Weight Loss: This Winter Detox Beverage May Help Boost Weight Loss And Metabolism

Weight Loss: This Winter Detox Beverage May Help Boost Weight Loss And Metabolism

Weight Loss: This Winter Detox Beverage May Help Boost Weight Loss And Metabolism January 29, 2019 0 – Advertisement –
Be it in a glass of tea or a plateful of biryani, there is something about cardamom that always stands out. The aromatic spice comes in two forms black and green. In addition to adding a distinct flavour to our curries, desserts and beverages, cardamom is a treasure trove of health benefits too. It is no surprise then that the herb has been a common fixture in several Ayurvedic concoctions. Since it is warming in nature, it is used extensively in winter preparations. According to the book, ‘Flavour of Spice’ by food writer Marryam H. Reshii, cardamom is cultivated majorly in Kerala, “generally in the hands of Syrian Christian community.” But cardamom is used across a variety of Indian cuisines, making it one of the most common spices in a quintessential Indian kitchen cabinet. Cardamom helps stimulate taste, boost digestion and its anti-inflammatory properties even help soothe cold and cough. A pinch of cardamom can do wonders to cut belly fat too! Here’s how.
(Also Read: Weight Loss: 5 Yummy Ways To Prepare Protein-Rich Spinach For Weight Loss) Cardamom Water For Weight Loss
Cardamom is an effective natural remedy to shed those stubborn kilos. According to the book, ‘Healing Foods’ by DK Publishing House, cardamom is “an effective digestive stimulant and diuretic, cardamom boosts the metabolism and helps the body burn fat more efficiently.” Being a diuretic, it helps maintain ideal water balance in the body and prevent bloating. If you are struggling from digestion problems, you are very likely to put on weight. If the digestion process is not smooth, it hampers the elimination of toxins and waste, which further takes a toll on metabolism. Cardamom also contains a decent amount of melatonin that also facilitates fat burning.
(Also Read: How To Lose Weight: 100 Weight Loss Tips | All You Need To Know For Shedding Pounds) – Advertisement –
Weight Loss: Cardamom is an effective natural remedy to shed those stubborn kilos
One of the most effective ways to yield most of cardamom’s benefits is by drinking cardamom water daily. The detox beverage is easy to make and is an excellent alternative for the sugary, aerated drinks that are often loaded with excess number of liquid calories. How To Make Cardamom Water For Weight Loss:
1. Crush 3-4 cardamom pods and collect the seeds.
2. In a container, take out seeds and grind them into a rough powder, using the back of a spoon.
3. Mix the powder in a glass of water.
Drink the detox beverage early in the morning to rev up your metabolism naturally.
Disclaimer: This content including advice provides generic information only. It is in no way a substitute for qualified medical opinion. Always consult a specialist or your own doctor for more information. NDTV does not claim responsibility for this information.

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Discovering hawker food in Singapore, a culture worth preserving — and devouring

There’s little that can prepare an outsider for the onslaught of food in Singapore.
Every stroll through this city shrouded in tropical heat is interrupted by open-air food centers, coffee shops and restaurants vying for your stomach’s attention.
Advertisement > Seek sanctuary inside an air-conditioned mall and you’ll be greeted by sprawling subterranean food halls that seem to span the distance between subway stops.
Dining out is a way of life in Singapore . One in four residents say they eat out daily , a recent Nielsen survey found. Many choose food centers, which aren’t your hot dog on a stick-variety mall food courts, but keepers of a proud local cuisine and tradition cobbled by generations of the city’s Chinese, Indian and Malay inhabitants.
The abundance and convenience of food in Singapore can be a shock to the system — particularly for someone like me who has lived in a community of tract homes in Santa Clarita, where dining out meant choosing between two equidistant McDonald’s.
I admit I have a weakness for Big Macs, but it’s no contest when outside my hotel on a stretch of Killiney Road I can choose between world-class satay, chicken rice, curry laksa, prawn noodles, fish ball soup, dim sum, Indian prata, chicken biryani, beef rendang or Cantonese barbecue — all for about the same price as a six-piece Chicken McNugget meal.
Straying from my neighborhood has been even more rewarding.
There were the piquant chili crab and salted egg yolk prawns at the East Coast Seafood Center that looks out onto the Singapore Strait, where at night, the tankers and cargo ships are anchored so close together they look like a neighboring city.
There was the crunchy fried Hainan chicken wing vendor at the Toa Payoh Lorong Food Center, who commands such a loyal following that customers line up long before opening to beat the crowds .

