Where no one goes hungry

Where no one goes hungry

Published February 16, 2019 by SoClaimon
ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation Pailin Siam at Waan Phor Dee The dining zone Alangkarn at Iconsiam offers a diversity of culinary journeys to meet different taste preferences. Green Mango Salad with Raw Black Crab at Lay Lao Dim Sum Basket at Grand Palace Where no one goes hungry tasty February 16, 2019 01:00 By Khetsirin Pholdhampalit The Nation Weekend Packed with temptation, Iconsiam’s restaurant zone Alangkarn quite literally spoils diners for choice
ALANGKARN – means “splendour” – is a new dining zone in the Iconsiam mega-mall offering diverse cuisine including Thai, Chinese, Japanese, Indian and French at more than 30 restaurants and cafes spread across the sixth floor.
The interior design is based on the concept of Thai rice, considered the heart of Thai food. The focal point is a tall waterfall playing with a kaleidoscope of lights. Rice paddies and rice barns as well as trees and water plants lend natural accents.
The dining zone Alangkarn at Iconsiam offers a diversity of culinary journeys to meet different taste preferences.
When it comes to spicy and tasty Isaan classics and fresh seafood, look no further than Lay Lao, whose first outlet on Soi Ari has been awarded the Michelin Guide Bangkok’s Bib Gourmand, representing value-for-money, for two consecutive years.
Hailing from the seaside getaway of Hua Hin, owner Panawat Chinwit knows how to find the best seafood around his hometown. Shrimp, squid and sea bass are freshly delivered from Hua Hin and Pranburi, while blue crab comes mainly from Surat Thani.
Lay Lao offers pungent taste of Isaan-style dishes with fresh seafood.
“My family loves cooking food with a pungent kick,” Panawat says. “People loved our family recipes and they urged us to open an eatery in Bangkok. We cook and serve it exactly the same way we do at home. The Ari outlet is four years old and has continuously received positive feedback, so now we’re ready to open a second branch at the mall.”
Panawat and his team personally buy vegetables and fruit at Bangkok’s Talad Thai market, rather than relying on food suppliers, to make sure they get the freshest produce.
“Many of our dishes are seasoned with aromatic palm sugar from Phetchaburi, which gives a pleasantly well-balanced flavour because it’s traditionally charcoal-simmered. We have to order a year in advance because they only produce a small quantity. The crab comes from a ‘crab bank’ project in Pranburi initiated by His Majesty the late King Bhumibol as a sustainable fishery.”
The menu at the 55-seat eatery offers 200-plus items, some exclusive to Iconsiam. A gluten-free selection is also available.
Deep-fried Squid
Deep-fried Squid with Secret Sauce (Bt265-Bt525) involves critters caught at sea and kept free of the oxidising bleach sometimes used to make it look fresh.
“We fry the squid stuffed with squid roe once and then again with sweet-and-sour sauce seasoned with palm sugar and lemon juice,” says Panawat. “It’s served with spicy seafood sauce that’s made fresh every day.”
Green Mango Salad with Raw Black Crab
The irresistible Green Mango Salad with Raw Black Crab (Bt480) features shredded, raw and tangy nam dok mai mango cooked with raw black crab and its roe from Surat Thani. It’s seasoned with fresh-squeezed lemon juice and palm sugar and fired up with chillies.
Sweet Corn Salad with Grilled River Prawn
Sweet Corn Salad with Grilled River Prawn (Bt550) is a large prawn perfectly grilled over smokeless charcoal to retain its juiciness and tenderness. It comes with spicy corn salad mixed with green apple, tomato and avocado.
Gaeng Som Prik Sod
A Hua Hin dish, Gaeng Som Prik Sod (Spicy and Sour Soup with Fresh Chilli, Bt235) cooked with sea bass and holy basil leaves has just the right combination of sweet, sour and spicy flavours. The chilli paste is seasoned with shrimp paste and palm sugar and the tartness comes from tamarind and lemon juice.
The resulting flavour is somewhere between gaeng run juan (hot and spicy soup seasoned with shrimp paste) and tom som (sweet-and-sour tamarind soup).
The famed Chinese restaurant Grand Palace brings its Cantonese feasts to the posh mall.
Lovers of Cantonese food will be pleased to find a third outlet of Grand Palace, one of Bangkok’s famed Chinese restaurants. The 33-year-old original on Mahesak Road is renowned for its dim sum and Peking duck.
Dim Sum Basket
At Iconsiam there’s a wonderful variety in the Dim Sum Basket (Bt235) – five mouth-watering choices. You get har gau (shrimp dumpling), steamed sumai with shrimp and crabmeat, fried dumpling stuffed with minced pork and shrimp and a rainbow bun with alternating layers of cream custard and salted egg cream.
Peking Duck
Ideal for both the solo diner and couples is the small size of Peking Duck (Bt450). The crispy skin is cut into seven pieces and served with steamed pancakes and sticks of cucumber and spring onion. Varying from the usual sweet bean sauce condiment, Grand Palace opts for black sweet soy sauce.
Steamed Rice with Crabmeat in Curry Powder
Hungry diners should try the Steamed Rice with Crabmeat in Curry Powder (Bt270). It’ a large bowl of rice topped with well-seasoned crabmeat and more steamed crabmeat on top of that.
Thai dessert cafes are gaining popularity against Western and Japanese-style treats. The compact Waan Phor Dee, which literally means “properly sweet”, is one such choice offering a range of traditional Thai desserts with exquisite preparation and authentic taste.
The small cafe Waan Phor Dee offers a range of Thai traditional desserts.
Nuttinee Wongchalermtarn and her partner opened the first Waan Phor Dee in Chiang Mai and it quickly became so successful that they were invited to open another at Iconsiam.
So far there are 10 tasty items on the menu at prices Bt30 to Bt40 higher than what you pay in Chiang Mai.
Pailin Siam
“The recipes are based on centuries of collective wisdom,” says Nuttinee. “It’s a risky business because of the very short shelf-life of Thai sweets – because coconut cream and coconut flesh do not keep – and the attention to detail in preparation, but we want to serve Thai desserts like Grandma used to make.”
Pailin Siam (Bt85) has small water-chestnut “jewels” coated with tapioca flour in the appealing shade of blue sapphire, sitting in flavoured coconut milk with colourful, sweet, thin noodles and topped with frozen coconut cream.
Khao Fang Piak Lamyai
Served warm is Khao Fang Piak Lamyai (Bt85). Millet seeds from Chiang Mai are boiled in water flavoured with pandan leaves and seasoned with sugar, salt and longan flesh and juice.
A separate shot of coconut milk is presented for customers to adjust the flavour, and a skewer of cubed coconut flesh makes a chewy side snack.
Puak Chuem
Puak Chuem (Taro in Syrup), Guay Chuem (Candied Banana Topped With Coconut Milk), Sago Piak Lamyai (Sago and Longan with Flavoured Coconut Milk) and Krong Krang (Caramelised Crisps in Coconut Milk) go for Bt85 a pop, while Khao Niew Mamuang (Mango with Sticky Rice) costs Bt250.
MORNING TO EVENING
Alangkarn is at Iconsiam on the Thon Buri side of Bangkok and open daily from 10 to 10.
Visit http://www.IconSiam.com .
Learn more about Lay Lao, Grand Palace and Waan Phor Dee on their Facebook pages sharing their names. Advertisements

