What’s on in Brisbane this weekend

What’s on in Brisbane this weekend

Image Lion Dancers Frolic During Hong Kong Lunar New Year Parade 0:33
The streets of Tsim Sha Tsui, in Hong Kong, were filled with revelers on the evening of February 5 as the Lunar New Year parade commenced, kicking off the Year of the Pig. This footage shows lion dancers participating in the parade. According to the South China Morning Post, the parade, organized by Cathay Pacific, featured a selection of carnival floats and international performers from Europe and Asia. Credit: brookscjosh via Storyful February 5th 2019 2 days ago /display/newscorpaustralia.com/Web/NewsNetwork/Network News/National/ Jacques Ha poses for a photograph at Chung Tian Temple, Priestdale, Thursday, January 10, 2019 (AAP Image/Richard Walker) Source:News Corp Australia Looking for something fun to do tomorrow? Look no further, here are our top picks for things to do this weekend in Brisbane.
FRIDAY
Swing That Music
For one night only, crooner Tom Burlinson, (Now We’re Swinging, Frank — A Life in Song), jazz vocalist Emma Pask, The Voice Australia season 2) and musician Ed Wilson, (Daly Wilson Big Band) and the highly-acclaimed All Star Big Band (Frank- The Sinatra Story In Song), perform timeless classics from artists such as Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington, capturing the dynamic sound and glamour of the 50s and 60s big band era including hits like It Don’t Mean A Thing, In the Mood, Mr Bojangles and Mack the Knife. Details: Concert Hall, QPAC, $79.90
SATURDAY
For the Love of the Game Multicultural Sports Festival
The inaugural Brisbane Multicultural Sports Festival will connect with local and migrant communities over the love of sport. Eagle Sports Complex will be a buzz with fans of volleyball and football as they watch teams compete over two full days for great prizes. Watch cricket, volleyball and football (soccer) across three locations at the complex.
Details: F.R. Caterson Park, 730 Mt Gravatt-Capalaba Road, Mansfield, Saturday February 9, and Sunday February 10, 9am-5pm, free
brisbane.qld.gov.au
Eurovision Australia Decides
Ten of Australia’s most established acts will battle it out to win the chance to represent the country at global music phenomenon Eurovision. Multi-platinum artist Kate Miller-Heidke, tenor Mark Vincent, pop quartet Sheppard and electric soul duo Electric Fields four of the contenders. The contest will be televised live on SBS and the winner decided by public vote.
Hosted by Joel Creasey and Myf Warhurst.
Details: Gold Coast Convention Centre, from $25
gccec.com.au
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Experience your favourite movies transformed with the music of a live symphony orchestra in the Harry Potter Film Concert Series. For the first time ever, audiences can rediscover the magic of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire while a live symphony orchestra performs Patrick Doyle’s unforgettable score and Harry PotterTsoars across the big screen in high definition.
Details: Brisbane Convention Centre, 1:30pm and 7:30pm, from $59
bcec.com.au
Chinese New Year Caboolture Town Square
Saturday February 9 See traditional Asian music and dance performances, including a Red Dragon Traditional Lion Dance, Chinese Orchestra performances, magic show and a drumming spectacular and feast on Asian flavours in an Eat Street-style food market.
Details: 4 Hasking Street, Caboolture, free
moretonbay.qld.gov.au
Chung Tian Temple Jacques Ha and Stephen Chang at Chung Tian Temple ahead of Lunar New Year festivities. Picture: AAP Image/Richard Walker Source:News Corp Australia
Saturday February 9 will be a traditional Buddhist chanting service at 10am and food fair; Sunday February 10 is the cultural open day with a baby blessing children’s puppet show and pantomime and Kung fu diaplsy.
Details: 1034 Underwood Rd, Priestdale
chungtian.org.au
Chinatown Gold Coast
The fifth annual Lunar New Year celebration at the Gold Coast Chinatown from 4pm includes a free screening of Babe at 6.45pm. There’s also a pop up laneway bar, Asian street food market and fireworks at 9pm.
Details: Young and Davenport Streets, Southport
goldcoast.qld.gov.au
The Lanes, Fortitude Valley
Follow the chimes of the Chinese Dragon through the Bakery and California Lanes in Fortitude Valley. Chow down on Brisbane’s most famous dumplings (hailing from Northern China!) from Fat Dumpling or an exploration of the delicacies of Korea and Japan from Nom Nom Korean and Nom Nom Ramen and Sake Bar then get a and make 2019 resolutions and blessings upon the Wishing Tree in Bakery Lane.
Details: Chinese lion dance through Bakery Lane at 8.30pm and California Lane at 9.30pm, free entry
facebook.com/events/533475513807618/
Westfield Garden City
Friday and Saturday February 8-9 6pm-8pm; and on Saturday February 9 the Choinese Choir performs 11.20am-1.30pm. Childrens can create their own Chinese lanterns and lucky red envelope through to Sunday February 10.
Details:
SUNDAY
Play On Closing Ceremony
Join UQ Art Museum for an afternoon of sport and creativity to celebrate the closing of its exhibition Play On: The art of sport. The Queensland Firebirds, Football Queensland, Queensland NRL, Queensland Reds and Sporting Wheelies and Disabled Association Queensland will be taking part. There will be face painting, jumping castle and scavenger hunt.
Details: UQ Art Musuem, St Lucia, 2pm-6pm, free
art-museum.uq.edu.au
Inala Food Trail
The Inala Food Trail is a food discovery experience, showcasing the ingredients and menus of Inala. The festival hosts a $2-$5 food trail with cooking demonstrations and an incredible selection of cuisines. The Inala Food Trail is the authentic foodie event not to be missed.
Details: Inala Plaza Shopping Centre and Inala Civic Centre, Corner of Corsair Avenue and Kittyhawk Drive, Inala, Sunday February 10, 11am-4pm
brisbane.qld.gov.au
The Minni Festival of Indian Dance
From Bollywood to Bhangra, Garba to Kathak and Tapori — Brisbane has an incredible and thriving Indian dance scene. Join our city’s best performers and experience the many incredible forms of Indian Dance in the Queen Street Mall. Featuring Dance Masala, Tapori Squad, Gujratri Association of Queensland and Infinity Kathak.
Details: Queen Street Mall, Sunday February 10, 11am-1pm, free
Sarah Millican Catch Sarah Millican this weekend at Brisbane City Hall Source:Supplied
Following on from her fifth sold-out UK tour, Control Enthusiast marks 10 years since Sarah established herself as one of the leading lights of the British comedy scene by winning the Best Newcomer Award at the 2008 Edinburgh Fringe. Since then she has been a regular on QI and Live at the Apollo.
Details: Brisbane City Hall,
ticketek.com.au
Wham! Glam! Thank You Japan
Band Bertie Page Clinic share their love of Japan through brand new rock cabaret show. The back beat of classic rock combines with Japan’s national instrument, the koto, to tell the tale of how the West collided with Japan after two and a half centuries of its self imposed isolation from the world. A renowned geisha from Japan has collaborated on the project.
Details The Brightside, Warner St Fortitude Valley, from 7pm, $20
ALL WEEKEND
Sunny Park
Wednesday February 6 and Thursday February 7 4pm — 5.30pm and Saturday February 9 and Sunday February 10 2,30pm-4.30pm Calligrapher Eric Lin, will scribe a special New year message as a memento.
Wednesday February 6 -Friday February 8 Kids can make their own pig lantern, 4pm-5.30pm.
Wednesday February 6 -Friday February 8 Lion Dance and Kung Fu performances will be on show outside ALDI or Woolworths at 4pm plus a neon lion dance performing on the outdoor dining deck.
Details: Sunnybank Plaza and Sunny Park Shopping Centre, cnr Mains Rd and McCullough St, Sunnybank, free entry
experiencesunnybank.com.au
Sunnybank Plaza
Monday February 4-10 Lion Dance performances will be on show each day commencing outside Hoyts Cinemas at 10.30am, with Kung Fu demonstrations also included at weekend performances.
Wednesday February 6 and Friday and Saturday February 8 and 9 Demonstrations
by the International Wushu Tai Chi Academy in the Sunnybank Plaza Foodcourt at 11.30am
Wednesday February 6 and Friday and Saturday February 8 and 9 Calligraphy Master Eric Lin will scribe a special Lunar New Year message as a treasured memento of this year’s celebrations. Eric’s team will also be running a ‘try-it-yourself’ station, where you can experience this beautiful art form first hand, 11am-1pm.
Thursday, February 7 from 1.30pm Watch as professional carvers from Ice Art transform a 1m, 140kg block of ice into a detailed Lunar New Year sculpture.
Wednesday February 6 to Sunday February 10 See the ancient art of fruit and vegetable carving, transforming every day fruit and vegetables into colourful works of art; from 11am-3pm.
Monday, February 4-Sunday February 10 Visiting artists from the Australian Asia Art Network Association, will demonstrate a wide variety of authentic handicrafts, painting and children’s toy making, 11am-3pm
Wednesday February 6 to Sunday February 10 Master Artist Jenny Gao, founder of the Xiu Zhen Ge Centre of Embroidery, will demonstrating the ancient art of Chinese Embroidery 11am-3pm. Workshops $20.
experiencesunnybank.com.au
Queen Street Mall
Tuesday February 5 Lion dances outside the Wintergarden at noon and 12,30pm and dragon dance Queen Street Mall stage at 1pm
Friday February 8 Traditional Chinese Music Quartet, Queen Street Mall Stage at noon, 1pm and 2pm; lion dance on bamboo pole outside Wintergarten at noon; Chinese lute performances at Milanos 4.30pm, 5.30pm and 6.30pm; lion dance outside Wintergarten at 5pm
Saturday February 9 Brisbane Chinese Festival with traditional Asian food and market stalls Reddacliff Place 9am-6pm; lion dance noon outside Wintergarten, Chinese lute performances outside Milanos at 12.30pm, 1.30pm and 2.30pm, and a grand parade of 2500 street performers leaving from King George Square at 5pm and weaving its way through the CBD.
Sunday, February 10 The Brisbane Chinese Festival continues at Reddacliff Place 9am-6pm; plus a mini-Festival of Indian Dance on the Queen Street Mall stage 11am-1pm;
brisbane’qld.gov.au
Details : Queen Street Mall, free
brisbane.qld.gov.au
Sweet Charity
Naomi Price (Beautiful: The Carole King Musical) stars in this reimagining of the Broadway musical about a young New York City dance-hall hostess navigating her way through misfortune in life and love. Includes original hits like Big Spender and The Rhythm of Life.
Details : Brisbane Powerhouse, until February 10, from $59
brisbanepowerhouse.org
The Designers’ Guide: Easton Pearson Archive
This exhibition of 200 garments designed by Pamela Easton and Lydia Pearson from 1989-2016 tells a story about Australian fashion.
Details : Museum of Brisbane, level 3, City Hall, $9-12, runs until April 22