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Chef’s Buzz Feb 19

January 27, 2019 the buzz
Story by Mark C. JohnsonWell, 2019 has just begun, and already there’s much happening in the restaurants, bars and markets across our great state—things are looking wonderful in the world of food and drink. By the look of things, ’19 is shaping up to be one of the most delicious years ever.
Albuquerque Chef Perno/Photo by Liz Lopez
On March 30, Los Poblanos Historic Inn and Organic Farm adds to its yearlong dinner series focusing on “the spirit and artistry of the season.” The dinner, Savor de Legumbres , is sure to sell out quickly, so I just want to give you all an early heads up to get a seat now! It is truly one of the most thorough and well-conceived vegetarian menus I’ve seen. With five courses at $115 per person, there are some truly impressive pairings, such as roasted spaghetti squash achiote and lime with Alejandro Fernández’s Dehesa la Granja, one of Spain’s most epic wines. Reservations for this all-inclusive dinner must be made online, so visit lospoblanos.ticketleap.com/los-poblanos-dining-series/details.com , and you’re in. Myra Ghattas/Photo by Dan Shaffer
A new restaurant quietly opened over the holidays, and we are really excited about it. Myra Ghattas , known for the award-winning Slate Street Caf é , opened her new Sixty-Six Acres restaurant across from the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, one of the most visited sites in New Mexico. The name gives homage to the original allotment of land for the Native boarding schools on which Avanyu Plaza sits. The restaurant’s touted as a “modern bar and grill” with shareable appetizers, salads, sandwiches, flatbreads and bowls. Best of all, there are 14 local breweries and eight local distillers represented behind the bar. There’s also a huge outdoor patio with plenty of shade and a fireplace for all seasons. You can call them at 505.243.2153 or drop by 2400 12th Street NW, Building B North.
Among myriad Valentine’s inspired dinners held around town this season of love, one definitely struck me like Cupid’s arrow as best romantic bang for your buck. On the evening of Feb. 14, Savoy Bar & Grill offers a full four-course dinner for just $48, or $64 with full wine pairings (tax and gratuity not included). Best of all, you’ll be serenaded by the sweet vocal stylings of Hillary Smith with her soulful blues and jazz. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 505.294.9463.
The first and only time I thought something I ate was going to put me in the hospital was my first visit to Albuquerque’s National Fiery Foods & Barbeque Show back in the ’90s. They had just bred the newest version of the ghost pepper and named it the “World’s Hottest Pepper.” Being raised on Chimayó chiles, I thought, no problem. I literally almost blacked out from the heat…and I loved it! While the event isn’t until March 1-3 at the Sandia Resort & Casino, advance tickets for $10.50 are on sale now through Feb. 22, before rising to $15.50. So, if you want to sample those sweet-heat desserts, sizzilin’ salsas, butt-kickin’ BBQ sauces, marinades and rubs, then log on to fieryfoodsshow.com and we’ll see ya there.
This year’s New Mexico Restaurant Week extends from Feb. 22 till March 3 in Santa Fe, and March 10-17 in Taos, with amazingly delicious deals to discover during this year’s 10th annual event. Between these two delectable slices of culinary adventure, Burque’s own Restaurant Week spans March 3-10, so once you finish off your plate in the City Different, head south; each week is worthy of your consideration. To name just a couple participating Duke City faves, Chef Ahmed Obo of Jambo Cafe Albuquerque offers both a $25 two-course lunch and a $35 three-course dinner showcasing everything from his succulent lamb kabobs to his award winning curried roasted and coconut cream bisque. And Kelley’s Brew Pub will offer a $15 menu for both lunch and dinner. Restaurants will continue to post their super-saver menus in the coming weeks, so go to newmexicorestaurantweek.com often to see who’s been added.
Ruidoso
The other night on the news, Mark Ronchetti, our KRQE weatherman, said the slopes with the most snow this year can be found at Ski Apache in Ruidoso, and if you need any more reason to make the two-hour drive down there, New Mexico Wine will be holding its Vines in the Pines festival on Presidents Day Weekend Feb. 16-17. With 14 wineries from the Land of Enchantment showcasing over 140 wines, it’s a good thing the town’s so small you can walk pretty much anywhere. Go ahead and book a cozy cabin and go to nmwine.com to get tickets online in advance…they are $20 for one day or $30 for both, and tickets at the door cost $25.
Santa Fe
Jennifer and Jimmy Day’s New Mexico Fine Dining , with Chef Charles Dale at the helm, has once again announced some exciting news for palates everywhere. With Bouche French Bistro , Maize Restaurant and Trattoria A Mano filling seats and tummies nightly, they’re adding two new restaurants to their table of great food here in Santa Fe. The first, slated to open sometime in April, will be Lucky Goat at 500 Sandoval St., with an Asian-inspired menu comprising a wide range of authentic and influenced dishes. With such a broad palate of cuisines to choose from across China and Southeast Asia, Chef is going to allow the flavors, textures and guests’ preferences help develop what will be on the ever-changing menu. In a completely different direction, soon after, in May or June, NMFD will bring us Jimmy Ds at 331 Old Santa Fe Trail (named after the owner of NMFD). It’s a much-needed affordable restaurant with updated diner food that will have both a contemporary and retro take on their dishes and décor. Jimmy D’s will dish out three meals a day, seven days a week and will be focused on the locals who live and work near the Plaza—think: state employees and budget-minded tourists. I personally can’t wait to taste Chef’s take on fried chicken and waffles. Finally, late in the year, they plan to open The Map Room Lounge at the same address with a focus on creative cocktails and craft beers for the younger at heart. L’Olivier/Photo by Gabriella Marks
Last November, our friends Chef Xavier Grenet and his wife Nathalie took a tour of the Côtes-du-Rhône with friends and brought back some special treasures they plan to share with us Feb. 7, when they’ll hold a tuber melanosporum, better known as the French Black Pearl Truffle , dinner. It rings in at $175 (or $135 without the wine pairings) and includes five courses, each with black pearl truffles, and a special sweet truffle dessert. The dishes are paired with Champagnes to start, and then wines of the Southern Rhône. So, get your tarte friande lardon and call 505.989.1919 to grab your seats!
“More great beer” is all I should really need to say, and big things are afoot at Santa Fe Brewing Company , New Mexico’s original and largest craft brewery. Last year brought SFBC a 40-percent sales increase across eight states, and they have commissioned a new Steinecker brewhouse expected to come online in June to stay ahead of their growth and to introduce two new year-round additions to their already substantive portfolio. Alas though, Brewmaser Bert Boyce , who gave us such iconic brews as the 7K IPA and Social Hour is moving on to his own pasture. But before leaving, he helped SFBC handpick his successor, Brian Schaeffer , who will take the reins April 1 after saying goodbye at Oskar Blues Brewery in Longmont, Colo., where he was the production manager who helped lead them to national prominence. So bienvenido , Brian the brewmaster, and welcome to New Mexico. We look forward to tasting your suds for years to come.
One of the highlights of the short time I’ve managed at the Natural Grocers is our new full-time, in-house nutritionist Rio, who I can totally geek out with. We just go on and on about everything from, “Can you use fermented foods to supplement B12 deficiencies in people on vegan diets?” to, “The overall advantages MCT oil has on your cellular mitochondria,” and you can pick her brain for free. She gives free hour-and-a-half, one-on-one consultations at the store and you even get a $5 gift certificate for seeing her. She also has a litany of lectures she can give to any group from book clubs to dinner clubs anyplace, anytime…within reason. Just call 505.474.0111 and ask for Rio. Radish & Rye/Photo by Gabriella Marks
Where has Radish and Rye gone you may have asked? I’ve been asking myself the same thing for a while now. The great news is, as of press time, if you call their number (505.930.5325), the recording says they’ll open soon in a new home at 505 Cerrillos Road in the same complex as Ohori’s Coffee and New Mexico Hard Cider Taproom. We’re just so excited to see Chef Dru Ruebush’ s return with creative cocktails, food and spectacular service. We’ll keep you informed as things progress, and if you beat us there, buzz us (they were aiming for an opening in January, last we heard). With Thai Cafe also moving in to the space once occupied by Talin Market, that area is about to get a whole lot more international.
Restaurant Week rolls through Santa Fe Feb. 22-March 3, and with nearly 50 restaurants already posting their menus, there are great meals galore to be planned! If we hit three a day, we’re still not even half way through, and they all look fabulous…from Arroyo Vino’s impeccable $45 menu with everything from carpaccio to confit, to Il Piatto Italian Farmhouse Kitchen’s $20 three-course lunch with options like mussels fra diavolo and pan-seared branzino. Check out santafe.nmrestaurantweek.com .
A big shout-out out to Lynn Cline , author of The Maverick Cookbook: Iconic Recipes & Tales from New Mexico , (Leaf Storm Press, Santa Fe) which has been optioned by Film Nest Studios for adaption into a television series. While Lynn has been a writer on food and fine art for publications that range from the New York Times to Local Flavor , it is her unique exploration of cooking and New Mexico history that inspired the book’s adaption to the screen. The book chronicles our culinary history through stories of several legendary New Mexicans from Billy the Kid to Georgia O’Keeffe and Fred Harvey to Dennis Hopper. Says producer Anna Darrah, “In a time when cooking shows are drawing unprecedented audiences, it’ll be a new take on an entertainment genre that could use some spicing up!”
Los Alamos
The New Mexico Brewer’s Guild holds their fourth annual Stout Invitational at Bathtub Brewing Co-Op located at 163 Central Park Square, and this one is definitely worth the short drive. Starting at noon Feb. 16, you’ll receive a HUGE flight, in varying styles of 16 stout—from Russian to Imperial, Milk to Nitrogenated—to ponder as you judge your way through them. After you turn in your ballot, you’ll get one fill of your favorite in a commemorative glass to take home, empty. All this smooth, frothy goodness tallies to just $25, but you do need to buy a ticket, so head to holdmyticket.com/tickets/331129 .
Taos
Taos’ Restaurant Week is the farthest in the future, taking place March 10 to 17, so there are not too many menus listed yet, but we do know Rancho de Chimayó boasts three courses for $15, and there’s no way we’re missing that one! Undoubtedly, as March approaches, more participating restaurants will spring up, and we’ll have a much better idea of where we’re eating in our March issue. Visit taos.nmrestaurantweek.com .
And this from James Selby on behalf of the Scott Robert Murray family and the many people privileged to know Scott.
Death of a Salesman: Scott Robert Murray, New Mexico wine and hospitality figure, passed away at the age of 59. Tall, with gregarious charm, sly smile and rumbling Oklahoma twang, Scott, who, as former sales manager helped usher Gruet Winery into national prominence, worked with numerous distributors and wineries, sometime buffalo skinner, died Dec. 17 at his home in Corrales. Born in 1959 in Muskogee, OK, taught to fly-fish by a grandfather named Bass, Scott worked through school selling menswear and found a calling. In 1995, Scott, wife Jyl, two sons and fishing buddies, Jon and Tailor, relocated to Corrales. “Most unforgettable was his ability to laugh at situations and laugh at himself,” Scott’s wife Jyl says. Related Stories

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The most anticipated restaurant openings of 2019 – SquareMeal