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7 healthy cooking oils for Indian food – Best Products s of India

7 healthy cooking oils for Indian food Shivani Srivastava Different cooking oils have different properties. The best is the one, which can provide a rich taste with zero trans fat and cholesterol. So, incorporate healthy cooking oils in your diet today. | Updated: Feb 13, 2019, 16:45 IST Image source: pexels.com Indians have been using cooking oil in their kitchens since time immemorial and usage of some of the oils here are even region-specific- like coconut oil in Kerala and mustard oil in north India. But the decade of 80s bought with it a lot of health-conscious practices while cooking and the scare of cholesterol and cardiovascular diseases. As a result, a lot of zero trans fat oils became popular overnight. Today, picking the right cooking oil for yourself can avoid a lot of health issues without compromising on the flavorful taste of rich Indian cuisines. Also, keep changing oil from time to time as it will provide different essential fatty acids to your body. Here are our top picks-

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February 14, 1912 – Arizona Joins the Union as the 48th State

February 14, 1912 – Arizona Joins the Union as the 48th State Posted on February 14,
Arizona is the sixth largest state in area and the 14th largest in population. It is one of the “Four Corners” states, having borders with New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, California, as well as one point in common with the southwestern corner of Colorado. Arizona’s border with Mexico is 389 miles long, along the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California.
Historically part of the territory of Alta California in New Spain, Arizona became part of independent Mexico in 1821. As part of the settlement of the Mexican–American War, Mexico ceded to the U.S. the northern 70% of modern-day Arizona above the Sonora border along the Gila River in the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. (The U.S. agreed to pay $15 million for more than a half-million square miles of Mexican territory.)
The southernmost portion of the modern-day state was acquired in 1853 through the Gadsden Purchase. Gadsden Purchase Area
In 1853, the entirety of present-day Arizona was part of the New Mexico Territory, which had been formed in 1850. But in 1863, Arizona was split off from the Territory of New Mexico to form the Arizona Territory. The Army built a series of forts to act as a buffer between Native Americans and settlers.
Fort Whipple served as the territory’s first capital. The capital was soon moved to Prescott and then, a couple of years after the end of the Civil War, to Tucson. In 1877, it returned to Prescott before moving to Phoenix in 1889.
An Arizona newspaper recounts that Arizona’s “road to statehood was long and agonizing. No other territory waited as long or fought as stubbornly as the pioneers of the Arizona Territory.”
In 1891, just 28 years after becoming a territory in 1863, the residents petitioned for statehood, without receiving satisfaction.
Nevertheless, thousands of Arizona men answered the call for a volunteer army in 1898 to fight in the nation’s first overseas war: the Spanish-American War. They became Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders. The Arizona troops were led by Prescott Capt. William “Bucky” O’Neill, who was killed and whose tombstone says it all: “Who would not die for a new star on the flag.” Colonel Roosevelt and his Rough Riders at the top of the hill which they captured, Battle of San Juan / by William Dinwiddie.LOC
Still, Congress denied the territory statehood.
In 1903, the chairman of the Senate Committee on Territories proposed combining Arizona with New Mexico and admitting the area as one state. They called it “jointure,” and while New Mexico liked the idea, Arizona didn’t, declaring in a petition: “We prefer to remain a territory indefinitely rather than lose our identity.”
Arizona started calling itself the “47th state” in anticipation of things turning around, and in 1910, Congress told the territory to write a constitution. Voters passed it on February 9, 1911 but President William Howard Taft vetoed it because of a provision including the recall of judges.
Arizona removed the recall of judges and went back to voters, who approved the sanitized constitution. It hoped to be admitted on February 12, the birthday of President Lincoln. But Taft didn’t sign off on statehood until February 14, 1912. Meanwhile, New Mexico, which didn’t tinker with Taft’s rules on a constitution, was admitted as the 47th state on Jan. 6, 1912, making Arizona the 48th.
After the Civil War, Texans brought large-scale ranching to southern Arizona. The era of large-scale mining in Arizona began in 1858 when Jacob Snively found gold in Gila City, east of Yuma. Gila City became the first of the region’s many boom towns. Mining for silver and copper came next.
As True West Magazine reports :
. . . the copper strikes really began in the mid 1800s. Still, it took the Southern Pacific Railroad’s arrival at Gila Bend in 1879 and the coming of electric power (thus, a need for copper wires) to lead to better copper-mining ventures. Even then, only roughly 1.7 million pounds of copper were hauled out a year from the 1880s till 1917. From World War I until the Great Depression, copper mining exploded . . . .”
The population didn’t explode much though until after the World War II, with the widespread availability of refrigeration and air conditioning.
The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of Arizona was 7,171,646 as of July 1, 2018. Of that number, 31.4% identify as Hispanic or Latino. Just 5% of the population is black.
About one-quarter of the state is made up of Indian reservations that serve as the home of 27 federally recognized Native American tribes, including the Navajo Nation, the largest in the state and the United States, with more than 300,000 citizens. Arizona has the greatest percentage of its acreage designated as Indian tribal land in the United States.
Navajo Indians from Arizona were enlisted to transmit secret communications for the U.S. Marines after the in 1941. Known as Navajo Code Talkers, they created an oral code the enemy was unable to decipher, fulfilling a crucial role during World War II and saving countless lives.
One of Arizona’s greatest challenges is the state’s water supply. It has a desert climate, and depends on water from four sources: Colorado River water, surface water other than Colorado River water, groundwater and effluent. Colorado River water, shared by Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming and Mexico, is a constant source of political strife. When there is less water in the Colorado river reservoirs, Arizona and Nevada have to start cutting back on their take, pursuant to a deal made with California in 1968. The state closely monitors drought conditions and water supplies; you can see the stats here . Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the United States in terms of water capacity, is a lake on the Colorado River formed by the Hoover Dam. The reservoir serves water to the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada, providing sustenance to nearly 20 million people and large areas of farmland. The outlook as of early 2018 was “dismal.” You can see from the photo below the effects of drought plus increased demand. White areas show decline of water level in Lake Mead (Photo: Mark Henle/The Arizona Republic)
Arizona’s continued population growth puts an enormous stress on the state’s water supply. Arizona the second fastest-growing state in the U.S. in the 1990s (the fastest was Nevada). The state encourages water-saving initiatives, such as drinking beer made from recycled water . You can read an update on the legal struggles over the water supply here .
As of the Census Bureau’s 2017 population estimates, Metro Phoenix had 4,737,270 residents, making it the 11th largest Metropolitan Area in the nation by population. Metropolitan Phoenix and metropolitan Tucson (close to 1 million) are home to most of Arizona’s people.
Southern Arizona is known for its desert climate, with very hot summers and mild winters. Nevertheless, you can find ski resorts in Arizona, even in Tucson. In addition to the Grand Canyon National Park, there are several national forests, national parks, and national monuments. (Arizona’s Grand Canyon is 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide, and one mile deep.)
Many people think of Mormons as living mainly in Utah, but as of 2010, the Association of Religion Data Archives reported that the three largest denominational groups in Arizona were the Catholic Church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and non-denominational Evangelical Protestants. In fact, the religious body with the largest number of congregations is The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
In Tucson, many people put Christmas lights on saguaro cacti (pronounced ‘sah-wah-roh’). Saguaros are found exclusively in the Sonoran Desert. [The Sonoran Desert straddles part of the United States-Mexico border and covers large parts of the U.S. states of Arizona and California and the northwest Mexican states of Sonora, Baja California, and Baja California Sur.]
Saguaros, the largest cacti in the United States, are very slow growing. A ten-year-old plant might only be 1.5 inches tall. Saguaro can grow to be between 40-60 feet tall. When rain is plentiful and the saguaro is fully hydrated it can weigh between 3200-4800 pounds.
This cactus is one of many desert cacti that put out both flowers and fruit; the saguaro flower is the state flower of Arizona. But the saguaro doesn’t produce its first flower until it is about 50 years old! The white blossoms open only at night, last less than 24 hours and are pollinated by moths and bats.
Another special biological phenomenon you can find in Arizona is the javelina. Javelina (the “j” is pronounced as an “h”), also known as collared peccary, are medium-sized animals that look similar to a wild boar. They have long, sharp canine teeth but they are vegetarians. Javelina mom & baby
There is great regional food in Arizona, especially in the south, where the Mexican and Native American populations influence the cuisine. In fact, Tucson has such great things to eat and drink that in 2015 it became the first city in the U.S. to be designated a UNESCO World City of Gastronomy. Prickly Pear Margarita