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Raffles Singapore Unveils New Culinary Concepts with Celebrity Chefs

Latest Travel News
Singapore (Singapore) – February 6, 2019 ( travelindex.com ) – Raffles Singapore unveiled today its new line-up of dining experiences, which combine the hotel’s much-loved culinary traditions with contemporary dining concepts by renowned celebrity chefs. Each dining concept promises to tantalise the senses and has been carefully selected to enhance the famed ‘Raffles Experience’ for the local community and the discerning travellers.
Gourmets and gourmands, discover the Best Restaurants for Fine Dining in Singapore only at Top25Restaurants.com/singapore
“For more than 100 years the dining venues at Raffles Singapore have been recognised as an integral part of the vibrant and ever changing local bar and dining scene, exciting the local community as well as city guests alike. Continuing with our tradition and commitment of the highest level of friendly, engaging and anticipatory service, we are more than excited to introduce concepts with partner chefs, who have a reputation of operating successful venues around the world, while at the same time, creating culinary experiences that are new and distinct to Singapore,” said Christian Westbeld, General Manager, Raffles Singapore.
New Celebrity Chefs Dining Concepts In 1899, Raffles Singapore was the first hotel in the city to hire a French chef, introducing travellers and Singapore to authentic French flavours. Fast-forward almost 120 years, and the Grand Dame is once again at the forefront of a culinary renaissance. The following are a series of culinary ‘firsts’ that Raffles Singapore will be introducing when the iconic hotel reopens.
BBR by Alain Ducasse Bar & Billiard Room (BBR) continues to evolve with a new chapter by acclaimed Chef Alain Ducasse, who will be presenting his first Mediterranean sharing and grill concept in the world, titled BBR by Alain Ducasse. The unique concept takes customers on a culinary journey along the Mediterranean coast, complemented by a modern and vibrant ambience. In true Bar & Billiard Room fashion, dining at the restaurant will also be accompanied by a lively bar scene that is fun, relaxed and perfect for social gatherings.
Alain Ducasse said, “I could not dream of a better location than the landmark Raffles Singapore to bring the Ducasse restaurant experience for the first time to Singapore. My team and I look forward to adding another culinary destination for Singapore’s varied international clientele.”
Seduced by the flavours of the Mediterranean at a young age, Monsieur Ducasse reveals the essence of Portugal, Spain, Italy and France in BBR by Alain Ducasse. It is a modern, energetic, vibrant and accessible gathering place to meet, exchange and discover the culinary traditions of this region.
With the new concept, the 122-year-old restaurant, which started as a club during British colonial rule, will continue to be the social gathering space of choice for travellers and the local community alike. Serving sharing plates and regular-sized dishes, this bar and restaurant is convivial and cosy – the perfect place to meet with friends. It features a high energy open kitchen with charcoal grills and wood-fired pizza ovens as well as a lively bar and lounge that will serve a selection of spirits, cocktails, beers, wines and wine cocktails. Additionally, the highly anticipated Raffles Sunday Brunch with a reputation of being one of the city’s most indulgent Sunday experiences will be returning when BBR by Alain Ducasse opens.
Gourmets and gourmands, discover the Best Restaurants for Fine Dining in Singapore only at Top25Restaurants.com/singapore
La Dame de Pic One of the world’s top female chefs with three Michelin stars, Anne-Sophie Pic, will debut her entry into Asia with a remarkable restaurant in Raffles Singapore. The restaurant, La Dame de Pic, Raffles Singapore invites guests to discover the world of Anne-Sophie’s culinary identity, which reflects her search for aromatic complexity, combinations of flavours and powerful tastes that evoke emotions. The restaurant’s drinks menu presents an elaborate and diverse collection of pairings to add both intensity and harmony in the delicate art of tasting; consisting of wines, cocktails, whisky, sake, tea, coffee, dashi, broth and consommés. The wine list in particular offers a wide international base that leans towards the French regions, with a particular focus on Anne-Sophie’s birthplace, the Rhône Valley.
Located in the hotel’s dining room at the Main Building, the contemporary chic restaurant is beautifully designed with a graceful and soft palette that is reminiscent of Anne-Sophie’s favourite colours and materials: pastel shades and natural decorative elements such as leather or wood. The renowned chef is also a third-generation Michelin starred chef, following the footsteps of her grandfather and father, perfectly reflecting Raffles Singapore’s rich heritage.
“Making our debut in Asia at Raffles Singapore is a very natural choice for me. Like Raffles, the Pic family’s culinary heritage spans more than a century. Just like this beautiful hotel that will become one of our overseas residences, we are storytellers and constant seekers of excellence. Together, we share the vision to provide distinctive experiences to our guests, delivered with innovation that combines both tradition and change,” said Anne-Sophie. “It is my personal belief that to ensure our guests are happy, it is essential to be anchored in the present while not forgetting our roots and to be creative in order to imagine.”
yì by Jereme Leung Helmed by one of the most influential chefs in the modern Chinese culinary movement, celebrity MasterChef Jereme Leung returns home to Singapore with yì by Jereme Leung. The contemporary Chinese restaurant will be located on Level 3 at the newly restored Raffles Arcade. yì, which stands for art in the Chinese language, awakens your appetite and senses. Alluding to the fine art of Chinese dining, it references centuries of culinary mastery woven into the intricacies of Chinese cuisine presented in the restaurant.Fr om Cantonese classics to adaptations of China’s ancient delicacies, Jereme will be using single sourced and seasonal ingredients with a contemporary approach to deliver refinement and sincerity.
The restaurant is designed with modern sophisticated detailing and a soft white palette amidst the colonial architecture. Guests can also explore an immersive multi-sensory dining experience in the Experience Room with poetic dishes curated to evoke all five senses. For the hosting of private affairs, intimate private dining rooms are also available.
Jereme said, “While I have lived abroad for most of my career, the formative years which I spent working in Singapore and Hong Kong were so important to defining my approach and style of cooking. Opening yì by Jereme Leung at Raffles Singapore is an honour and I am excited to be able to work with some of the best minds in the Singapore industry and present my personal take on Chinese cuisine. These dishes reflect what I believe the future of Chinese cuisine should be 20 years from today. It is not fusion, not ‘east-meets-west’; rather, it is about capturing the essence of provincial ethnic Chinese cuisines. With careful focus being placed on healthy and seasonal food produce, it will create authentic taste profiles that are enhanced by modern culinary techniques.”
Butcher’s Block The refreshed Raffles Arcade will also see an introduction of a vibrant steakhouse, Butcher’s Block. Here, the focus is on the world’s finest cuts of single sourced meats, showcased in The Vault, a glass meat cooler situated next to the Open Kitchen where the chef’s butcher block is and where meats are prepared and cooked to perfection. Guests are given personal recommendations by our resident meat specialists, based on their individual tastes. Seated amidst a lively ambience set with cobalt blue hues complemented with dark wood panelling, the restaurant features communal tables for exceptional gatherings, complete with a wine library that houses more than 100 different wine labels.
Refreshed Signature Dining Experiences Return to Delight
Signature dining experiences that over the years have come to be synonymous with the hotel make their return to delight, with many of these returning favourites incorporating subtle tributes to the hotel’s 130-year history and heritage.
Tiffin Room A part of Raffles Singapore’s history since 1892, Tiffin Room continues to celebrate the heritage and flavours of North India with our resident Indian Chef. The restaurant offers an evocative dining journey across the North Indian palate, from Rajasthan to Punjab to Lucknow through a refreshed semi-buffet lunch and ala carte dinner. Authentic specialties served in the eponymous tiffin boxes are prepared with perfectly balanced spices, paired with classic Indian brews and beverages. The restaurant will also present an interactive dining experience with tableside service by chefs, complete with freshly ground spices to elevate the experience.
The restored interior décor of the restaurant includes reinstating the wooden floorboards in Tiffin Room to bring back features from the early 1900s based on research by our heritage consultants. Intricately patterned wood and mirror wall panelling add richness and create a signature visual language while colourful displays of Tiffin boxes are imbued with historical notes but modern in feel.
Long Bar Home of the Singapore Sling for over a hundred years, the Long Bar’s plantation-inspired décor will be refreshed, and the famous Long Bar counter restored. Long Bar continues to be the heritage bar for visitors to Singapore to enjoy the most iconic cocktail of the city.
The Lobby The classic Raffles Afternoon Tea experience will be served at a new location – the iconic Grand Lobby of the Raffles Singapore. Guests can indulge in one of the hotel’s great traditions – a truly unique and refined Afternoon Tea with a distinct sense of heritage – in the newly restored lobby. The Raffles Afternoon Tea is perfect for sophisticated and elegant celebrations, serving classic sandwiches, home-baked scones and cakes as well as seasonal indulgences, complemented by a curated collection of exquisite teas and Champagnes.
Writers Bar Established as a tribute to famous writers that have come through the doors of Raffles Singapore over the years, Writers Bar will be expanded to a full bar with bespoke craft cocktails, wines and spirits. Decked in luxuriously appointed furnishings, lovingly curated mementos and books, referencing the literary legacy of Raffles, the bar will be a sophisticated and serene refuge kept exclusive to residents and restaurant patrons; keeping this a place for discreet elegance and intimate conversations.
Raffles Courtyard Exuding a garden style and welcoming vibe, Raffles Courtyard is the city’s social space in a lushly landscaped alfresco venue at the Raffles Arcade. This friendly bar and lounge is open all day, offering guests a garden respite against a colonial architectural backdrop, complete with refreshing shared summer drinks and a selection of Southeast Asian small plates, including authentic Singaporean delights.
Ah Teng’s Café Raffles’ new takeaway café is named after a famous local baker of the same name, who used to own a shop in the neighbourhood back in the 1900s. Ah Teng’s Café serves visitors, the surrounding community and travellers alike with freshly made cold beverages, a selection of premium coffee, tea and homemade bakery, pastries and artisanal ice-creams for takeaway.
Pierre Burgade, Executive Chef, Raffles Singapore, who oversees the Hotel’s culinary landscape portfolio, said, “It is an incredible privilege to be given the opportunity to update these time-honoured Raffles signatures while also curating the stellar line-up of celebrity chefs for this iconic hotel. The deliberate and careful curation of the new dining concepts aims to elevate Singapore’s culinary landscape and makes our hotel an all-in-one gastronomic journey for guests and visitors alike.”
“We are pleased to embark on the meticulous restoration of Raffles Singapore, a distinctive hotel that is emblematic of Katara Hospitality’s commitment to create extraordinary experiences on the backdrop of iconic heritage hotels and provide unsurpassed service to our esteemed guests,” said Mr. Hamad Abdulla Al-Mulla, Chief Executive Officer of Katara Hospitality, a globally recognised hospitality owner, developer and operator who is also the owner of Raffles Singapore.
“Since opening its doors in 1887, Raffles Singapore has maintained a lasting legacy as a landmark hotel, hosting some of the world’s most famous and elite personalities. As a National Monument of Singapore and one of the few remaining 19th century hotels in the world, the hotel’s restoration is a testament to our continued pursuit in preserving portraits of historic charm, while growing Katara Hospitality’s portfolio of iconic properties in key travel destinations. Raffles Singapore is no exception, with its carefully implemented restoration programme that is poised to unveil contemporary charm and elegance; reminiscent of the luxurious splendour of Katara Hospitality hotels,” added Mr. Al-Mulla.
About Raffles Singapore Opened in 1887, Raffles Singapore is one of the few remaining great 19th century hotels in the world. Till today, its architecture is perfectly preserved both inside and out, giving it an intoxicating blend of luxury, history and classic colonial design. Within its walls are more than a hundred expansive suites, framed by polished teak verandas and white marble colonnades, clustered around lush tropical gardens. Each is serviced by the legendary Raffles butlers and offers every modern convenience necessary.
Raffles Singapore is currently undergoing a careful and sensitive restoration that is being carried out in three phases. The hotel is now fully closed with a grand reopening planned in the first quarter of 2019. The Raffles Gift Shop continues to be in operation at its temporary location on 3 Seah Street, around the corner from the hotel.
The restoration of Raffles Singapore is designed to ensure that we retain what is so special about Raffles – the ambience, the service, the charm and the heritage of the hotel. It is also designed for Raffles Singapore to stay relevant and distinctive by moving with the times and with its guests and adapting to the changing needs of the well-travelled and Singapore’s community Contact Us | About Us | Blog | Terms | Privacy | Advertising Guide | Help | Feedback Copyright © 2016 BestDestination.TV, Travelindex Media and Respective Rights Owners

