Vipassana: Why Everyone Should Do A 10 Day Silent Meditation — And Why Many…

Vipassana: Why Everyone Should Do A 10 Day Silent Meditation — And Why Many…

Vipassana: The Everything Guide to Why Everyone Should Do A 10 Day Silent Meditation — And Why Many Fail Trying
Matt Livadary Follow Jul 10 · 26 min read “Show me one thing in this store that will change my life and I’ll buy it.”
This is the audacious proposition I posed to a book clerk at the former Equator bookstore on Abbot Kinney. I was 23, arrogant, and secretly praying he didn’t try to pawn off one of his $4,000 crystal sound bowls. He didn’t seem to even think before immediately bee-lining for a corner shelf. He pulled down a book and handed it to me, all without uttering a word.
The book I bought that day was Meditation Now by S.N. Goenka. It details the Vipassana meditation technique that Gotama the Buddha discovered over 2500 years ago to liberate himself, starting with the fundamentals of focusing on your respiration. I recall appreciating the read, but at that age, wasn’t sure if it lived up to the question I’d posed. But there was something at the very end of the book that intrigued me ever since.
All over the world, there are more than 200 non-profit Vipassana groups, hosting 10 day silent meditations (and up to even as long as 60 days). They’re run by volunteers, completely free, and almost instantly have a waitlist hundreds of people long every time they announce an upcoming course. And the fact that you can’t even donate to the organization until you complete a 10-day retreat struck a chord with me. Where else do you find an organization so un-encumbered by brand involvement, partnerships or showy individual donors? It’s a pure organization — run entirely on the passion of those it serves. I loved this immediately.
Many other mainstream figures have begun talking about vipassana as well. Sam Harris, Tim Ferris and Marc Benioff just to name a few. And in 2016, Oprah covered a story called The Dhamma Brothers, which chronicled the incredible benefits found after introducing a 10 day vipassana retreat to a violent Alabama state prison. It seems many who commit to this, end up seeing results.
After cancelling my enrollment four times over the last decade, when I turned 35, I was finally ready to do a 10 day silent meditation retreat.
Or so I thought.
I want to outline the magic and the hell of doing a 10 day silent meditation retreat. There are gifts so immense it can be life changing. By the end, my mind became so sharp and focused that I could feel every sensation of every inch of my body. I could feel the shape and movement of my heart, the pulse running through my spinal cord, and the physical flaps of my brain — just by concentrating on them. It was unreal, but it’s actually the most real thing I’ve ever experienced. And it’s completely accessible to any of us, any time. And is much more practical and simple to understand than I expected. More on this later.
But there are also so many things I wish someone had told me before I joined. It’s not uncommon for at least a few people to drop out before the end — something that’s highly discouraged and warned against. My hope is by learning a few helpful expectations, that less people will give up on it before the 10 days are over. They may be the exact people who need the technique the most. And also there are far too many people waiting for the chance to be there to have any of the fortunate few waste their opportunity.
SPOILER ALERTS: There are several anecdotes from my own realizations and experiences about the technique beginning at the days 1–3 section and after. These experiences are by no means prescriptive nor comprehensive, everyone’s journey will be unique. Don’t cling to what you read below nor crave or hope against having this exact experience, you won’t. You will have your own experience. I lay these out to show the types of leaps that are possible — many may discover less or well beyond what I was able to in 10 days. Regardless, if you prefer going into the retreat without any expectations, I’d suggest not reading further.
THE BASICS T here are a few fundamentals to understand before we dive in: Vipassana silent retreats vary in length — but according to the Southern California Vipassana Center, the minimum recommended retreat is 10 days. And while many, including myself, doubted this seemingly endless time to be silently off the grid, I’d completely agree it’s the minimum amount of time to grasp it all — most of my biggest revelations happened from days 7–10.
You meditate for almost 11 hours a day and remain completely silent for days one through nine. This means no talking, no gesturing to fellow participants, no electronics, no phones, no books, pens, journals, or really anything that can distract you. You can schedule 5 minutes with the assistant teacher on most days where you can chat one-on-one. I took advantage of this every opportunity I could. Why not? It’s someone to talk to and it’s something to do that’s not meditating. That was my thought the first time I had a session with my teacher before realizing how wise he was and how every session would give me something profound to meditate on. Pun intended.
This is the schedule you get — there were two things that stuck out to me immediately and one that wasn’t as obvious until I got there:
The daily, silent routine. Not a lot of variety. The first two things I noticed are the wake up time and the shocking amount of meditation you’re required to do on one of these retreats. My “meditation practice” (which is hilarious to even think I had one prior to this) was maybe 1–2 times per week for no more than 30 minutes a piece. I definitely felt like I was about to run a marathon without ever having really jogged before. This intimidated this shit out of me. I will say, for the record, it is possible to do and anyone can do it. But almost no one can do it without struggling at some point. It will test your fortitude and your sanity at many different stages.
The third and more subtle thing I didn’t exactly realize until 5PM on day one is that “tea break” does not mean “dinner.” If you’re a first time student, you can enjoy some fruit with your tea or coffee. If you’re a returning student, you don’t get to eat anything beyond milkless tea. The two full meals you eat during the day are “vege-fuckin-tarian,” as I might have sighed before the retreat. I’m an over-eating carnivore who occasionally dabbles in vegetables. The meditation regimen on top of having to “skimp” on my food intake was disheartening, and I hadn’t even been there 24 hours.
But the food is shockingly good. And it’s all prepared thanklessly, wordlessly by volunteers. As I’d learn first hand, meditation is much more effective when the stomach isn’t completely full. And for all my certainty about how my body would reject these meager vegetarian meals, I never missed my normal cuisine once. I’ve even downloaded the recipes we ate on the retreat and now make them at home. If you know me, you’d know this is almost unthinkable.
The last thing I’ll say for someone facing their first retreat: bring a watch and get as comfortable as you can as early as possible. The watch helps you get used to the schedule, knowing how much time you have left on breaks, etc — and you can always choose not wear it when you don’t want to. As far as getting comfortable, I can’t believe how little thought I gave to the seating before I arrived. I brought a yoga block. That’s it. I knew they’d have some cushions, but they go quickly — by day 3, all supplies have been pilfered, you’ll be look around as you ache to see neighbors sitting atop 6 cushions. All the back-seats are gone almost immediately. You’re left to fend for yourself. Some people bring chairs, though you’re more susceptible to falling asleep that way. On day one, I’d recommend getting as comfortable as possible early — know that you can relocate your assigned cushion to the wall, while there’s real estate available. And know that if you’re close to the door, it’s going to be more distracting if people come and go. If I do another retreat, I’m definitely investing in my own seat in advance.
A POORLY NAMED RETREAT The other important thing to know right away is that, despite the name, these are not retreats . It’s a lot of work. Constant work. And some of that work is painful. And you come to realize it has to be that way. We’re trying to sharpen and strengthen the mind. If we were doing the same for our bodies, there are very few ways to get results without sweating — without pushing yourself. The mind is the same. Do not expect a cake walk meditation vacation where you just get to clear your mind — while clarity and peace of mind certainly come, it’s completely dependent on you to show up ready to work way more on meditating than you ever thought possible.
There was a guy I spoke briefly to during opening registration (before we were required to go silent) — he admitted he never once meditated and that he read somewhere that these retreats were a good “meditation bootcamp”.
Halfway through day three, he went home.
These retreats are diving into the deep end no matter what your background or practice are when you arrive. I don’t think you have to have meditated before arriving. But I do think it’s foolish not to at least have tried a few sessions on your own. It certainly can’t hurt you.
But I’d rather end this section on another man I met at registration. He was 23 and said he also quit after three days of his first 10 day attempt when he was only 18. It crushed him to give up, but he said he wasn’t ready. So he spent the next few years casually incorporating meditation into his life and was now standing before me, ready to tackle the retreat once again. I was really impressed by him and admit I may not have ever returned if I’d been in his shoes.
Spoiler alert: he made it all the way through and experienced some profound revelations.
THE SILENCE The first question most people ask me about the retreat is “how was it dealing with the silence for ten days?” It’s the easiest question to answer: it’s completely necessary and one of the easiest routines to adopt. By day two you come to realize that not having to make small talk in between meditation sessions and not having to compare your experience against another’s is one of the best gifts. Otherwise, everyday I certainly would have been bitching in some form or another of how hard it was, or how I still hadn’t had a breakthrough, or “woe-is-me this is lame, don’t you think?” It would have poisoned my meditations as I’d become fixated on someone’s story — someone who claimed to feel electricity all over their body when they focused hard enough. It would begin spiraling you into wanting, craving and aching over your comparative progress. It would also give you one more thing to think about when all you’re job is is to focus objectively and intensely. The silence is a great thing. And it really goes a long way to making the practice possible.
“Who is your enemy? The mind is your enemy. No one can harm you more than a mind untrained. Who is your friend? The mind is your friend. Nothing can help you more than a trained mind.” — Buddha
V ipassana runs on the basis that all human unhappiness is caused by three things: ignorance, craving and aversion. Wanting water because you’re thirsty is fine, but when you want that water so badly that you become agitated, bitter or angry, and you’ve just let yourself become miserable. And likely the people around you, too.
We’ve become so accustomed to our habits of reacting with craving or aversion that it feels like an impulse — someone cuts us off on the freeway or our parents say something that hurts our feelings, we instantly react with some desire to re-write the whole thing or give them a piece of our mind. In this, we unconsciously give power to these bad habits. That’s how untrained minds think, anyway. That’s certainly how my mind works — and I wouldn’t even consider myself unhappy or reactionary — I’ve always prided myself on having a very even keeled approach to life. But I learned a lot of things subconsciously holding me back by beginning to train my mind.