11 highly anticipated London restaurant openings for 2019 11 highly anticipated London restaurant openings for 2019 11 highly anticipated London restaurant openings for 2019 Posted on 02 January 2019 • Written By Eamonn Crowe Last year over 200 restaurants opened in the capital, and this year appears to be just as chock-full with London openings. As we settle in to 2019, we’ve rounded up some of the launches that we’re most excited about for the 12 months ahead. Trying each and every one of them will be a tough, thankless task, but we’ll endeavour to do our best – and you should too. Read below to see our top picks.
Arros QD , Fitzrovia (featured image)
When does it open: Early 2019
Why we’re excited: Three-Michelin-starred chef Quique Dacosta (who owns an eponymous restaurant on the Costa Blanca) is opening a premium paella restaurant in Oxford Street’s Plaza Building. Originally billed as InPaella, the restaurant has since changed its name to Arros QD, and its menu will focus on rice, something not featured prominently in high-end gastronomy.
Bao , Borough
When does it open: Spring 2019
Why we’re excited: The ever-popular Bao (which already has sites in Fitzrovia and Soho ) is set to open a third site, on the former site of the Borough Market branch of Feng Sushi. The first couple offered contemporary Taiwanese small plates, alongside the signature soft-steamed buns. However, this new location is expected to provide a slightly different offering. Whatever the menu, we’re sure Londoners will be queuing up to try it.
Big Mamma , Shoreditch
When does it open: Early 2019
Why we’re excited: This site from French restaurant group Big Mamma is found on the corner of Great Eastern Street in Shoreditch, in the space which formerly housed Red’s True BBQ. The as-yet-unnamed restaurant will be split over two floors and seat around 150 diners. The interiors will be inspired by the Italian island of Capri in the 1970s and the food will likely follow suit.
Bob Bob Cité , City
When does it open: 25 March 2019
Why we’re excited: A full year after we included this sequel to Soho’s Bob Bob Ricard in our ‘most anticipated openings of 2018’ feature, and we’re still waiting. The opening is now scheduled for March, but we’re willing to wait, thanks to the promise of ‘press for Champagne’ buttons and cooking from top chef Eric Chavot, who also oversees Coda at The Royal Albert Hall.
Darby’s , Battersea
When does it open: Early 2019
Why we’re excited: Irish chef Robin Gill has already made a name for himself with his restaurants including Sorella and Counter Culture , but this is his biggest project to date. Irish-influenced Darby’s will open on the tenth floor of Embassy Gardens (a retail/residential development) and will sit beneath the SkyPool, an outdoor swimming pool suspended 35 metres in the air between two residential blocks.
Darling , Hackney
When does it open: Spring 2019
Why we’re excited: We love Sager + Wilde , so we were excited to hear that its co-founder Charlotte Wilde is opening her own joint, comprising a wine bar, kitchen as well as an events and production space. Darling’s food menu will consist of a small, seasonal à la carte of modern European dishes, while cocktails will offer twists on classic sips such as Negronis. The wine list meanwhile will feature 100 regularly changing bottles at accessible prices.
Eggslut , TBC
When does it open: Early 2019
Why we’re excited: Despite its somewhat controversial name, Eggslut has proved a hit in the US, operating a handful of sites across California and one in Vegasas well as its international outpost in Lebanon. Its first London site will debut at an as-yet-undisclosed location, with more set to follow. Signature dishes include the Slut: potato purée served in a glass jar, topped with a coddled egg and paired with slices of baguette.
Farzi Café , St James’s
When does it open: 18 January 2019
Why we’re excited: Seven-strong Indian restaurant chain Farzi Café is launching its first London site just off Piccadilly Circus. Farzi is known for its modern interpretation of Indian cuisine, as well as its tableside theatrics. Dishes to indulge in will include tandoori wild mushrooms, sprinkled with a truffle and walnut dust, and the Raj Kachori (pastry shells filled with sweet and sour pumpkin, topped with chutney foam, and served with a crisp okra salad).
Nutshell , Covent Garden
When does it open: January 2019
Why we’re excited: The kitchen at this two-floor Iranian restaurant is headed up by ex-Noma and Greenhouse chef Leonardo Pereira, with counter dining on the ground floor and a more formal space upstairs. The menu is set to focus on Iranian cuisine made using British produce and will include the likes of hay-infused yoghurt with freshly-baked flatbreads, and raw scallops dotted with Iranian caviar.
Roast Kitchen , Fitzrovia
When does it open: Opens mid-2019
Why we’re excited: Borough Market favourite Roast is launching a second, more casual site in Fitzrovia. Open all day, Roast Kitchen will be set across two floors and plans to offer the brand’s signature British roast dinners, alongside new additions. The kitchen will be headed by chef Paul Shearing, who has previously worked at the likes of Odette’s and the One Aldwych hotel.
Xier , Marylebone
When does it open: February 2019
Why we’re excited: This is the first solo project from chef Carlo Scotto, who counts Angela Hartnett as his mentor (who won our AYALA Female Chef of the Year Award 2018 ). The minimalist, chic space is split across two floors, with a tasting menu served in the first-floor Xier and a more accessible and casual offering, called XR, in the ground-floor space. Expect the likes of yellowfin tuna tartar served with aubergine caviar. For a more extensive list of 2019 openings, take a look at our full list of restaurants coming soon . More from Restaurants News

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澳門金沙度假區及澳門金沙賀年美饌Sands Resorts Macao and Sands Macao Chinese New Year Dining Offers