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The National Multicultural Festival is changing. Is it for the better?

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Hundreds of thousands of Canberrans will spend the weekend enjoying the National Multicultural Festival, mingling with family and friends and enjoying arguably the best international cuisine Canberra has to offer.
But as more and more commercial ventures move in to the jam-packed space in the city centre, are the organisers putting profits over purpose?
An estimated 200,000 people are expected to attend this year’s festival. Credit: Dion Georgopoulos
The purpose of what was once a grassroots festival made up of community cultural organisations has become a festival of things that don’t have much multicultural significance at all – like chips on a stick.
It has become fete-like, with general community organisations pitching their wares, crowding the space without adding anything multicultural to the mix. Advertisement
There were 339 stalls registered to be involved this year.
There were Tongans selling a traditional watermelon drink called Otai, and a Lebanese food stall selling Arayes, a bread stuffed with beef mince. An Indian meal of Chole Pulao, a chickpea curry served with fried onion flavoured rice and cucumber yoghurt raita, was also on offer, as was German kransky, Peruvian street food and Korean barbecue.
These are the types of stalls Canberrans and visitors to the capital want and expect at the National Multicultural Festival.
Throw in culturally relevant beer and some locally brewed drinks and the atmosphere is ripe for a good time.
You can almost enjoy having to push your way through hordes of people and stand in long queues to have the tried and true multicultural experience.
But the festival is changing. Commercial ventures that have little (if any) cultural significance seem to be more common. Whether or not it is a revenue-raising venture, it is potentially poisoning the feel of the festival Canberrans love and desire.
So should Canberrans fight to keep their multicultural festival cultural, or is it time to recognise that it is well past a multicultural festival, and call it something else instead?
There is at least one part of the festival that has the community, cultural and commercial mix spot on: the entertainment scene.
Groups from exotic countries and dance schools teaching international styles put on a spectacular show for the community.
This year there are 150 acts on six stages across the festival weekend, including showcases from the United States, India, China, Greece, Africa, the Pacific, Celtic culture, the Latin countries and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.
If you can find a space, grab a curry and a weissbier and sit down and enjoy the Chinese New Year showcase entertainment. That’s a real multicultural mix.

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Deep Space NYC

The tale of Deus Ex: Human Revolution was quite excellent in spite of beginning off kinda gradual. You play the part of protagonist Adam Jensen ex SWAT for the Detroit Police Division and now top rated security man for David Sarif of Sarif Industries. Sarif Industries is actually a mega company which creates and manufactures Augmentation prosthetics. Think of robotic cyber implants for that human physique and also you have Augmentations.
Early inside the video game Sarif Industries is attacked by a group of Black Ops mercenaries. Jensen is caught by shock and almost killed while attempting to guard lead Sarif scientist Megan Reed. Reed also takes place to be Jensen’s girlfriend. Sarif Industries saves Jensen from dying by totally Augmenting his entire body (with out his permission). Six months has prior and Jensen goes again to Sarif Industries in which he is on a quest for answers. Jensen travels around the globe in his quest taking him to Shanghai Wilson Ramos Rays Jersey , Montreal and in some cases Singapore. The story includes a deep undertone of moral questioning with regards to the use of Augmentations on both sides from the fence relating to people that has them and the kinds who do not.
The visual art style was genuinely extraordinary while walking close to cities. The CGI sequences exactly where graphically impressive at the same time. Each and every town you check out appears alive on countless levels. The neon symptoms, the people cigarette smoking and chatting. Deus Ex: Human Revolution features a deep enthralling atmosphere thanks to the visual and gameplay design and style. The sound layout was truly very good. The sci-fi themed orchestra tunes designed a drab dim cyber punk world where people with augmentations are in chaos. The audio design and voice over work was quite very good also. There’s a great deal voice dialog in this recreation that i heard precisely the same voices for different characters. The gameplay of Deus Ex: Human Revolution commences and stops with Jensen’s Augmentation tree. Let’s imagine you need to play Deus Ex as a shooter. You’d bring in XP points while hacking Steven Souza Rays Jersey , speaking and finishing tale missions like typical. If you earn enough XP it is possible to assign a Praxis Stage to particular augmentations like Jensen’s arms for shooting guns with far more intention and accuracy. In the event you instead sneak all around and hack computer systems you can find particular augmentations you can modify for the people gameplay elements as well.
No multiplayer for Deus Ex Human Revolution Review only simple player which lasted me 20 hours. This really is a terrific sport even with its glaring faults. Issue of reality its almost certainly the top sci-fi cyber punk themed game i played this complete generation. Deus Ex Human Revolution Review incorporates a genuinely thick atmosphere that a gamer can get misplaced in. I realize i did.
The peppercorn is really a fruit that has been used to flavour food items for centuries in Asia, the Middle East and Africa. This particular spice is recognized as one of the most important spices within Asia and it’s utilized for flavoring food. This seasoning pepper comes from peppercorns and it is available in 2 major kinds which are black and white. Black pepper is eaten by many people throughout the world and they utilize it to spice up their meals. White pepper can also be used to spice up different kinds of foods although it isn’t as powerful as black pepper.
Ancient folks who could afford peppercorn would trade this specific spice as a type of money and they would ingest it for medicinal purposes. Peppercorn is understood within the medical industry to fight germs and to enhance the digestive tract. Some medical research speculates that pepper has the capacity to fight colon cancer though the evidence for this claim cannot be tested. India is where you can peppercorn which is produced from the Piperaceae tree. Indian delicacies require black pepper within a lot of its recipes and the Chinese have been known to utilize this spice too.
Other types of foods including those located in Jamaica Dustin McGowan Rays Jersey , the U . S ., Egypt and Madagascar all add black pepper into their dishes. Chinese cuisine have meals including peppercorn chicken where black Adeiny Hechavarria Rays Jersey , white and red pepper is used in the dish as one of the main ingredients. Various other cultures including Mexico utilize black pepper as a part of their flavoring for tacos, burritos and some other Mexican dishes. People in america utilize black pepper to enhance chicken Corey Dickerson Rays Jersey , ground beef and many other sorts of meats and poultry including steaks as well as fish. Pepper is also applied to eggs and often those people inside the United States have at least one container of pepper on hand to deliver flavoring to food as needed.
Peppercorns not only comes in black and white forms there are also red-colored, pink coloured Matt Duffy Rays Jersey , green and orange varieties. Each one of these various kinds of peppercorns possess a different and unique taste. Pink coloured pepper has the taste of standard pepper when it first runs into a person’s taste buds but it eventually turns fairly sweet as it melts on their tongue. Green pepper has a more gentle flavour as compared to regular black pepper. Red peppercorn has a sweet and mellow flavor and don’t possess the spicy flavor as black pepper. Orange peppercorns has a taste similar to reddish peppercorn.
Chef’s from all over the world pay homage to pepper and they respect it as being the king of spices. Numerous great culinary chef’s figure out how to blend pepper with many other spices in order to enhance a food’s normal flavor. Chef’s who’re experienced with creating new dishes with peppercorn have been able to manufacture many of the most original mouth watering foods on the globe. Every serious chef knows that pepper is the most important spice at their dispo. Wholesale Cheap Jerseys Wholesale Jerseys Free Shipping Wholesale Jerseys Wholesale NBA MLB Jerseys From China Wholesale Retro Jerseys Wholesale Hockey Jerseys Wholesale Authentic Nike NFL Jerseys Wholesale Authentic College Jerseys Wholesale New NBA Jerseys