“Don’t you go getting hinky on me.”
These are the last words my step dad said to me before I left, praying I wouldn’t come out a hippy or vegan or whatever. Most people hear “Vipassana meditation” and assume it’s some scene out of Wild, Wild Country ; some cult that tricks people into the promise of a better life, at the cost of their own integrity and morals. It’s the way many people view Burning Man — a retreat that many say is “the way the world should be” but once home, they yearn and ache for next year’s festival — completely relying on an external event for the feeling that “this is the way the world should be”.
But Vipassana is just a meditation technique that helps you understand heaven and hell (or simply, joy and unhappiness) are inside of us at any given time. And while many of the people who do a 10 day retreat wind up converted to loyalists, evangelizers even, it’s not a religion, doesn’t ask for followers and doesn’t assign any vague doctrines to worship. It’s shockingly practical.
It’s a blueprint to enlightenment that’s simple to understand. But enlightenment may not be your bag. And that’s okay too. There’s no voodoo. While there’s (unfortunately) some ancient Indian chanting to put up with that some may take issue with (as I did early on with the morning session’s 30 minute distracting gutteral dischords that caused me to meditate in my room whenever allowed), at its heart, Vipassana is shockingly straightforward.
It’s commonly called by Goenka as following the “law of nature” — and it does so in surprisingly plain-spoken and common ways that are almost obvious. And while the ultimate goal is to liberate humans from suffering so they can achieve enlightenment, its practice is actually just disciplining and optimizing your mind to be used more to its capacity. In doing so, you do in fact learn how to control whether or not you decide to react to whatever external stimuli is being presented to you, so you spend less time spiraling out of control or yearning to re-write the narrative. You just allow it to be, and you understand that you aren’t as affected — because all unhappiness is from the inside out. But we’ll get back to that in a moment.
The results you discover about yourself from day to day can be mind-blowing — one of the best parts of the technique is you can feel yourself getting stronger, sharper, more focused, just about every day. Max out on push ups for one day, you won’t feel stronger tomorrow. You may have to max out every day for a week to be able to do just one more push up by next week. That progress is how our muscles grow over time. But the brain is highly elastic, and when you begin exercising it with a sound technique under the right conditions, it begins to improve quickly.
Walking path, Vipassana Meditation Center — Twentynine Palms, CA I arrived with my bags ready to live like a monk for 10 days. My modest little room thankfully had an AC. When I unpacked, I discovered a deck of cards and a Kindle in my bag (a no-no that could easily distract me in my down time). I turned in the Kindle immediately. They don’t check your bags or act like the gestapo, it’s all on the honor code. But why go through all this trouble if I wasn’t going to commit to the regimen?
But I put the playing cards to a different use. Rather than be tempted to become the world’s best solitaire player, I permanently devoted 10 cards to tracking my progress. Every night before bed, I’d have a little card-flipping ceremony where I celebrated the growth of the day. This not only gave me something to look forward to, but it forced me to honestly think about how I was doing. I made a routine around reflecting the changes I was experienceing and highlight areas where I know my brain self-sabotages. Without it, I don’t know if I’d have made the revelations I did. And it gave definition to each day, where otherwise meditating for that long can begin feeling like one day is the same as any. It’s definitely not.
Many may understandably disagree with this potential distraction. But for me, I’d recommend a simple method of keeping tabs on each day and creating a routine around it. The cards kept my spirits up when I needed it, and helped me celebrate when I would have otherwise thoughtlessly soldiered on. But whatever you use, don’t bring a pen. There are plenty of times you’ll want one, but I’ve spoken to many since who all agree it’s a slippery slope that will begins becoming a goal of writing down expressions of the experience before allowing the space for the experience to happen.
You’ll likely memorize every bathroom product’s label by the end of the 10 days ( “Bon Ami cleans with calcium carbonate!” ), but don’t add any unnecessary distractions because just the littlest thing can begin to take over your focus.
DAY 1 OF 10 ACT 1: DAYS 1–3 On day one, your only task is to sit as comfortably as possible and objectively observe your respiration in and out of your nose. Sounds simple enough. But I could barely get three clear breaths in and out before some of the most batshit thoughts began carpet bombing my focus. Why hadn’t my building’s handyman put my name in the door directory yet? What were the lyrics to Fastball’s 90’s hit “The Way”? How does one get into furniture design?
It turns out, it’s really hard to clear your mind. The emails you forgot to send, the people who know how to reach you in an emergency, the list of things you intend to do when you get out — all of it clouds the ability to focus the mind. I had very little hope I was cut out for this retreat. The instructors remind constantly that it’s okay if your mind wanders — just “smilingly bring your focus back to the breath.” I was doing that all the time, though I don’t know about “smilingly”. I was frustrated. I shifted constantly on my uncomfortable little cushion seat. What was I doing in this place?
Then the assistant teacher said something that helped. Instead of getting down on yourself every time you notice your mind has yet again wandered, he instructed us to silently celebrate that you noticed it wander in the first place. This slight shift in perspective began to help me shed the chatter.
And breath by breath, it gets easier.
By the end of day 2, I could more-or-less sit for an entire session without too much wandering. That’s when the instruction shifts slightly — now notice every sensation you can feel in your nose while you’re breathing. And as always, observe objectively without attaching any sort of reaction to the sensation. This is where the meaning of the word vipassana comes to play: “seeing things as they really are.”
But this isn’t vipassana meditation. Not yet.
Days one until halfway through day four are known as Anapana meditation. The act of focusing your concetration. This is like the mise en place of vipassana. It creates the foundation of concentration where you can comfortably sit for long periods of time in deep focus without wandering.
By day three, I didn’t miss my phone. I got into the rhythm of the schedule. Began having wildly lucid dreams during the few times I could actually sleep (ProTip: Bring your own pillow. The ones provided are unapologetically two-dimensional). Over the course of this time, you’ll notice your mind get sharper as the instructor coninually narrows the size of your focus — finally to the septum.
Focusing all attention on the tiny space beneath your nostrils and you’ll begin to notice incredible sensations. Enegery, pulsating, microscopic hair follicles. It’s wild to think anyone of us could reach this level of heightened perception in only a couple days. By this point, you have about 33+ hours of meditating entirely on your nose. My focus was sharper than it’s ever been. Still, it’s monotonous. Several of the men and, I’d later learn, a few of the women had already quit. And I totally understand why.
But knowing what I know now, I have to urge anyone whoever tries this:
Do whatever you can to make it through day 4.
Day 4 is Vipassana Day, and it’s when the painful magic begins.
DAY 4: “VIPASSANA DAY” I cried on the morning of day 4.
I was walking on the path after breakfast, looking forward to whatever “Vipassana Day” meant, and was suddenly overcome by painful memories. Deep memories I hadn’t ever given much thought to. Memories whose only common theme seemed to be they lacked closure. Accompanying them was a sense of yearning, wishing I’d been a better person, or handled something better. My instinct was — and is always — to do something about these memories! — c ommit to being more aware; look to make amends; chastise myself — anything to make the shame go away.
As the teacher would tell me, this is natural as you go deeper. As you dig inside yourself, you’re bound to uncover buried memories. These memories seem safely stowed away, but they actually crust over in the shape of bad habits or behaviors that may seem completely unrelated.
Your only job: observe their sensations objectively.
Instead of trying to busy or distract ourselves, which just buries them deeper only to erupt later, focus on how the memories feel. What parts of your body are affected? What does this sensation feel like? How does it manifest physically in your body? Accept the feeling openly and be comfortable living in that moment. Face it head on. Breathe with it. And allow yourself to let it go. Because after a few honest breaths at doing this, the memories begin to sting less and less. Our fists begin to unclench. And letting them go becomes possible.
Vipassana Day starts in the afternoon on day 4. And it blew my mind.
Imagine focusing on your nose for 4 days, focus getting deeper and deeper, narrowing the focus to the septum, feeling every sensation that exists in a 1/4″ of space. And all of a sudden, the teacher says “now transfer your awareness to the crown of your head.”
My scalp became electrified.
It was like I could feel every hair follicle, every breeze from the AC, every pulse moving through my scalp — the feeling was like little ants crawling around on top of my head. I was suddenly aware of these sensations that are happening all the time. The instructor asked us next to move the awareness to our shoulder — and before I could ask exactly how we do that, my right arm came alive. I could feel the subtle spasm of my arm muscle and a tingling senation all over the area.
As you begin scanning every inch of your skin, you become aware of the changing nature of everything. What you’re witnessing are chemical and biological reactions happening throughout the ever-changing body. New cells generating, old cells ceasing, all regenerating into an entirely new body. The body we had last week is not the same body we have today.
It’s the most intense lesson of impermanence I’ve always read about, intellectualized, but never quite understood it until this moment. Everything is impermanent. Our sensations, our bodies, our planet — everything. To attach a reaction to something that’s impermanent is silly. This feeling will pass. This sensation will pass. Do not get fooled into reacting to it — it will be gone.
The body scans get stronger and stronger and the goal is to have no blind spots on any inch of your skin. I had several transcendant meditation sessions where the time was over before I realized to care about the time. There were other times I felt lighter than air and completely in harmony with everything around me. I also had really hard sessions as well — just trying to get comfortable was an ongoing battle. My back isn’t great, and I finally found a spot against the wall that helped mitigate it slightly, but discomfort and shifting always remained. Ping ponging between highs and lows may be par for the course of vipassana retreats.
This goes on until Day 6 “Adhittahana Day”— which most people admit is one of the hardest days.