Sands Resorts Macao and Sands Macao Chinese New Year Dining Offers 2019-01
今年春節,澳門金沙度假區及澳門金沙旗下15間食府–喜粵、渢竹自助餐、北方館、巴黎軒、御蓮宮、巴黎人自助餐、朝、南方小廚、常滿飯莊、康萊德大堂酒廊、奧旋自助餐、金沙閣、皎月食坊、888美食天地以及888自助餐將推出一系列賀年菜式及節慶自助餐,讓賓客盡情享用,迎春接福。
For the coming festive season Sands Resorts Macao and Sands Macao are welcoming in an auspicious year of good fortune and happiness with authentic menus and buffets at 15 celebrated restaurants including Canton, Bambu, North, La Chine, Lotus Palace, Le Buffet, Dynasty 8, Southern Kitchen, Rice Empire, The Lounge, Grand Orbit, Golden Court, Moonlight, 888 Food Court and 888 Buffet.
澳門威尼斯人 The Venetian Macao
北方館: 以北方及四川美食佳餚見稱的北方館將推出特設賀年菜單,包括吉祥如意拼盤:黃酒醉鵝肝、燈影牛肉、蜇頭拍黃瓜、蟹肉香麻菠菜、溫拌海螺及傳統口水雞,熱食則有滾滾財源酸菜海鮮鍋及團圓鮑魚獅子頭等。
North : Home of the most authentic northern Chinese and Sichuan cuisine, North offers a unique culinary experience. This Chinese New Year guests can enjoy an exceptional selection of cuisine, including a cold dish combination comprising drunken goose liver, crispy sliced beef, marinated jellyfish, poached spinach and crab meat, marinated sea whelks and poached chicken with sesame along with hot dishes such as ‘Dong Bei’ style braised prawns, pork belly and dried seafood in pickle vegetable broth and braised pork dumplings with abalone in soya sauce.
喜粵: 以精致裝潢及高端粵菜見稱的喜粵將推出的新春菜譜包括四海昇平(豉味花膠扣酥肉)、錦上添花(油鹽妙製松露海鮮球)、財源興旺(黑椒金菇和牛卷)、及以鮑魚、海參、瑤柱、金蠔、海蝦、髮菜、豬手、鵝掌等食材共冶一爐的包羅萬有(喜粵聚寶盆菜)。
喜粵外賣盆菜: 欲想安坐家中品嚐傳統賀年美食的賓客可選擇喜粵的外賣盆菜,由2019年1月21日起接受預訂,並可於2月1至19日期間提取。
Canton : Offering superb southern Chinese cuisine, Canton will provide Chinese New Year promotion menu dishes including braised pork belly with fish maw in fermented black bean sauce, deep-fried seafood balls with black truffle, and M7 Wagyu beef with black pepper enoki mushrooms, crowned by a wonderful Poon Choi, incorporating braised abalone, sea cucumber, fish maw, dried scallop, dried oyster, sea prawn, sea moss, roasted pork belly and goose web.
Poon Choi takeaway : Canton’s exceptional Poon Choi is also available to experience at home this Chinese New Year. Pre-orders can be placed from Jan. 21, with pick-up from Feb. 1-19.
渢竹自助餐: 賓客可於新春期間蒞臨渢竹自助餐享用豐盛的節慶自助餐,恭賀豬年。餐廳特意準備了一系列賀年佳餚,更有迷你佛跳牆,讓賓客喜迎豬年賀新歲。
Bambu : A sumptuous buffet offering will greet the Year of the Pig with a heart-warming selection of western and Asian specialities. As part of a series of festive dishes, diners will find a mini version of the famous ‘Monk Jumps Over the Wall’ dish.
澳門巴黎人 The Parisian Macao
御蓮宮: 澳門巴黎人享負盛名的中菜食府御蓮宮將於農曆新年期間推出新春菜譜套餐。餐廳亦提供單點新春菜譜及新春撈起菜單,單點菜式包括嘻哈大笑(櫻花蝦醬琥珀蝦球)、幸福美滿(懷舊金沙炒重皮蟹)。
Lotus Palace: The renowned restaurant is offering delicious Chinese New Year set menus. Lotus Palace also provides a Chinese New Year à la carte menu, as well as a ‘Lo Hei’ menu, which includes stir-fried king prawns and amber walnuts with sakura shrimp sauce, stir-fried crispy soft shell crabs wrapped with salty egg yolk and more. A prosperity ‘Lo Hei’ features luxurious and auspicious items such as sashimi salmon, surf clams, Hokkaido scallops and jellyfish platter, South African abalone three heads yu sheng platter, and Australian lobster yu sheng platter.
新春撈起菜單則嚴選名貴食材如日本三文魚片、北極貝、北海道鮮帶子、南非三頭鮑魚片及澳洲龍蝦等。此外,御蓮宮亦推出精緻盆菜,包含澳洲鮑魚、海參、花膠、鵝掌、瑤柱、海蝦、金蠔等上乘食材。
Lotus Palace’s exquisite Poon Choi including braised Australian abalone, sea cucumber, fish maw, goose webs, dried scallop, tiger prawns and dried oysters is also available for dine.
巴黎軒: 超卓的巴黎軒特意為賓客送上多款賀年套餐。寓意吉祥的菜式包括一帆風順齊撈起(巴黎軒特色撈起–牡丹蝦、阿拉斯加蟹柳、北極貝、海蜇頭等)、和包括冰鎮滷水小鮑魚、法式手指餅凍鵝肝醬脆皮乳豬萍果伴松露丸子的六六大順。
餐廳亦準備了兩款新春盆菜(6至8人享用)以供選擇。
La Chine: The exceptional restaurant located in The Parisian Macao’s Eiffel Tower is offering set menus this Chinese New Year. A feast of fortune menu includes ‘Love of Eiffel Tower’ Chinese New Year refreshing fortune salad with prawn sashimi, Alaskan crab legs, surf clams and red jellyfish head, La Chine ‘Six Treasure’ appetisers with braised abalone; and roasted suckling pig ‘éclair’ with foie gras terrine, apple and black truffle caviar.
There are also two Poon Choi options, both for six-eight people.
巴黎人自助餐: 今年春節,賓客可於匯聚國際美食的頂級巴黎人自助餐慶賀新春佳節。除了各款沙律、開胃菜、刺身壽司、海鮮、意大利麵和中印美食外,自助午餐更提供澳洲肉眼扒及葡式椰汁烤雞,晚餐則提供即煎鵝肝、現煮波士頓龍蝦、現烤芝士及黑松露意大利燴飯配巴瑪臣芝士圈。
Le Buffet: Celebrate the auspicious time of year with one of Macao’s best and most varied buffets. The Chinese New Year lunch buffet offers a carving station with Australian prime rib roasted on the bone alongside Macanese style African chicken in addition to a wide range of salads, antipasti, sushi and sashimi, seafood, pasta, Chinese and Indian delicacies. The dinner buffet adds stations for foie gras poele, Boston lobster thermidor, raclette cheese, Australian prime rib carving and truffle risotto tossed in a parmesan wheel.
澳門金沙城中心 Sands Cotai Central
朝 : 澳門康萊德酒店的「朝」將呈獻包括九道佳餚的新春套餐,菜式包括滿堂吉慶(乳豬冷熱拼盆 – 乳豬、鵝肝金桔凍、燒鴨)、興隆招寶(石斛葛仙米燉花膠)、好市包發財(髮菜蠔豉扣鮑魚)、連年有盈餘(清蒸海東星斑)、彩鳳迎朝陽(脆皮龍崗雞)、招財又進寶(腰果西芹百合炒雞油菌)及五穀賀豐收(櫻花蝦乾貝五穀絲苗)。
「朝」更為賓客預備了包括鮮草蝦、六頭鮑魚、瑤柱甫、金蠔、鵝掌及花膠等矜貴上乘食材的農曆新年盆菜,可供4至6人享用。盆菜亦可供外賣帶回家中,與親朋好友分享節日滋味。
Dynasty 8 is offering an exceptional nine-course Chinese New Year set menu. Featuring an appetiser combination platter of suckling pig, mandarin goose liver and roasted duck, it also offers double-boiled superior soup, dry oysters, steamed red spotted garoupa, crispy-fried chicken, celery with lily bulb and chanterelle mushrooms, assorted grains with conpoy and sakura shrimp.
A classic Poon Choi including prawns, six-head abalone, conpoy, dried oysters, goose web and fish maw rolls is also available. It can also be ordered as a festive takeaway to enjoy at home with family and friends.
奧旋自助餐 : 「奧旋自助餐」將帶來滋味豐足的農曆新年自助餐,包括地中海、西式、中式、日式、葡萄牙、東南亞及印度等特色菜餚,並提供豐富的冰鮮海產供賓客選擇。餐廳提供的賀年菜餚包括發財好市大利、橫財就手,自助晚餐亦增添波士頓龍蝦及螃蟹。
Grand Orbit is featuring a sumptuous Chinese New Year buffet, featuring Mediterranean, Western, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese, Southeast Asian and Indian specialities, as well as chilled fresh seafood on ice. Chinese New Year specialities include braised pork tongue with oysters and braised pork knuckle with red bean paste, while the dinner buffet also adds Boston lobster and crab.
大堂酒廊: 澳門康萊德酒店大堂酒廊將特別供應「農曆新年下午茶套餐」以迎接新春佳節,精選多款美味小食及別致的傳統鹹點和甜點,及自選兩杯茶、咖啡或農曆新年特製的無酒精雞尾酒或雞尾酒。
The Lounge : A delicious East meets West afternoon tea will be served at The Lounge to celebrate Chinese New Year, and includes a selection of both savoury and sweet traditional treats, along with a choice of tea or coffee or two special Chinese New Year cocktails or mocktails.
澳門金沙 Sands Macao
金沙閣: 備受歡迎的金沙閣炮製了一系列特別菜餚歡度新春佳節。新春應節小菜包括風生水起(三文魚、海參、雞絲、海蜇頭、蟹籽撈起)、發財好市(髮菜蜜餞百花煎金蠔)、龍馬精神(金瑤醬爆龍蝦及百靈菇)等。
Golden Court: Popular Golden Court Cantonese restaurant has put together some delicious dishes for the special festive occasion, including tossed salmon, sea cucumber, chicken, jellyfish and crab roe, wok-fried honey glazed dried oysters and minced prawns with sea moss, wok-fried Boston lobster with oyster-mushroom and XO conpoy sauce, and more.
888自助餐: 春節期間,賓客可於888自助餐與親朋摯友享用一系列午膳及晚膳自助佳餚美饌。以匯聚中葡美食聞名的888自助餐將帶來風山水起(三文魚撈起)、金雞報喜(葡式燒雞),甜點則有紅棗餅和紫薯甜卷。
888 Buffet: Treat family and friends with festive lunch and dinner buffets at 888 Buffet. Enjoy all the Chinese and Portuguese specialities for which the restaurant is renowned, including seasonal favourite ‘fortunate tossed’ salmon and vegetables with sesame dressing, alongside daily grill stations and desserts including steamed red date cake and purple sweet potato roll. TAGS

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Where to Experience the Best Nightlife in Singapore

Jan 30 2019
If you are someone who likes exploring a place long after the sun has set and lights have come out, there couldn’t a be better place for you than Singapore . Packing a punch with world-famous bars, restaurants, clubs and lounges, the nightlife in Singapore is exhilarating and exciting in equal measures. When in Singapore, party to your heart’s content at these top places.
Clarke Quay
The top choice for night revellers looking for a good time, Clarke Quay is at the bustling heart of Singapore’s nightlife. Set on the side of a river, the buzzing dining and drinking scene here gives some of the world’s top cities a run for their money. A wide array of restaurants, bars and pubs based on imaginative themes line up, serving everything from traditional Singaporean fare to Indian and continental cuisines. From Crazy Elephant to the Chupitos Bar, and from Hooters to Cuba Libre, Clarke Quay presents some excellent options for pub-hopping.
Marina Bay Sands
You’ve read about it, you’ve seen glimpses of it on television, but nothing can prepare you for your first tryst with Marina Bay Sands , the glamorous neighbourhood of Singapore, known for its record-making buildings that host many luxurious entertainment zones. It’s the best place in the city-state for rooftop dining and drinking, raising the toast to the twinkling city lights below. The waterfront bars make it possible to soak in the buzz of the waterfront promenade whereas the lounge bars and other nightclubs are the best places to spot the who’s who of Singapore.
Orchard Road
Popular as the shopping haven of Singapore, Orchard Road also has ample lures for after the sun sets. There are number of trendy bars and night clubs lined up here, serving some of the best food and booze in the city inside creatively-themed spaces. Manhattan, the Other Room, and the Horse’s Mouth are the go-to places where you are guaranteed the good old time. If you are more in the mood for a lounge, do check out L’Espresso, House of AnLi Bistrot, Privé or Bar Canary. TWG Tea and other teahouses remain open long in the night for teetotallers.
Holland Village
The chic and young crowds in Singapore patronise the Holland Village , teeming with a range of great bars, pubs and restaurants. It’s the kind of place where you will find more locals than tourists, chilling after a day of work. From live band performances to unique bespoke cocktails and a range of local and international delicacies, the nightlife spots in the Holland Village have several recipes for a good time. Some of the most popular names include Wala Wala, Umi Nami, The Pit Restaurant and Bar, Lucky Bar, 72o Bistro And The Toys amongst many others.
Club Street, Chinatown
One of the busiest areas in Singapore has also turned into one of the best places for night-time fun. Don’t let the little watering holes and laid-back hangouts have you believe that fun and entertainment will be limited. When the rest of the city is long-asleep, these little bars and clubs come to life and welcome visitors looking for a great music and food as well as good company. IZY, Drinks and Co, Les Buchons, Oxwell and Co and Beaujolais are some of the places worth checking out.

