When French gourmet cuisine comes to India

When French gourmet cuisine comes to India

March 19, 2019 12:38 12:38 IST more-in French ambassador Alexandre Ziegler on the gourmet initiative Gout de France
Starting tomorrow, close to 80 restaurants over India will come together to host what the French Ambassador to India, Alexandre Ziegler, calls “the largest French dinner in the world”. In its fifth year now, Gout de France is a week-long gourmet initiative by the French government to expose the world to their gastronomy. This year, their focus is on environmentally-responsible and sustainable cuisine. While world over the festival will begin on March 21, India will get a two-day headstart. What is the purpose of Gout de France?
In France we’ve thought for decades that [the popularity of] French gastronomy was a given, and that we didn’t need to promote it. But slowly we realised that while gastronomy was known as a part of the French cultural DNA, the image of it was very elitist. It was like a three-star Michelin restaurant, very unaffordable, once-in-a-lifetime sort of experience. When it comes to casual food on a Friday evening with friends and family, you’d think Italian or Chinese or Indian. But definitely not French. So came this idea, that we were going to propose a worldwide event, that would portray French gastronomy as something that is made for the people, that would engage restaurants — and not only three stars, but also smaller bistros, to reach out to the emerging middle-class. What sort of French dishes adapt to bistronomy?
What I miss when I’m away from France is something like duck confit, or the apple pie by my grandmother, or the wine-chicken that my mother cooked. You find these in bistros and small neighbourhood restaurants. We love this idea that France’s niche is luxury, but that’s actually not our culture. [In France now] there is high gastronomy by young chefs, who use local products, and make dishes more creative and affordable. How has Gout de France grown?
When we started in 2015, we had 1,000 partner restaurants all over the world. In India, we’ve grown from 65 partner restaurants last year, to almost 80 this year. Does France have further plans for food-diplomacy?
We want to slowly spread the culture of introducing more French techniques into cooking. The chef that came in for Gout de France during my first year here was Chef Akrame. Since he’s gone back, he’s opened a restaurant that’s popular in Paris. With it he’s now proposing a Spice Routes’ cuisine — Iranian, Central Asian, and Indian. He got the idea in India. He’s very talented when it comes to French gastronomy, but he’s also now in a position to test new ideas. That’s exactly the sort of inspirations we are looking at.
For the list of participating restaurants: Restaurateurs.
goodfrance.com/en/ participating -restaurants

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The Four Seasons Resort Bali At Jimbaran Bay, Indulge in Bali’s Grand Dam of Beach Resorts

By Glenn Harris Mar. 18th, 2019 All Images Credit Four Seasons Resorts and Spas
Bali is more than one place. It is a destination of destinations offering a range of experiences from the full-on party central of Seminyak to the spiritual calm and serenity of Ubud. The cerulean seas and their beaches are simply perfect as are the tropical landscapes. One of its most scenic beaches is Jimbaran Bay, an enormous horseshoe-shaped bay of white sand beaches and blue seas. Perched along the beach and hillside is where you’ll find the grand dam of luxury Bali’s beachfront hotels, the F our Seasons Resort Bali At Jimbaran Bay.
The Four Seasons Resort Bali At Jimbaran Bay has what most would look for in a tropical island resort. The resort is laid out like a traditional Balinese village with 146 Balinese style villas spread over the 35 acres full of colorful flowers, swaying palm trees and the resort’s private two-mile stretch of flawless beach. The resort style is opulent yet welcoming with a friendly and switched on staff who go beyond to ensure a wonderful vacation for all their guess. It is an uber-romantic resort with privacy plunge pools and outdoor showers, couples spa treatments and romantic candlelit dinners make it ideal for couples celebrating a special occasion or the steady flow of honeymooners. It is also ideal for families with Four Seasons kids club as well as the pools and plenty of activities for the little ones as well.
Bali is a spiritual place and throughout the island you’ll encounter ornate stone temples ordained with grotesque stone statues known to ward off evil spirits. This aspect of Balinese heritage is part of the guests’ welcome experience which goes beyond a cool drink and towel. Guests are greeted by the resort’s Balinese Hindu priest who provides a spiritual ritual and blessing on the property’s authentic Hindu temple. It’s truly a moving experience where guests, upon arrival, begin to feel the spiritual gravitas for which Bali is well known.
Through the resort’s manicured tropical gardens and past the lava rock walls are the one and two bedroom stand-alone villas. They are situated to afford optimal privacy and serenity yet provide delicious views of the Indian Ocean. Past the external doors of the villa grounds is a stone walled courtyard with a tropical garden with a wood deck patio and daybeds creating an idyllic outdoor living space. There is also a thatch roof gazebo with a lounge area overlooking the infinity edge pool and beautiful seascapes.
Inside features a balance of British colonial design and Balinese décor and details of teak furniture, batik prints and stone carvings and artwork as well as the latest technology demanded by today’s traveler. The centerpiece is the uber-comfortable bed shrouded in white curtains. The opulence continues in the bathrooms with an outdoor rainforest showers as well as a large deep soaking bath, big enough for two, fully accessorized with bath salts and candles. There are even larger and elaborate villas with generous sized pools made for families and groups of friends traveling together. All of the villas are a jealous mistress who dares all who enter to want to leave.
Indonesian food is as vibrant and flavorful as the awe-inspiring landscapes and energy of the islands. The Four Seasons Resort Bali At Jimbaran Bay embraces the culinary richness of the destination with several dining options throughout the resort.
Their signature restaurant is Sundara which also doubles as a beach club during the day and a posh cocktail lounge in the evening. During and after sunset, this is a chic and glam setting offering tasty cocktails to share with your loved one as the sun goes down over the bay’s horizon. Candles dot tables under the canopy of stars as live pop music plays by local artists. The is an ideal setting for a romantic evening ahead as couples dine alfresco on Sundara’s contemporary Asian cuisine.
During the day, guests dine in between strolls on the beach, sunbathing, or cooling off in the infinity edge pool or the Jimbaran Bay sea which is steps from spacious indoor-outdoor lounge and restaurant. There are canopied day beds that line the wood deck where guests lounge about having Aperol spritz and noshing on tapas-style light lunches.
Taman Wantilan is the all-day dining restaurant and offers a smorgasbord of options from haute international and local dishes. It is part buffet and part live cooking stations where chefs put on a performance of culinary artistry as while preparing fresh dishes while you wait and watch. Local seafood, meats, and ingredients are presented in a wide array of options including Indian and Asian and intercontinental. The options don’t end at the main courses as there is a dedicated room just for a sweet ending offering irresistible freshly prepared crepes made live as well as a dizzying offering of sweet treats.
The Four Seasons caters to honeymooners and others who may find it difficult to get away from the villa or each other by providing some exceptional in villa dining experiences. None is more unforgettable than their Floating Breakfast. Yes, no typo here. It’s a literally a full-on breakfast served in your pool with omelets, eggs benedict, waffles, juice and coffee. It’s basically whatever you like, complete with discrete service of their exceptional staff there to make sure you have all you need and then disappear leaving you and your loved one to dine in the cooling waters of the pool overlooking the magical views of the bay.
The Four Seasons Resort Bali At Jimbaran Bay has done well at incorporating the local culture into the guest experience with and a day of foodie exploration. The experience begins with an early visit to the Jimbaran Bay Fish Market which is a few minutes from the resort. The tour is led by Head Chef Kristya Yudha, who has been with the resort for over 20 years. He points out every manner of exotic sea creature from that morning’s haul as fishermen sell their catch of the day for to locals and restaurants. From there it’s on to their state-of-the-art show kitchen for a course on making traditional Balinese dishes culminating with the joy of dining on local delicacies made by the guests’ own hands.
Bali is known around the world for their healing treatments and restorative rituals. The Four Seasons incorporates their own kind of spa services with at the resort’s Healing Village which is one of the best on the island. This is a full-service spa will a complete range of facilities from Jacuzzi’s, saunas and steam rooms as well as a first-rate fitness center.
There are eight treatment rooms where a host of treatments are provided from facials, to beauty, to massages or more ethereal chakra-opening rituals and physic healing. A treatment easy to recommend is the Balinese massage which includes a body scrub with ancient Himalayan salt crystals which is a full body massage that combines stretching, long strokes, palm and thumb pressure techniques and leaves the body refreshed, exfoliated, and restored.
The wellness services go beyond the spa with yoga classes as well lead by a highly certified trainer which take place in a pavilion on a bluff overlooking the bay. One of the more fun courses is the anti-gravity yoga that incorporates cirque du sole type harnesses where the class dangles from the rafters moving and shifting into various stretching and strengthening positions. Probably something not to try at home but a wonderful experience for the novice or expert yoga student.
The Four Seasons Resort Bali At Jimbaran Bay is a resort that has all that one could desire in a tropical vacation. An idyllic setting, uber-romantic villas with private pools and luxurious amenities, exceptional dining experiences spa, not to mention the perfect island setting on a two-mile beach. For the ideal tropical getaway, Bali and the Four Seasons Resort Bali At Jimbaran Bay is an ideal option. Glenn Harris
Glenn Harris is an accomplished journalist focusing on international travel, fine dining, and luxury lifestyle events. His wanderlust has taken him to over 100 countries where he is constantly straying off the beaten path uncovering new and exotic finds. He particularly enjoys seeking out lesser known travel gems and places to stay, dine, or experiences to capture.