I’d agree with them.
Day 6 — “Aditthana Day” Adhittahana is a pali word for “strong determination”. Days 6 onward are all sittings of strong determination. And they will test your determination, and then some.
The goal of these sessions: when you sit down, get comfortable and then challenge yourself not to move at all until the end of the session. No shifting, no pivoting, stretching, re-positioning — nothing.
I’d been shifting constantly before this — 11 hours a day in lotus position will do this to you. And now I was being challenged with being a still frame of meditation. Oh man.
For me, the first hour-long session of this was impossible. My leg fell asleep 10 minutes in and I knew I was toast. Goenka’s voice occasionally reminded:
“Whatever the sensation, observe it, and remain perfectly equanimous”
Yeah right, Goenka. Trying to focus on the pain objectively without reacting to it would have been laughable if I hadn’t been in so much pain. My leg throbbed like a sock full of sand being slammed against the ground. I could feel the pinch in my glute, cutting off the exact artery that furnished my entire left leg. My mind began cursing not being able to immediately Google “how long can the leg survive without blood flow? ” I started seeing images of Lieutenant Dan from Forrest Gump wondering how I’d explain to people how I lost my leg “Oh, just this meditation retreat that got super intense”.
But before I could devote all of my pity to my leg, my back began screaming. Nots all over. Then my butt began throbbing all over.
Pain. All. Over.
I broke the position 40 minutes in, feeling partly like a failure and partly like an idiot for ever volunteering to this. I wanted to give up. I remember sipping my tea at the 5PM break in complete defeat: there’s no way I was going to be able to do this.
That’s when a story of a friend of mine came into my head at the perfect time. He’d run the Boston Marathon, one of the world’s most challenging 26.3 mile footraces. I went to Boston College that sat at the top of “Heartbreak Hill” which is the end of a long, brutal incline 23 miles into the race. I remember cheering on the brave, exhausted runners in college, trying to will them to go just a little further. My friend had trained for nearly a year to be ready — he needed to clear Heartbreak Hill and after that, it’s smooth sailing for the last 3.2 miles to downtown Boston. The day arrived, he struggled, but he managed to make it over the hill and could almost taste the finish line.
But a few downhill blocks in, he collapsed.
He was so delerious he barely remembers if it was anything more than fatigue, but he recalls some medic asking him if he needed to be carted off. He was barely cognizant of saying “yes” — but before he knew it, he was on a stretcher, saying goodbye to his dream of finishing the marathon. He never raced again. I remember the deep regret in his face as he told me this story before I attempted my only marathon, and he urged me:
“Push through. If you’re not going to die or be permanently damaged, do everything you possibly can to push through. Push through.”
It was this very mantra that made me get back on my feet after I too collapsed at mile 23 of the 2014 LA Marathon. A marthon I’m grateful to have finished. All because I told the medic to leave me be, even though my body was aching to be carted away and buried somewhere.
Years later, in the middle of the desert, I carried this story with me to the next meditation session. I was determined to be readier, have a more comfortable seat (I included my bed pillow under my butt for just a little more comfort). I showed up early to the mediation hall, carefully cushioning every surface of my seating, testing it out, re-positioning. I felt like the Princess and the Pea — if one little lump was felt, I tore it all down, and re-built my seat.
None of it worked.
The thing about Adhitthana is that it will be uncomfortable regardless. My meditation quickly turned to a full attack with pain flanking me from all sides. It would have been so simple to move my leg an inch just to refresh it. But this would have been a reaction. I resolved to remain equanimous. “Observe it. Push through. Observe it.”
I could feel the heat jumping ship from my body. I began sweating. “Observe the sweat,” the teacher would say. Nausea began. “Observe the nausea” . I felt like vomiting more than once. My body felt like it was breaking down. I managed not to avert from the pain, but as I sensed the hour coming to a close, I noticed I’d built an intense new craving: needing to reach the end of the hour. I was certain the teacher was fucking with us — giving us just a few more minutes before ending the session just because. Surely it’s been well beyond an hour by now. I was on the brink of giving up. I ached for the end of the hour. More than I’ve needed almost anything, I needed this session to end .
The session finally ended and my body exhaled. Oddly, even before I moved an inch, I noticed the pain subsided — just by sheer fact I knew it was over.
I made it. It was painful, but I made it. So just by comparison to the first session, I was already stronger. Able to handle this more in only one more session. It was motivating, I was proud of my progress and determination, but I felt guilty that in avoiding reacting to the pain, I’d built up an intense craving for the end of the hour — so much so that I was miserable, agitated and nearly unable to function until it ended. I took my question to the teacher the next day:
“How could replacing one craving with another be accomplishing anything?”
The teacher would tell me that the two cravings were not equal. Impatience is a common and temporary type of craving that we often are forced to sit through. But how often do we ever allow ourselves to sit through intense pain and simply observe it? Especially at such a deep level of our consciousness where we can actually eradicate these types of reactions at their root — reactions that likely contribute to everyday feelings of impatience as well. By withstanding and observing the pain — even for just a couple minutes — I was building a discipline and awareness that my own reactions are within my control, as is my suffering. He said to keep breathing and observing through it and I would soon notice both the impatience and the pain would affect me less.
He was completely right.
By day 7, I had no less pain, but I began to observe it better and simply allow it to be. The hour sessions felt like they ended faster. I struggled still on and off til the very end, but overall the pain didn’t bother me as much. It enabled the magic to settle in — the harmony of it all, and the detachment from any of it. I would eventually have some beautiful, revelatory sessions that I can’t put into words here except to say they were among the most transcendent experiences of my life.
I’d gotten over Heartbreak Hill.
Day 10: Breaking the Silence T here were so many a-ha moments, so many deep-seated habits I’d never been aware of that I got to encounter head on. Heartbreak Hill, it turns out, is more of a mountain range. And each one teaches you a new lesson about yourself. Just as I begun feeling like I was “locked in,” I’d have a session that humbled me. I realized ways in which my mind sabotages me from my goals — even trying to cleverly convince myself that it’s for a greater cause. I’ll skip many of these realizations and experiences and simply say I struggled and grew significantly in just 10 days.
(Sidenote: you leave on the 11th day — be forewarned or this news can be disheartening!)
On day 10, you can finally talk to the others. We instantly cut through any small talk and went right to the heart: at what points did you go insane? And what did you learn? The 35 men in my group all shared similar stories of unbelievable pain and all admitted to nearly giving up at least once — and usually right before they broke through the egg shell a little more with a revelation that profoundly changed them. It seems that’s how it always happens.
I suddenly discovered these men I’d avoided making eye contact with for 10 days. The man sitting next to me was a chiropractor from Long Beach (damn that would have helped). Another man was a firefighter who had now done six 10 day retreats — his calm, stoic demeanor seemed to reflect years of this method working through him. There was a 19 year old who’d already done 2 retreats, having been introduced to meditation by his parents in the 3rd grade. I remember thinking that kid is going to take over the world.
I made some new friends almost immediately. And learning from others’ experiences helped put into words similar things I’d been feeling. The talking lasted long through the night and was really helpful in buffering the inevitable reintegration back into the world of the speaking.
(Sidenote: re-integration after one of these retreats may include some overwhelm —the Sunday we got out, I made the mistake of trying to get anything vegetarian from Whole Foods. This was ill-advised. It felt like the last scene of THE HURT LOCKER.
Culture shock in THE HURT LOCKER I could feel the folds of my brain just by concentrating, but I couldn’t cope with a Whole Foods on a Sunday. While Vipassana helps equip us better for these types of scenarios, the initial one or two days after one of these retreats, you’re still a little raw. So forgive yourself and maybe lay low for a day or two and it, like everything, passes.)
Not everyone necessarily wanted to sign up for another retreat, but it seemed everyone left grateful to have done it and learned a lot of practical tools to better navigate the world. I’m eternally grateful for this practice and look forward to doing this insane thing again.
Day 11 and beyond I’m a fervent supporter of vipassana and wish there was a way every human could take it. It helps you understand how much more capacity we have in the mind, and how we can optimize it to work towards our goals instead of against us. I’ve already begun incorporating the meditation into my life — it’s making a noticeable difference already.
I tend to find my discipline on many fronts has improved — my morning runs actually end when — or go even long than — I intended (whereas before I’d commonly skimp on mileage because I had a busy day); I don’t go back for multiple helpings of food; and I do actions with much more intention. I still eat meat for sure, but much less. And the teacher left me with some wisdom that sticks with me still.
Instead of feeling guilty about eating meat, or considering it a “sin” (a word he wasn’t a fan of), he told me,
“Look at every decision you make as constructive or destructive”
Being so deeply in tune with yourself, there’s a heightened sense of what’s constructive or descructive. And making choices from that level, life immediately begins to be more productive and positive.
The more interesting thing is even only after doing a 10 day retreat, I notice I view other people’s pain differently. Instead of getting offended, defensive or embarrassed by another’s blunt or heated outburst to something, I find that I hear a deeper place where it’s coming from, a place I’m now much more familiar with. It helps me listen with more compassion instead of judging or reacting to the words coming out of their mouth. I’m not perfect about this by any stretch and still have much work to do on this front, but I’ve definitely gotten better.
I find myself thinking a lot about that book clerk. I wish I could find him and let him know that the book he silently recommened me that day lived up to the hype. It’s been a long journey to get here, full of much more pain that I could have ever expected, but that’s how it should have been. No such thing as a free lunch, I suppose. And it’s only the beginning of the journey that I plan to continue the rest of my life. I hope you find it as useful as I did.
Now go forget every bit of this and go have your own experience. : )
MAY ALL BEINGS BE HAPPY.