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Exotic/Disgusting Foods and Beverages Forum–A Few Wacky Drinks

This week’s post features a couple of mundane edibles used in odd ways, as weirdo beverages. Specifically, a beet juice energy drink and two kinds of “sipping vinegar.” The beet one is part of the Juice Performer line from CAJ Foods Products, Inc., and the vinegar drinks are from Vermont Village.
I doubt there are many readers who have never eaten beets in their life. This plant is a very common food, both its stems and leaves (the greens), and the taproot, the usually reddish bulb which is typically called the beet itself. The young greens are eaten raw, in salads, and the older greens are usually cooked, like spinach. The taproot, is eaten raw, boiled, roasted, or pickled. Or in soups, like borscht. They’re also a common spiced side dish in Indian cuisine. And I was surprised to personally learn that in Australia they’re regularly put on burgers in fast food restaurants. The beet itself is usually red, although it can be yellow or orangish, too. The color is so intense that beets are sometimes used as a food coloring, to “punch up” the hues of jams, jellies, sauces, ice cream, cereals, and even tomato paste. But, being featured as a beverage is still pretty rare. I’ve read it is sometimes made into a wine, but I think this is even rarer still.
The effects of beets are a bit contested. Nutritionally they’re decent sources of folate (27% of the U.S. daily recommended allowance), and manganese (16%), and they have small amounts of B vitamins, vitamin C, iron, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, and zinc. Historically, though, people thought that they had medicinal uses, such as for treatment of blood and digestive disorders. Currently, many folks claim that beets can increase blood flow, lower blood pressure, and help people exercise longer. And that they may be anti-inflammatories, and aid in digestion, brain function, weight loss, and even cancer-fighting. The Beet Performer can I drank says the nitrates in beets, “quickly deliver oxygen to your muscles.” and, “aid in cardiovascular wellness with their heart-healthy vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.” However, as so frequently occurs, this is then followed by the asterisked, “This statement has not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.” So I’m sure beets are a pretty healthy consumable, but if you do have any of the ailments mentioned earlier, don’t go throwing out your medicines in favor of beets just yet.
As far as the company that makes the Juice Performers, CAJ (based in Indiana in the U.S.), the website and online information about it was pretty scarce. Other variants of the drink line are a 100% beet juice one (the kind I had was a combo of beet and passion fruit juice in undisclosed percentages), and a tart cherry flavor. The company also markets the Biotta drink brand, which is also various kinds of fruit and vegetable juices. Some of Biotta’s flavors include beet again, carrot, elderberry, celery, cranberry, cherry, and even sauerkraut. Biotta was begun in 1934 by a Swiss man named Dr. Hugo Brandenberger, and they started making juices in 1957. No details were given on if CAJ bought Biotta out, or when, or if they’re just licensed to distribute Biotta products. And, the label of the drink I got says it was made in Austria, but no further detail was provided.
Apple cider vinegar is made from, obviously, apple juice, which has had yeast added to ferment it, and then bacteria turns it into acetic acid. It’s regularly used in salad dressings, chutneys, and to “pickle” many sorts of vegetables and fruit. The nutrients in vinegar are almost none–it has 1% of the calcium you need, plus 2% iron, 1% magnesium, 1% phosphorus, and 2% potassium. However, like beets, many folks, since as along ago as 3300 B.C., have thought that apple cider vinegar, and vinegar in general, has good medicinal properties. Just online currently I read about how apple cider vinegar can help with intestinal gas, heartburn, weight loss, hair and skin care, blood sugar regulation, cholesterol, gut bacteria, and even cancer. It’s also said to treat warts, poison ivy rashes, seasonal allergies, and can even kill fleas and pests. It’s even billed as being an effective deodorant in a pinch! But there’s more. By coincidence, the other day in the mail there was an advertisement for a book called, “Vinegar: The King of All Cures!” by Jerry Baker. Aside from claims that vinegar can effectively clean things, and the usual meal recipes, it made some very bold health boasts. Most notably, it said that if you drink (famous 19th century historical figure) Sam Houston’s Vinegar Texas Tonic, made from various concentrations of grape juice, apple juice, and apple cider vinegar, “you’ll live whip-smart and pain-free your whole life….”. There’s also a whole page of testimonials from (alleged) satisfied customers. Sadly modern science is much more skeptical of all of these health claims, and the evidence for these is lacking, even more so than with the beets. Once again, apple cider vinegar, and vinegar in general, has its uses, such as an ingredient in many foods, and food preparation, but to think that it’s some miracle substance is unfounded, and let’s face it, absurd. Think how much cheaper and easier it would be if simply quaffing some vinegar could make everyone intelligent, or ensure that nobody ever had to suffer from any pain again.
Moving on, according to the Vermont Village website, the company employs about 35 people, but their products are sold in 12,000 stores nationwide. It started as a co-op in the 1970’s, and was incorporated as the Village Cannery of Vermont in 1995. Initially the firm sold mostly organic canned foods, but now they sell vinegar products, applesauce, and apple butter. Their products are proudly unpasteurized, almost completely organic (since they add Vitamin C for processing, legally they’re slightly less than 100% organic), kosher, and allergen-free. (Well, unless you’re allergic to apples, I guess!) The website was also oddly nonspecific about who exactly owns and runs the company, or who’s a major shareholder, even. They’re referred to as “moms and dads,” and “gourmet chefs.” So it appears that they’re rather shy.
1) Beet Performer, Endurance-Enhancing Body Fuel, beet juice with passion fruit juice flavor: Came in a 8.4 ounce (250 mL) can. Ingredients were just lacto-fermented beet juice and passion fruit juice. Only one lame pun on the label–“BEET them to the punch.” Listed nutrients included 3 grams of protein, 24 grams of sugar, 80 milligrams of sodium, 15% potassium, and 15% magnesium. Had mine chilled, as directed, and as I prefer all my beverages. The color, not shockingly was an intense blood red. It was pretty bad. I should say that I don’t like beets in general, so the odds of me enjoying this were low. The odor was unpleasant, too, and the drink had a negative aftertaste to go with the crappy before and during tastes. It was hard to finish. And I can only imagine how terrible the 100% beet juice kind must taste.
2) Vermont Village Sipping Vinegar, ginger and honey flavor: Ingredients were raw, organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar, organic honey, and organic ginger. Bottle was 236 gram/8 ounces. Two serving suggestions were to mix it with 8 ounces of either water or seltzer. Not being big on seltzer, I went with the former, and chilled it first. Its color was yellowish-brown. The odor was like regular vinegar–strong and pungent. It was like drinking vinegar, only slightly diluted. Or, in other words, not good at all–unpleasantly sour and astringent. I was barely able to finish this small amount. I didn’t really detect any honey or ginger flavors, either. It makes me wonder whether anyone really likes this as a beverage, or if just about all consumers just choke it down because they think it’s good for them.
3) Vermont Village Sipping Vinegar, cranberry and honey flavor: Ingredients were the same as the other, only substituting organic cranberries for the ginger. Bottle was the same size, too. Color of this one was more reddish-brown, evidently from the cranberries. This flavor was maybe slightly more palatable than the other, or, to put it more accurately, slightly less unpalatable. But still not a tasty experience at all. And once again the flavor additives weren’t detectable.
So, obviously I wasn’t a fan of any of these, and won’t be buying them again. Especially because I find their alleged health benefits to be very alleged, and not real. I did experience one common side effect from the beet one, too. The results of a subsequent trip to the restroom were somewhat alarming, resembling the final scenes of the movies “Carrie” or “Dead-Alive.” (That’s called beeturia, and it is harmless.) Also, be aware that consumption of apple cider vinegar can cause tooth decay or throat issues, since it’s so acidic, and it can also lower a person’s potassium levels and cause problems with blood sugar regulation. Despite what Sam Houston probably asserted, I suppose.