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Ultimate Guide to one week in Bali Itinerary

Ultimate Guide to one week in Bali Itinerary Posted on March 19, 2019
I visited Bali over three years, but I’ve visited this magical island around four times now on four separate occasions and despite it changing constantly over the last 10 years it’s somewhere I decide to return to again and again. It’s a place which has a very special place in my heart and I have grown fond of over the years. In absence of me having visited over the past three years I have got nostalgic and decided to pull together more content from my time travelling around south east asia and Indonesia.
The island is usually split into four sections when deciding on a road trip: north, south, east and west. To the south, the beachside city of Kuta has lively bars, while Seminyak, Sanur and Nusa Dua are popular resort towns and are great for surfing too. The best surfing spots on the island are Padang Padang and Uluwatu. Further inland is Ubud, a hill town known for its spa treatments, yoga and ecotourism, which may include a trip to a monkey preserve. But if you are better placed in the ocean then make sure you stop by for a snorkel at one of the islands many coral reefs teeming with sea life. Bali is part of the Coral Triangle, the area with the highest biodiversity of marine species and in this area alone, over 500 reef-building coral species can be found.
Next up in my series of content, is a guide to one week in Bali itinerary. It includes everything from, where to stay, what to do and when to go. Keep reading to find out more! 10 FUN THINGS TO DO IN BALI Head to a yoga retreat in Ubud to find some real zen! Wander through Monkey Forest and keep your valuables safe as the monkeys are brave! Visit the world heritage site The Elephant Cave – one of Bali’s historic temples Climb the active volcano Mount Batur and watch the sunrise at 4am! Take a yoga class at one of the many yoga schools in Ubud Take a boat over to the Gili Islands and chill out on the laid back tropical paradise island Go on a snorkelling day trip and spot sea turtles and an array of colourful fish Spend a couple of days at a Balinese home stay to experience Balinese culture Jump on another boat and head to Nusa Lembongan, and go on the hunt to spot Manta rays Stay a night in the unique Bali Bubble hotel and sleep under the stars! Here is my ultimate guide to a week in Bali itinerary…. HOW TO GET TO BALI
There are no direct flights into Bali from the UK, however many popular airlines operate indirect flights via Europe or the Far East to this beautiful island. Bali Ngurah Rai International Airport, also known as Denpasar International Airport, is located in southern Bali, 13 km south of Denpasar. It is Indonesia’s second-busiest international airport. The flight time is around 18 hours with a stopover in either Singapore or Dubai! However, some airlines could take as long as 41 hours based on the stopover destination and waiting duration. Waiting time at intermediate airports could be anywhere between 1 hr to 24 hrs. I flew with Emirates last time I visited Bali and it cost me around £450 in economy class. However when I just checked skyscanner for any time, any date in the next month if offered me a flight for only £241. WHEN TO GO TO BALI
For many reasons, best time to come to Bali is April, May, June and September, just before and just after high season. It’s still dry season, it’s slightly less humid, and room prices and villa rentals can be 30-50% cheaper than during high season. GETTING A VISA FOR BALI Under the Visa Exemption rule, American citizens are not required to have a visa to enter Indonesia if staying for tourism for 30 days or less. Entry under the visa exemption is for free but may not be extended. U.S. citizens visiting family or traveling for other purposes may apply for a 30-day visa on arrival. For UK citizens you just have to pay for an entry visa and exit visa when you arrive and leave. I can’t remember the exact price but it was around £10. HOW TO GET AROUND BALI
The best way to get around Bali is either by car, bus or by moped. If you’re seeking to go between towns, you can catch a ride on a public bemo (bus), a private bemo, a taxi, a car/driver rental package, or rent a car to drive. If you have cash to spare, you can hire a car in Bali, with the option to drive it yourself. If you rent from a reputable car company, you can have the benefit of driving your own vehicle to Bali’s less-traveled destinations, with your range being limited only by your gas budget. Riding a taxi in Bali works the same way it does everywhere else: you hail a taxi from the curb; a taxi stops to pick you up, and off you go. The blue taxis marked “Bali Taxi” (known as Blue Bird Taxis) are the most honest. If you want to relive that iconic Eat Pray Love moment then hire a bicycle and get around this way – but be careful and be aware of the cars on the road.
WHERE TO STAY FOR A WEEK IN BALI
Here are the various regions you could stay during your trip to Bali, I’ve stayed all over and can promise you Ubud is amazing! Here is my guide of where to stay in Bali! South Bali
South Bali includes Kuta, Western Bukit and Uluwatu, Canggu, Denpasar, Jimbaran, Legian, Nusa Dua, Sanur, Seminyak, and Tanah Lot. Here you are in the most visited part of the island by far, with tourists flocking to world renowned Kuta Beach and chic Seminyak. Central Bali
Central Bali includes Ubud, Gianyar, Bedugul, and Tabanan. This region is the cultural heart of Bali and the central mountain range. West Bali
West Bali includes Negara, Gilimanuk, Medewi Beach, and Pemuteran. You have here access to ferries to Java and the West Bali National Park. North Bali
North Bali includes Lovina, and Singaraja. You can enjoy quiet black sand beaches and the old capital city. East Bali
East Bali includes Amed, Besakih, Candidasa, Kintamani, Klungkung, Mount Agung, Padang Bai, and Tirta Gangga. Here, you can discover another atmosphere with laid back coastal villages, an active volcano and the mighty Mount Agung. Southeastern Islands
Southeastern Islands includes Nusa Lembongan, Nusa Penida, and Nusa Ceningan. These quiet offshore islands in the southeast are very popular for diving activities. WHAT TO DO IN BALI
Here are my top 21 fun things to do in Bali…
1. Head to a yoga retreat in Ubud to find some real zen!
2. Wander through Monkey Forest and keep your valuables safe as the monkeys are brave!
3. Visit the world heritage site The Elephant Cave – one of Bali’s historic temples
4. Climb the active volcano Mount Batur and watch the sunrise at 4am!
5. Take a yoga class at one of the many yoga schools in Ubud
6. Take a boat over to the Gili Islands and chill out on the laid back tropical paradise island
7. Go on a snorkelling day trip and spot sea turtles and an array of colourful fish
8. Spend a couple of days at a Balinese home stay to experience Balinese culture
9. Jump on another boat and head to Nusa Lembongan, and go on the hunt to spot Manta rays
10. Stay a night in the unique Bali Bubble hotel and sleep under the stars!
11. Watch the traditional Kecak dance performance at Uluwatu temple
12. Marvel at the stunning Tegallalang rice terraces
13. Spend a day chilling out at the luxurious Sunday’s Beach Club in Uluwatu
14. Have a go at stand-up paddle boarding in Seminyak
15. Party the night away in Kuta where there is one of Asia’s biggest clubs (I spent many a drunk night here and can say I’ve had some of the best nights of my life here!)
16. Hop on a boat to Nusa Lembongan one of Bali’s neighbouring small islands and go on the hunt to spot Manta rays.
17. Laze around at Jungle Fish retreat and swim in the infinity pool overlooking the jungle.
18. Take a Balinese cooking class, learn how to make all the favourites!
19. Sip on a Bintang while watching the sunset over the Ocean in Old Mans in Canggu
20. Grab a Balinese massage at one of the many spas dotted across the island
21. Eat health and search of one of Bali’s many vegan restaurants or juice bars. DAY ONE – Uluwatu, Tanah Lot and Seminyak
On your first day in Bali I would suggest jumping in a car and heading to the world famous Uluwatu Temple. Uluwatu Temple is a Balinese Hindu sea temple located in Uluwatu. The temple is regarded as one of the sad kahyangan and is dedicated to Sang Hyang Widhi Wasa in his manifestation as Rudra. And once you’re done here, I would also head to Tanah Lot Temple, in time to enjoy the amazing sunset there. If you are also in time, catch the famous Kecak Dance here that is set against the backdrop of this beautiful temple. Stay the night from here in Seminyak! DAY TWO – Seminyak, Petitenget Beach and Elephant Safari Park
Seminyak is a beach resort area at the southern end of Bali, Indonesia, with many luxury hotels, villas and spas, as well as high-end shopping and restaurants. Sleek bars and clubs with busy sunset scenes line Seminyak and Petitenget beaches, which are wide, west-facing stretches of Indian Ocean shoreline with gray sand and good surfing conditions. And if you’ve got time from here make a stop at Elephant Safari Park in Desa Taro. DAY THREE + FOUR – Ubud and Tegalalang
For day three and four I would suggest an overnight stay in the magical town of Ubud. Here you can walk around the town, find cute cafes, shop in some of their boutique shops and enjoy a massage or spa day too. Whilst you are here you could also head out to the north to the neighbor town of Tegalalang to find classic rice terraces of Asia. Many tourists also like to stay in Ubud as it is quite central to many of the attractions around Bali and yet away from the crowds in Kuta. DAY FIVE – Balangan Beach
Have a beach day today, after four days of exploring! Bali has some of the best beaches in the world so make sure you head to Balangan beach and Padang-padang beach and soak up the rays, as well as snorkelling in clear blue waters! Towards evening, go to Jimbaran for a romantic seaside dinner. DAY SIX – Northern Bali, Mount Batur and Pura Ulun Danu Bratan
On your fifth day in Bali why not head north and explore that area. Wake up early to catch the dolphins at Lovina and after, chill at the black sand beach then jump back in the car and head over to Pura Ulun Danu Bratan, an impressive temple by the lake. This is one of the most important temples in Bali. After that, you can head further west to Mount Batur for a view or if you prefer a hike up and then end the northern loop at the Besakih Temple. Or do these two the opposite way round, with an early sun rise hike up Mount Batur and then an afternoon exploring the temples. DAY SEVEN – Kuta and Party!
On your last stop on the island spend a day and a night in Kuta! It’s also fairly close to the airport too so you can get to your flight easily. Head quickly to Kuta beach and get some suntan and swimming in. After enjoying the beautiful sunset, head to the city and check out Kuta’s vibrant nightlife. WHERE TO EAT & DRINK IN BALI Sisterfields
Sisterfields is an Australian concept cafe, bringing good coffee into the heart of Seminyak. This place serves all-day breakfast, brunch and lunch menu, coupled with a huge selection of coffee. The acai bowl (RP $110,000; SGD $10.50) is super insta-worthy, due to its vibrant colours. Bebek Bengil
Located in the Ubud area of Bali, Bebek Bengil has become a veritable Bali institution since first opening in 1990. The restaurant’s name literally translates as the ‘Dirty Duck Diner’, a reference to the restaurant’s speciality. The Café at Mulia Bali It’s rare for buffet-style food to rank among a place’s top restaurants, but the Café at Mulia Bali is a welcome exception. Set in Mulia Bali, a six-star hotel in Nusa Dua, the Café offers one of Bali’s largest and most diverse spreads. The dining is divided into six sections: Indian, Chinese, Southeast Asian, Western, Indonesian and dessert, with each cuisine prepared by a native chef for authenticity. Lamak Bali
Lamak Bali exudes Balinese traditions through its thoughtful décor and menu, both of which fuse classic local dishes with modern Asian and European flair. The restaurant’s elegant interior incorporates stones, local wood and ornate carvings. Urbana
The Bebek Urbana (RP 145,000; SGD $13.90), crispy Balinese duck plated with sambal-fried vegetables paired together with fragrant jasmine rice is a dish you should try when you are at Urbana. Urbana has an all day happy hour so do make use of that to get your 1-for-1 cocktails! Tamade Café
Walls filled with self-drawn murals, Tamade is a cozy family-run café that serves home-cooked Indonesian food (read: not fusion food). The umami bowl (RP 55,000; SGD $5.10) is rice with either pork or chicken, drizzled with salted egg yolk sauce. Cafe Pomegranate
Vastly different from the typical Bali beach view, Cafe Pomegranate is located in the middle of a rice field in central Ubud. Cafe Pomegranate gets especially busy during the hours of sunset as many patrons want to enjoy the picturesque view while having dinner. Bumbu Bali
Bumbu Bali has a traditional Balinese setting with zen vibes, just minutes away from Nusa Dua Beach. With many dishes to offer, they even have set meals on their menu! Finns Beach Club
Situated in front of Berawa surf break, Finns Beach Club is a great spot to enjoy a spectacular sunset view. Patrons can relax on a day bed or get a drink from the swim up bar in the infinity pool, while grooving to cool tunes spun by the club’s DJ. Revolver Espresso
Friendly staff and top notch quality are phrases people would often use to describe this cozy cafe. The cold brew (RP $35,000; SGD $3.35) has a chocolatey caramel taste to it, refreshing to have on a hot day in sunny Bali. Potato Head Beach Club
Chilling on a day bed at Potato Head whilst sipping on a cocktail or taking a dip in the infinity pool to cool off is a great way to spend an evening. If you’re not looking for a splash, you can also check out their indoor dining area. Other posts that may help you:

