indian flavours, diners can expect to tuck into dishes like Chicken Tikka Sliders, Lamb Keema Tacos, Paneer Croquettes and many other innovative dishes when it opens its doors mid-month.
Cardamon Street , G/F, 38 Elgin Street, Central, Hong Kong
Although not opening its doors until June, we hear that Louise will be taking over the space currently occupied by Aberdeen Street Social . Partnering with Hong Kong restaurant group JIA, Louise is a collaborative effort by Michelin-starred French chef Julien Royer and Odette restaurant (which recently took the top spot on Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants list) . Further details about the menu and concept are yet to be announced, but Aberdeen Street Social will be closing its doors on Monday, 1 April for renovations to begin.
Louise , PMQ, 35 Aberdeen Street, Central, Hong Kong
This huge 8,000 square foot restaurant, designed to resemble a Chinese garden, has just opened up in the striking Xiqu Centre in West Kowloon. The food is overseen by executive chef Hui Mei Tak, who has spent over 30 years perfecting his craft. The classics on the menu, which include Sweet and Sour Pork with Pineapple ($128) don’t disappoint, but it’s the roasted meats that stand out . Don’t miss the Signature Peking Duck ($380 for half or $680 for whole), which is carved tableside. We hear that the crispy skin is cooked to perfection and the meat is perfectly moist. The menu also features Fried Rice with Minced Beef, Spring Onion and Garlic ($148 ), along with Mozzarella and Creamy Egg Custard Buns ( $48 ), so make sure to go hungry!
Moon Lok Chinese Restaurant , 1/F, Xiqu Centre, 88 Austin Road West, West Kowloon Cultural District, Kowloon, Hong Kong, www.buick-hk.com
Featured image courtesy of Mashi No Mashi via Facebook , image 1 courtesy of Sushi Zo, image 2 courtesy of Mashi No Mashi via Facebook , image 3 courtesy of House 1881 , image 4 courtesy of Mint & Basil , image 5 courtesy of Lee Ho Sing , image 6 courtesy of Cardamon Street, image 7 courtesy of JIA Group, image 8 courtesy of Moon Lok Chinese Restaurant About the author Annie Simpson A born and bred Brit with a constant sense of wanderlust (and an insatiable appetite to match!), Annie will travel…
A born and bred Brit with a constant sense of wanderlust (and an insatiable appetite to match!), Annie will travel far and wide for a good meal. Heading up the Eat & Drink and What’s On sections at Sassy Hong Kong, Annie can usually be found hunting down the newest restaurants and bars in the city, sipping on a beer at the beach, or cooking up a storm in her tiny kitchen.

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