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idli street Tirupati grand opening very soon

About us Traditional South Indian Treat
Idli street now offering Traditional South Indian delicacies now in Tirupati.
Welcome to Idli Street, a Traditional South Indian Food Now in Hyderabad . At Idli Street, We endeavor to cater a distinctive menu to food conscious customers and outshine the magnificence of traditional south Indian cuisine. Glorifying the importance, vitality and overall richness of nutritional value hidden in south Indian cuisine, fueled up by the authentic new recipes artfully originated by our chefs,
We aim to cater people irrespective of their age, ethnicity, region or religion.Giving south Indian food a Traditional new taste and showing it to the world in a new light is our primary motive.
Idli street is established to give a new colour and glamour to the south Indian cuisine (breakfast).
Idli Street’s menu presents various types of idli, dosa and many other mouth melting South Indian delicacies which can be consumed at any meal of the day, either for breakfast and brunch or for lunch and evening snacks.
Each recipe has its own delicacy, deliciousness, Richness with untamed nutritional value that nourishes the body and soul with substantial energy to work effortlessly and efficiently to carry out your work throughout the day.
Our Menu Includes:
http://www.idlistreet.com
Any Time Breakfast (ATB) Mid day Meals ( Lunch Varieties) Mouth Melting Chinese Cuisine Evening Special Menu Mocktails Kids Specials we believe in ” Eat Healthy and Live Strong”
For more info visit us at http://www.idlistreet.com
call us on 8143650999 for a franchise
A brand of JFC Food Consulting LLP

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Chef of the Week: Dez Turland, Executive Chef at Brend Hotels in Devon & Cornwall