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Vegetarian Food From Around the World: Kid-Friendly Meatless Meals

This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.
This post is from KS Contributing Writer ‘Becca Stallings of The Earthling’s Handbook .
When you need a meatless meal for a Friday in Lent , do you instantly think of cheese pizza, fish sticks, or macaroni-and-cheese? Those options please most kids, but they’re not especially healthful or interesting. Especially if you’re going meatless year-’round or more than one day a week, you really need some more options.
Meatless meals are hard when you’re used to eating meat, potatoes, and a vegetable each on its own part of the plate–because what else can you put in the meat space? Here’s a different way to think about your meals that will also help you think about loving your neighbors! Learning About Other Cultures
Cultures around the world eat different styles of food, and many of these styles are easy to enjoy without meat. As we try different meals, we can talk about the people who traditionally eat this way. Some of them live in faraway countries–what is it like there? Some of them live in our neighborhood–how are we different and the same?
Try serving food in the style of a different culture each Friday of Lent (or each Meatless Monday ) and talking with your family about people and cultures nearby and far away. You can make this a big project or just a casual conversation topic. You can focus on learning geography or praying for the branches of our human family around the world. You can talk about politics, history, agriculture, nutrition, poverty, environmental stewardship, traditions–or just make it about what tastes good!
My family has been eating a low-meat diet since before the kids (now 14 and 4 years old) were born. My partner and I gave up meat and fish 6 days a week for Lent 2002, and we just never went back to eating meat the way we used to! You can read all about our motivations and what we’ve learned .
One of our main lessons is that the typical American/British concept of what goes on a dinner plate is very limiting. Not only is it difficult to make without meat, but it’s just boring. The flavors of other cuisines make food more exciting , with or without meat! A bonus is that these cuisines often integrate vegetables into the meal so you can’t help eating them–and they’re yummy!
Here are some ideas for meals your family might like. It’s hard to predict what kids will try and which new tastes they’ll like! Try not to be intimidated by picky eaters. Show your enthusiasm for the food , link it to bigger ideas, and consider serving sauce on the side or choosing “salad bar” style meals where each person can decide how much of which food goes into his bowl. Korean Vegetarian Food
One of my recent victories as a mother is finally making Bee Bim Bop for my family! We first discovered Linda Sue Park’s catchy-rhyming picture book in our local library when our son was 2 or 3. Although he was excited by the idea of making and eating Bee Bim Bop, somehow I never quite got around to it for more than a decade.
Each person gets a bowl with some rice in the bottom and adds her choice of toppings. Then you grab your chopsticks and mix it all up!
We used The Wanderlust Kitchen’s recipe , except that I forgot to buy scallions and we decided not to include eggs. This meal was easier than it sounded –there’s a lot of chopping and several separate things to cook, but all the cooking processes are simple and very quick. I think we actually spent less than the hour she suggests for total prep+cook time. My partner Daniel made the pickled vegetables and sliced the mushrooms during the afternoon; I did everything else when I got home from work and had dinner on the table 35 minutes later.
Our 4-year-old Lydia was resistant to the idea of eating anything unfamiliar that night…until she smelled the toasted sesame oil and I let her taste a cucumber slice seasoned with it. Then, seeing the array of dishes on the table got her interested in trying more of the things. It turned out that she loved the pickled daikon and ate lots of it! You just never know what kids will like.
The rest of us loved the gochujang sauce , but it was too spicy for Lydia. Daniel and I agreed that it tastes kind of like steak sauce or hoisin sauce , and we have a bottle of each in the refrigerator, so we gave Lydia samples of those sauces. She thought they were all right but ultimately preferred to have no sauce on her bowl.
This meal is a great example of planned leftovers . We had several delicious lunches of Bee Bim Bop.
Although I’d never made this specific meal before, the basic concept–seasoned vegetables and protein over rice –is one we eat a lot. Chinese Vegetarian Food
Stir-fry is a nice quick way to cook food–usually, I can get it all chopped and cooked before the rice is done (about 20 minutes) . Learn to stir-fry , and it’s easy to make many Chinese restaurant favorites from recipes–or just make up your own combination of classic Chinese seasonings with vegetables. Use cashews (use the code STEWARDSHIP for 10% off at that site!) , peanuts, tofu, edamame, or fish as your protein.
Fried rice is a classic way to turn leftover vegetables and rice into a different meal! Making use of every bit of food is a way of taking less for ourselves so that there’s more for our neighbors. Do you think of fried rice as a side dish? Change your perspective and focus on what you get to eat while fasting! A bowl of fried rice with peas and carrots and mushrooms and egg, zinging with ginger and soy sauce, is a feast. Mexican Vegetarian Food
Burritos , tacos, and quesadillas all are quick and easy to put together and adaptable to various ingredients. Beans are packed with iron and fiber as well as affordable protein! Katie shows how you can quickly cook dry beans without soaking using your Instant Pot. Experiment with black , red , pinto , and other beans. Try different types of chili powder and/or peppers.
My 4-year-old has lost her appreciation for spicy beans and is grumpy about most beans and most spicy food now…so we make her a serving of mildly spiced Mexican food with plenty of cheese and raw sweet peppers on the side, while the rest of us enjoy the spicy beans!
Check out Katie’s homemade tortilla recipes , especially if you have grain sensitivities.
For a different twist, try this homemade chipotle simmer sauce that mimics a packaged product. It goes well with the usual Mexican-food accompaniments of tomato, lettuce, bell peppers, sour cream, and cheese–but it includes some ingredients from other cultures, like fish sauce and thyme. Here’s an opportunity to talk about how people from different places can pick up each other’s good ideas!
Another “melting pot” recipe is my mom’s Mexican Pizza , which uses up odds and ends on a cornbread crust. Native American Vegetarian Food
You could live in the United States all your life and never eat in a Native American restaurant. The traditional cuisines of the thousands of tribes who once thrived in this land are virtually unknown in our popular culture. Do you even know which tribe once lived in the place where you live now? Researching that, and what the natives of your local area used to eat, would be a great family project!
The Iroquois called corn, beans, and squash The Three Sisters because these vegetables can grow together in the same field, taking care of one another. This ancient agricultural practice is not just efficient and good for the soil . It also produces three foods that taste great together and are nutritionally complementary : beans for protein, squash for vitamins, corn for carbohydrates.
You don’t have to be a farmer to enjoy these Three Sisters! Frozen corn, canned or pressure-cooked beans, and frozen or canned pumpkin will do. (We baked all the squash from our CSA farm share in the autumn and froze some of it for later.)
I like to brown some onions in oil, then cook up the Three Sisters and serve the mixture in a bowl, topped with cheese, with corn chips for dipping. I also add sweet peppers if we have them, because my kids like them and they’re very nutritious–and bell peppers, too, are native to the Americas.
Chip-dip for dinner might seem fun and silly, but take a closer look: It’s low-impact and frugal to leave more resources for sharing with others. You can talk about making good choices in agriculture to care for Creation . You can talk about all that was taken from the tribes and pray that God will guide us toward a more peaceful and respectful world. All kinds of educational possibilities!
In my experience, both preschoolers and older kids are fascinated by the story of why Native Americans sometimes are called American Indians, when they were never from India at all! By the way, the term Native American also carries some baggage , and some people prefer to be called Indian (but some people from India have strong feelings about that!) or to be called by the name of their tribe, ideally the real name instead of a European corruption or the name of a nearby river . . . .
These things are complicated, yet they’re also simple. Even young children can understand how American Indians suffered from being misunderstood by people who spoke a different language and held different assumptions about property and manners. We can pray for understanding and compassion when we encounter people whose behavior surprises us.
Older kids can research the question, “Are there now more American Indians or more Indian-Americans in the United States?” and all the many factors affecting the numbers of these two groups that (despite the names) are no more related to one another than any other two groups. Meanwhile, let’s have some more food! Indian Vegetarian Food
India has the world’s lowest rate of meat consumption , with at least 20% of people eating no meat at all. They’ve come up with lots of great ideas for vegetarian meals!
Masoor Dal means red lentils . This shelf-stable protein cooks much more quickly than green lentils and has a soft, flaky texture that appeals to many people. (Check out The Dal Glossary –all about 8 kinds of lentils!)
One of my family’s favorite meals is red lentils with Indian spices and grated carrots . You can make this mildly spiced for sensitive little tongues! It has a sweet flavor that many kids–and many adults who think they don’t like lentils–enjoy.
Green lentils boiled or baked with garam masala (spice blend) and salt have a nice basic flavor that some people like plain and others want to eat with toppings –fried onions are my favorite! Add some butter or oil to the lentils toward the end of cooking to enhance yumminess.
Palak Paneer is basically Indian-flavored creamed spinach with tomatoes. Normally it has chunks of cheese in it (paneer is a firm, white, grainy-textured cheese) and the vegetables are puréed to a pudding-like consistency. I made this with a glob of cream cheese and a glob of yogurt, and I didn’t bother puréeing. It was delicious anyway!
We don’t always have to make recipes the way they’re made in restaurants. I bet real people in India making dinner for their families don’t always use a blender or have paneer on hand. This is Palak Paneer like your neighbor might make it!
We’re pulling a multicultural thing with our bread: Flour tortillas heated the right way taste a lot like naan! Place a tortilla directly on the grate of the gas stove burner. Get your tongs . Turn the burner on high. Wait about 10 seconds, then grab tortilla with tongs and flip it. Then flip every 5 seconds until it’s puffy and brown.
Enjoying lentils with fried onions made me wonder aloud, “How is this not mujaddara? Well, that’s Middle Eastern . . .” We turned to Wikipedia and were surprised by what we learned! Middle Eastern Vegetarian Food
Mujaddara is lentils cooked with rice (or other grain), seasoned with cumin and coriander , topped with caramelized onions. It’s one of my favorite things to order in Middle Eastern restaurants. But I didn’t know that Arab Christians traditionally eat mujaddara during Lent!
I also didn’t know mujaddara is sometimes called “Esau’s favorite.” The story of Jacob offering his brother Esau some yummy lentils in exchange for his inheritance is the first Bible story that really interested my son. But some translations describe those lentils as “soup” and “red stuff,” which doesn’t sound like mujaddara. Any lentil dish you make might be the one that tempted Esau! That gives you an opportunity to talk about this guy who played mean tricks on his brother–that’s only the first round; it’s quite a story!
Any lentil/bean dish is great alongside loubie, a green bean and tomato combo that’s easy to make with frozen vegetables. (You might cook the green beans and tomatoes separately, or cook some without seasoning, to satisfy your kids.)
Another easy Middle Eastern food is hummus. Try Rachel’s recipe –even kids can make it! (I confess that I’ve been saving time by buying hummus at ALDI recently.)
My partner asked for a birthday dinner of hummus, stuffed grape leaves, olives, tomatoes, and pita bread. I had fun choosing an array of olives from a supermarket olive bar, which is also where I got the grape leaves. (This easy dinner prep left me time to bake his birthday cake !)
Olives are mentioned frequently in the Bible , and Middle Eastern food, in general, is what Jesus ate during his Earthly life. Try a meal like this as you think about his final weeks. Japanese Vegetarian Food
Fish and tofu are delicious baked in homemade teriyaki sauce ! Serve with steamed or stir-fried vegetables over rice or soba noodles , which are made with buckwheat and can be gluten-free.
It’s fun to make your own sushi, or if you don’t have a sushi-rolling mat, try making rice balls that you squeeze together with your hands . Tasty fillings are carrot, cucumber, baked tofu, and tamago omelet.
To make tamago , just mix a little sugar, soy sauce, and rice wine vinegar into eggs and then scramble. It’s traditional to make a very thin omelet and then fold it up in layers–but it still tastes good if you just cook it as scrambled egg! (Use a neutral-flavored oil, not olive oil.) Nicaraguan Vegetarian Food
My family loves Gallo Pinto , a Nicaraguan version of beans and rice –with carrots mixed in and a fried egg on top! The spiciness is very adjustable. We often make it with regular onion when we don’t have green onions on hand. It’s great with avocado, too! Vegetarian French Food
Use up all your bread heels making French toast , and serve breakfast for dinner! Balance the meal with fresh fruit or a cooked fruit sauce using your odd bits of fruit. Once again, a meal made out of scraps feels like a feast.
We like to have a “French picnic” meal of bread, cheese, and fruit –on a day when the weather isn’t at all suitable for a picnic! This simple meal is quick to prepare and perfect with wine . . . or coffee, if you prefer. Fancy cheeses are affordably priced at ALDI or Gordon Food Service . We had cranberry goat cheese, applewood-smoked cheddar, and ordinary cheddar in case Lydia wouldn’t try the fancy cheeses (but she did, with enthusiasm!).
Apples are delicious with cheese, but if you serve a variety of fruit, everyone’s likely to eat more fruit.
“French picnic” dinner makes me think of Jesus because it’s similar to what we eat on Maundy Thursday at our church. Now that I’m accustomed to eating bread, cheese, and fruit when remembering the last evening Jesus spent with his friends , having that meal always reminds me. And isn’t that another way of doing what Jesus asked us to do? “When you eat and drink, remember me.” African Vegetarian Food
I don’t want to leave out a whole continent, but I don’t have a great idea for kid-friendly African food that I’ve cooked myself. That’s an area for us to explore this Lent! If you have any favorite African recipes, please leave them in the comments! I know that Ethiopian restaurants offer an array of tasty vegetable and bean dishes; I just haven’t learned to make any of them at home.
Whatever you’re eating, let each meal remind you to love your neighbor as yourself. Different foods remind us of different neighbors. Use a variety of meals to help your family think about all the different people of the world, all the many things to eat and many ways to fix them, and the love we share when we eat together. Invite some friends to join you!
Meatless eating is deprivation in one way, but it can make us more aware of just how rich our lives are, how many delicious sensations can be packed into one humble bowl. What are your kids’ favorite meatless meals? How have foods from other cultures widened your perspective?