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The Best Things to Do in Metro Phoenix This Week: July 11-17

EXPAND Gathering for Movies on Main in Mesa. Ivan Martinez The Best Things to Do in Metro Phoenix July 11-17 Cara Pencak , Lynn Trimble , Jason Keil | July 10, 2019 | 6:30am Looking for some fun this week? You can get into your feels at Risk! , transport yourself to Europe at Experience France, or enjoy a sundae after a history lesson during the Old Fashioned Ice Cream Social. For more things to do, visit Phoenix New Times ’ calendar .
EXPAND Checking out One-Eyed Jack in Old Town Scottsdale. Lynn Trimble Summer Spectacular Art Walk Strolling the streets of Scottsdale’s Old Town arts district is a relaxing way to beat the summer heat, especially during the free Summer Spectacular Art Walk , which happens from 6:30 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, July 11. Start on Main Street between Scottsdale Road and Goldwater Boulevard, where Royse Contemporary’s “Moments of Color” exhibit includes works by Cherie Buck-Hutchison, Nigel Clouse, Charmagne Coe, Gennaro Garcia, Daniel Shephard, and Onna Voellmer.
Then head over to Marshall Way north of Indian School Road, where you’ll see John Randall Nelson’s giant rabbit sculpture for Scottsdale Public Art. It’s also home to Wilde Meyer Gallery, which is having its “Annual $100 Show,” and the Art One gallery that has an eclectic selection of affordable offerings. Expect live music and refreshments, too. Lynn Trimble
Kevin Allison Mindy Tucker / With Reservation Risk! Risk! isn’t a typical storytelling podcast. The tales told may shock and even repulse (bodily fluids are often involved). But make no mistake, they will also make you laugh, cry, and feel. Kevin Allison, a member of the beloved comedy troupe The State, hosts the live show’s return to Phoenix. The lineup has yet to be released, but expect great local talent to step behind the mic. When Risk! made its Phoenix debut in 2017, comedians Anwar Newton and Kathy Cano-Murillo (The Crafty Chica) took the stage.
Gather round at 8 p.m. on Thursday, July 11, at Crescent Ballroom , 308 North Second Avenue. Tickets are $20. Jason Keil
All about Frida. Kathy Cano-Murillo Forever Frida: A Celebration of the Life, Art, Loves, Words, and Style of Frida Kahlo Most people know Kathy Cano-Murillo as The Crafty Chica, but she’s also an accomplished writer. Her latest work merges her love of art and prose. Forever Frida: A Celebration of the Life, Art, Loves, Words, and Style of Frida Kahlo is a deep dive into the work and legacy of Frida Kahlo. This isn’t going to be a typical book signing, either. There will be a Kahlo-themed art workshop after the presentation for those who are creatively inclined.
The book signing begins at 6 p.m. on Thursday, July 11, at Changing Hands Phoenix , 300 West Camelback Road. The workshop takes place at 7:30 p.m and costs $20, which doesn’t include a copy of the book. The signing is free. Jason Keil
‘Hugo Medina: 10 Year Retrospective’ Hugo Medina’s first show took place at Barrio Cafe in 2009. In the decade since, the Bolivian-born artist’s murals have transformed downtown Phoenix into a colorful feast for the eyes. Medina’s paintings, many of which reflect the struggles of migrants and the working class, along with images of his murals will be on display until the end of August at the Arizona Capitol Museum in an exhibition titled “Hugo Medina: 10 Year Retrospective.” You can meet the artist at the opening reception.
The reception begins at 5:15 p.m. on Thursday, July 11, at 1700 West Washington Street. This is a free event. Jason Keil
Jumanji Nearly five years after Robin Williams’ death, people still gather to watch the many films he made, including the 1995 film Jumanji , which imagines a giant, jungle-themed board game coming to life. Grab your lawn chair or blanket for a free screening happening at 8 p.m. on Friday, July 12, at The Sliver Lot , 219 West Main Street in Mesa.
National Comedy Theatre will be doing preshow activities, and the street will be lined with vendors and food trucks for the city’s 2nd Friday Night Out event. This month’s theme is Gamers’ Dilemma, so other offerings will include a vintage video game competition, plus an 8 p.m. trivia contest at the gallery at 101 West Main Street. Lynn Trimble
Padriac Murphy ran with the “Bugs and Blooms” theme. West Valley Arts HQ “Bugs and Blooms” Seeing an exhibit filled with flowers might not sound that exciting until you recall the vastly different ways artists have rendered them through the years. Consider Claude Monet’s serene “Water Lilies” paintings compared with Jeff Koons’ flashy Bouquet of Flowers sculpture, or flowers created by Kahlo, Klimt, and Van Gogh. You’ll see intriguing variations in flowers created by local artists in the new “Bugs and Blooms” exhibit at West Valley Arts ’ Arts HQ gallery, 16126 North Civic Center Plaza, Surprise.
Meet several of the artists during the free opening reception from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, July 12. The exhibit, which continues through August 23, features works by more than three dozen creatives, including several inspired by desert blooms. Lynn Trimble
EXPAND Exploring native plants and ancient petroglyphs. Deer Valley Petroglyph Preserve Sunrise Tour What used to be called the Deer Valley Rock Art Center is now the Deer Valley Petroglyph Preserve . Operated by ASU’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change, it’s located at 3711 West Deer Valley Road. The 47-acre preserve includes a quarter-mile nature trail with prehistoric petroglyphs, native plants, and desert animal life, where you can take the sunrise tour at 7 a.m. on Saturday, July 13. The preserve is also home to educational exhibits highlighting Arizona’s archaeological history. Bring water and a hat, and wear your closed-toe walking shoes, plus sunscreen. It’s an easy trail, but it never hurts to be prepared for the summer sun. The tour is free with $9 admission. Lynn Trimble
EXPAND Celebrating French culture. Musical Instrument Museum Experience France Recently, soccer fans got to watch the U.S. win the 2019 Women’s World Cup in France, which might put an extra spring in your step during Experience France, a two-day event happening at the Musical Instrument Museum , 4725 East Mayo Boulevard. It starts on Saturday, July 13, when you can explore French music and culture from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The lineup includes a curator talk, artist encounter, family film screening, and photo booth with themed props, plus crafts and musical performances. It’s free with $20 admission, but you can also buy French cuisine in the museum’s café or France-inspired gifts in the museum’s shop. Be sure to visit the France display in the European Gallery while you’re there. Lynn Trimble
Time for summer treats. Phoenix Zoo Winter in July Nearly 50 tons of snow is coming to the Phoenix Zoo for Winter in July, happening from 7 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 13. Wake up early and make your way to 455 North Galvin Parkway, where you can watch animals eat icy treats, play games, enjoy splash play areas, hear a DJ spin tunes, explore a fire truck, and get some rare snow time while you rock your favorite pair of mittens. Admission starts at $24.95 ($22.95 online). Bring money for extras like carousel and camel rides, plus food and drinks or souvenirs from the gift shop. Pro tip: The monkeys get treats at 9:30 a.m. Lynn Trimble
EXPAND Enjoying Christmas in July in Glendale. Lorraine Zomok Christmas in July With so many holidays happening near the end of the year, it’s nice to spread the holiday spirit around a bit. Give it a try in historic downtown Glendale , where Christmas in July is happening from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, July 13. You don’t have to stay up wrapping gifts or baking pies the night before. Just pick up your event map at 5836 West Palmaire Avenue, then start exploring. Expect plenty of shopping and hands-on activities. There’s even a cookie crawl, but only while supplies last. Bring bottled water if you’d like to donate to relief efforts for vulnerable populations. Lynn Trimble
EXPAND Kerri Gallagher bringing the comedy to JOJO Coffeehouse. Juliet Straker It’s a Talk Show If you like a little coffee with your comedy, head over to Scottsdale for a live taping of It’s a Talk Show , featuring comic Kerri Gallagher. She’s turning her weekly podcast into a comedy talk show, complete with panels of comics talking pop culture plus interviews with industry experts. Her next free family show happens from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, July 13, at JOJO Coffeehouse , 3712 North Scottsdale Road. The casually elegant coffeehouse serves food, espresso drinks, wine, beer, and nonalcoholic beverages. Lynn Trimble
The Rocky Horror Picture Show If you’ve only watched The Rocky Horror Picture Show on your television screen, then you haven’t really seen the movie. Come to FilmBar in your best fishnets and give yourself over to absolute pleasure while watching the ultimate cult classic. The musical tribute to B-movies stars Susan Sarandon, Meat Loaf, and Tim Curry as “a sweet transvestite from Transexual, Transylvania.” Frankie’s Fishnets, a local “shadow cast,” will be there to guide you through every step of the “Time Warp.”
Be warned: The virgins will be sacrificed starting at 11 p.m. on Saturday, July 13, at 815 North Second Street. Tickets are $14. Jason Keil
Old Fashioned Ice Cream Social Wearing long, puffy gigot sleeves and three-piece suits isn’t the coolest way to spend a summer afternoon in the Valley, but costumes are encouraged during the Old Fashioned Ice Cream Social at Heritage Square . First, you can learn about the lives of Phoenicians in the late 19th century when you go on a guided tour of the Rosson House Museum, a restored Queen Anne Victorian house. Then enjoy a sundae and a game of croquet.
Bring your mallets at 1 p.m. on Sunday, July 14, at 113 North Sixth Street. Tickets are $15 and $10 for children. Jason Keil
EXPAND Art meets cider in Mesa. Jennifer Gastelum Cider & Scribbles Cider on tap and colored pencils make a nice pairing when you’re ready for a relaxing Sunday. Grab your sketch pad and pens, or anything else you like to draw with, and head to Cider Corps, 31 South Robson in Mesa. That’s where Cider & Scribbles is happening from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 14. No worries if you don’t have drawing supplies, by the way. They’ve got you covered. The event is free, but bring money for food truck fare or drinks from cider mimosas to cider slushies if you want to indulge a bit while you’re sketching your little heart out. In case you’re curious, the event is part of Mesa Arts Center ’s Creative Catalyst initiative, which promotes community engagement through creativity. Lynn Trimble
EXPAND Step inside Vision Gallery in Chandler. Lynn Trimble ‘Selections from the Permanent Collection’ Vision Gallery in Chandler is mixing it up this summer, showing works of public art on a rotating basis as they get various pieces ready for installation around the city. See the free “Selections from the Permanent Collection” exhibit at the gallery, 10 East Chicago Street, between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Monday, July 15. Then circle back sometime before the show closes on August 23, because what they’re showing will shift over time. They’ve exhibited some unique public art works in the past, including Ruth Knowles’ life-size ostrich sculpture called Olivia Ostrich Buys Fresh & Local, which references the city’s renowned ostrich festival. Lynn Trimble
Disney Movie Trivia Disney keeps turning its animated library into mediocre live-action films, but viewers of a certain age remember it was truly an event when the studio released one of their classic films on video. If you wore out your VCR watching Dumbo or The Little Mermaid , then you and your friends just might win Disney Movie Trivia . There will be five rounds of questions ranging from Lady and the Tramp to The Lion King . Just don’t consider your team “poor, unfortunate souls” if you don’t win it all.
Quiz upon a star at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, July 16, at Growler U.S.A., 5415 East High Street #101. This is a free event. Jason Keil
EXPAND Francene Christianson’s take on summer road trips. i.d.e.a. Museum ‘Roadtrip U.S.A.’ Who doesn’t dream of taking summer road trips? Embrace your inner wanderer with the “Roadtrip U.S.A.” exhibit at the i.d.e.a. Museum in Mesa, located at 150 West Pepper Place. They’re showing 71 artworks that reflect the theme of traveling through different parts of the American landscape, created by 24 artists from around the U.S. Ten artists, including Mesa ceramicist Farraday Newsome and Tempe printmaker Jake Early, hail from Arizona. The show runs through September 8.
Exhibition hours on Tuesday, July 16, are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $9, and the exhibit also includes several hands-on activities, including making maps and vacation postcards, creating a magnetic license plate, and using a green screen to picture yourself in surfing vacation scene. Odds are, you’ll leave inspired to plan your own getaway, or at least revisit those vintage road trips your family made when you were just a kid. Lynn Trimble
Apollo 11 If