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CHASKA introduces Indian street food to Toronto

Canada / Community / CHASKA introduces Indian street food to Toronto CHASKA introduces Indian street food to Toronto
Chain begins planned expansion in GTA with new Atrium on Bay location
Authentic street food that serves up a fresh alternative to traditional Indian cuisine is coming to Toronto’s downtown core early in the New Year.
Building on the popularity of its first location in Mississauga, CHASKA will open a second eatery at 595 Bay St. in The Atrium on Bay building on February 19, 2019. The new location will mark the beginning of the chain’s expansion across the GTA.
“We’re looking forward to giving people in Toronto the opportunity to enjoy Indian food the way it’s supposed to taste,” says CEO Naveen Seth.
The restaurant’s food-truck inspired concept features a full truck facade, complemented by a rustic industrial feel. The open-kitchen allows diners to watch as their meals are prepared.
CHASKA believesin a different kind of Indian food than can be found at typical restaurants in North America. CHASKA prepares mouth-watering recipes without the thick and rich sauces that are usually associated with Indian cuisine. CHASKA culinary staff take time to spice, marinate and slow cook dishes to bring out the full flavour of the ingredients without that heavy feeling.
CHASKA sources their products through farmers and suppliers who raise and prepare foods with care and responsibility. Their meats are halal, never frozen and are raised without the use of hormones.
“We know that a great meal starts with the best ingredients. The passion that we put into our recipes starts with a commitment to simple and fresh ingredients,” Seth says. “The freshness and flavours that you experience at CHASKA are a reflection of our high standards and unwavering commitment to quality.”
Seth expects to open at least four CHASKA locations in downtown Toronto in 2019.

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Nice hotel, great location, good service

Hi I was flying from Mumbai to Kolkata early in the morning and I had requested an early check in. I had also requested for an airport pick up. The driver was there waiting for me to pick. The ride to the hotel was smooth. When I reached the hotel, I was told that they did not have rooms for an early check in. But when I requested, they upgraded me and gave me a bigger room. I was tired after waking up early morning at 5am and was happy to be able to check in early. The rooms are spacious and well thought out. I live in Singapore and had no issues connecting my laptop to the power point. They had a good razor and shaving gel sachet. I did not have to open my shaving and dental kit at all. The food was excellent. I had breakfast and they had a good spread of India breakfast. The service in the restaurant was good too. For lunch and dinner I went to their Saffron Indian cuisine restaurant. The food as well as the service was excellent. Paulomi especially was a good host. The location is the best part. If you are visiting Kolkata on business, but also want to shop or taste good Kolkata food, you just need to step out and you have all options available. My only issue with the hotel was that they were not able to exchange Singapore Dollars (as I wanted to shop and was short of Indian rupees). But even this they managed to direct me to a close by Foreign Exchange shop and I managed to get Indian Rupees. Overall, I would recommend this hotel – for both business and leisure for those traveling to Kolkata!

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Cambodian adventure holidays: 7 best activities in Cambodia