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Who owns falafel as its national dish?

The first part of his post comes from Alexander Lee . The second part reflects my own experiences.
Falafel is an archetypical Middle Eastern dish. Made from ground fava beans, chickpeas or both, these deep-fried balls are a staple of Levantine cuisine. Whether eaten alone as a quick snack, or served in a pitta with salad and tachina-based sauces, they are a common sight across the Levant.
Falafel is as contested as the region itself. While Israelis have fêted it as their national dish, Palestinians see it as the theft of their distinctly Arab speciality. Clearly ownership of this most distinctively Levantine dish was bound up with issues of national identity between the two nations.
Falafel platter with hot sauce, sliced tomato, lettuce, pickled turnip & parsley.
Credit: Abla’ s
Meanwhile the Lebanese want falafel recognised as their own; and the Yemenis say it is they who invented it. This is not just a matter of culinary pride. Mostly arguments about the origins of falafel are refracted through the lens of political rivalries.
Despite all the claims, falafel was almost certainly developed in early modern Egypt. There are no references to anything resembling falafel in pharaonic texts; in any case, the vegetable oil in which falafel was fried was then very expensive. Nor was falafel invented by Coptic Christians as meat-free food for Lent.
Falafel is modern, appearing in Egyptian literature only after British rule (1882). Probably this was because British officers from India may have asked their Egyptian cooks to prepare the Indian cuisine using local ingredients.
Falafel probably emerged in Alexandria, the country’s principal port and home to the largest concentration of British and European troops. At first, its principal ingredient was fava beans, which were grown in large quantities nearby and which became an Egyptian staple under the Muhammad Ali dynasty. From Alexandria, falafel spread across the country, then migrated.
Shortly after WW1, it had reached what is now Lebanon and, in 1933, falafel shops opened in Beirut. Soon falafel travelled down the Red Sea coast towards Yemen, north along the Mediterranean to Turkey and west towards Libya. Each nation generally left the basic recipe unchanged, slightly altering the ingredients to suit their own tastes or to reflect the balance of local agriculture.
Falafel also reached the Jewish communities in Palestine and the Jewish pioneers adopted it readily. Having long grown used to cultural exchange with Muslim neighbours, they gave no thought to whether it was an Arab food or not. They simply integrated it into their own cuisine. It was tasty and filling, and the ingredients could be bought cheaply. Falafel balls were convenient to eat, served either hot or cold.
The Jews who came to Palestine from Eastern Europe, especially during the 1920s and 30s immigration-waves, were more hostile. Suspicious of anything they regarded as Arabic, these Ashkenazi Jews stuck doggedly to their own cuisine, finding falafel alien food.
Independence for Israel came in 1948. Though recipes extolling its nutritious qualities appeared in newspapers, falafel’s popularity was patchy. Two developments changed that:
1] the introduction of rationing. Struggling to cope with the influx of new immigrants, and lacking both food and money, Israel introduced a strict programme of food rationing in 1949. Not only was falafel a good substitute source of protein, but cheap enough for even the poorest families.
2] The second was the arrival of MANY Sephardi Jews from Yemen, Turkey and North Africa. In 1949, 100,690 Sephardim arrived in Israel from these regions, 41% of all immigrants in that year! Having already loved falafel in their native countries, they happily brought it with them to their new home and cooked it regularly.
In the wake of the Arab-Israeli War of 1948-9, there was a concerted effort by the Israeli government to foster a distinctive sense of Israeli national identity and to separate its culture from that of its neighbours. Helped by the fact that many Yemeni Jews soon started opening falafel stalls, the Israeli government incorrectly promoted the idea that falafel had been imported not from Egypt but from Yemen.
By the 1960s, this nationalisation process was complete. Falafel had been identified as the Israeli dish par excellence. It was proudly served on long-haul flights by Israel’s national carrier El Al; and top chefs prepared special dishes in international cookery competitions.
Falafel sandwich with pitta bread, tomato, mint leaves, pickled cucumber, turnip and lettuce
By then falafel had begun to reach more distant shores. Waves of Arab and Turkish migrants in the early 1970s had taken it through Europe, especially Germany. Even in the USA in the late C20th, falafel began to be appreciated by a much wider audience.
**
In my parents’ home, I had never been to a Sephardi synagogue or heard of Sephardi cuisine. Presumably this was because almost the entire Jewish community in Melbourne before and soon after WW2 were from Poland, Russia, Germany or Hungary.
Then I joined a pioneering youth movement in 1963 where the focus was on scouting skills, working the land and Hebrew language. All the movement’s parties celebrated with platters of falafel, chumus, techina, pitta bread and pickled vegetables. Finger food!
Going to Israel the first time, for a Gap Year in 1966, the food in the academy was cheap, fattening and filling, but not very healthy. So although falafel was still not traditional enough for me to love it, some of the other Ashkenazi students from abroad readily adapted.
Then both of my Ashkenazi sons married beautiful Sephardi wives (one family from Alexandria and one family from Damascus) and their diets changed. One son eats falafel and chumus as an entrée before every dinner. The other son has it on the table, with a range of other entrées, every single Sabbath and Holyday dinner.