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DeKalb BBQ Joint Cited For Health Violations | Decatur, GA Patch

restaurants & bars DeKalb BBQ Joint Cited For Health Violations Gokul Sweets | Dragon Express | Wyatt’s Diner | Cheesecake Factory | Pita Palace | Rincon Latino | Mediterranean Bakery | Bay Leaf By Tim Darnell, Patch Staff Jul 10, 2019 9:23 am ET {{ replyButtonLabel }} Reply {{ replyCount }} Here are some recent DeKalb health inspection reports. (Renee Schiavone/Patch) DECATUR, GA — Here are a few of the restaurant, pool and food service inspections conducted in DeKalb County during the past week. Click on the date to see more info.
Each item on an inspection form has a point value ranging from 1 to 9 points, with violations deducting points from a best possible score of 100. Higher points are taken for items with higher risk to cause illness, while repeat violations take even more points. Letter grades assigned are A for totals of 100 to 90 points, B for 89 to 80, C for 79 to 70, and U for less than 70.
To search for scores for a particular facility, visit the inspections page on the DeKalb County Board of Health website.
GOKUL SWEETS 07/08/2019 79
MEDITERRANEAN BAKERY 07/08/2019 86
PITA PALACE 07/08/2019 91
RINCON LATINO 07/09/2019 85
CHEESECAKE FACTORY 07/09/2019 93
DILWORTH’S BBQ 07/09/2019 71
DRAGON EXPRESS 07/09/2019 86
WYATT’S DINER 07/09/2019 99
AMERI BISTRO 07/09/2019 85
BAY LEAF INDIAN CUISINE 07/09/2019 82
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Cats Thursday, Aug 08 at 7:30pm