Cambodian adventure holidays: 7 best activities in Cambodia February 14, 2019
Cambodian adventure holidays are famous for being culturally enriching experiences with plenty of exciting things to do. To help you get your adrenaline fix we’ve pulled together seven of the best activities In Cambodia. Cambodian adventure holidays
Based in South East Asia, Cambodia has a terrible past. Between 1975 and 1979 the Khmer Rouge regime killed around 21-24% of the countries population. Estimates put the death toll at around 1.7 million people.
But this sublime Southeast Asian nation is picturesque with a fascinating ancient history and culture. Reclaimed from the jungle in the 1990s the UNESCO world heritage site of Angkor Wat is a must visit destination.
Cambodian people are very friendly, the food a tasty mix of Thai, French, Chinese and Indian cuisine. The landscape is stunning and provides the perfect playground for Cambodian adventure holidays. 7 best activities in Cambodia
Here’s our list of the top seven ways to experience adventure in Cambodia. Scuba diving in Sihanoukville
Cambodia has an array of beautiful beaches lining its coast, and none are more impressive than Sihanoukville. But if you’re looking for something more than just lounging on the golden sands, this sleepy town is the unofficial scuba-capital of Cambodia.
Boats regularly depart from Sihanoukville port for the number of small uninhabited islands just off the Cambodian coast. These islands are home to myriad tropical fish and coral, ideal for an unforgettable diving experience.
There is a huge variety of dive sites available, so there is something for you whether you’re a beginner or an expert. If you’ve never tried scuba diving before, Sihanoukville has PADI dive schools to get you up to speed and ready to dive. Cycling the Cambodian countryside
Cambodia is a country of stunning scenery and awe-inspiring natural beauty. And to experience Cambodia holidays than from the seat of a mountain bike is easily one of the best activities in Cambodia.
Cycling keeps you involved with the authentic natural feel of the country. But it gets you around to the beautiful sights a lot quicker than walking.
Where you go is completely up to you, but there are a few classic itineraries you can follow. The Mekong River makes an excellent trail to follow. You’ll enjoy views of Cambodian farms, scenic silk villages and of course the river itself.
Another popular choice is to navigate your way between the magical temples of the Angkor region. With a country this impressive, you can’t really go wrong. Trekking in Siem Reap
The wilderness of northern Cambodia is the place to go if you want to enjoy trekking. Begin your journey from the city of Siem Reap, which is also the home to UNESCO world heritage site Angkor Wat .
It is a popular tourist destination, and might not seem like a sensible starting point for a trekking adventure. However, travel just a little way north and you’ll find yourself surrounded by untouched natural beauty.
There are a number of sites here that you really won’t want to miss. The beautiful Temple of the Women still stands from the 10th century and gives you a real sense of the history of Cambodia.
The River of a Thousand Lingas and it’s impressive waterfall is another of the region’s unforgettable sights. With a variety of temples and natural scenery to enjoy, you’re never too far from something incredible. Kayaking the Kampot River
The Kampot Province is Cambodia in microcosm. Rolling green hills and towering forests back onto tranquil villages and rice paddies. It’s a beautiful and peaceful place.
It’s also home to the broad-shouldered Kampot River which offers the intrepid traveller excellent opportunities for kayaking. This is a unique way to see this exquisite region during Cambodian adventure holidays.
The river has just about everything you could ask for from a kayaking experience. Long stretches of gentle, relaxing waters give way to rapids to get the adrenaline flowing. There are plenty of places to dock your kayak and go ashore, should you get the urge.
And you can be sure that your journey will be variously punctuated with the daily lives of local fishermen and impressive wildlife. Without doubt one of the best activities in Cambodia. Raft the Mekong River
You might also find it interesting to go rafting in Cambodia . Don’t expect raging whitewater, but a voyage down the Mekong river in a boat is a great adventure. Hiking and safri in the Bokor National Park
Bokor National Park is one of the most striking experiences that Cambodia provides. It’s a huge, sprawling, verdant landscape or natural wonders.
Home to wild tigers and elephants it makes for a great adventure safari. Hiking is the most popular way to get around and it’s the only way to take in some of the impressive sights.
The ruins of the Black Palace should be on any itinerary. Actually a complex of villas rather than a palace, the uninspiring windowless exterior gives way to pretty marble floors and a sense of the grandiose.
The Hill Station is another enjoyable glimpse into Cambodia’s past. Built by the French in the 1920s, this creepy building has been the location for a number of movies.
Bokor National Park offers travellers than chance to see wonderful natural scenery and diversity. Experienced alongside reminders of Cambodia’s past it is very different to most holiday. Surfing Bamboo Island
Not many people realise it but you can go surfing in Cambodia ! On the slightly difficult to reach Bamboo Island. You may not get the swell of Inonesia or Vietnam but three to six foot waves are not uncommon.
Fancy a Cambodian holiday? Make sure to check out our Cambodia adventure discounts as you could save a fortune.

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Provo, Utah, has international flavor and local history