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Sahara Star celebrates the win of Mabruk at the Times Food and Nightlife Awards 2019

Sahara Star celebrates the win of Mabruk at the Times Food and Nightlife Awards 2019
March, 2019, Mumbai: Adding another cap to its feather, Mabruk – The Mediterranean restaurant won the best Lebanese fine dine cuisine award for the ninth time at the Times Food & Nightlife awards 2019 that was held on 01st March 2019.
The Times Food and Nightlife Awards 2019 is one of the most prestigious award ceremonies for Mumbai restaurants. It is also considered the Oscars of Food and Nightlife. The restaurants are judged by a jury of industry connoisseurs.
The Mabruk, is a Mediterranean restaurant, sets the mood with its casual low seating on a wooden deck and a spectacular view of the lagoon area, the pillar less clear-to-the sky dome as well as the other restaurants. At Mabruk you can enjoy the sophistication and subtleties of Mediterranean cuisines with the exotic ingredients of the Middle and Far East. Chef Jihaad is the man behind all the delicacies prepared at Mabruk and he gets his knowledge from Lebanon.
On this great achievement, Chef Salil Fadnis, Hotel Manager at Sahara Star said, “We are ecstatic on winning this prestigious award for the ninth time. Perfection is something that we strive to accomplish, along with that giving unique yet traditional food to our customers is the goal.”
Mabruk gets the famous dishes of the Mid East to your plate like samboussek, tabouleh and the evergreen falafel. This along with the ambience is what led to this restaurant.
About Sahara Star Hotel
Sahara Star, the flagship hotel of Sahara India Pariwar, is one of India’s most desirable destinations. The 5-star hotel strategically located near Mumbai’s domestic airport magnificently blends Indian mysticism and culture, while personifying the country’s progressive spirit blending peerless hospitality with ultra-modern technology. Creating a paradigm shift, Sahara Star showcases world largest-pillar-less- clear- to- sky dome, an architectural landmark blending hospitality and entertainment to cater one of the most individualized hospitality experiences. Hotel Sahara Star features 348 well-appointed luxurious guestrooms with 25 elegant suites.9 specialty restaurants, 9 unique concepts and 1 inimitable journey. Hotel Sahara Star brings together a sumptuous array of delicacies from across the Globe. The hotel features an unbelievable external façade made of glass and steel post completion. Here, the culture, mystique & hospitality of India blend with modern facility & services to create the finest business-cum-leisure hotel of the country.

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YOU AINT GOT NO CULTSHA

Race is due to ecosystem impact, formed in a place relatively isolated and pressing people to adapt. What color they are, the shape of their nose, the foods they prefer, the furniture they sit on, the way the mothers shape the ideas of the world for their children — all of that has nothing to do with race as a unique physical quality. It has everything to do with culture, which has nothing to do with anatomy. Culture is an invisible mental and emotional system in which humans live. Culture has no color.
https://www.livescience.com › Culture https://www.livescience.com/21478-what-is-culture-definition-of-culture.html ” Jul 12, 2017 – Culture is the characteristics and knowledge of a particular group of people, encompassing language, religion, cuisine, social habits, music and arts. … The word ” culture ” derives from a French term, which in turn derives from the Latin “colere,” which means to tend to the earth and grow, or cultivation and nurture.”
Trump has a very specific culture which is based on immigrant scrambling for money, regardless of ethics, but he yearns to be truly “cultured” in terms of respected European values as described in the paragraph above. He doesn’t have the temperament, the education, or the family that would allow him to be respected in the disguised terms of European royalty — not even as much as past dynasties like Bush, Kennedy, Nixon (oh, sorry, Nixon’s descendants became peripheral.), and to a minor degree Clinton. (Horizontal legacy?) At least these families had an understanding of what culture is.
Money and force (mafia-style second hand surrogate punishers and gate-keepers) are not enough to make one become a member of an existing and respected old culture or to create a new culture. Even before Trump’s mind was diminished by dementia or senility or disease or drug-use, he was not able and would not have recognized a more sophisticated omni-culture or theory of the whole.
The passage that starts here is so good that I couldn’t resist copying some of it, though redacting. If you want more of it, go to: The Center for Advance Research on Language Acquisition (http://carla.umn.edu/index.html) goes a step further, defining culture as shared patterns of behaviors and interactions, cognitive constructs and understanding that are learned by socialization. Thus, it can be seen as the growth of a group identity fostered by social patterns unique to the group.
“Culture encompasses religion, food, what we wear, how we wear it, our language, marriage, music, what we believe is right or wrong, how we sit at the table, how we greet visitors, how we behave with loved ones, and a million other things,”
“The term “Western culture” has come to define the culture of European countries as well as those that have been heavily influenced by European immigration, such as the United States . Western culture has its roots in the Classical Period of the Greco-Roman era and the rise of Christianity in the 14th century. Other drivers of Western culture include Latin, Celtic, Germanic and Hellenic ethnic and linguistic groups.”
The sources cited here above are self-congratulatory retro-thought rather than diagnostic identification of what exists. Some paleontologists are beginning to emphasize the invasion of the steppe horseback peoples much, much earlier. This tilts the argument towards genomic qualities, physical propensities. It is characteristic of “white” culture to project their nature onto everyone else without justification.
Eastern culture “Eastern culture generally refers to the societal norms of countries in Far East Asia (including China , Japan, Vietnam, North Korea and South Korea) and the Indian subcontinent. Like the West, Eastern culture was heavily influenced by religion during its early development, but it was also heavily influenced by the growth and harvesting of rice. . . In general, in Eastern culture there is less of a distinction between secular society and religious philosophy than there is in the West.”
Latin culture “Many of the Spanish-speaking nations are considered part of the Latin culture, while the geographic region is widespread. Latin America is typically defined as those parts of the Central America, South America and Mexico where Spanish or Portuguese are the dominant languages. . . .”
Middle Eastern culture “The countries of the Middle East have some but not all things in common. This is not a surprise, since the area consists of approximately 20 countries, according to PBS . The Arabic language is one thing that is common throughout the region; however, the wide variety of dialect can sometimes make communication difficult. Religion is another cultural area that the countries of the Middle East have in common. The Middle East is the birthplace of Judaism, Christianity and Islam.”
So why are they from the beginning opposed to each other and warring over dominance? Does it come from a diminishing ecology or has Europe seized the labels for their own uses?
African culture “The continent of Africa is essential to all cultures. . . . Africa is home to a number of tribes, ethnic and social groups. One of the key features of this culture is the large number of ethnic groups throughout the 54 countries on the continent. . . .Currently, Africa is divided into two cultural groups: North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. This is because Northwest Africa has strong ties to Middle East, while Sub-Saharan Africa shares historical, physical and social characteristics that are very different from North Africa. . . The harsh environment has been a large factor in the development of Sub-Saharan Africa culture, as there are a number of languages, cuisines, art and musical styles that have sprung up among the far-flung populations.”
Cultures of the Americas ???? This information exists, though most Americans only know “Indians” from the movies and believe that Hispanics are not the same as other peoples indigenous to these connected continents. Like Africa there are many countries and languages, all varying according to their ecology: “fish Indians,” “horse Indians,” “desert Indians,” “jungle Indians”, and the Peoples of the Far North. Someone needs to work on this, create a hunger to know about it. Why should Manhattan island rule the world?
When people of the small towns in the US call themselves “white supremacists” or even “Americans as they were and should be”, they are ignoring history and denying the facts, which is that they are trying to replicate a dominance in Europe they never had — in short, a fantasy, possibly hatched in the horseback hearts of steppe-dwelling hordes. What is the new culture we should be building in which the ecology is a whole planet?

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Pizza and Pasta taking over the world: Italian food tops popular cuisine list, know where Desi food is?