Chef of the Week: Dez Turland, Executive Chef at Brend Hotels in Devon & Cornwall
What’s your role at Brend Hotels? I’m based and work out of Saunton Sands Hotel in North Devon which is part of the Brend Hotels group. My position has developed over the years from Development Chef to now a role of Marketing & PR Chef developing the Brend brand through cookery demonstrations/judging competitions and importantly nurturing the talent that we have within the group.
How long have you worked at your current restaurant? I started work with Brend Hotels in 1991 as Head Chef of the Royal Duchy in Falmouth before taking on the role in 2007 as Development Chef. In 2010 I moved to North Devon to oversee food operations at Saunton Sands Hotel.
Where did your passion for cooking come from and where did you learn your skills? I’m very lucky to have come from a family with European values about food, as my mother is Austrian therefore food always played an important part of growing up. As for learning skills I was taught the basic (which every chef should have) at Halesowen College, but you never stop learning you always develop and improve.
What do you enjoy most about being a chef? My role now allows me to get out and about and meet farmers, fishermen and producers and I really believe in building close working relationships so much so that a lot of our suppliers have become good friends.
Name three ingredients you couldn’t cook without. Food is constantly evolving and new methods and ingredients are being introduced into kitchens but to me as a chef there are three that you’ll always need no matter what, they are salt (I always use Cornish Sea Salt), butter (a good quality unsalted butter) and garlic (probably because of my European upbringing).
Which piece of kitchen equipment couldn’t you live without? Again this is a difficult because there’s been tremendous influx of kitchen tools and gadgets over the past few years that can add different textures and contrasts to food but hell we can all still cook the old fashioned way. So I’d have to say and I always preach it on stage is a good sharp knife that you are comfortable with I’d have my TOG Knifes awesome blades and a great knife.
What food trends are you spotting at the moment? Food trends are forever changing and sometimes it’s a mission in itself to stay in touch with them, a lot of chefs seem to be growing their own produce – it’s definitely a way of getting exactly what you want and working closely with the growers.
What do you think is a common mistake that lets chefs down? Sometimes young chefs want to run before they can walk – you need to get as much experience from your peers whilst you are at a learning age then develop your own identity it’ll come with hard work, dedication and determination.
What is your favourite time of year for food, and why? For me it’s autumn, September marks a turning point in the year whilst we still have some of the prime British summer fruit and veg available we also have the arrival of autumnal produce. Game is just starting to appear, blackberries and elderberries are at their prime, wild mushrooms are in abundance you’ve got to love autumn.
Which of your dishes are you most proud of? I’ve been in the industry way too long to single out a particular dish, but one that keeps cropping up whether on stage at a cookery demo or even at home is a twist on my Birmingham heritage “lamb curry” where I use different cuts and cooking techniques lamb loin/neck/shoulder, cauliflower and coconut puree, onion bhajis, confit potato and cumin jus.
How do you come up with new dishes? I’ve a cookery library at home of over 250 cook books (much to my wife Rachel’s annoyance!) so I’m constantly reading you may see a dish in a book and tweak it slightly or adapt it. I also eat out a lot and I think this is very important for chefs as they can evaluate what’s happening in our industry.
Who was your greatest influence? I guess firstly I’d have to say my mother as I left school a bit of a rebel not knowing what to do and she was the one who kind of pushed me into cooking. Secondly, my first great mentor was the late Michael Quinn MBE for giving me an opportunity at the Ritz. Thirdly, and most importantly, my wife and best friend Rachel for constantly having belief in me and supporting me throughout my career they always say that behind every great man there’s a great woman and where would I be without her.
Tell us three chefs you admire. Marie-Antoine Carême, who was probably the first internationally renowned celebrity chef. Marco Pierre White – the godfather of modern day cooking in the UK and a true legend. Paul Liebrandt, an Englishman in New York known for his daring and eccentric style.
What is your favourite cookbook? OMG I’ve hundreds but if I had to choose would go for:Eleven Madison Park by Daniel Humm; Grand Livre De Cuisine Desserts & Pastries by Alain Ducasse; Too Many Chiefs Only One Indian by Sat Baines, Oh and ask me in a few weeks time when I’ve finished reading through it and I’ll probably add Out of My Midsummer House by Daniel Clifford.
Who do you think are the chefs to watch over the next few months? Tom Brown seems to be a chef on a mission, with a finals appearance in GBM and the opening of his first restaurant Cornerstone I’m sure he’ll only go from strength to strength. I think it’s also interesting to keep a watch out for the progression of the finalists in MasterChef 2019 Matthew Ryle and Laurence Henry who have both impressed.
What’s been your favourite new restaurant opening of the last year? For me it has to be my good mate Tom Brown at Cornerstone in Hackney Wick London, I’ve known him for quite a few years now & after spending time under the mentoring and watchful eye of Nathan Outlaw, 2018 has provided him with this wonderful opportunity.

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A Weekend in Playground Palm Springs

A Weekend in Playground Palm Springs A Weekend in Playground Palm Springs Prev Article Next Article
Just like when the movie stars of the 1920s flocked to the area from Hollywood, the Palm Springs area continues to be Los Angeles’s favorite getaway. This little big town in the desert, flanked by the dramatic San Jacinto mountains and poking palm trees, provides a playful swanky, sun-drenched landscape just a few hour drive from the hustle and bustle of LaLaLand.Soak up the mid-century modern design from the 1940s to 1970s, evident in homes and retail spaces left behind from the days where celebs hired innovative architects to build their vacation homes and post-war optimism bred indoor-outdoor living, proud colors, glass and concrete, deep overhangs, and dramatic angular roofs. Find a map at the Palm Springs Visitor Center (in an iconic 1965 futurist Tramway Gas Station) or download the app called palmspringslife.com/psmodapp that will guide you to over 80 mid-century landmarks. Palm Springs Visitor Center
Some people escape to the Palm Springs area to luxuriate in a boutique hotel hideaway or a lavish spa hotel surrounding a picturesque Palm Springs pool. Beyond doing nothing or swinging a golf club or tennis racket, there are myriad ways to savor the California Coachella Valley. Under the desert’s sun, moon, and stars, remind yourself how good life can be. Learn why we keep going back and how you too can explore the Greater Palm Springs area. Meeting up at the Saguaro Hotel to start our Palm Springs Mod Squad architectural and design tour.
EXPLORE
In the last 11 years we have seen the evolution of Palm Springs through weekend trips from LA for numerous attractions: Coachella Music Festival, Modernism Week, the Palm Desert Food & Wine Festival, yoga retreats, biking around the homes in the Indian Wells neighborhood, or walking through the old Movie Colony District for architectural design inspiration.
This trip the Palm Springs architectural and design tour with Palm Springs Mod Squad gave us a new appreciation of the history of the artists, designers, and celebs who flocked to the area as a creative outlet. Passionate tour guide and owner Kurt Cyr brought the glamour and architecture to life as he drove us and another couple around to numerous locations to learn about the Modernism movement in just 90 minutes. The curated experience is a step above the typical self-guided tour and his wealth of knowledge adds so much more to the experience than a guidebook or map ever could.
If you are in the Rancho Mirage area, discover historic Sunnylands. This former Annenberg estate welcomed presidents and royalty since the 1960’s thanks to publisher billionaire magnate Walter Annenberg, who created TV Guide, Seventeen Magazine, and one of the first TV stations out of Philadelphia. Most notable is the introductory 35-minute film showcasing the numerous presidents and celebs who brought the estate to life. Walk the wildflower field or Great Lawn gardens and marvel at the history of this former meeting place where often over golf or dinner major ideas were exchanged and international relations and laws were sorted out and discussed. Private tours of the home can be booked in advance. Sunnylands
In addition to the main Palm Springs Art Museum , there is another location in Palm Desert on the easternmost side of the Coachella Valley that is free. This Art Museum is a worthwhile visit for contemporary art pieces with a handful of rotating special collections plus a sculpture garden. Until September 2019, view their latest exhibit displaying how artists have represented the body across cultural contexts and artistic movements. You won’t forget the unique sculptures so utterly realistic they seem to be breathing.
EAT+DRINK
Our typical favorite Palm Springs stops include sipping a glass of wine at the Barn Kitchen at Sparrows Lodge, snagging an early morning breakfast (with a bacon flight and corn pancake) at Cheeky’s, and ending the night with a cocktail at old school Melvyn’s at the Ingleside Inn. A glam lunch at the Parker always rounds out a stellar weekend, but this trip we discovered more pleasurable possibilities you don’t want to miss. Pistachio Mousse Cake with dehydrated bougainvillea at Workshop Kitchen and Bar.
For an expensive memorable dinner to impress the in-laws, score a table on the glittery twinkly lit patio (with heat lamps) at Workshop Kitchen and Bar , Palm Springs latest stylish eatery in a former movie house. Inside intimate booths and a long communal table are hugged by the concrete modern minimalist aesthetic. Impressive dishes include the black cod with colorful veggies, creamy kabocha squash risotto, and pistachio mousse cake with dehydrated bougainvillea. Cheers to kicking off the weekend right! Black cod from Workshop Kitchen and Bar
At redeveloped historic and luxurious La Serena Villas , find Azucar’ s BoHo chic rooftop lounge called Sugar High for sunset Happy Hour. Find a cozy spot near the fireplace with stunning views of the mountains and marvel at the sexy space while sipping on a blood orange margarita. You may just have to find a way to book a room since the vibes are so luxurious. La Serena Villas lobby
In Palm Desert on the second floor of The Gardens on El Paseo or now in Palm Springs, Wilma & Frieda’s Café dishes up hearty high-quality comfort brunch. Options like Banana Caramel French Toast, Blackberry Custard French Toast, Meatloaf topped with eggs, Churro Waffles, Short Rib Scramble, Filet Mignon and Eggs, Soy-Rizo Scramble, or Biscuits and Gravy will give you enough fuel for the rest of the day.
For a retro lunch transporting you back to the glam racket club days of the 1950s or 1960s, The Pink Cabana’s décor is swathed in blush pink and greens. As part of the newly renovated Sands Hotel and Spa in Indian Wells, this new spot is a must-see for the Instagram obsessed! The menu consists of California – Mediterranean cuisine with some Moroccan influence. While our lunch consisted of three quite small Spanish chicken tacos, the Sands Burger was a heartier option. Come for a Turkish coffee with bourbon or the chicken tagine batbout (Moroccan version of a chicken salad sandwich). Seasonal cocktails are influenced by the Great Spice Route while classic cocktails or a smoked sage margarita can be savored at the green tiled bar or peaceful outdoor area. The Pink Cabana
Perhaps it was due to a Sunday night, but four of us were able to find a spot at the tiny popular playful Bootlegger Tiki bar where we indulged in sampling fancy rum-soaked cocktails some complete with cold brew, absinthe, or Mezcal. Drinks like the Gates of Hell are so strong that a 2 drink max is imposed. A Tiki Light section is helpful for those who can’t imbibe with just as sensationally seductive combinations like Pearl of Wisdom (pineapple, lime, passion fruit, cold brew, macadamia nut gardenia mix). This kitschy Hawaiian place brings the best ambiance. Bootlegger Tiki
Even if you are not staying at the Westin Mission Hills in Rancho Mirage, dinner at Italian restaurant Pinzimini is one of the best in the area. Start with minestrone soup followed by crisp calamari with fried warm olives and shredded brussels sprouts before diving into handmade rich lasagna, linguine with clams, or the New Zealand rack of lamb. Find room for the Pistachio and Ricotta cake. You’ll want to hug the chef before you leave this exquisite Tuscan dining experience. Pinzimini
If you are in the mood for authentic Neopolitan thin crust pizza cooked in a wood-burning oven with over 20 options, consider Piero’s PizzaVino in Palm Desert too.
STAY
While we loved time staying previously at the sophisticated Miramonte Indian Wells Resort and Spa, the boutique Triada Palm Springs in the heart of the Movie Colony district, and the kitschy Hawaiian themed Caliente Tropics Resort for Coachella, this visit we wanted to be situated close to our in-laws in Rancho Mirage.
For families or couples looking to use their Marriott points, consider staying at The Westin Mission Hills Golf Resort and Spa Rancho Mirage. Rooms sit on the golf course with multiple pools, some just for adults. The hotel is kid and dog-friendly. Children can choose from hourly fun activities, admire the mini “zoo” of pets on site, and play in the game room. Many children crowded around the firepits at night to make S’mores. In the middle of the lobby lies a dog house area for a resident rescue dog who is waiting to be adopted. Due to the rain, we missed our early morning tennis clinic but found time to work out at the gym. Westin Gear lends out New Balance workout gear (in case you forgot your own) for a small fee. The Westin Mission Hills Golf Resort and Spa
Besides the restaurant Pinzimini mentioned above, the spa was the best part of our rainy stay. Numerous massage therapies are offered using honey from their own hives. Embrace your harmony with their signature honey massage providing a full body treatment that includes a warm beeswax thermal mask on the back to balance the vital energy of the body, enhance the metabolic activity and immune system, and help you de-stress. Honey scrub and honey lotion with beeswax down the spine not only felt therapeutic but smelled delicious. The spa offers an outdoor jacuzzi to unwind after a treatment. Westin’s signature lavender oil roller next to the bed is a nice way to keep the relaxation going till bedtime. Omni Rancho Las Palmas Resort and Spa
For golfers and families or couples who want everything at your disposal, the Omni Rancho Las Palmas Resort and Spa in Rancho Mirage is the perfect option. Our ground floor room faced the golf green and lake while the simple white décor felt calming. Our room was a short walk from Omni’s bluEmber Restaurant serving super fresh dishes for lunch with ingredients from local farmers. Kudos to Chef William Withrow for the vegetarian options and healthy grand portions we adored eating for lunch like Hawaiian Poke and Cobb Salad. Since we visited the few days a year that it rains, we didn’t get to enjoy golf at the 27-hole championship course, tennis at the Rancho Las Palmas Country Club or the resort pools. Even Splashtopia seemed like the ultimate kid play zone with waterslides, a sandy beach, fountains, sprinklers, and a 450 lazy river.
Your Palm Springs playground awaits!