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A History of the East Village as NYC’s Most Exciting Dining Neighborhood

A History of the East Village as NYC’s Most Exciting Dining Neighborhood It’s one of the most diverse and most affordable places to eat in New York City Part of The Ultimate Guide to Eating in the East Village The East Village has the most kinetic, rapidly evolving, and downright fun restaurant scene in the city. In addition to boasting almost any type of cuisine you could hope for — from around the nation, and indeed, the world — the neighborhood is also a wellspring for numerous highly original restaurants. Due to its small parcels of real estate, progressive attitude, and history of counterculture, the neighborhood is an incubator for aspiring young chefs and restaurateurs — just as it has been for musicians, writers, poets, and revolutionaries in decades past. But the neighborhood wasn’t always such a remarkable place to eat out. It wasn’t until the late 1980s that any significant dining scene began to develop, and it really wasn’t until this century that the East Village produced world-renowned restaurants. The East Village as a distinct geographic entity only dates back to the 1960s. Prior to that it was considered part of the Lower East Side, and was populated for much of its history by German and Jewish immigrants. The oldest remaining restaurants in the East Village don’t reflect this heritage. McSorley’s Ale House (1854) is an Irish pub, Veniero’s (1894) is an Italian pastry shop, and John’s of 12th Street (1908) is a picturesque Italian red sauce joint. B&H Dairy (circa 1939) is one of the few remaining vestiges of the neighborhood’s Jewish culinary tradition. Veselka It was in the post-World War II era that the East Village became known as the “pierogi belt,” due to the spate of restaurants that opened up to feed the hungry Ukrainians and Poles who flocked to the neighborhood. A few remain with us, such as Veselka (1954) and Odessa (1965). But most of these establishments, like Leshkos (1957 to 1999) and Kiev (1971 to 2000), are distant memories. Also of note is Second Avenue Deli , which operated in the East Village from 1954 to 2006 (it relocated after a lengthy closure and is now located in Murray Hill). Indian restaurant Shah Bag (now closed) opened at 320 East Sixth St. in 1968, and by the 1970s, there was a significant number of Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi restaurants centered on Sixth Street, popularly known as “curry row.” By 2000, there were over 25 of such restaurants, but these days, that number has dwindled significantly. There is also still a slight remanence of the neighborhood’s bohemian roots. Casa Adela also opened in 1976, serving classic Latin fare, and it remains open to this day. But Angelica Kitchen (1976), a pioneer of vegetarian cooking, closed in 2017 after a 40-year tenure, and Dojo, which opened on St. Marks’s Place in 1974 and closed in 2007, lasted by name until 2018 with a recently closed Greenwich Village location. The early 1980s saw the opening of a number of quirky, eclectic, casual restaurants, and fast-food joints that would help to define the neighborhood’s culinary zeitgeist and lay the groundwork for what was to come. Life Cafe (1981 to 2012), Yaffa Cafe (1983 to 2014), and San Loco (1986 to 2017) are now closed, but Cafe Mogador (1983), Two Boots (1987, which started off as a full-service restaurant), and Paul’s Palace (1989, now known as Paul’s Da Burger Joint ) are still around today. They may not reflect the most avant-garde expressions of their respective cuisines, but they are all East Village originals. The openings of Sapporo East (1983 to 2013, replaced by the very similar Beronberon ) and Hasaki (1984) were arguably the most significant openings of the mid 1980s, as they foreshadowed the ascension of Little Tokyo , which would grow rapidly in the following decade. An interesting footnote to cap the decade was that in 1989, a young chef by the name of Bobby Flay took the helm of the kitchen at Miracle Grill. It was his first executive chef job and showed that the East Village could be a fertile ground for a young chef. By the 1990s, the East Village had become a full-fledged nightlife destination with bars and clubs proliferating in the neighborhood. This helped to boost the restaurant scene as well, and often the two worlds blurred together. Lucky Cheng’s (1993) was part drag cabaret and part Cali-Asian fusion restaurant. And both Decibel (1993) and Angel’s Share (1994) represented part of the Little Tokyo scene and anticipated the cocktail and spirits obsession of today. The decade also saw a number of French bistros pop up that are still around, such as Jules (1993) and Lucien (1998). And the area also became known for affordable Italian trattorias and wine bars. Frank Prisinzano opened Frank restaurant in 1998, and he went on to launch two more neighborhood spots — Lil Frankie’s and Supper , a pizzeria and trattoria, respectively. All three are still thriving today. As the decade closed, Gabrielle Hamilton opened Prune (1999), which would become one of the most influential and important East Village restaurants of its day. It set the tone for the decade to come. While the road to 2000 is fairly easy to follow, the meteoric ascension of the East Village as a dining neighborhood in the 21st century — especially in the last decade — is somewhat harder to quantify, so dizzying has the progress been. Currently, there are more than 300 establishments licensed to serve food in the East Village, and the diversity is staggering. Unquestionably, gentrification has played a role in the evolution of the neighborhood’s dining scene. The escalation in real estate prices led to a younger, wealthier demographic in the neighborhood. But the rise in the number of restaurants speaks beyond pure economic and demographic shifts, and demonstrates the ascension of the local culinary arts. The cultural space and mindshare occupied by music and art in decades past is now increasingly focused on restaurants and dining. Some notable openings from that era were ramen restaurant Rai Rai Ken (2000), the Greek Pylos (2003), the Mermaid Inn (2003), Marco Canora’s Hearth (2003), and Degustation (2006). All remain notable in their field, except the now-closed Degustation, and Canora, especially, has garnered national recognition for almost single handedly kicking off the broth trend. Momofuku pork buns But it is David Chang’s Momofuku restaurants that have been the most influential. From $5 soft-serve ice cream to $500 tasting menus, Chang has conquered the East Village. Momofuku Noodle Bar opened in 2004, followed by Momofuku Ssäm Bar (2006) and Momofuku Ko (2008). Collectively, they revolutionized dining, stripping away much of the pomp and fostering a new era of creativity by allowing chefs to cook what they felt like. Chang’s restaurants occupy an especially important place because they have had a global impact. As the brand spreads out across the planet, chefs and restaurateurs around the world draw inspiration from the food and service style of the Momofuku restaurants. Beginning in 2008 with the opening of Gemma , the Bowery corridor began to attract big-name chefs. Daniel Boulud opened DBGB in 2009, followed in quick succession by Brad Farmerie’s Saxon + Parole , Andrew Carmellini’s Bar Primi , John Fraser’s Narcissa , and Josh Capon’s Bowery Meat Company . DBGB has since closed. They are all very good restaurants, but with all due respect, it is hard to consider them part of the restaurant culture of the East Village. They are big, ambitious projects from chef/owners who made their names and fortunes elsewhere. The spaces they occupy are discordant both architecturally and culturally with the rest of the neighborhood. Rather, the East Village is better defined by restaurants like Amanda Cohen’s Dirt Candy (2008, relocated to Lower East Side 2015); Sara Jenkins’s sandwich shop Porchetta (2008 to 2016) and trattoria Porsena (2010); and Northern Spy Food Co (2009 to 2016). The neighborhood is also particularly adept at generating oddball fast-food brands. The aforementioned Two Boots Pizza and San Loco are early examples, and more recently we have seen Crif Dogs , Artichoke Pizza , Luke’s Lobster , and David Chang’s Fuku all branch out and become mini-chains. The East Village has more recently seen a burst of creative energy, with openings like Brian Kim and Tae Kyung Ku’s Korean hit Oiji , Jonah Miller’s Basque-tinged Huertas , Thomas Chen’s Chinese-New American restaurant Tuome , Alex Stupak’s Mexican-influenced Empellon Al Pastor , and Chung Chow’s Hawaiian-inspired Noreetuh . And a surge of Chinese students in the area has led to a boom in stylish new restaurants serving hyper-specific regional Chinese cuisines, meaning the neighborhood is now home to Yunnan-style mifen (rice noodles) at Little Tong Noodle Shop , Sichuan dry pot at MáLà Project , Cajun-Chinese seafood boil at Le Sia , and Taiwanese beef noodle soup at Ho Foods . None of these places existed a decade ago, yet they now rank among the most compelling restaurants in downtown Manhattan. Eater NY Sign up for our newsletter. Enter your email address Subscribe By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy.