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Is pizza your favorite cheat meal or pasta is your guilty pleasure? You’ll be pleased to know that Italian food has officially been named the most popular cuisine in the world. The YouGov survey examined the eating habits of more than 25,000 people in 24 countries. A total of 34 cuisines were part of the survey and the one that came out on top was Italian food.
Indian food bagged the 9th spot in the survey coming in after Mexican cuisine. The sheer variety of flavors in our cuisine makes it absolutely irresistible.
Italian food came top of the charts, with an average popularity score of 84% across the 24 nations surveyed. It seems that pasta and pizza are universally adored, a fact we don’t find surprising at all. We asked 25,000 people in 24 countries how much they liked 34 national cuisines. Here are the top 5:
1. Italian cuisine – average of 84% in each country who have tried it say they like it2. Chinese – 78%

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Rosewood Hong Kong Opens Its Harbourfront Doors as A Timeless Monument to Residential Luxury

Email Rosewood Hong Kong opens today as a magnificent new ultra-luxury property in the heart of the Victoria Dockside arts and design district on the shores of Victoria Harbour. Situated on one of Hong Kong’s most significant waterfront locations in Tsim Sha Tsui — Kowloon’s dynamic, culturally compelling heart — the property is set to become a grand icon for the city, celebrating the area’s role as Hong Kong’s new creative and cultural epicentre. A Visionary Legacy The opening of Rosewood Hong Kong, the 26 th international property for Rosewood Hotels & Resorts®, is a defining milestone for the group, solidifying its stature as one of the world’s most dynamic hotel brands and leader in global style. This showpiece of the brand’s highest aspirations epitomises Rosewood’s essence and represents the complete manifestation of a differentiated and modern expression of ultra-luxury hospitality for the world’s “affluential explorers.” From the brand’s inception 40 years ago as a fine private home that opened its doors to guests, each Rosewood hotel worldwide continues to be guided by A Sense of Place® philosophy and the concept of the hotel as a living canvas celebrating artistry in all its forms. This spirit reaches its zenith at Rosewood Hong Kong. Guests can experience the first urban outpost of the brand’s pioneering wellness concept; gastronomic innovation showcasing locally grown and artisanal ingredients; masterworks by the most highly acclaimed artists of our generation; supremely stylish, residentially natured gathering and living spaces – all within a masterfully designed and meticulously curated journey in architecturally bold environs commanding the harbour. Rosewood’s opening in Hong Kong marks the evolution of another meaningful historic legacy. The site is the former Holt’s Wharf, dating back to 1910, which was subsequently acquired and developed into New World Centre, a lifestyle magnet for the city in the 1980s, which holds a unique place in the hearts and minds of local residents as a place of discovery and wonderment. New World Centre – a proud expression of Hong Kong’s transition to modernity and establishment as a regional business hub – was the creation of Dr. Cheng Yu-tung and Dr. Henry Cheng, the grandfather and father (respectively) of Rosewood Hotel Group Chief Executive Officer, Sonia Cheng. “With Hong Kong evolving from a business and financial centre to become a true global cultural capital, I wanted to create an iconic property that not only showcases the city’s rich history but also reflects its bright future,” says Sonia Cheng. “New World Centre was conceived as my grandfather’s ultimate gift to Hong Kong, a celebration of its progress, vibrancy and spirit. I hope that Rosewood Hong Kong enhances this legacy and helps fulfill his and my father’s vision for the city that they loved. Rosewood Hong Kong sets bold new benchmarks for design, guest experience, cuisine, and culture. Our ambition is to create a new world standard for ultra-luxury hospitality and a focal point of the vibrant Hong Kong lifestyle, reflecting its incredible dynamism, style and diversity.” A Vertical Estate The Kohn Pedersen Fox-designed, 65-storey exterior pays homage to the city’s impressive verticality. In lush counterpoint are the beautifully landscaped lawn, verdant gardens and terraces with spellbinding harbour views. Renowned hospitality designer Tony Chi of New York studio tonychi, has created a complete and immersive experience for a new age of elevated residential hotel living. An homage to Rosewood’s origins as an aristocratic manor, Chi has conceived the entire hotel as a “vertical estate” which incorporates significant green spaces and outdoor areas throughout, creating openness and room to breathe as a defining element of the Rosewood Hong Kong guest journey. Artful Luxury As visitors transition from the harbourside thoroughfare Salisbury Road by cobblestone drive, the urban din falls away against a backdrop of oversized bonsai, lush topiary and a serene forecourt that fronting the harbour. Guests are greeted by a significant semi-abstract bronze sculpture by the late British sculptor Henry Moore. “Three Piece Reclining Figure, Draped” in the courtyard, featuring one of the artist’s key themes — the human figure in repose – is a mid-century sculptural masterpiece. At the hotel’s entrance on the second floor, a magnificent bronze façade frames the lobby doors with Rosewood Hong Kong’s signature “seal of the house” on the door handles, symbolising the privacy, intimacy and exclusivity that await within. Entering the statuesque yet intimate lobby is akin to entering a refined private residence. At reception, a large window overlooks an ornamental bonsai tree, framing the harbour beyond. Two sizeable contemporary works by American artist Joe Bradley surround the lobby, with their vaulted limestone walls and marbles floors lending an air of soulful, storied elegance. An auxiliary guest lobby evokes the grand rooms of Europe’s stately homes, showcasing oak marquetry ceiling panels, coconut wood columns and a revelatory art moment by contemporary Indian female artist Bharti Kerr. Entitled “The Skin Speaks a Language Not its Own,” the life-sized sculpture of an elephant lying splendidly in repose fills the room with a powerful, emotive presence. Masterful and important art throughout the property includes works by Henry Moore, British artist Damien Hirst, as well as China’s Wang Keping and homegrown Hong Kong artist Wilson Shieh. Significant works are juxtaposed with an eclectic, whimsical approach to decorative arts throughout the hotel. Generously Curated Stays More than 80 per cent of Rosewood Hong Kong’s rooms boast standout harbour vistas, with the remainder featuring verdant Kowloon Peak views overlooking the fabled Lion Rock and distant, scenic mountains. There are dedicated, generous “salons” on each guestroom floor from the 24 th level up. Each features carefully selected objets that reflect Hong Kong’s richly layered past. Guests may linger over a book with a fine tea or a cocktail before retiring to a guestroom where lovingly curated treasures and vintage collectables blend mid-century sophistication and fine modern accents with haute Chinoiserie touches. “For me, Rosewood Hong Kong is the majestic ‘estate on the harbour’ that pays reverent homage to the great founding family that built and operates it, and also the legacy of its surrounding community,” says designer Tony Chi. “Having designed Rosewood London — an elegant mansion in a royal city — and being in the process of refreshing The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel, in New York, an iconic residence in Manhattan’s Upper East Side; there’s a remarkably rich and overarching sense of continuity and a sense of place that binds all these properties together.” The Ultimate in Residential-Inspired Hospitality Generous space and residential luxury are the hallmarks of Rosewood’s 322 light-filled guestrooms, which start at 53 square metres (570 square feet) and include the Grand Harbourview Rooms, boasting panoramic views of Hong Kong Island. Elevated homely comforts include eclectic curios and objets d’art , curated interior details, considered amenities, generous marble bathrooms with freestanding soaking bath and separate, freestanding vanities with hammered copper sinks and twin showers, as well as spacious walk-in closets. Sumptuous textures and finishes weave a tactile tapestry into each and every room. Elegant lacquer panels feature a contemporary take on the octagonal Chinese bagua symbol — a motif that subtly appears on property’s