“This is a great activity for date night,” a young employee at the Soap Factory in Provo informed me when I walked in as a party of one. I looked around the room and saw many couples making their own soap (for their future His and Her sinks?). Then I noticed a penguin mold in the bin, and I found my companion for the night.
The Utah Valley city is not your typical destination or college town; it has a long and strong affiliation with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Two of its most prominent institutions are Brigham Young University and the Provo City Center Temple, both of which are ringed by majestic peaks.
Provo was named for the French Canadian trapper Etienne Provost and was settled by Mormons in 1849. In 1875, church President Brigham Young established an academy that rose to university status at the turn of the 20th century. Nearly 90 percent of the population is made up of members of the LDS Church, and many residents are current or former BYU students, a distinction that has shaped the city’s culture. For instance, Mormons do not consume alcohol, and the dearth of bars and social drinking is notable in Utah County, much of which is a mountainous area that attracts outdoorsy types with happy-hour habits. (I spotted two bars downtown and overheard one group of friends searching for wine, which they located at the Black Sheep Cafe. The caveat: They had to order food, too.)
But Provo doesn’t need cocktails to stay up late. Many of the BYU campus museums remain open till 9 p.m. on weekdays, as do the shops and restaurants. On a Thursday night, in the dead of winter, I stood on tiptoes to read the chalkboard of flavors at Rockwell Ice Cream Co. The following evening, I set out to hear live folk music at Pioneer Book but ended up in line for country dancing lessons and later at a crafts table surrounded by fragrant oils and paints. (These activities do seem to support the county’s controversial nickname, Happy Valley, and I did feel fairly joyful ending the day with new toiletries and dance moves.)
The culinary scene, meanwhile, is partially influenced by the Mormon tradition of international missionary work. Members who leave for proselytizing return to Provo with expanded palates. You can play spin the globe in the historic downtown district, stopping on pho, Belgian frites, sushi, Indian, Czech pastries, Mexican fruit pops or kronuts in a French bakery. Of course, the natural attractions that preceded the pioneers are equally integral to the Provo experience. Depending on the season, you can fly-fish on the Provo River, boat on Utah Lake, and ski, snowboard and hike in the Wasatch Range. Bring a date, or go solo – Mother Nature doesn’t care about your relationship status.
GO Local faves
Hop on the Provo Canyon Scenic Byway, also known as Highway 189, and watch civilization fade away in the rearview mirror. The 24-mile route runs from Provo to Heber City; don’t be hard on yourself if you don’t reach the end point. Several parks will draw you in and out of your car, such as Mount Timpanogos Park and South Fork Park, which links to the Great Western Trail, the epic trek from Canada to Mexico. The Provo River runs parallel to the road, and you can often see anglers standing in the water, waiting for the blue-ribbon trout to bite their flies. In Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, the 607-foot-tall Bridal Veil Falls unleashes curtains of water in the summer and freezes over in the winter, becoming a Spidey course for ice climbers. About 16 miles up, Deer Creek State Park offers activities for every weather system, including stand-up paddling, zip-lining, ice fishing and camping – in case you want to prolong your return to that other world.
You don’t need to own a car, or know the words to “Route 66,” to appreciate AAA Lakeside Storage and Museum. The vintage gas station signs, pumps and automobiles were amassed by the storage company’s owner, who scours the country for new acquisitions. Among his finds: a Polly Gas pump frozen in time and price at 32 cents per gallon; a Bob’s Big Boy statue with protruding belly; and a green Volkswagen bug that might cause you to punch the nearest shoulder. There is also a P-51 Mustang fighter plane with a Flying Tiger shark mouth that pretend-growls at visitors and a 1942 white halftrack used during World War II. The tour is self-guided, so unless you’re a baby boomer, you might need to call your grandpa to fill in the blanks. However, the website does provide information on select objects, such as the Roman Column Wayne Model 491 pump, which it describes as “the fanciest and most beautiful gas pump ever built by the Wayne Pump Company.” One person’s pit stop is another person’s passion.
Guidebook musts
The Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum, on the Brigham Young University campus, doesn’t count homo undergradutis among its 3 million-strong collection of mammals, crustaceans, birds, insects, arachnids and plants. However, it does display the equally fascinating liger, a hybrid cat named Shasta from the Hogle Zoo in Salt Lake City, as well as an 8-foot-tall Kodiak bear that greets guests with a tinny growl. The research institute, which opened in 1978 and completed a renovation in 2014, is more than the final resting place for its subjects. At least once a day, staff members hold a live critter show. During my visit, the handler trotted out a cockroach, a corn snake named Reggie and a frog called Lemon, who is not allowed to fraternize with his brother, Lime. “They have been known to eat something too big and choke and die,” she said to an auditorium full of parents and children too squirmy to fully comprehend the implications. The university is also home to the Museum of People and Cultures, the Museum of Paleontology and the Museum of Art, which is currently exhibiting Pulitzer Prize-winning photos from the Newseum and towering willow branch sculptures by Patrick Dougherty.
On a tour of Provo Pioneer Village, Stevens Nelson doesn’t temper the truth. “When they got here,” said the museum director, “life was hell.” The open-air historical attraction focuses on the period from 1849, when the first Mormons landed in Provo, to 1869, when the railroad arrived. The seven original buildings demonstrate the early inhabitants’ will to survive, and sometimes in style. In the Turner Cabin, porcelain tableware and figurines adorn the shelves and a framed picture of hair art (yes, the stuff that sprouts from your head) hangs by the front door. The cotton coverlet in the Haws Cabin features a decorative chenille star pattern. “The women civilized this place,” Nelson said. “They made it happen.”
To learn about their food prep, visitors can peek into the Corn Crib, where the ears were dried and then ground into cornmeal. The village also owns several wagons and handcarts that the poorest settlers pushed to their new life. In the summer, a working blacksmith practices his trade near the oxen lift used to shoe the beasts of burden. Before exiting, take a peek inside the outhouse for a cheeky surprise.
Eat Local faves
Homesickness has an upside: authentic Hawaiian and Polynesian food thousands of miles from its roots. The founders of Sweet’s Hawaiian Grill are originally from Tonga (Mom, whose name is Sweet) and Samoa (Dad), and they lived in Hawaii before moving to Provo for law school. Missing the cuisine of the islands, they started serving plate lunches nearly 30 years ago. Their kids now run the show, but the classic meal has not changed much: two scoops of rice, a choice of macaroni salad or pineapple with li hing mui seasoning and one to four proteins – including kalbi ribs, katsu fried chicken, teriyaki barbecue chicken and kalua pig. The restaurant rotates its specials and themes, such as Saturday’s poke bowl. Beverages dive deeply into tropical flavors. Try the Otai, a Tongan smoothie with mango, coconut milk and ice, or an infused kava drink created by BYU students. Omai Crichton, the daughter often found behind the counter, also makes leis that she sells in an adjoining space. It’s the statement piece that says, “Aloha, Provo.”
What do you get when you combine Czech and Texan culinary influences? Czech-Tex? Nope, Hruska’s Kolaches. The Eastern European breakfast food arrived in Provo on the wings of three Texan siblings attending the university. The dough is based on a recipe from their grandmother, and the fillings are as bold and assertive as a Texan oilman. The sweet pastry resembles a Danish in appearance but not taste; the savory variety looks like a dinner roll with a bun in the oven. The teeny bakery with the pear-themed decor (“hruska” means “pear” in Czech) opens at 6:30 a.m. By the noonish closing time, only the tags describing the 24 flavors and two specials remain. On a weekday morning, empty trays mocked patrons for not arriving earlier. We missed out on la bomba carnitas; chocolate, peanut butter and banana nut; bacon, egg, cheese and jalapeno; and raspberry nutella, to name a few. A few maple pecan and mixed berry remained, but the kolache clock was ticking.
Guidebook musts
Chef Mark Mason cooks what he knows – Native American and Southwestern dishes – and what he picked up from watching cooking shows on PBS. Before opening Black Sheep Cafe with his two sisters, Mason lived with his family on a Navajo reservation in Arizona and the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation in North Dakota. (The siblings have since sold the business, but Mason still holds the head-chef title.) That formative experience turns up in such dishes as hog jowl tacos on blue corn tortillas and Navajo tacos with green chile pork or red chile beef. The green chile also shows up on the frites and in a stew. All of the sauces and breads are made on-site, including the nanniskadi, which kicks the burger bun to the corner. The restaurant has a full bar with bottles of high- and low-alcohol beer, though who needs booze when cactus pear lemonade is in the house?