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James Herbert…

Railway/Railroad President of Operations and Freemason.
“James M. Herbert (1863-1923) President of Colorado, Wyoming & Eastern Railway, 1914-16 and St. Louis Southwestern Railway, 1916-23. b. Jan. 15, 1863 in Westmoreland Co., Pa. Began as a telegraph operator in 1881, and worked up as dispatcher, chief dispatcher, and trainmaster. In 1897 he became superintendent of the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada, and of the Missouri Pacific in 1901. He was later manager of the Southern Pacific and Denver and Rio Grand Western. Mason. d. Aug. 5, 1923.”
When I was in High School…I think my Junior Year…we had school pictures that year and I wore a Western Native American Patterned long sleeve shirt…with an arrowhead chain…the only thing that was missing I guess from that was an earring in the year…which was never allowed…and still not allowed…as I live with Mommy and Daddy…
https://www.outwestmktg.com/product/rockmount-ranch-wear-mens-western-shirt-winter-fleece-native-american-inspired-pattern-tan-2xl-backordered/
Similar to that design…I should have had a hat and a bison and a horse to go with it…lol…
I was reading a fashion article on my cell phone yesterday as I was viewing the prime-time results for the Tour de France…and the article centered around Native American Fashion Designers in The United States…and this particular article mentioned that many stores over the years have copied Native Patterns and Designs often without giving credit to the peoples that originated them…tribes or sometimes empires of Central and South America…
And that happens over time…the gold and valuable things were taken from the Aztec and the Inca correct? And all of the land was eventually taken as well…
I used to wear that shirt constantly…I also had another one as well…if I remember correctly…
I’ve often thought about what it would be like to live out that way…The Rocky Mountains…Southwest…Pacific Northwest…I’ve never been to the Pacific Northwest (States such as Oregon and Washington State) and I also like the designs of Totem Poles that exist in that area of the country…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Totem_pole
Dad and I took a ski vacation in 2000…when I was in my sophomore year at Widener…in between the impossible to pass Organic Chemistry classes…Winter Break to Utah…and I took my camera and could not wait to take pictures of the mountains from the peaks…we skied Alta Mountain ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alta_Ski_Area )
Wasatch Mountains: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasatch_Range
Ute: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ute_people
Shoshone: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshone ; refer to Sacagawea https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacagawea mentioned in previous posts connected to Lewis and Clark (their guide) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_and_Clark_Expedition and Lewis and Clark were connected to Freemasonry…Sacagawea married a Frenchman ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toussaint_Charbonneau ).
It wasn’t totally horrible being with Dad all that time…but years before…Dad and Craig McDaniel had skied in the same area…Snowbird ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snowbird,_Utah ) and when Dad returned home…Mom had given to me a ski headband that had Native designs on it from Snowbird…I think it actually had the design of the Thunderbird on it…
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=native+american+thunderbird&FORM=HDRSC2
When Dad and Craig had worked for Huntington Mortgage and Banking (a company) …
https://www.huntington.com/ ; refer also to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntington_Bancshares
They did a certain amount of business for the year and if an employee was among a certain range of sales…they could go on a vacation…and at that time…the company sponsored a trip to ski Utah…
Out that way…in that portion of the country…and even in this portion of the country…Northern Georgia and up into Tennessee and the mountains of the Carolinas…people have been building log cabin homes for years…and I often thought it would be wonderful to own a similar home and to decorate it with a Native-Western theme…and then to have tequila and beer at night sometimes…lol…
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=log+cabin+homes+rocky+mountains&FORM=HDRSC2
Some of those homes are really big but it would be wonderful if I could own my own property one day…actually not own…a mortgage is not really owning property…but it would be nice to have a quiet place to myself to read, write, work perhaps…and then enjoy the property or what is around it…nature…hiking…the mountains themselves…etc.
But when I was a teen and my Mom gave me that ski headband I wondered: “who actually suggested this? Did Dad actually wear this in Utah skiing down the mountain? It doesn’t appear to be Dad’s style…it is pagan after all…”
Lol…I’ve often thought to myself that the thunderbird…a small to medium sized one…would make for a cool tattoo…but again not allowed…no earrings, tattoos, and no sex unless you’re married to the opposite sex…that’s Jehovah’s Witnesses…
I talked about Native American Cuisine (or the foods of the peoples that once dominated The Americas) and Mexican Cuisine is also so delicious ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_cuisine ).
“ Mexican cuisine began about 9000 years ago, when agricultural communities such as the Maya formed, domesticating maize , creating the standard process of corn nixtamalization, and establishing their foodways. Successive waves of other Mesoamerican groups brought with them their own cooking methods. These included the Olmec, Teotihuacanos, Toltec, Huastec, Zapotec, Mixtec, Otomi, Purépecha, Totonac, Mazatec, and Mazahua .
The Mexica establishment of the Aztec Empire created a multi-ethnic society where many different foodways became infused . The staples are native foods, such as corn (maize), beans, squash, amaranth, chia, avocados, tomatoes, tomatillos, cacao, vanilla, agave, turkey, spirulina, sweet potato, cactus, and chili pepper .
After the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire in the 16th century, Europeans introduced a number of other foods, the most important of which were meats from domesticated animals (beef, pork, chicken, goat, and sheep), dairy products (especially cheese and milk), and rice . While the Spanish initially tried to impose their own diet on the country, this was not possible.
African and Asian influences were also introduced into the indigenous cuisine during this era as a result of African slavery in New Spain and the Manila-Acapulco Galleons.[2]”
Maize: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize
“ Maize (/meɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish: maíz after Taino: mahiz), also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico about 10,000 years ago .[1][2] The leafy stalk of the plant produces pollen inflorescences and separate ovuliferous inflorescences called ears that yield kernels or seeds, which are fruits.[3]
Maize has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with the total production of maize surpassing that of wheat or rice. However, little of this maize is consumed directly by humans: most is used for corn ethanol, animal feed and other maize products, such as corn starch and corn syrup.[4 ] The six major types of maize are dent corn, flint corn, pod corn, popcorn, flour corn, and sweet corn .[5] Sugar-rich varieties called sweet corn are usually grown for human consumption as kernels, while field corn varieties are used for animal feed, various corn-based human food uses (including grinding into cornmeal or masa, pressing into corn oil, and fermentation and distillation into alcoholic beverages like bourbon whiskey), and as chemical feedstocks. Maize is also used in making ethanol and other biofuels.
Maize is widely cultivated throughout the world , and a greater weight of maize is produced each year than any other grain.[6]”
The indigenous peoples of Mexico began with their agricultural organization and maize 9,000 to 10,000 years ago…and yet…Adam and Eve were created as the first humans in 4026 BC…according to my religion of birth…sometimes I think that people still argue about the history of the world and humans…one person states one thing and another person states another thing altogether…
Even though my doctor has suggested not eating a lot of “corn” based products…I still eat corn based products…some of the things on the Native Foods and Mexican-Native Foods list we consume in this household…my Mom still purchases foods with amaranth too…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amaranth#Taxonomy
Some cereals for breakfast sold at the supermarket include amaranth mixed with other grains which we consume as well…
Mexico just won the Gold Cup ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019_CONCACAF_Gold_Cup ) this year and as mentioned before the Aztec Empire ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aztec_Empire ) once had a lot of gold too (along with the Inca) but after the Spanish conquered the Empire…all gone…
https://www.mexicolore.co.uk/aztecs/ask-us/how-much-gold-did-the-conquistadores-get
During that time…1500’s…Spanish Conquest…The Kingdom of Spain added to its wealth…back then most of it was in coinage I think…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_Empire
“ Following the voyage of Christopher Columbus in 1492 and first major settlement in the New World in 1493 , Portugal and Castile divided the world by the Treaty of Tordesillas (1494), which gave Portugal Africa and Asia and the Western Hemisphere to Spain.[28] The voyage of Christopher Columbus, a Genoese mariner married to a Portuguese woman in Lisbon, obtained the support of Isabella of Castile, sailing west in 1492 , seeking a route to the Indies. Columbus unexpectedly encountered the western hemisphere, populated by peoples he named “Indians.” Subsequent voyages and full-scale settlements of Spaniards followed, with gold beginning to flow into Castile’s coffers . Managing the expanding empire became an administrative issue. The reign of Ferdinand and Isabella began the professionalization of the apparatus of government in Spain, which led to a demand for men of letters (letrados) who were university graduates (licenciados), of Salamanca, Valladolid, Complutense and Alcalá. These lawyer-bureaucrats staffed the various councils of state, eventually including the Council of the Indies and Casa de Contratación, the two highest bodies in metropolitan Spain for the government of the empire in the New World, as well as royal government in The Indies.”
If all of that wealth flowed into companies that operated to colonize Central America by The Kingdom of Spain (or Spanish Empire) and also banks and banking systems of Spain and later Europe…it’s not really mentioned in the history classes…I don’t remember it mentioned in any of the history classes I had in High School or College…then who actually owned it or had primary control over it?
Companies are owned and usually banks are owned…some people in their history classes I think assume that the rulers of The Kingdoms (such as King and Queen of Spain or The Spanish Empire) owned it all…but that’s probably not true…not factual…even though a Monarch may allow a company or bank to operate with some sort of Royal Decree or Certificate…companies usually have “shareholders” or “owners” and banks can as well…those are the people (usually men) that own those sources of wealth as property…then all of the common people of the realm can borrow amount of money and they will have to pay interest over time which is “profit” to that bank or company that lends money…high interest rates are usually the wealthy adding to their wealth in my opinion…
But that’s what people have to do these days to afford to live…
Transportation? Automobile? Debt…loan…bank or banking company…
To live or reside somewhere? House? Debt…loan…bank or banking company…
To educate oneself so as to get a job in order to pay one’s bills (food, clothing, shelter)? Debt…loan…bank or banking company…etc.
I would argue that’s life…how many people in a city or town in America can actually go to a car dealership and purchase a car with cash? No one really…
And then my Dad would complain about people in the area of Media and what they were “driving around in” as if all they were doing was trying to impress their neighbors…lol…
All the fighting that this nation has done with Germany over the years…lol…driving around in a German Car such as a Mercedes ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercedes-Benz ), a BMW ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BMW ), or an Audi ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audi ) is seen as an accomplishment in life in The United States…some sort of status symbol…as if someone has “made it” in life…
And my Dad would say about people in the Media area…people driving around in those cars and living in large homes in the portion of Media outside of town: “well those people can’t probably really afford that car and that house…they probably have some sort of big mortgage payment and big car payment…or they probably lease the car…”
Well who can afford it (meaning pay for a house and car upfront with cash)? No one really…lol…it’s not as if people actually have the cash to buy a home for hundreds of thousands of dollars and a car that is tens of thousands of dollars…lol…
So I guess if people want to lease a BMW or even purchase one with debt (loan) why not? It’s what everyone has to do…it’s not as if everybody in America has “Watchtower” money and assets…a global company that owns tons of property and actually very valuable property in New York City…or used to before World HQ operations moved completely to upstate New York…
It’s someone else’s life…German Engineering is known for its precision, reliability, luxury/class…it’s more expensive compared to other automobile manufacturers but one purchases quality…that’s what the Germans are known for…and one day those Germans might just invent the flying car…lol…
But Dad would say: “well it’s not as if that person can really afford it…”
Meaning a big house or luxury car…if Dad meant the word “afford” meaning “purchase in cash without having debt or a loan” (which is what the word afford actually means) then most people can’t…that’s how most people live because they have to…that’s the only way they can live in a home and have transportation to get to work…
Afford: “ have enough money to pay for ”
Is our society designed to be that way? To keep people in debt while there are owners of banks and companies that have a lot of control over money and gold and that extends to having direct control over people’s lives? Is that how it has been since the beginning of “America?” Is that the way it has been for thousands of years?
Wealthier class having control over the money of a realm or government and production…for thousands of years…agricultural…owning all of the land…and the people having to work for and be in subjection to those owners…and now…the same class of wealthy people own the majority of the companies and banking and the regular people must still be in subjection to that class through debt all the time for the majority of their life?
My Dad made those comments around the time that I was thinking of going to grad school in 2002…Doctor May…while I was completing my computational chemistry project…told me: “Take your GRE’s (Graduate Record Examinations) …see how you do…apply to a university in Pennsylvania that has a Comp Chemistry program such as Penn State or another university…see if you can get a degree and then do research or instruct in that field or other classes…”
And Dad while we were out preaching with the organization…spring of 2002…in the car with some other people…began to discuss what people in the world could afford…and he began to say that some people that end up going to graduate school end up with a lot of debt…and then they have to get a car and a house and the debt just piles up…and sometimes their salary can’t handle all of that debt…
And I thought: “most graduate schools don’t do that to students…they offer students assistance…and many graduate schools offer students a stipend…”
In fact a lot of graduate schools offer assistance to minorities in the field of science because industry and academia likes to see more minorities in the sciences…
And now I have a lot of debt trying to get a Master’s in graduate school…perhaps I should have listened to my Dad and the counsel of Jehovah God…
“Don’t go to grad school…you’ll end up in debt up to your eyeballs…”
Still trying to figure out if there were calls to the graduate school or calls to the loan agency about the amounts and it could have been less expensive…a lot less expensive for someone such as myself…if true…I don’t think that that’s fair…I also don’t think it would be fair if my classes were harder compared to a regular MBA program…
I think that it would be very strange that an adult entering graduate school would have to have his Daddy and a religious organization control or monitor him and what he does in school…and oversee anything that has to do with financing and financial assistance…very weirdo…and also inappropriate in my opinion…but if factual doesn’t really matter…
But Dad sometimes feels that way about people living in a larger newer home and driving around in a BMW all day headed to work…
“Those people can’t afford that…”
So? If someone else purchases a Chevrolet…is that person in debt for their transportation? Yeah…almost all people are…so that person can’t afford (have enough money to pay for) their Chevrolet either…
And yet there is tons of gold in those vaults and the people used to be able to make claims on that…not sure who that belongs to now…not sure who that really belonged to from the very beginning either…or how it got to The United States in the first place…
Sometimes Dad walks around as if he owns the whole place…well for years he’s owned property and vehicles and he’s the head of the house so at times I’ve felt owned as if I am property as well…not really a son but property…and one of my purposes in writing about ownership and property and finances was to ask: “what if The United States of America is owned?”
What if it is property connected to the banking system which pays government employees (even The President has a salary) to do a job? Complete tasks every day?
Well in my opinion that wouldn’t really be liberty and freedom and wouldn’t also be democratic or a republic either…but what if that is reality? What about all the other governments of the world?
Civilization…from the beginning of civilization…has been about one group of people…dominating and controlling another group of people and their lives…which isn’t freedom and liberty either…and one way to certainly dominate and control other people and their lives is to own things (such as property) and other people don’t own things such as property…
During Medieval Europe…how did all of the Nobles/Aristocrats and The Royals dominate the peasants and the serfs?
They owned everything…the peasants and the serfs had to live on some wealthy Noble’s property (which His Lordship owned) and work the land and that was how that person lived…peasants and serfs usually by law did not have the rights to own property in comparison to a titled individual such as a Lord…dominating and having control over someone’s life…
And in the past…the religious elite as well have owned things and been superior to other people in that way…the religious elite in the ancient world may have had a lot of power and control in land ownership and property…
I would argue that it is still that way but most people are “blind” to it…people think that they own their home and own their car and have ownership in other areas of life but if you have debt…the things that you think you own…are really not completely yours…if you think that…miss a few payments…then what happens?
Repossession…so is it really your property in the first place while you have debt?
Anyway…in my opinion…once people wake up to the reality of financial problems (every regular person has financial issues and issues paying the bills) then it really is about survival…human beings I think have always had to try to adapt and survive in certain environments…
But does it have to be that way at all? Do people have to live that way?
In an equal society…as the declaration states…would there be a class of people in civilization that would dominate and control another class of people and their lives? Would that class tend to own everything while other people would have to be in debt all the time and not actually have the right to own anything outright? It seems to have always been that way so…should it be different at all in this society?
Sometimes I wonder if my life could have been better at all…after I finished with college and started working and tried to auxiliary pioneer for the organization…I had already told my parents about being gay and I felt that it wasn’t going to “change” and then 2007 came along and that happened and I went to the doctor (Doctor Greco) and he gave me Xanax and I began to take that more than what was prescribed and went back to the pharmacy to request more bottles and then began to use alcohol with it late at night…
I just felt that nothing about my life was ever going to improve…and I still feel that way even though I have changed location…I try to keep my mind occupied so as not to think about the negative things in life all the time but sometimes that’s all one can think about when one goes to the meetings of Jehovah’s Witnesses…
One day I’ll have to write a lengthy post about that…at the meetings…it’s as if one is constantly bombarded by the “problems” of this world…and other people’s lives and how horrible it can be for other people to live…it’s like the news every day…
Starving people in this country…bombings and terrorism in another country…a natural disaster strikes people in a certain part of the world and the government of the country can’t assist its own people and the television states that number of people died…shootings happen…a recession occurs…reports of people working for some greedy company in America lose all their savings and retirement funds because the executives at the top did something improper with their accounting/finance departments…
And what is the cause of all those things and then some?
A malevolent being named Satan The Devil and Demons…used to be in heaven but now confined to the earth in exactly the year 1914.
Combined with my life and who I am which I still think is unchangeable…its so depressing…it makes one full of despair…and one can’t get away from it…its everywhere…
What is the solution? God’s Kingdom…a government that will bring about an Armageddon and then a perfect world…as foretold in The Bible…
That’s the theme of the Bible as taught in Jehovah’s Witnesses… God’s Kingdom…
https://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1980043?q=theme+of+the+bible&p=par
Written in 1980…the year I was born…
“LAST summer, at a conference of scientists and religious leaders at Massachusetts Institute of Technology , the problems facing the world were described as ‘very nearly apocalyptic.’ There is no “blueprint for survival,” Jerome R. Ravetz, a philosophy teacher from the University of Leeds in England, warned. “ The scale and complexity of the problems are so great that human reason alone will not conquer them.”
2 What, then, can we expect of the future? A United Church of Canada clergyman asserted: “No one can confidently forecast that a better day is coming. Whether civilization will disappear or whether there will finally be a new society with more abundant life for all, no one surely knows .”
When I was going thru the Xanax and alcohol phase…I still have some alcohol sometimes…I think if I remember correctly…some family from Delaware and I went to one of the Mexican restaurants North of the city (Wilmington) and I had some tequila and margaritas on the rocks…then I went home and popped some Xanax…thinking about all that was happening or had happened in my twenties…into 2008 or so…
Dan & Shay: “Tequila”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4qgqNS_20s