floors, ceilings, walls and doors – and is juxtaposed with chequered Loro Piana navy fine wool wall covering for a sartorial touch. Distinguished Suite Stays Rosewood Hong Kong is home to the highest number of suites of any Hong Kong luxury hotel and also some of the largest. The 91 suites, starting from 92 square metres (990 square feet), offer carefully curated stays, bespoke services, and inviting, artful interiors, with layered vignettes of carefully chosen custom furnishings that lend an air of having been lovingly acquired over time. Contemporary artworks with an accent on Hong Kong’s art talents are stylishly placed. Suite guests enjoy exclusive services including access to Rosewood’s Manor Club executive lounge, personal butler service, monogrammed pillow cases and robes, along with personalised amenities from arrival to departure. On each floor, the 123-square-metre (1,323-square-foot) Grand Harbour Corner Suites offer glittering panoramic harbour views from every vantage point. In addition, Rosewood Hong Kong features 18 of the most outstanding signature suites in the metropolis, each with its own unique character to meet the diverse needs of today’s sophisticated travellers. The crowning jewel amongst them, the superlative 1,000-square-metre (10,764-square-foot) Harbour House floor boasts spectacular views from private sky terraces on the 57th level and unique décor and design. Enhancing the lavish interiors, a garden oasis features harbour view sun decks and private lap pools. Located on the same floor, the Harbour House and Garden House can be combined, offering an entirely private five-bedroom retreat complete with state-of-the-art private gym. Extended stays for the ultimate in fuss-free city living will be amply catered to by the exclusive Rosewood Residences, set to launch this Spring. Introducing 186 spacious, inspired interiors and uniquely positioned luxury accommodations designed for longer-term stays, the Rosewood Residences Hong Kong will offer a separate private entrance and dedicated 53rd floor club facilities, including an indoor swimming pool and private fitness centre, along with a host of special services and amenities for guests. Privileged Retreat With its prime position on the 40th floor affording spellbinding Victoria Harbour views and multiple outdoor terraces, Rosewood’s signature executive lounge concept, the Manor Club, extends a sense of residential refinement to suite stays. Offering 24-hour service in an exclusive space, all-encompassing personalised services include elegant complimentary food presentations and handcrafted beverages throughout the day, a distinguished bar overlooking the harbour, a games room with pool table, as well as a host of auxiliary amenities. Authentic Dining Each of Rosewood Hong Kong’s eight dining concepts possesses a distinctive character and showcases creativity and a contemporary interpretation of accessible gastronomy and refined beverage craft. The hotel’s culinary programme is characterised by an accent on local cottage producers and seasonality via its Partners in Provenance programme. Holt’s Café is named after the historic Holt’s Wharf upon which Rosewood Hong Kong stands today, and elevates traditional Hong Kong cha chaan teng dining culture to an upscale, lively contemporary experience. With glamourous interiors featuring inspiration from Europe’s fin de siècle grand cafés and brasseries, Holt’s Café serves a diverse mix of comforting creations marrying Cantonese dishes with international influences. The Tea Conservatory features an extensive list featuring Chinese, premium aged, single-origin herbal blends and rare vintage teas. The Legacy House Chinese restaurant showcases sophisticated interiors designed by Melbourne’s award-winning BAR Studio and is blessed with an expansive outdoor terrace presenting sweeping views of Victoria Harbour. Two distinct experiences include the bustling main dining room and the seven privileged private dining rooms, each modelled after a different landmark moment in the life of Cheng family founding patriarch, Dr. Cheng Yu-Tung. As Rosewood Hong Kong’s monument to nuanced Cantonese cuisine, The Legacy House pays homage to Dr. Cheng’s significant life. Honouring his Shunde roots while offering much-loved, updated Chinese favourites, the menu places an emphasis on regional Shunde cuisine, which is renowned for its elaborate preparations that bring out the inherent flavours of the pristine ingredients. DarkSide bar is destined to become Hong Kong’s most sought-after destination for premium drinks in a handsome setting, offering speciality cocktails, coveted vintage cigars, a choice selection of wine and spirits, and nightly live jazz sessions. The al fresco outdoor terrace overlooking Victoria Harbour is the perfect spot from which to enjoy a fine cigar and a distinguished libation. The Butterfly Room , Rosewood Hong Kong’s inviting all-day lounge, speaks of comfort and elegantly restrained luxury, courtesy of contemporary art and custom furnishings. Guests are invited to enjoy refined continental breakfasts, chic coffee breaks, sophisticated pre-dinner drinks and small plates. Afternoon Tea is a show-stopping highlight, as patrons are transported to some of Europe’s most exquisite tea rooms with savoury bites, irresistible pastries and indulgent sweets. At The Butterfly Patisserie , glittering confections take centre stage. Modelled after a high-end jewellery atelier, the elegant environs of The Butterfly Patisserie showcase breathtaking centrepieces of tiered cakes, rows of artisan gelatos and sorbets, and glass walk-in display cases in every twinkling, artful corner. Majestic Weddings and Events Set over the third and fourth floors, 3,200 square metres (34,450 square feet) of expansive meetings and event space are enhanced by one of Hong Kong’s few truly private garden venues: an elegantly landscaped lawn with immersive Victoria Harbour views. Lending an air of exclusivity and distinction, a dedicated event arrival space on the second floor opens to an elegant old world staircase, creating an unrivalled setting for grand entrances. Bathed in natural light that floods through its picturesque windows, a series of beguilingly beautiful social spaces on the third floor frame the 1,000-square-metre (10,700-square-foot), pillarless Grand Ballroom. With an accent on residential luxury, the event galleries offer distinguished, versatile meeting spaces with floor-to-ceiling windows coupled with a grandiose private kitchen and entertaining area. In the Grand Ballroom, an automated skyfold partition lends customisable drama, with faceted, geometrically-shaped chandeliers that add glamour and can be lowered for greater intimacy. The ambience is reminiscent of the lavish, palatial ballrooms of Europe’s stately homes. The Pavilion on the fourth floor offers 1,000 square metres (10,700 square feet) of superlative, residential style event space including the 300-square-metre (3,122-square-foot) Pavilion Hall with dramatic floor-to-ceiling windows. A master stroke for private meetings and events, The Pavilion is home to four salons, animated by a dedicated private show kitchen. The fourth floor event space also features, in a marriage of comfort and beauty, The Orangery, where each corner of its 118 square metres (1,270 square feet) space pays homage to refined elegance. From the expansive covered terrace overlooking the Lawn, to the dove blue, suede-swathed, and pastel lacquer interiors, The Orangery is an inspirational destination to raise a glass and toast life’s most cherished, magical moments – be they bridal or occasional. Rosewood Hong Kong’s Events Studio is a showcase of the property’s event accessories and accoutrements, giving guests the opportunity to curate a customised event and bring their vision to life in every detail. Transformative Wellness In addition to Rosewood Hong Kong’s outdoor infinity pool and state-of-the-art fitness centre overlooking the harbour, the property will host the first urban outpost of Asaya, Rosewood’s signature integrative wellness offering, in Autumn 2019. Following the platform’s launch at Rosewood Phuket in 2017, Asaya – a word derived from Sanskrit to signify the setting of intention or hope – is founded on the key objective of empowering self-change and transformation. Set over two dedicated floors, Asaya will revolve around specific individual wellness goals, supported by alternative therapies and rituals, enriching fitness and lifestyle activities, healthy eating plans, a dedication to pure, authentic ingredients and specially designed social spaces for relaxation and reflection, with a membership programme that aims to build a sense of community both for local residents and global guests alike.