With more than 1,000 games, you could easily end up eating three square meals, plus snacks, at Good Move Cafe. The board game restaurant, which serves diners from 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. on weeknights and till midnight on weekends, encourages eating while playing. If you’re stumped by all the choices, the staff is happy to recommend a dish (the Cowboy Burger, Meeples Mac and Cheese) and a game (Telestrations, Photosynthesis). If you dribble, say, gooey cheese from the Grilled Parcheesi onto the Sorry! board, don’t fret: “That’s why we have a budget to buy new games,” said Dave Moon, who owns the place with his son, Shawn. On Wednesday nights, the cafe holds tournaments, and you can take the Jenga Burger Challenge. Eat a stack of three burgers chosen off the menu to win a free burger for a future visit. Before opening wide, you might want to hit up the Hungry Hungry Hippos for some tips.
Shop Local faves
With the exception of ironing, if your preferred activity ends in “board,” you can satisfy all of your provisioning needs at Board of Provo. Founded in 2004, the shop specializes in skateboards, longboards, splitboards and snowboards. You can find all the big names in the industry, such as Burton, Capita, Volcom, RVCA and Emerica footwear, plus crucial hot-tub attire such as flip-flops and board shorts. John Hales and his wife, Ellis, practice what they sell and know the riding landscape well. After a morning on the slopes, John was bantering with customers while perusing a catalogue of hooded ninja suits by Airblaster. When I asked them for recommendations, they suggested the Provo Recreation Center’s skate park and the Provo River Parkway Trail for skateboarding and Sundance Mountain Resort for snowboarding. Then Ellis offered to suit me up.
When designing Shade Home and Garden, in nearby Orem, Todd Moyer looked across the Atlantic for ideas. The Utah native wanted to replicate the European garden centers he had toured with his English wife. He envisioned a pastoral escape from the city, where customers could leisurely shop for their window sills and front yards. Moyer describes the store’s aesthetic as “modern farmhouse,” assuming your barn is in the desert (cactus and succulents) or Kyoto (bonsai trees). In addition to fauna, the store carries decorative planters, straw baskets with pompoms and pillows with cactus designs. In the cooler months, a herd of goats turns the greenhouse into a yoga studio. The Goga Guys use treats to encourage Nigerian dwarf goats to climb on practitioners. That sound above you isn’t infinite consciousness but Tootsie and Butterfinger crunching on graham crackers.
Guidebook musts
The Shops at Riverwoods is home to some familiar faces, such as Williams-Sonoma, but ignore those. Instead, seek out the unfamiliar names. Lime Ricki, for one, is a swimwear company founded by three sisters from Utah. Their designs – fashionably high bikini bottoms, wrap fronts, Dalmatian spots – transform women of all body shapes and modesty levels into sirens. Katie Waltman learned to make jewelry from her grandmother while in high school. She opened the Provo store in 2014 to showcase the delicate pieces adorned with her signature flourish, feathery leaves. Pebbles and Twigs carries new and consignment pieces that will up the cozy factor of your house, and Heirloom Art & Co. peddles in small indulgences, such as an Arches National Park puzzle, a giant fly-shape swatter and bird call boxes. For your commitment to local retailers, reward yourself with a cocomel cookie from Suss Cookie Co., a riff on the Girl Scouts’ Samoa.
Open since 1980, Pioneer Book fills its two-level shop with used, signed and rare books, without a whiff of mustiness. The ground floor contains every category of literature except fiction, which dominates the stacks upstairs. For regional reading material, check out the books filed under “Western, Americana, Utah and Native American,” or the entire wall of Mormon nonfiction. Blue index cards designate customer and staff picks, and if you find your reviewer soul mate, congrats! (Mine are Tori and Black C.) The store runs an annual reading challenge – “book with red cover,” “book by an author born over 100 years ago,” “book with a strong female lead” – and the winners earn a $50 store credit. A backroom upstairs showcases local art and hosts folk music jams. As a warm-up before the show, go hang out in the “Music” section.
Stay Local fave
The family behind Aspenwood Manor created the Airbnb-esque accommodations with particular travelers in mind: Their guests do not need frequent housekeeping (once a week will do), a front desk (no keys, just door codes) or room service (full kitchen included; vending machine downstairs). The 20 luxury suites occupy two stately buildings near downtown and range in size from 220 square feet to 1,110 square feet. Each room is named and decorated after a destination close to the family’s heart. Waltzing Matilda, which has a secret passageway in the eaves, honors the clan’s patriarch, who grew up in Australia. Monocacy Estates, which comes with a built-in playhouse, gives a shout-out to Maryland, where the family previously resided. A daughter studied abroad in Austria, hence the Vienna room, a posh three-bedroom fit for a Habsburg. (Three-night minimum required for all rooms.)
Guidebook must
The namesake of the Hines Mansion Bed & Breakfast worked in mining and real estate and as a pharmacist and saloonkeeper. His hard work paid off, as you will witness when you step inside the opulent Victorian manse dating to 1895. You might first notice the chandelier, a prop from “Gone With the Wind,” or smell the chocolate cookies cooling on the counter. All nine rooms feature jet tubs, and one (the Library) has a spiral staircase that leads to a soaker with skylight views. With such dreamy names as Victorian Rose and Secret Garden, I was hardly surprised to meet around the breakfast table newlyweds and a couple celebrating their fifth anniversary. I stayed in the Seaside Retreat, the original location of Spencer and Kitty Hines’ bathroom, but wished I had known about the Lodge room’s Butch Cassidy connection before booking. (The outlaw allegedly sneaked in through the door to evade the sheriff of Salt Lake City, whose cousin, a friend of Cassidy’s, owned the place.) Ghost stories are up to the guests’ imagination, but whenever an electric issue arises, innkeeper Michelle Schick will say, “Kitty, knock it off.” When the front door code didn’t work, I knew exactly who to blame.
Explore Local fave
I first spotted Robert Redford in the hallway leading to the Tree Room, one of five drinking and dining venues at Sundance Mountain Resort. He was cuddling a golden eagle, and I am pretty sure everyone who passed by the wall of photos wished they were that raptor. In 1969, the celebrity benefactor bought the Provo Canyon land that morphed into the year-round playground. Sports enthusiasts can ski and snowboard in the winter and then switch gears to hiking, mountain biking and horseback riding in the warmer months. The fire pits are seasonal, but the zip lines operate in all four. Most of the noncardio activities take place in the village, such as the Owl Bar, a watering hole that honors both Butch Cassidys (the real scofflaw and the Redford one), and the Art Studio, where artists teach guests to make pottery, jewelry, soap and other crafts. The General Store stocks their creations, as well as clothes, blankets, housewares and other goods that possess the Sundance spirit. As a souvenir, grab a free Sundance catalogue. Signs posted outside select locations ask guests to refrain from taking photos to protect the privacy of others, but the advisory does not mention asking for an autograph.
Guidebook must
The Utah Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau’s walking tour covers more than 70 sites, including many in the Provo Downtown Historic District. Where do you start? No. 1, Provo Town Square, seems obvious, but I decided to begin with No. 71, because I am a sucker for sweets. Startup’s Candy still occupies the 1900 building that produced the country’s first filled candy and Magnolias, a forebear of the breath mint. The confectionery is open weekdays, one of the few places on the list with public access. (Most are private homes.) The LDS Tabernacle (No. 65) suffered fire damage 112 years after its dedication and was turned into a temple. Only Mormons with an ecclesiastical recommendation can enter the sacred space, but everyone can stroll the parklike grounds. On Center Street, the main strip for eating, shopping and entertainment, I supplemented my education with historic plaques. En route to the Soap Factory, I learned that Brigham Young set up his first school nearby. Most likely, the academy didn’t teach its students how to make soap in emoji and Star Wars shapes, but modern-day Provo will.
Millennials are called a lot of things — lazy, attention-seeking, entitled, etc. But murderous?
The internet, in all its glory, is home to countless articles about the age-old products, businesses and traditions millennials have sent to the gallows.
Canned tuna? Gone. The mayonnaise you mix with it? Gone. Hooters? Say it isn’t so!
We investigated some of the more prevalent claims to see which have merit and which don’t.
(Lauren Hill) Midwestern kindness runs deep, but throughout the city’s neighborhoods, it turns out some residents are more polite than others (or simply complain less). Digital Third Coast, a Chicago-based digital marketing firm, recently analyzed 2018 data of complaints to 311 from the 30 most densely populated neighborhoods. They looked at noise, garbage and dog poop complaints to determine where residents were less than pleased with their surroundings. How did your ‘hood fair? Click through to see which 10 city locales yielded the most complaints per capita.
(Darcel Rockett) 10 more dismissed from Broward Sheriff’s Office under new regime Rapper YNW Melly accused of slaying two longtime friends on lonely road near Everglades | Video Hyde: A voice of welcome experience arrives at Dolphins | Commentary Art

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