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Discovering hawker food in Singapore, a culture worth preserving — and devouring

Discovering hawker food in Singapore, a culture worth preserving — and devouring Los Angeles Times 12 hrs ago By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times © Catalyst Jan. 29–SINGAPORE — There’s little that can prepare an outsider for the onslaught of food in Singapore.
Every stroll through this city shrouded in tropical heat is interrupted by open-air food centers, coffee shops and restaurants vying for your stomach’s attention.
Seek sanctuary inside an air-conditioned mall and you’ll be greeted by sprawling subterranean food halls that seem to span the distance between subway stops.
Dining out is a way of life in Singapore. One in four residents say they eat out daily, a recent Nielsen survey found. Many choose food centers, which aren’t your hot dog on a stick-variety mall food courts, but keepers of a proud local cuisine and tradition cobbled by generations of the city’s Chinese, Indian and Malay inhabitants.
The abundance and convenience of food in Singapore can be a shock to the system — particularly for someone like me who has lived in a community of tract homes in Santa Clarita, where dining out meant choosing between two equidistant McDonald’s.
I admit I have a weakness for Big Macs, but it’s no contest when outside my hotel on a stretch of Killiney Road I can choose between world-class satay, chicken rice, curry laksa, prawn noodles, fish ball soup, dim sum, Indian prata, chicken biryani, beef rendang or Cantonese barbecue — all for about the same price as a six-piece Chicken McNugget meal.
Straying from my neighborhood has been even more rewarding.
There were the piquant chili crab and salted egg yolk prawns at the East Coast Seafood Center that looks out onto the Singapore Strait, where at night, the tankers and cargo ships are anchored so close together they look like a neighboring city.
There was the crunchy fried Hainan chicken wing vendor at the Toa Payoh Lorong Food Center, who commands such a loyal following that customers line up long before opening to beat the crowds.
At Golden Mile Food Center, I took my first bites of Peranakan food, a centuries-old cuisine born out of the intermarrying of Chinese and Malays. The cuisine, which requires meticulous preparation, is slowly fading from fashion along with the few remaining chefs who know the recipes by heart.
“You’ve only scratched the surface,” I was told by K.F. Seetoh, an evangelist of Singaporean food culture, founder of the Makansutra food guide and the subject of profiles by R.W. Apple Jr. and Calvin Trillin.
Over a plate of beet red mee goreng, a local Indian take on stir-fried Chinese noodles, Seetoh spoke about a looming crisis. The storied ranks of Singapore’s food vendors, known here as hawkers, are aging faster than they can be replaced.
Their children, equipped with elite educations and living in one of the most affluent countries in the world, have little interest in working 12-hour shifts in 10-by-10-feet hawker stands in unrelenting heat.
“Thousands of old heritage hawkers — proud, loud, humble, authentic — are marching toward a cliff,” said Seetoh, who has been keeping a running tab on his Facebook page of the latest dining destinations to close. “They’re going to go down and into the sunset. Behind them are perhaps 10 new hawkers to replace them.”
Without them, Singapore wouldn’t have its frenetic dining scene where unpretentious food reigns and the instinct to eat elbow-to-elbow with strangers forms the basis of community.
Hawkers typically specialize in one thing, like a Hainanese chicken rice or bak kut teh, a pork rib soup, and rarely charge more than $4 a portion. Their artisan’s way of cooking set standards high, making it hard to find a bad meal in this island nation.
“We have professors coming from the U.S. and they go to our canteen here and they say, ‘This is restaurant-type food and you pay two U.S. dollars. You guys are spoiled,'” said Malone-Lee Lai Choo, an expert on urban development at the National University of Singapore.
Hawkers are the descendants of itinerant street food vendors who predate Singapore’s founding in 1965. After nationhood, they were licensed and housed in pavilions located in or near public housing, where 80% of Singaporeans live today.
That gave the masses access to cheap, clean and abundant food that helped power Singapore’s productivity. By taking away the chore of cooking, it enabled both spouses to work. Government statistics show about 65% of Singaporean households with children include two working parents. That’s a rate slightly higher than in the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Buying groceries can also cost more than dining out, providing another reason to eschew the kitchen.
The Singaporean government has long played a heavy hand in the way its citizens eat. It has to, it says, for the sake of food security in a country of merely 278 square miles and no room for farms. More than 90% of everything Singaporeans consume is imported from countries such as Malaysia, Indonesia, China and Brazil.
After perhaps underselling its appeal, the Singaporean government has jumped on the hawker bandwagon in recent years. It established a hawker incubation program that allowed applicants to lease a stall at half-price for six months to encourage a new generation. And it launched a campaign to include hawker culture into UNESCO’s List of Intangible Cultural Heritage alongside things such as France’s gastronomic dining and Italy’s Neapolitan pizza. Singapore’s submission is due in March.
“You see any restaurant food in ‘Crazy Rich Asians’?” said Seetoh, a proponent of the UNESCO bid. “Nada. It’s all chili crab and satay. Hawker food is a national icon.”
It remains to be seen whether Singapore can retain its hawkers’ artisan roots. It’s easier today to buy staples like fish balls wholesale than it is to make them from scratch. More food service companies are operating air-conditioned facsimiles of the hawker centers and supplying the vendors there with semi-prepared meals from a central commissary.
There are 114 hawker centers in Singapore, each housing 100 to 200 stalls outfitted with sinks and a few burners. One of the older locations, Golden Mile Food Center on Beach Road, was built in 1975 under public housing that sits on former waterfront property long obscured by reclaimed land.
On a recent weekday, the center’s two-story dining area hummed with the sound of undulating electric fans. Hundreds of diners, mostly workers from nearby office buildings, tucked into orders of clay pot rice, braised duck and lor mee, a popular dish of egg noodles submerged in a thick dark gravy.
To one side of the floor, in stall B1-30, stood Charlie Tan, chef and owner of Charlie’s Peranakan Food. Tan returned to cooking in 2017 after an eight-year hiatus triggered by poor health.
“I was burnt out,” said Tan, 62, whose perpetually furrowed brow is befitting of a man who works from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week. “This isn’t ordinary food. It’s very complex. It takes proper planning.”
Consider one of Tan’s most popular dishes, ayam buah keluak. The recipe relies on buah keluak, a walnut-size seed found in mangrove swamps that has to be soaked for days to remove poisonous toxins.
“Otherwise you get the runs,” Seetoh said.
Tan painstakingly empties the flesh of each seed, blending it with minced pork and shrimp before returning it into its casing. It’s then simmered in a sauce with chicken and served with rice and a Popsicle stick to scoop out the contents of the buah keluak. Sour, inky and earthy, it is like eating a mixture of Mexican mole and Filipino adobo.
Tan is one of only a few cooks with Peranakan bloodlines still preparing this kind of food in Singapore. He’s even more of an anomaly because he has a son who wants to take over the business.
Joshua Chen, 20, recently finished his two-year compulsory national military service. Now he stands at his father’s side, hoping to absorb the elder’s exacting techniques, one dish at a time.
“The passion is there,” Tan said of his son, “but I don’t see the flair yet.”
___
(c)2019 the Los Angeles Times
Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Hong Kong gifts Pakistan a culinary star