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Book ~ “Every Day Easy Air Fryer: 100 Recipes Bursting with Flavor” (2018) Urvashi Pitre

From Goodreads ~ Everybody knows how difficult it can be to get a delicious meal on the table night after night, not to mention a healthy one made from real and readily-available ingredients. Enter the air fryer, the must-have, revolutionary kitchen device.
As Urvashi Pitre will show you, the air fryer makes home cooking easy. Every one of the recipes in this book can be made in an hour or less, and many are on the table in as little as 30 minutes.
You won’t find “cream of anything” cans in the ingredient list; instead you’ll start with fresh ingredients – healthful meats and vegetables – and let the air fryer do the hard work.
In her signature way, Pitre will walk you through the simple process so you can learn to use your air fryer like an expert in no time. And there is no shortage of flavors – with recipes inspired by authentic Indian, Korean, Mexican cuisines and more, including Poblano Cheese Frittata, Thai Chicken Sate, Chicken Fajitas, Shrimp Scampi, and Chinese Spare Ribs, to name just a few. And because you’re using an air fryer, you won’t need to cook with loads of oil to get incredibly tasty results.
Gord and I received an air fryer as a Christmas gift in December. We liked it so much that we bought a second one. Since then, I’ve been looking for fun things to cook in it.
The content of this book includes an introduction, a few words about the recipes (easy, authentic, fresh foods, etc.), how an air fryer is different from an oven, why air fry, air fryer myths and realities, helpful accessories and troubleshooting.
The recipe sections are:
Eggs & cheese Vegetables Chicken/poultry Seafood Beef, pork & lamb Desserts Sauces & spice mixes
There were lots of delicious sounding recipes that didn’t sound too hard that I would like to try. This cookbook was different than I was expecting as instead of having “American” food, for example, like chicken wings, home fries, pork chops, etc., the recipes were more “ethnic” like African Piri-Piri Chicken Drumsticks, Tandoori Chicken and Indian Mint & Chile Kebabs. Plus she made personal comments about the recipes … like how she grew up eating Chile-Cheese Toast, how through trial and error she adapted some recipes, etc.
I liked that prep times, cooking times and dietary considerations (grain-free, nut-free, gluten-free, paleo, vegetarian, etc.) were provided. It would have been nice if the nutrition (calories. amount of fat, protein, carbs, etc.) had been listed.
There are full-colour pictures accompanying some of the recipes. I read this book on my iPad and it was formatted well for it.
Here is a sample recipe that had a picture …

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