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Amazing 2 days at an very beautiful property.

Lunch buffet didn’t match our expectations, may be the menu was not very North Indian suitable. We didn’t find it worth the price.
Everything about this resort is just so amazing, staff is just amazing, they always smiles when you pass them by and have been helpful throughout our stay (every single one of them) We complained about our disappointment with lunch buffet while having dinner to the Head Chef Paul who came to enquire about our stay experience, he handled our complaint so well, making sure that we had a wonderful dinner experience. Pan Asian cuisine restra of the property Carnival has amazing food with nominal prices. Rooms are clean and had amazing view with minibar and munching options, amazing weather made it more pleasurable. Ocean is just 2 min walk for the property, tough the beach is not clean like beaches in far south (Agonda, etc) but is was again very good experience, having beach accessible from the property is best thing to have in goa. Pool area is also very nice, every corner has a pool attendant and also has a pool bar with multiple pool of diff depth levels making apt for everyone. You have to relay on resort’s restra and buffets for your meals because there is nothing much around. Spa services are also available, had taken a foot massage and it was just average. I had a wonderful 2 days here and would like to come back. One can easily spend 2-3 days here enjoying beaches, pools and vast green property.
Stayed in July 2019

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This is relevant to my interests. I’m of Indian descent (born in Mumbai) but have lived in the GTA most of my life. My top picks, in no particular order, are as follows:
1) Avani Bistro (Mississauga) is excellent. Food quality, service and presentation are all top notch. They offer a variety of different dishes from different regions, including Hakka-style Indo-Chinese cuisine. Price point is definitely on the higher side, but you get what you pay for.
2) Nirvana – The Flavors of India (Mississauga) is similar to Avani, but more of a hidden gem.
3) Guru Lakshmi (Mississauga, copying a previous post of mine) is good as long as you’re looking for South Indian food (dosa is their specialty). It’s a very distinct and different region than the typical North Indian (butter chicken, naan, paneer, etc.) palate that North Americans are used to. Things to keep in mind for Guru Lakshmi though; they are strict with reservations and make no exceptions if you’re even five minutes late. The service isn’t great, but the food is more than worth this.
4) Banjara (Downtown) USED to be a favourite of mine, but has gone severely down hill. Hygiene is terrible there, the quality has dropped, and the food is flavourless and greasy.
5) Hakka Legend (Scarborough) if you’re looking for Hakka-style food. Excellent quality, and tasty bites. Lovely food and great service.
Feel free to PM me if any more reco’s are needed – I’m 30, can’t really cook all that well, and love trying out new spots.

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Restaurant Review: Kahani

Restaurant Review: Kahani
James Lawrence visits Kahani and experiences subtlety with power, and confidence with restraint.
So far, I really like it. Admittedly, I have only just put my foot through the door but I have already received a warm welcome from the manager – and the smell is enticing. I’m sitting in the basement restaurant of Kahani, which is owned by Peter Joseph. Originally from Chennai, Joseph has been exciting diners looking for superlative Indian cuisine in London for over 15 years. Kahani, which means ‘story’ in Urdu, opened in September 2018. Before this, Joseph worked at another famous Indian stalwart, Tamarind, for 14 years. To put it mildly, he knows his stuff.
Yet, when he opened Kahani last year Joseph must have felt more than a little trepidation; flying solo is so very different from being a chef: the hours are no less intense but now you now (potentially) face pullulating bills, dissatisfied customers, and staffing issues. Nevertheless, all appeared right with the world during my inaugural visit, as i stood propping up the small but plush bar, sipping gin-based cocktails. The basement dining room can seat up to 90 diners and tonight was an assortment of families, couples, and suits. A wine cellar is visible behind a glass window and the kitchen is also semi-open. It’s a very pleasant space in which to while away a few hours.
The other vital part of the equation is Joseph’s cooking, which I’ve enjoyed many times at Tamarind . Joseph eschews heavy sauces and fiery heat in favour of a more sophisticated, subtle edge; his cooking is refined, a modern take on Indian cuisine and one which blends culinary techniques from the sub-continent with British produce. Overall, the food is on the lighter side, aromatic and not overly spiced, and brilliantly executed.
Poppadoms came with a trio of chutneys: tomato, tamarind, and pineapple, which were a pleasant way to start the proceedings. Indeed, my favourite parts of the evening came within the first hour: smoked Malabar prawns – from Bangladesh – had an exquisite flavour and nicely absorbed the spices and our waiter got plenty of exercise returning to the table for repeat orders. Lamb seekh kebab was a show-stopping dish of sublime, deep, umami flavours nicely rounded off with a softening hint of raita.
Joseph clearly wants his dishes to balance subtlety with power. The fish curry was excellent, the flesh nicely cooked and the sauce not overly spiced, while prawn biryani had lovely fragrant rice, the grains well separated, in addition to having carefully cooked prawns. Their signature dish, ‘Kahani ‘ butter chicken, wrote the book on gastronomic pleasure. The chicken had been charcoal grilled and pulled, the sauce featuring a tomato and fenugreek marriage made in heaven, and yet the sauce was lighter than one typically expects; usually, there is enough butter to horrify a cardiologist, however, Joseph again prefers a more dainty, subtle approach. The very epitome of classy Indian cooking, with health-conscious undertones.
What else remains? Service and our wine pairings were both very good but it is the excellent food that really makes a lasting impression at Kahani. Starting any business venture is fraught with risk, but judging by tonight’s experience, Joseph and Kahani have a rosy future ahead.