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Pure Luxury defined at its best for my home away from home

We have always returned to this top-most and esteemed hotel for some 30 years plus (kindly treated there as Starwood Preferred Guests) and call it our luxurious home away from home. We are compelled to write this overdue and deserving review following our recent visit last month as we owe it to them for years. Centrally located in the best part of the capital it has a prime position with an imposing and iconic glass architecture situated near all the beautiful and historical landmarks. Soon as you get down from your vehicle the warm welcome starts with a tall, erect and dignified traditional Indian doorman from Punjab who ushers you greetingly into the stunning lobby that exudes an understated elegance with contemporary charm surrounded by the beautifully designed coffee shop called ‘One’ and a stylish avant garde Indian restaurant ‘eu de Monsoon’ by the side of ‘Longitude’… an open and informal meeting place at next level lobby serving sandwich, coffee, chocolate and savouries, ideal for conversations with an open view of all the 20 floors and beautified with angelic looking illuminated escalators going up and down amidst waterfall effect. Quite a view to adore. Be it service, food, cuisine, fine dining or relaxation in the top notch Spa all are ”par excellence” provided by loyal and experienced team who have been there from it’s years of success to success. Although all the management and staff are dedicated and passionate for service, yet, some names deserve a special mention. Firstly, it is the General Manager Mr Tarun Thakral because a good manager makes a good team, hence the first credit. He is a well bred gentleman and highly experienced with flair and unmatched expertise, a keen car collector enthusiast, and is a pioneer of the first car museum in India. He is the soul of the hotel . Great conversationalist and very knowledgeable. Next one is, Miss Dipi Singh, the Front office manager and a director. She is simply brilliant and a perfectionist to ensure more than 100% guests’ satisfaction. She is honest and always upfront, works long hours and has a special sense of humour that is her USP to connect to guests as she almost guarantee at least a smile on most serious guest. She is an asset and we have seen her for years befittingly growing to her senior position. We are very grateful to Dipi Singh for making our every stay memorable one by taking care of every little detail and our preferences. She makes the front office team praiseworthy. Another name we must mention is Mr Sukhi who is now the manager of the prestigious chinese restaurant ‘Belvedere’ on the top floor with stunning view of Delhi and landmarks such as India Gate and Presidential Palace. He has been there for many years and have risen the ranks having worked all over this hotel. At our recent trip last month he very kindly invited us for dinner and went out of his way to dress up a romantic table for candle light champagne and dinner overlooking the awesome illumination to mark the Indian independence day celebration. It was simply heavenly atmosphere and we were most touched by Mr Sokhi’s gesture. He is articulate, professional, knowledgeable and thorough in providing an ultimate in fine dining experience. Our breakfast at ‘One’ became a daily sojourn not to be missed with a vast and gala selection of items/dishes you name it…its there temptingly awaiting indulgence. The atmosphere is buzzing and display is appetising with designer made to order kiosks be it eggs, pancakes or traditional Indian breakfast dosas/prathaas. We were looked after hugely well daily by a very charming staff namely ”Utkarsh Reema” who is full of energy and perfect service with IT speed, and with a very pleasing personality….perfect for such a pressure job.Thanks to him as we had a great start to every day. He does not know the word ‘no’ or ‘sorry, I cannot’. Thanks also to the ever helpful and enterprising ‘One’ manager and the hostess who ensured our precise choice of table. We cannot but mention the room service staff and the sheer excellence in their professional service with much fanfare and the courtesies with polite conversation 7 star. Thanks to Mr. Madan and Mr Neeraj for a great dining room service. Our suite was immaculately clean with all the amenities and courtesies that surpass expectations of a discerning traveller. The housekeeping do a great job providing a most comfortable stay and a great night’s sleep. What more could we ask. Last but not the least deserving special mention is Vimal’s brilliant team at concierge/bell boys. We have known them for years and they always give us the traditional Indian respect and welcome. Our commands are their proverbial wishes. They, like others there, are like an extended family. One such member who has moved to another department is Bhuvan who especially came to give us his respects when he learnt of our arrival. Such is the bond they all cherish with their guests. Such is the level of service of Indian traditional hospitality at its warmest and its best. Even the airport pick up and drop off was, in no way, less than an Indian Maharaja treatment in a posh Mercedes or BMW with welcome drinks and perfumed wet towels to cleanse . Surely, we have been treated as a Maharani and Maharaja and that too indeed consistently for so many years with the bar and standard risen at our every re-visit especially following the multi million dollar huge refurbishment that exudes pure excellence. See for yourselves to authenticate our superlatives. Thank you Le Meridien, New Delhi. Apologies for a long review but goodness and excellence sometimes is difficult to be succinct or contained. Madam Geeta Sarin and Mr Sarin, UK