Hong Kong gifts Pakistan a culinary star Published 1 day ago on 30 January 2019 This picture taken on January 16, 2019, shows spiced fish (centre), naan bread and other dishes on display at the New Punjab Club restaurant in Hong Kong. — AFP pic
HONG KONG, Jan 30 — A pair of his father’s old tandoor ovens helped Hong Kong restaurateur Asim Hussain achieve a dream — the world’s first Michelin star for a Pakistani restaurant, an accolade he hopes will fire interest in the country’s often overlooked cuisine.
Like many of Hong Kong’s 85,000 strong South Asian population, Hussein’s family trace their lineage in the bustling financial hub back generations, when the city was a British colonial outpost.
His great-grandfather arrived during World War One, overseeing mess halls for British soldiers while his Cantonese speaking father owned restaurants in the eighties and nineties.
Hussein, 33, already had some twenty eateries in his group when he decided to embark on his what he described as his most personal and risky project yet, a restaurant serving dishes from Pakistan’s Punjab region, the family’s ancestral homeland and where he was packed off to boarding school aged six.
His father, a serial entrepreneur and even once Pakistan’s ambassador to South Korea, suggested he restore two old tandoors from his now shuttered restaurant collecting dust in storage.
“He comes from a generation that doesn’t throw things away,” laughs Hussain, dressed in a traditional knee-length tunic and sitting in a restaurant decked with paintings by Pakistani artists. “Actually the results are better than if we had new ovens because these things improve with age.”
Those tandoors, frequent trips to Lahore to perfect recipes and a kitchen overseen by head chef Palash Mitra, earned the New Punjab Club a Michelin star just 18 months after it opened its doors.
‘A benchmark’
The success made headlines in Pakistan, a country that is unlikely to see a Michelin guide any time soon and whose chefs have long felt overshadowed by the wider global recognition gained from neighbouring India’s regional cuisines.
“It makes us proud, it makes us very happy,” Waqar Chattha, who runs one of Islamabad’s best-known restaurants, told AFP. “In the restaurant fraternity it’s a great achievement. It sort of sets a benchmark for others to achieve as well.”
Hussain is keen to note that his restaurant only represents one of Pakistan’s many cuisines, the often meat-heavy, piquant food of the Punjab. At it doesn’t come cheap — as much as US$100 (RM411) per head. This picture taken on January 16, 2019, shows Hong Kong restaurateur Asim Hussain sitting at a table in his restaurant, the New Punjab Club in Hong Kong. — AFP pic
“I’m not arrogant or ignorant to say this is the best Pakistani restaurant in the world. There are better Pakistani restaurants than this in Pakistan.”
But he says the accolade has still been a “great source of pride” for Hong Kong’s 18,000-strong Pakistani community.
“It’s bringing a very niche personal story back to life, this culture, this cuisine is sort of unknown outside of Pakistan, outside of Punjab, so in a very small way I think we’ve shed a positive light on the work, on who we are and where we come from,” he explains.
It was the second star achieved by Black Sheep, the restaurant group which was founded six years ago by Hussein and his business partner, veteran Canadian chef Christopher Mark, and has seen rapid success.
But the expansion of Michelin and other western food guides into Asia has not been without controversy.
Critics have often said reviewers tended to over-emphasise western culinary standards, service and tastes.
Daisann McLane is one of those detractors. She describes the Michelin guide’s arrival in Bangkok last year as “completely changing the culinary scene there — and not in a good way.”
She runs culinary tours to some of the Hong Kong’s less glitzy eateries — to hole in the wall “dai pai dong” food stalls, African and South Asian canteens hidden inside the famously labyrinthine Chungking Mansions and to “cha chan teng” tea shops famous for their sweet brews and thick slabs of toast.
While she’s “delighted” New Punjab Club has been recognised, she has her reservations: “There is a lot of world cuisine operating way under the radar in Hong Kong and it doesn’t get noticed by Michelin or the big award groups.”
‘Taking ownership’
For some, any recognition of Pakistan’s overlooked cuisine is a success story.
Sumayya Usmani said she spent years trying to showcase the distinct flavours of Pakistani cuisine, so heavily influenced by the tumultuous and violent migration sparked by the 1947 partition of India.
When the British-Pakistani chef first pitched her cookbook to publishers on her country’s cuisine, many initially balked.
But in recent years, she says, attitudes have changed. Pakistani-run restaurants in the west that once might have described themselves as Indian are more proudly proclaiming their real culinary heritage, she says.
“I think it’s really good that people are coming out of that fear of calling themselves specifically Pakistani,” she told AFP. “It’s nice that Pakistanis have started to take ownership of what belongs to them.”
Back in Hong Kong, Hussain remarks the hard work has only just begun.
“I joke with the boys and I say that ‘It’s the first Pakistani Punjabi restaurant in the world to win a star, let’s not be the first one to lose a star’”. — AFP Related Articles

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Food and drink festivals Phoenix February 2019