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Pukka in St. Clair West is expensive but have a good summerlicious deal going on right now. Very filling… wouldn’t really call it traditional food but they do a great job with the dishes they prepare. For something more affordable I’ve heard great things about Gandhi Indian Cuisine.

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LegenDerry Street Food Festival to spice up Walled City next weekend

The city is turning up the heat for food and drink lovers this summer with its first street food festival and it’s going to be LegenDerry!
The LegenDerry Street Food Festival will take place in the heart of the historic Walled City in Guildhall Street from 19-21 July, serving up a totally unique dining experience for visiting foodies seeking authentic local cuisine with some extra pizzazz.
The three-day festival will offer mouth-watering local and exotic street food with lots of added spice from Latin-American, Indian and Asian inspired culinary talent based in the city.
All the delicious food on offer from the participating vendors including surrounding local businesses, will be washed down by craft beers and spirits served from pop up bars. A double decker bus will even be parked up for some festival seating with a view of prominent local landmarks including the 17 th Century City Walls which are 400 years old this year.
Live music performances and DJs will help festival-goers dance their way through the weekend under outdoor heaters and festoon lighting complemented by some specially commissioned street art which will provide a vibrant backdrop to the celebrations.
There will be two quirky new food trailers on the block for what is believed to be the first street festival of its kind in Northern Ireland. Lo & Slo and the White Horse Hotel will both be debuting their foodie destination wheels in what will also be a ‘first’ for a hotel in the region.
Selina Horshi, Managing Director of the Best Western Plus White Horse Hotel, said: “It is a perfect time during the Open golf championship event to engage locals and tourists with great quality local produce prepared by our finest local chefs.
“We have a new summer menu that showcases some amazing super local ingredients and we are using the expertise of Head Chef, Noel Ward, with the unique spicing skills of our Sous Chef, Umesh, to turn two starters from our summer menu into street food.
“These include Donegal Cod in a Spiced Gram Flour Batter with a Coriander Chutney served with Indian Tea Blackened Chickpeas and Fresh Pomegranate. This dish showcases fresh, local fish but uses Indian flavours to bring a twist to the dish. We are combining the best produce with the best skills – utilising the talent we have with the White Horse and within the city.”
Emily McCorkell of Lo & Slo will be unveiling four new products to add to her existing range of authentic smoked barbecue sauces and dry rubs for enhancing meat flavours developed at the city’s Foodovation Centre. These include a Ghost Chilli and Dulse Seaweed Blend, mustard and paprika based blends and a Ghost Chilli and roasted ginger pepper sauce.
Emily, a native of Pennsylvania who has been living in Derry for the past four years, is passionate about American BBQ cooking and will be serving her deliciously flavoured pulled pork and beef brisket. There will even be cotton candy for those with a sweet tooth!
“I love anything to do with street food and can’t wait for the vibrancy this festival will bring to the city at night,” said Emily whose small business has grown so quickly she now needs more staff and a production unit to supply local stockists of her hot sauces which are also now being incorporated in some local restaurant menus.
North west-based Irish Venezualan mobile catering business La Tia Juana’s will also be bringing their authentic Latin American cuisine to the street food festival. Juana was first taught to cook by her grandmother from the Warao people of the Orinocco Delta, picking huge avocados and ripe plantain from the local rainforest.
“We sell authentic Latin American street food using fresh, locally sourced gluten-free ingredients with options for carnivores, vegetarians and vegans,” she explained.
Jennifer O’Donnell, Tourism Manager with Derry City and Strabane District Council which has added the LegenDerry Street Food Festival to its award-winning events calendar, said: “We are really excited about our inaugural LegenDerry Street Food Festival which we hope will also become an annual event following the success of our LegenDerry Food Festival and Slow Food Festival. Our ultimate aim is to become the number one food destination on the Island of Ireland by 2025.”
Food experts John and Sally McKenna of the prestigious McKenna Guides have described Derry as the ‘Next Foodie Capital of Ireland’, hailing the destination as “the most happening urban place in Ireland, so get yourself up there before the hordes start to arrive”.
Participating food and drink outlets at the LegenDerry Street Food Festival include: Café Guild, Warehouse, Nonnas Wood Fired Pizza, Burrito Bar, Lo & Slo, 2 North Street Food, Silverbean, Doherty’s Meats, La Tia Juana’s, White Horse Hotel, Mekong, Walled City Brewery, Northbound Brewery, Muff Gin, Dopey Dick/Guildhall Taphouse and Baronscourt Brewery.
The festival will run from 5pm-11pm on Friday and Saturday,19th and 20th July and 2pm-10pm on Sunday, 21st July 2019. Admission is free.
For more information visit www.derrystrabane.com/streetfood
CAPTION: Emily McCorkell of Lo & Slo in the city’s Foodovation Centre. If you have a story or want to send a photo or video to us please contact the Derry Now editorial team on 028 7129 6600 for Derry City stories Or 028 7774 3970 for County Derry stories. Or you can email [email protected] or [email protected] at any time. Recommended Articles
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Get to know the newest businesses to launch in Denver

Get to know the newest businesses to launch in Denver Photo: Serene Cuisine of India/ Yelp Wed. July 10, 2019, 2:36pm by Hoodline
Interested in checking out the newest businesses to open in Denver? From an Indian restaurant to a barbecue joint, read on for a rundown of the newest spots to debut near you. Sweetwaters Coffee & Tea Photo: sweetwaters coffee & tea mint town center/ Yelp Sweetwaters is a coffee and tea spot that recently opened at 7545 E. 29th Place in Stapleton. The shop carries signature and classic coffees, light fare, iced and hot coffee, teas, frozen drinks and other drink options such as Italian soda and an in-house handcrafted ginger ale. When it comes to food, look for a yogurt parfait, sandwiches, salads and pastries, as well as chocolate berries, caramel marshmallows and cheesecake as dessert items. Click here to view the full menu. With a four-star Yelp rating out of five reviews, Sweetwaters Coffee & Tea is off to a positive start with locals. Stop in and give it a try from 5 a.m.–10 p.m. Monday-Friday, 6 a.m.–11 p.m. on Saturday and 6 a.m.–9 p.m. on Sunday. Post Oak Barbecue PHOTO: POST OAK BARBECUE/ YELP Post Oak Barbecue is a smokehouse and traditional American spot that recently opened at 4000 Tennyson St. in Berkeley. Cooked in wood-fired pits, Post Oak Barbecue serves up juicy St. Louis ribs, pork shoulder, turkey breast, chicken and housemade sausage by the pound, in tacos and as a sandwich. Pair any selection with jalapeno bacon mac and cheese, borracho beans or fried okra from the sides menu. Yelpers are liking the new addition, which currently holds a 4.5-star rating out of 25 reviews. Grab a bite from 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 11 a.m.–11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 11 a.m.–3 p.m. on Sunday. Serene Cuisine Of India Photo: serene cuisine of india/ Yelp New to 2070 S. University Blvd. in University Park is Serene Cuisine Of India , an Indian spot.
The restaurant features a menu that includes tandoori chicken, lamb, mahi mahi and shrimp. The spot also serves curry selections and vegetarian specialties like the palak paneer, which is paneer cheese cooked with spices and creamy spinach, as well as alu gobi, which consists of potatoes and cauliflower pan fried with turmeric, garlic, cilantro and tomatoes. Click here to see the menu.
With a 4.5-star rating out of 19 reviews on Yelp so far, Serene Cuisine of India seems to be a welcome addition to the neighborhood.
Head on over to check it out: Serene Cuisine of India is open from 11 a.m.–10 p.m. daily. Park Hill Sushi Photo: nalz c./ Yelp Park Hill Sushi is a sushi bar that’s made its debut at 4900 E. Colfax Ave., Unit A in Hale. Start with miso soup and seaweed salad. Then choose between cucumber, salmon, spicy tuna and blue crab rolls, a chirashi bowl or yellowtail, albacore and Wagyu sashimi. This business has been hitting the right note with locals, with a 4.5-star rating out of 10 reviews.
Interested? Stop by to welcome the new business to the neighborhood. Park Hill Sushi is open from 11 a.m.–3 p.m. and 4 p.m.–9 p.m. on Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.–3 p.m. and 4 p.m.–10 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 4 p.m.–9 p.m. on Sunday.
This story was created automatically using local business data, then reviewed and augmented by an editor. Click here for more about what we’re doing. Got thoughts? Go here to share your feedback. share this story:

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