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What we ate in South Africa

Mossel Bay
Next we went on to Mossel Bay. A quiet town situated on the coast, it offers fresh and delicious sea food.
Focaccia and Sea food at Delfinos
I still remember the candle-lit dinner at the beautiful Delfino’s listening to the sounds of waves as they crashed against the rocks. The focaccia there was crispy and garlicky, the sea food platter fresh and the pasta warm and tasty. Focaccia
One thing I noticed in South Africa is that most of the cafes there also have art displays. One such place was the Art Cafe just on the beach.
Seafood at the Art Cafe
While waiting for the skies to clear up for our sky-diving, we had some snacks at this artsy place. The sea food platter (consisting of calamari, hake, prawns and mussels) was so good. The butter-garlic sauce with the mussels was especially delicious. Sea food – Calamari, Hake, Prawns and Mussels Art on display Knysna
The Knysna waterfront proved to be quite surprising in terms of weather. Chilly winds and light rain left us hungry for warm homely food.
Bunny chow at Knysna
Ever since we decided to visit this place, I was excited to try this local dish. Bunny chow is chicken-liver tossed in a veggies gravy and served with soft bread. It was very flavourful as can be seen in the mouth-watering image. bunny chow
This was accompanied by the usual British fish and chips.
Pizza at Cafe Mario
During our 2 evenings at Knysna, this Italian cafe ( Cafe Mario) was always busy. So on our third evening we decided to visit this place early enough to get a seat. And it surely lived upto its name. chicken pizza
Oysters at Ocean’s Basket
Knysna is also famous for its annual oyster festival which attracts people from all over the world. The oysters at Ocean’s basket were nice and so were the veg dishes. The maki was bite sized and tasty, so was the soup. Mussels in Butter garlic lemon sauce
Tramezzini at George Airport
Well, yes. Hungry us also ate like a hog at the George Airport while leaving Knysna. The cafe had just opened up at around 7:30 in the morning. We had a sumptuous meal of tramezzini ( an Italian dish consisting of stuffed pita bread) and a humble chicken wrap. They made our tummies happy 🙂 chicken wrap Tramezzini Suncity, Johannesburg
We had mostly Chinese and Thai food at various restaurants in Suncity. The chicken pad-thai noodles were slightly sweet while the thai curry was sooo hot.
Another interesting restaurant we visited here served Portugese cuisine.
Cheese Garlic bread and pickles at Callisto
I just fell in love with the pickle and bread they served as a complimentary starter there. The cheese garlic bread was equally good .. I have never eaten such a soft yet beautifully flavoured and very cheesy garlic bread in my life. Pickle and Bread
And our trip ended at Johannesburg. Though we couldn’t try all of the local dishes like Biltong, I think we did a good job for our curious foodie inside (atleast we didn’t eat Indian food there which was very easily available and which most Indians prefer). Will add the remaining dishes to our bucket-list 😛
More posts on our South African adventure coming up. So long…

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Warm Up with Curry – Food-And-Drink – Living – The Chronicle Herald

Published: a day ago Updated: 18 hours ago
Spice up dinner with this simple curry dish inspired by Malay cuisine. This dish’s fragrant aromas and bold flavours are sure to warm you up on a cold night. As for what to drink, I’ve long professed the best beverage to accompany a curry is beer.
Curries are intense and sometimes, but not always, spicy. This is where beer shines on the dinner table. Hoppy beer styles such as IPA (India Pale Ale) simply explode with citrus, grassy and spicy hop aromas which allow them to stand up to curry. Bonus, the naturally lower alcohol content gives beer a cooling effect, allowing them to wash away the heat of spicier Indian inspired dishes. Thankfully, our local brewers have latched on to the IPA band wagon, and so for the perfect partner to a curry, you need not cross provincial boundaries or pass through international waters. There are plenty of local selections for you to choose from.
For wines, keep the reds Light & Fruity and your white selections Aromatic & Vibrant. And don’t forget the spirits. Try making a tequila and tropical fruit juice-based cocktail and pairing it with this dish. Chicken Curry

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Ethiopian food: The 15 best dishes

Ethiopian food is both distinctive and delicious, befitting a remarkable country with a cultural heritage that stands out from the rest of Africa.
While the cuisine of Ethiopia is gradually becoming better known, it’s no overstatement to say it remains one of the world’s best-kept secrets.
Eating Ethiopian-style means rethinking many assumptions you might have about dinnertime — for most of us this means starting with eschewing cutlery and being ready to get messy fingers.
That’s because the foundation of the vast majority of Ethiopian meals is injera, a giant grey spongey pancake-like bread, upon whose strangely rubbery surface are served a vast array of foods, ranging from multi-colored mounds of spicy stews to vegetable curries to cubes of raw meat.
This mode of eating is highly communal, with everyone gathering around a large circular metal tray of injera heavily laden with food as hands go back and forth scooping up from the various piles of foodstuffs with strips of injera torn from the edges.
All this can take some getting used to; tourists have been known to mistake injera for the tablecloth or for kitchen flannel. Also, the bread’s bitter, slightly sour taste can put some off. But injera’s subtle taste-enhancing power lies in how it contrasts beautifully with, as well as tempers, the fiery sauces it accompanies.
Ethiopians, like Indians, aren’t shy of adding spices. One of the most common accompaniments is berbere, an Ethiopian spice mix containing up to 16 constituent elements, including chili powder, fenugreek, ginger, garlic, cardamom and cinnamon.
Another bonus of eating Ethiopian is that injera is made from tef — the world’s smallest grain — which Ethiopians have grown and obsessed about for millennia. In America and Europe it is increasingly viewed as a “super grain,” up there with quinoa and spelt, being high in protein and calcium, and gluten-free.
The result of all of the above will have your taste buds doing somersaults, while also being good for you. Most Ethiopian dishes are nutrient-dense and low in fat.
Beyond the endless dishes on offer, it’s essential to try Ethiopian coffee after a meal. Ethiopia is reportedly the birthplace of quality Arabica coffee, and its coffees are widely praised as some of the best in the world.
Here are 15 essential dishes to try:
Tibs
Sliced beef or lamb, pan-fried in butter, garlic and onion, tibs is one of the most popular dishes among Ethiopians.
It comes in a variety of forms, varying in type, size or shape of the cuts of meat used, and can range from hot to mild or contain little to no vegetables. A particularly recommended variation is shekla tibs, in which the strips of meat arrive at your table roasting atop a clay pot stoked with hot coals — dramatic and delicious.
Historically, tibs was served to pay a compliment or show respect to someone. Today it’s still viewed as a special dish, hence its popularity for commemorating special events and holidays. At the same time, though, if you walk into a rowdy bar on a Friday afternoon in Ethiopia’s rambunctious capital, Addis Ababa, it’s likely that most of the revelers will be enthusiastically ordering and eating tibs.
Typically, the meat of the tibs that arrives at your table has just been cleaved from carcasses hanging outside beside the restaurant’s entrance. Don’t be put off; meat rarely comes fresher or tastier.
Kitfo
Made from the leanest meat, kitfo is viewed as a big treat by ordinary Ethiopians, while its nutritional powers are also praised.
Similar to French steak tartare, the meat is minced and warmed in a pan with a little butter, mitmita (a stronger version of berbere) and sometimes thyme. Kitfo is typically served leb leb (warmed, not cooked), though you can ask for it to be betam leb leb (“very warmed,” which basically means cooked).
Kitfo can be served with aib (like dry cottage cheese) and gomen (minced spinach), a recommended pairing making the meal even more delicious, as well as especially filling — highly recommended after a hard day’s traveling or if one is confronted with a hangover after a long night.
Beyainatu
The name of Ethiopia’s most popular vegetarian dish translates as “a bit of every type,” hence your injera arrives blanketed in piles of tasty and colorful vegetables, potatoes, curries, lentil stews and more, creating a riot of colors and tastes.