Let friends in your social network know what you are reading about Facebook Email Food and drink festivals Phoenix February 2019 Here are 13 of the best food and drink festivals happening in Phoenix in February 2019. Hang out with fellow food lovers at just one or many of these! Post to Facebook Food and drink festivals Phoenix February 2019 Here are 13 of the best food and drink festivals happening in Phoenix in February 2019. Hang out with fellow food lovers at just one or many of these! Check out this story on azcentral.com: https://www.azcentral.com/picture-gallery/entertainment/dining/2019/01/30/food-and-drink-festivals-phoenix-february-2019/2721746002/ Cancel Send A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Posted! A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Join the Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs This conversation is moderated according to USA TODAY’s community rules . Please read the rules before joining the discussion. Best food and drink festivals for Phoenix in February 2019 FEB. 2-3 – ARIZONA VEGETARIAN FOOD FESTIVAL: Back for its fifth year, the Arizona Vegetarian Food Festival takes over Scottsdale Civic Center Plaza for two days of food and fun. In addition to featuring 60 vegan vendors, the event includes presentations, yoga, workout classes, kids’ activities, and music. DETAILS: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2-Sunday, Feb. 3. Scottsdale Civic Center Mall, 3939 N. Drinkwater Blvd., Scottsdale. $20. azvegfoodfest.com . The Republic None FEB. 2-3 – ARIZONA VEGETARIAN FOOD FESTIVAL: Back for its fifth year, the Arizona Vegetarian Food Festival takes over Scottsdale Civic Center Plaza for two days of food and fun. In addition to featuring 60 vegan vendors, the event includes presentations, yoga, workout classes, kids’ activities, and music. DETAILS: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2-Sunday, Feb. 3. Scottsdale Civic Center Mall, 3939 N. Drinkwater Blvd., Scottsdale. $20. azvegfoodfest.com . The Republic FEB. 9 – ARIZONA STRONG BEER FESTIVAL: Arizona Beer Week includes hundreds of events all over the state, but the don’t-miss action will be at the Arizona Strong Beer Festival. More than 150 breweries from around the state and country will gather in central Phoenix to tap and taste specialty, unique and rare brews. Admission includes 40 tasting tickets with VIP tickets available for those interested in perks like early entry and private restrooms. DETAILS: 1-5 p.m. Saturday, Feb 9. Steele Indian School Park, 300 E. Indian School Road, Phoenix. $60. 480-365-9000, arizonabeerweek.com/arizona-strong-beer-festival . Melissa Fossum/azcentral.com None FEB. 9 – ARIZONA STRONG BEER FESTIVAL: Arizona Beer Week includes hundreds of events all over the state, but the don’t-miss action will be at the Arizona Strong Beer Festival. More than 150 breweries from around the state and country will gather in central Phoenix to tap and taste specialty, unique and rare brews. Admission includes 40 tasting tickets with VIP tickets available for those interested in perks like early entry and private restrooms. DETAILS: 1-5 p.m. Saturday, Feb 9. Steele Indian School Park, 300 E. Indian School Road, Phoenix. $60. 480-365-9000, arizonabeerweek.com/arizona-strong-beer-festival . Melissa Fossum/azcentral.com FEB. 16 – THE CHILI BOURBON FESTIVAL: Local home cooks and chefs can compete in this downtown Chandler cook-off. A ticket includes a tasting card to sample from the competitors and the right to vote for your favorite. The event also will feature more than a dozen types of bourbon, which will be available to sample with the purchase of a drink card. DETAILS: Noon-9 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16. Dr. AJ Chandler Park, 178 E. Commonwealth Ave., Chandler. $10. chilibourbonfestival.com . Chili Bourbon Festival None FEB. 16 – THE CHILI BOURBON FESTIVAL: Local home cooks and chefs can compete in this downtown Chandler cook-off. A ticket includes a tasting card to sample from the competitors and the right to vote for your favorite. The event also will feature more than a dozen types of bourbon, which will be available to sample with the purchase of a drink card. DETAILS: Noon-9 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16. Dr. AJ Chandler Park, 178 E. Commonwealth Ave., Chandler. $10. chilibourbonfestival.com . Chili Bourbon Festival FEB. 16 – LAVEEN BBQ FESTIVAL: Hosted by the not-for-profit Laveen Community Council, this 6th annual event includes barbecue, cold drinks, family-friendly games, and live entertainment. DETAILS: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16. Cesar Chavez Park, 7858 S. 35th Ave., Laveen. $10. Laveenbbq.org . Laveen BBQ Festival None FEB. 16 – LAVEEN BBQ FESTIVAL: Hosted by the not-for-profit Laveen Community Council, this 6th annual event includes barbecue, cold drinks, family-friendly games, and live entertainment. DETAILS: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16. Cesar Chavez Park, 7858 S. 35th Ave., Laveen. $10. Laveenbbq.org . Laveen BBQ Festival FEB. 16 – SCOTTSDALE TACO CRAWL: Inhale tacos and exhale negativity at this bar crawl with a hefty side of tacos. Taco and tequila lovers will sample tacos at several Old Town Scottsdale bars, which include Casa Amigos, Goodwood Tavern, Old Town Gringos, Skylanes, El Chameleon, and Wasted Grain. Tickets include six tacos and drink specials at each location. DETAILS: noon-6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16. Multiple locations. $20. scottsdaletacocrawl.weebly.com . Arizona Taco Festival None FEB. 16 – SCOTTSDALE TACO CRAWL: Inhale tacos and exhale negativity at this bar crawl with a hefty side of tacos. Taco and tequila lovers will sample tacos at several Old Town Scottsdale bars, which include Casa Amigos, Goodwood Tavern, Old Town Gringos, Skylanes, El Chameleon, and Wasted Grain. Tickets include six tacos and drink specials at each location. DETAILS: noon-6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16. Multiple locations. $20. scottsdaletacocrawl.weebly.com . Arizona Taco Festival FEB. 16-17 – STREET EATS FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL: Fifty-five food trucks will roll into Salt River Fields in Scottsdale for this two-day fest. Every truck will serve a $2 sample menu so attendees can taste as much street food as possible. Food is not included in the general-admission ticket price. Entertainment will include live bands, lawn games, eating contests, local vendors, cooking classes and more. DETAILS: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16 and Sunday, Feb. 17. Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, 7555 N. Pima Road, Scottsdale. $12. streeteatsaz.com . Street Eats Food Truck Festival None FEB. 16-17 – STREET EATS FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL: Fifty-five food trucks will roll into Salt River Fields in Scottsdale for this two-day fest. Every truck will serve a $2 sample menu so attendees can taste as much street food as possible. Food is not included in the general-admission ticket price. Entertainment will include live bands, lawn games, eating contests, local vendors, cooking classes and more. DETAILS: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16 and Sunday, Feb. 17. Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, 7555 N. Pima Road, Scottsdale. $12. streeteatsaz.com . Street Eats Food Truck Festival FEB. 16-17 – THE COCKTAIL JAM: Kick off Arizona Cocktail Week at this music and mixology party at the Van Buren in downtown Phoenix. DJ Z-Trip will perform and admission includes 10 cocktail samples. DETAILS: 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, to 2 a.m. Sunday, Feb 17. The Van Buren, 12 W. Camelback Road, Phoenix. $50. Arizonacocktailweekend.com . Arizona Cocktail Weekend None FEB. 16-17 – THE COCKTAIL JAM: Kick off Arizona Cocktail Week at this music and mixology party at the Van Buren in downtown Phoenix. DJ Z-Trip will perform and admission includes 10 cocktail samples. DETAILS: 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, to 2 a.m. Sunday, Feb 17. The Van Buren, 12 W. Camelback Road, Phoenix. $50. Arizonacocktailweekend.com . Arizona Cocktail Weekend FEB. 18 – TOP BARS: Why travel to taste cocktails from the best bars around the country when they’ll all be in Phoenix for Top Bars? This Arizona Cocktail Week event will highlight bars such as Herbs & Rye in Las Vegas, Arnaud’s French 75 in New Orleans and Raised By Wolves in San Diego, all of which will set up pop-up bars and pour cocktails for attendees to sample. DETAILS: 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 18. The Croft, 22 E. Buchanan Street, Phoenix. $50. Arizonacocktailweekend.com . Arizona Cocktail Weekend None FEB. 18 – TOP BARS: Why travel to taste cocktails from the best bars around the country when they’ll all be in Phoenix for Top Bars? This Arizona Cocktail Week event will highlight bars such as Herbs & Rye in Las Vegas, Arnaud’s French 75 in New Orleans and Raised By Wolves in San Diego, all of which will set up pop-up bars and pour cocktails for attendees to sample. DETAILS: 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 18. The Croft, 22 E. Buchanan Street, Phoenix. $50. Arizonacocktailweekend.com . Arizona Cocktail Weekend FEB. 21 – DEVOUR THE WORLD: For the second year, Devour Week includes Devour the World, a celebration of the international flavor alive in Phoenix. Held at the Japanese Friendship Garden, the event includes multicultural cuisine from restaurants such as Good Fortune Kitchen, Satay Hut, Flavors of Louisiana, El Chullo Peruvian Restaurant & Bar and Hana Japanese. DETAILS: 6-9 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21. $75. Japanese Friendship Garden, 1125 N. Third Ave., Phoenix. $75. classic.devourphoenix.com/devour-the-world . Dominic Armato/The Republic None FEB. 21 – DEVOUR THE WORLD: For the second year, Devour Week includes Devour the World, a celebration of the international flavor alive in Phoenix. Held at the Japanese Friendship Garden, the event includes multicultural cuisine from restaurants such as Good Fortune Kitchen, Satay Hut, Flavors of Louisiana, El Chullo Peruvian Restaurant & Bar and Hana Japanese. DETAILS: 6-9 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21. $75. Japanese Friendship Garden, 1125 N. Third Ave., Phoenix. $75. classic.devourphoenix.com/devour-the-world . Dominic Armato/The Republic FEB. 23 – SCOTTSDALE BEER FEST: Beer lovers can head to Old Town Scottsdale for this hop-filled party. Attendees can taste beer samples from multiple breweries at Wasted Grain. DETAILS: 2-6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23. Wasted Grain, 7295 E. Stetson Drive, Scottsdale. $20. scottsdalebeerfest.weebly.com . golero, Getty Images/iStockphoto None FEB. 23 – SCOTTSDALE BEER FEST: Beer lovers can head to Old Town Scottsdale for this hop-filled party. Attendees can taste beer samples from multiple breweries at Wasted Grain. DETAILS: 2-6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23. Wasted Grain, 7295 E. Stetson Drive, Scottsdale. $20. scottsdalebeerfest.weebly.com . golero, Getty Images/iStockphoto FEB. 23-24 – ITALIAN FESTIVAL OF ARIZONA: Join the Italian Association of Arizona for the sixth annual Italian Festival in Scottsdale. The two-day event includes food, wine, music, dance performances and crafts. General-admission tickets include entrance and all entertainment. DETAILS: 11 a.m.- 9 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24. $10. South Bridge, 7114 E. Stetson Drive, Scottsdale. $10. Italianfestivalaz.com . Courtesy of Italian Association of Arizona None FEB. 23-24 – ITALIAN FESTIVAL OF ARIZONA: Join the Italian Association of Arizona for the sixth annual Italian Festival in Scottsdale. The two-day event includes food, wine, music, dance performances and crafts. General-admission tickets include entrance and all entertainment. DETAILS: 11 a.m.- 9 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24. $10. South Bridge, 7114 E. Stetson Drive, Scottsdale. $10. Italianfestivalaz.com . Courtesy of Italian Association of Arizona FEB. 23-24 – DEVOUR CULINARY CLASSIC: Phoenix food lovers won’t want to miss the 10th annual Devour Culinary Classic, easily the most high-profile food festival of the year. The event takes place at the Desert Botanical Garden for two days of culinary indulgence. Catch top restaurants — including Barrio Cafe, Cotton & Copper, Talavera, Gallo Blanco and Chula Seafood dishing out samples alongside local food vendors, winemakers, spirit artisans, and more. DETAILS: 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, and Sunday, Feb. 24. Desert Botanical Garden, 1201 N. Galvin Parkway, Phoenix. classic.devourphoenix.com . Dominic Armato/The Republic None FEB. 23-24 – DEVOUR CULINARY CLASSIC: Phoenix food lovers won’t want to miss the 10th annual Devour Culinary Classic, easily the most high-profile food festival of the year. The event takes place at the Desert Botanical Garden for two days of culinary indulgence. Catch top restaurants — including Barrio Cafe, Cotton & Copper, Talavera, Gallo Blanco and Chula Seafood dishing out samples alongside local food vendors, winemakers, spirit artisans, and more. DETAILS: 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, and Sunday, Feb. 24. Desert Botanical Garden, 1201 N. Galvin Parkway, Phoenix. classic.devourphoenix.com . Dominic Armato/The Republic FEB. 23-24 – PHOENIX VEGAN FESTIVAL: This family-friendly event at Margaret T. Hance Park in downtown Phoenix offers vegan food trucks, restaurants, and food purveyors. The animal-free festival also features a vegan market with vegan-friendly products, chef demonstrations, live music, and kids’ activities. DETAILS: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, and Sunday, Feb. 24. $25. Margaret T. Hance Park, 1202 N. Third St., Phoenix. $25. phxveganfest.com . Juice Core None FEB. 23-24 – PHOENIX VEGAN FESTIVAL: This family-friendly event at Margaret T. Hance Park in downtown Phoenix offers vegan food trucks, restaurants, and food purveyors. The animal-free festival also features a vegan market with vegan-friendly products, chef demonstrations, live music, and kids’ activities. DETAILS: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, and Sunday, Feb. 24. $25. Margaret T. Hance Park, 1202 N. Third St., Phoenix. $25. phxveganfest.com . Juice Core Interested in this topic? You may also want to view these photo galleries: Replay

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