Due to Ethiopia’s strong tradition of religious fasting and abstaining from meat on Wednesdays and Fridays, beyainatu is widely available around the country, and served just about everywhere from fancy hotels to tiny food shacks beside the road. Hence when traveling or faced with a menu only printed in Amharic, beyainatu is a safe and simple go-to.
Many visitors to Ethiopia return proclaiming — regardless of whether they are vegetarian or not — beyainatu their favorite meal.
Fuul
Popular across East Africa and the Middle East, Ethiopian fuul is a mix of stewed and spiced fava beans eaten by many Ethiopians for breakfast.
Regular fuul is usually served as a modest portion for one — while still filling you up — supplemented with an endless supply of fresh bread. So-called special fuul is usually large enough to share, and served with yogurt, tomato, green chili, onion, egg and occasionally avocado. Locals mash this together and season further with salt, additional spices and fresh chilies.
You can tell you are in the right sort of fuul-serving diner if it’s brought to you in small metal bowls that are too hot to touch, with eaters using a piece of torn-off bread to grip the bowl’s side.
Fuul serves as a healthy fast food, especially in Addis Ababa, where it is often cooked and dispensed out of vast pots, with most customers well fed in under ten minutes before they head off into the teeming city for their day’s work.
Tere siga
Not for the faint-hearted, one of Ethiopia’s most popular delicacies is cubes of raw red meat. Two people typically order half a kilo of tere siga to share, which is eaten with injera or bread to clasp the meat you carve off the raw slab, and dipped in copious amounts of mitmita.
One of the stories about how Ethiopians developed a love of raw meat is that it was developed as a military tactic during the 16th century so fighters could avoid detection by not having to start fires to cook their meat.
While most Ethiopians seem to suffer no adverse effects from eating tere siga — the majority avow it makes them feel on top of the world — eating raw meat does carry a relative health risk. This ranges from tapeworm to salmonella, though this author hasn’t experienced any problems post-tere siga (though if one is concerned after a trip to Ethiopia, a simple tablet available from pharmacies can be taken to neutralize any tapeworm risk).
Doro wot
Wot is Ethiopia’s version of curry, and the ubiquitous companion of injera. While beef and goat are often used with wot, chicken — doro in Amharic — reigns as the wot champion.
Doro wot is made with chicken drumsticks or wings cooked and served in a hot sauce of butter, onion, chilli, cardamom and berbere. In the midst of this stew incongruously bobs a hard-boiled egg. It proves a delicious accompaniment — typically offered to a guest as a sign of respect.
For Ethiopians, doro wot is the go-to meal of celebration during national and religious festivals (the day before, women can be seen everywhere carrying upside-down clucking chickens by their feet).
Enkulal firfir
While basically just scrambled eggs, which might not sound that exciting, Ethiopia’s enkulal firfir is not to be missed at breakfast. Cooked with nitre kibe — Ethiopian spiced butter — it is further enhanced with a combination of green and red peppers, chilli, tomatoes and onions, all of which is scooped up with fresh tasty bread rolls, often still warm from the bakery.
A notable feature of enkulal firfir is how fantastically yellow it is, which translates into a far superior taste compared to the results of pallid egg yolks in the west. The omelet version is known as enkulal tibs. Be warned: your appreciation of scrambled eggs back home will never be quite the same after savoring enkulal firfir.
Dulet
For the uninitiated, this dish of mixed meats might be more enjoyable if not translated and explained. It’s made with minced tripe (an animal’s stomach lining), along with liver and lean beef fried in butter, onions, chilli, cardamom and pepper.
Like kitfo, much of its popularity stems from it being very filling and hitting the spot after a hard-going day or night. Offal has never tasted so good — give it a go.
Shiro
A lightly spiced chickpea or bean purée, shiro is particularly favored by Ethiopians on fasting days. One of the most unassuming dishes you’ll encounter, it can appear as not much more than slop. Don’t be deceived, it’s very tasty.
Shiro is often prepared with the addition of minced onions, garlic and, depending upon regional variation, ground ginger or chopped tomatoes and chili peppers, further boosting the flavor.
Tegabino shiro is a type of shiro made with heavily spiced legumes, chickpeas, field peas or fava beans, flour, oil or butter, and water brought to the boil, and then brought bubbling all the way to the table in a miniature clay pot.
Ti’hilo
A specialty in Tigray, Ethiopia’s most northern region, Ti’hilo is Ethiopia’s answer to Swiss fondue, consisting of barley balls pierced by carved sticks with two prongs at the end and dipped in a fiery-looking sauce made from pulses, flour and spices.
As with much eating in Ethiopia, a touch of ceremony attends this dish: A person comes and sits by your table while scooping from a triangular wedge of barley and rolling the barley between hands into little balls to be placed on the tray of injera for you to pierce, dip and eat.
Having long been associated with just a small part of Tigray, around the city of Adigrat especially, the tasty and nutritious benefits of ti’hilo mean it’s now catching on and spreading around Ethiopia. If you don’t make it up to Tigray, you can track ti’hilo down in Addis Ababa, though you may have to ask around a bit.
Dabbo firfir
Comprising torn-up bits of unleavened bread mixed with clarified butter and berbere, and often accompanied by yoghurt, dabbo firfir is a good example of Ethiopian cooking’s ability to take something simple and do much more with it.
Like shiro, it might not look much but dabbo firfir is surprisingly tasty. And as another incentive, in this rare instance Ethiopians are willing to resort to a spoon or fork.
Fatira
A breakfast dish popular around the Horn of Africa, fatira usually comprises a thin pastry top and bottom with scrambled eggs and honey wedged in the middle. Typically served as a large portion, this perfect combination of savory and sweet can happily feed two.
Fatira also comes in a street food version comprising small square pieces cooked in the open on a giant frying pan in the likes of Ethiopia’s beguiling eastern city of Harar.
Accompanied by freshly brewed Ethiopian coffee, there aren’t many better ways to start a day of exploring Ethiopia.
Asa
Eating fish — asa — in Ethiopia is quite an experience. Typically, a fish such as Nile perch is fried and served entirely whole, the gaping mouth of jagged little teeth looking like you have a Piranha on your plate.
As ever, it’s eaten by hand with either bread or injera, accompanied by a fiery sauce to dip into. Bar a few bones, Ethiopians eat every bit, and justifiably so — the grilled fins are particularly tasty.
Asa tibs are chunks of fish marinated in berbere spice and lime juice and then fried in sesame oil, olive oil and paprika, with grated garlic and ginger added. It’s a good option if you don’t want the hassle of picking out bones or having to contemplate the fish’s angry-looking face.
Spriss
Dotted all over Addis Ababa are juice houses — often not much more than a shack — serving spriss, delicious juice mixes made from the likes of avocado, guava, papaya, mango, pineapple and orange.
Spriss is mixed by pouring layers of juice — typically from three fruits — on top of each other. There’s no water added, no sugar and no ice, just unadulterated pureed juice topped with a lime squeezed over the top. Some Ethiopians choose to add a squirt of a purple cordial that the author has never quite identified, though it adds a satisfyingly sweet touch.
A juice is often served with a triangular wedge of sweetened bread, the combination of which serves as an effectively filling snack, especially if you opt for your glass to just be filled with pureed avocado. Spriss is extremely refreshing and a nice sweet break from all the other spicy foods.
Pasta beu injera
Italy’s historical involvement in Ethiopia means that if you need a break from endless injera — or if your stomach is feeling tender and you need to play it safe — help is at hand in the form of pasta beu atkilt, pasta with vegetables, being readily available all over the country.
Ordering pasta beu siga — pasta with meat — will get you something resembling a tasty spaghetti Bolognese.
Alternatively, if you haven’t been overwhelmed by injera and you want a quirky mix that would be sure to raise eyebrows in Italy, you could try pasta beu injera: a great dollop of pasta incongruously lumped in the center of injera.
Even in this challenging instance, Ethiopians stay true to tradition: a fork is only used to cut the pasta into manageable bits, after which it is all scooped up with injera clasped between fingers, as usual.
Particularly tricky for first-timers, but one of the most filling meals you can get. Carbs galore.

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A History of Lisbon in 10 Dishes

Europe
Sardines, roast chicken, Cape Verdean stew, Nepali momos: the dishes to try in Lisbon.
Portugal was one of the most outward-looking countries in the world at the time of its global explorations in the 15th and 16th centuries, its cuisine drawing on ingredients obtained from colonies in Africa, the Far East, India, and South America. It was also influenced by its nearby trading partners the Moors, the Spanish, the French, the British, and the Flemish. During its 48-year dictatorship, which only ended in 1974, the country became more closed-off, with poverty, agricultural self-sufficiency, and regional identities shaping the way people ate. The capital city today feels wide open again: immigrants from all over the world live here, it’s popular with sun-seeking remote workers, and the speaking of foreign languages and the embrace of neighboring nations’ culture is marked. This, along with climate favorable for growing a great many fruits and vegetables, makes for a varied food culture: traditional regional recipes, fusions of different cuisines, and the national dishes of the former colonies are all part of Lisbon’s diet. Sardines Sardines on toast at Taberna da Rua das Flores .
Lisbon is on an estuary only about 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the sea: fish and seafood are always on the table. The humble sardine has been part of the city’s diet at the very least since the Moors— Muslim inhabitants of North Africa— conquered the city in the early 8th century, according to Alfredo Saramago’s culinary history of Lisbon . The sardine is one of the city’s symbols, stamped on advertising materials and tourist merchandise since those industries were taking their first steps.
The June festival of St Anthony , the patron saint of Lisbon, also marks the beginning of the sardine harvest. For the whole month, but culminating on June 13, many streets sets up outdoor grills and offer whole sardines on a slice of bread. If you’re here in June, head for Alfama for the wildest sardine saint parties. In a restaurant, your sardines will more likely come the way all Portuguese fish dishes come— with boiled potatoes and a serving of vegetables. The tinned sardine is big business here too: you can buy beautifully-designed presentation tins, or eat a snack of tinned sardines ( conservas ) with different garnishes in cafes and bars. The former fishing-tackle shop turned bar in the Cais do Sodré area, Sol e Pesca , specializes in this.
Sa rdine stocks are declining, though: 2018 was the fourth consecutive year of restrictions on sardine fishing. In 2017 there was controversy about many of the June sardines being Spanish–where local sardines were found they were more expensive. This year, one of the outdoor festival bars made a statement about sustainability by offering carapau (horse mackerel) instead. Bacalhau Bacalhão at Imperial de Campo de Ourique .
If the Portuguese are obsessed with fish, they’re particularly obsessed with bacalhau (salt cod). This is strange, considering that another of their obsessions is eating their own local produce (see the Spanish sardine debacle above), and the fact that excellent fresh fish can be caught off their own coastline. This cod is imported from Norway, the UK, or Canada, and salted to preserve it.
Some ascribe the tradition to the time of the colonial voyages, when Portuguese sailors caught cod off the Newfoundland coast and salted it to make it last. Others say it might stem from a 19th-century accord with King Edward III of England that allowed Portugal to fish English waters for 50 years. Whatever the reason, bacalhau is the undisputed national dish. You can see the large hard chunks of fish hanging in shops and supermarkets, and a small saw is often used to cut them. The cod is desalted by being soaked in constantly-refreshed water for at least 24 hours before being cooked slowly and carefully. The joy is in the different preparations rather than the fish itself. Popular bacalhau recipes include bacalhau à brás –fish with egg and chips– bacalhau com natas (cod in cream) and meia-desfeita (cod, chickpeas, egg, and potato).
João do Grão , in the center of Lisbon, which has been in the same family since 1810, is a great place to try the latter. Pataniscas de Bacalhau (cod fritters served with a rice and bean stew) is a comfort food that really fills you up. Try it at the atmospheric Ponto Final restaurant, just across the water from Lisbon at Cacilhas. Caldo Verde Caldo Verde at La Boulangerie .
The only food the Portuguese are more crazy about than fish is soup, which they consume more than any other European country . (If you get the chance to go to a Portuguese soup festival, do!) Caldo Verde is the mainstay; cheap, hearty, and found everywhere. It is thought to originate in the north of the country in the fifteenth century, or even earlier, devised by field workers using the ingredients they had to hand. It’s eaten at celebrations like birthdays and weddings, and all the rest of the time too; on its own, as the first course of a traditional long lunch or dinner, or as a late night snack. It’s made with thinly-cut strips of Galician kale and potato, and always has a lump or two of chorizo floating it it (beware, veggies: the soup is made with chicken stock, but the ‘veggie’ version is usually just the same thing with the chorizo picked out). Try it at O Caldo Verde in Santos, just to the west of Lisbon’s center. Pastel de nata Pastel de nata at Aloma .
Every Portuguese street has a bewildering array of pastelarías (pastry shops), and every shop has a bewildering and sometimes bizarre-looking array of confections. These nearly all rely heavily on eggs.
The traditional pasteis were invented by monks and nuns, who were rich enough to buy quality ingredients, including spices like cinnamon from the colonies, and had time to experiment with them. The resulting sweets were given as gifts to noblemen and travellers. There are different theories to explain the predominance of eggs, particularly yolks, in the recipes, the most persuasive probably being that the yolks were the by-product of the egg whites used to starch nuns’ habits. When the monasteries and convents were closed down by the Marques de Pombal in 1834, the monks and nuns passed the secret recipes to their families, who are still using them today.
The pastel de nata (custard tart) was supposedly invented in Lisbon’s grand Monasterio de Jerónimos in Belém, which was next door to a sugar cane refinery. The owners of the shop Pasteis de Belém are said to have acquired the recipe they still use directly from the monks. They make such large quantities that their tarts are always fresh, but if you can’t stomach the queues of tourists, there are plenty of other fine natas to be had in the city: just find somewhere with a high turnover that’s baking them on-site. (Or, you can try to skip Belém ’s line and just take a seat inside—sometimes you might be lucky.) Iscas com elas Iscas com elas at Taberna da Rua das Flores .
Iscas are thin strips of cow’s liver, sautéed in white wine and garlic. They’re served with boiled potatoes (referred to as elas— meaning simply ‘them’). The dish was brought to the city by the Galicians who arrived in the 19th century to work in, and later own, restaurants and cafés (many other dishes considered Lisbon classics also owe their existence to the Galicians, including the bacalhau dishes meia-desfeita and pataniscas ). Iscas com elas became so popular as a cheap, filling meal that a large number of restaurants at the time served only that. You can still find these simple, budget versions today, as well as a range of modern twists. Taberna da Rua das Flores , in Chaido, offers a widely-praised gourmet version as part of its affordable lunch menu, its waver-thin calf’s liver iscas marinated beforehand using a traditional recipe. Prego Prego at O Trevo .
A snack much-loved by meat-eating Lisboetas is the prego , or steak sandwich. It began, like so many dishes, as a poor man’s meal, the cheapest cuts of beef in a possibly slightly stale bun, the bread softened by the meat juices. It now exists in gourmet versions too, with tender strips of steak served on artisan bread. According to the history of Sintra, “ Velharias de Sintra VI ,” it was invented by Manuel Dias Prego for his simple beach-side restaurant on the coast near Sintra, just outside Lisbon, in the late 19th century. Others say the name does not derive from Mr Prego at all, but from the custom of hammering the tough beef to tenderize it ( prego also means nail). The Alentejo region’s twist on the prego, equally popular in Lisbon, is the bifana , which uses pork meat. Both are such fast food classics that McDonald’s produces a McPrego and a McBifana for the Portuguese market. The prego is often served in a bolo de caco , a soft, traditional Madeiran bread bun. The simple prego is best sampled with a beer at the food stands at soccer matches, or at Cervejaria O Trevo in Praça Luis de Camões. At the gourmet end of the scale, the 80-year-old luxury restaurant Gambrinus makes a fantastic tenderloin prego in homemade bread. Roast chicken and potato chips Roast chicken and potato chips at Cucurico .
The cockerel is a symbol of Portugal. As a country that remained dominated by small-scale agriculture while its neighbours were industrializing, it was until quite recently a place where nearly everyone kept their own chickens, even in the city. Chicken is the cheapest and easiest to rear form of animal protein. According to popular lore, João VI, King of Portugal from 1816 to 1826, ate two or three roast chickens every day for his lunch and to have carried a few drumsticks around in his pockets for when he got peckish. The national fast food is spit-roasted chicken served from a small kiosk to take home, often with potato chips. The chips are either fried in-house, in the chicken fat, and served hot, or are just a pre-packaged bag of simple, salted chips fried in sunflower oil. You can have a whole or a half chicken. For your sauce you can usually choose between butter, lemon, or piri piri (African chillies marinated in olive oil, another Portuguese staple with colonial roots, in Mozambique). As with other traditional foods, it’s best to seek this out on local high streets outside the center. The area around Praça do Chile has some well-established places. Cachupa Cachupa at Tambarina .
Thanks to the conservative and nationalist dictatorship of António de Oliveira Salazar—whose regime wanted Portugal to have an empire—and despite international censure, Portugal clung to its African colonies long after its fellow European empire-builders. The wars for independence from 1961 onwards were a large part of what toppled the fascist regime in 1974, and it was only then that Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea Bissau, So Tomé and Principé, and Mozambique were freed from Portuguese rule. The wars and independence resulted in a huge migration of people from those countries to Portugal, including Portuguese settlers and their families, known as ‘ retornados ’, returning to a ‘homeland’ they often knew little about. Immigration from the former colonies continues today, with people from the islands of Cape Verde forming the largest group of immigrants.
In Lisbon you can sample the cuisines of Portugal’s former African colonies, usually in small, friendly, no-frills places. The Cape Verdean cachupa is one of the best-known imports. It’s a nourishing stew of beans, corn, cassava, and sweet potato that comes in meat, fish, and less-traditional vegetable-only versions. It’s common to have last night’s cachupa fried up for breakfast too, along with an egg and sausage or mackerel. Try it at Tambarina in Rua Poço dos Negros: If you’re lucky you’ll get some music too. Goan Prawn curry Goan Prawn curry at Tentações de Goa . (Photo by Eric Garza)
When India captured Goa from the Portuguese in 1961, Goans did not lose the Portuguese citizenship they had been granted back in 1957, and many Goans, particularly intellectuals and government and military workers, took up Portugal’s offer of citizenship and began to emigrate here in search of opportunities. Portuguese nationality law was changed in 2006 to extend citizenship to the third generation, so those whose grandparents lived in Goa before 1961 can also emigrate. Some Goans also went to Mozambique, lending the cuisine its elements of African-Indian fusion. Such is its appeal that Lisbon has a handful high-end Mozambican restaurants.
The common Goan street food the chamuça (samosa) in particular has became firmly established as a Lisbon snack, found in many Portuguese cafes. The highlight of Goan cooking, though, is the fish and seafood curries. While many of the Indian restaurants here tone down the spiciness of their food for the European market, the Goan restaurants don’t usually disappoint. Try the prawn curry (Caril de Camarão) at Tentações de Goa ( Rua de São Pedro Mártir 23) .
Nepalese Momo Nepalese Momos at Tasca Do Marinheiro .
Nepalis are one of the more recent immigrant groups bringing their food to Lisbon, and they’ve had an impact disproportionate to the size of the community— estimated to be in the low tens of thousands, but rapidly growing . They began coming here in significant numbers around a decade ago, seeing Portugal initially as a stepping stone to wealthier European countries (Portugal’s residence requirement of six years before applying for a passport is among the shortest in the European Union). Many ended up staying, the most often-cited reasons being the climate and the friendly welcome they received. Their community has expanded greatly in the last five years, with new arrivals supported by the existing inhabitants, who mostly own and work in shops and restaurants.
The Nepali momo is a dumpling that can be served steamed or fried, with a curried meat or vegetable filling, and a spicy tomato-based dip on the side. Nepali restaurant owners are keener than the Portuguese to extend their opening hours, so the momo has become popular with young lisboetas looking for an affordable late-night snack. In the studenty area of Anjos, Leo restaurant is the first to appeal directly to this customer base: a backpacker hostel-styled bar that also serves momos . In the center, try momos at Tasca do Marinheiro , Rua Conceição da Glória, or the Tibetan version at Os Tibetanos off the Avenida da Liberdade.

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