USA Pears Aims to Drive Health Awareness Amongst Indian Consumers

USA Pears Aims to Drive Health Awareness Amongst Indian Consumers

by Shrutee K/DNS
The Pear Bureau Northwest was established in 1931 as a non-profit marketing organization to promote, advertise and develop markets for fresh pears grown in Washington and Oregon. Pears from these two Northwest states are distributed under the USA Pears brand. USA Pears are among the world’s finest pears. Grown in Oregon and Washington where the right mix of volcanic soil, clean mountain water and warm spring and summer days, with cool nights, combine to produce some of the world’s finest pears. Pears are an excellent source of fiber, providing about 24% of your daily needs. USA Pears contain Levulose, a natural sugar that can satisfy the sweet cravings for everyone, even for diabetics without guilt.
This season, USA Pears have entered India with two varieties of Anjou, both green and red. Also, for the first time a small volume of Starkrimson and Bartlett Pears have been imported into the market. Over the years, India has emerged as one of the fastest growing markets for USA Pears and is currently among the top 10 markets globally. USA Pears perfectly compliment the Indian Pear season. USA Pears are available in the market from November to March. Indian Pears are available from August to October. The Indian market is expected to grow exponentially in the coming years as more consumers get aware and availability penetrates to Tier II and III cities. Pears are often a fruit that get missed out in consumers’ shopping baskets as not much is known about this fruit. We as the representatives of Pear Bureau Northwest, the agency responsible for marketing of USA Pears, are making all efforts to make Indian consumers aware about the nutritional attributes of Pears and also about its wonderful taste as a healthy, anytime snack or as a perfect addition to varied Indian cuisines including salads, entrees and desserts. As far as the promotional plans and strategies, we are concentrating on below the line promotions and look to work with importers, wholesalers and retailers (both modern and traditional) to reach out to discerning consumers across India. For USA Pears we also have a consumer communication program and look to engage with newspapers, magazines, food writers, bloggers and digital and social media influencers.
The demand for the fruit is coming from across the country. While the demand is increasing from Metros and Tier I cities, we have been pleasantly surprised by the consumption increase in small and medium cities. At present, it is more a question of meeting the demand. As supply chain bottlenecks clear and better cold chain systems get created, we expect USA Pears to be consumed across India. Aside from promoting the fruit, we also take care of the necessary measures to educate consumers on how to test the right eating stage for Pears. Most people don’t know how to check Pear ripeness as this fruit does not change color when maturing. Normally, when people buy Pears from retailers it is very hard. USA Pears varieties like Anjou and Bartlett taste best when they are perfectly ripe. For this, we run a campaign called “Check The Neck” where we educate consumers to press gently at the base of the Pear stem near the neck. If the Pear yields slightly, your USA Pear is ready to eat. You can get your pears to ripen by leaving them at room temperature for a couple of days. Once ripe, you can refrigerate the pears for consuming over the next five days.
USA Pears are a complete package of health, nutrition and taste. Pears are a power house of nutrition! They are an excellent source of fibre, potassium and Vitamin C and are sodium, fat and cholesterol free. A single medium pear contains nearly 24% the daily fibre needs – and is only 100 calories that’s a lot of nutrition in one sweet and juicy package! Eating a variety of fruits and vegetables is the foundation for a healthy lifestyle, and pears are a delicious part of this menu. Numerous studies indicate that Pears help reduce cholesterol levels, risk of coronary heart disease and Type II diabetes. These are just a few of the many benefits of Pears, however there are many more benefits including its high nutritionist quotient, a healthy complexion, increased energy, and a lower weight Talking about the price of the fruit, in general, prices for USA Pears are not very different to the prices of similar imported fruits like Apples, Kiwis etc. that have found widespread acceptability. Indian consumers are more than willing to spend if the product is healthy and tasty and good for the family. USA Pears are a wonderful addition to the shopping basket of discerning Indian consumers. For a tasty and healthy treat, indulge yourself with a mouth-watering USA Pear, this winters.

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The best Chinese restaurants in Glasgow as voted for by you – Glasgow Live

The best Chinese restaurants in Glasgow as voted for by you The best Chinese in Glasgow? Here are the 10 that get your vote … Share Get the biggest daily stories by email Subscribe Thank you for subscribing See our privacy notice Could not subscribe, try again later Invalid Email
From high end restaurants to takeaways, and Asian supermarkets to whip up your own, Glasgow isn’t exactly short of great Chinese food.
But which gets your vote as the best in Glasgow?
We raided those sought-after plaudits, TripAdvisor scores , to find out which Chinese restaurants come out on top here in Glasgow – and some of the results might surprise you … Opium (Image: Opium/Facebook)
This city centre restaurant is a go-to for dim sum, offering food marked ‘oriental fusion’ to ever-loving Glasgow foodies. You don’t get to number one on TripAdvisor without some seriously good eats – those reviewers are a picky bunch, after all. Chin Chin Instagram
Never heard of it? That’s because it’s hidden away in Gartcosh – but don’t let a trip out of the city centre put you off. Number two on the TripAdvisor list also ranks in at number 35 out of almost 2,000 restaurants in Glasgow. Not shabby at all for your local Chinese … the ultimate hidden gem? Lychee Oriental (Image: Lychee Oriental/Facebook)
You might recognise head chef Jimmy Lee, as he’s become something of a celeb in Glasgow circles and even represented Scotland on BBC cooking show Great British Menu. Foodies flock to Lychee for its contemporary take on oriental cuisine, as well as a stylish interior – and we happen to think it more than deserves its place on this list. COSMO (Image: Cosmo/Facebook)
More fusion food than traditional Chinese, Silverburn buffet restaurant COSMO serves up oriental fare with a side of sushi, Indian curry … you name it. Still, they get your vote, if TripAdvisor reviews are anything to go by. Read More

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Restaurant review: Yo! Tuk Tuk, Windmill Inn, Beverley

Restaurant review: Yo! Tuk Tuk, Windmill Inn, Beverley Amins bangers and mash. Published: 07:00 Share this article Sign Up To Our Daily Newsletter Sign up Have your say
Yo! Tuk Tuk does good food and brings something a bit different to the East Riding pub scene, but it’s not without its flaws.
At a time when pubs are closing at an alarming rate and opening a new restaurant is riskier than ever, it’s good to see innovation and practicality meld together to create something like Yo! Tuk Tuk. I
It’s a curry house and takeaway located inside a pub. Everyone wins; the pub gets rent (and maybe a few spill-over punters) and the restaurant pays reduced rent (and maybe gets a few spill-over punters). Win/win. All you have to do is ensure the food is good enough for your customers to block out the un-restaurantness of the pub. The food at Yo! Tuk Tuk is indeed good, but with a few caveats.
Before we eat, let’s get the basics out off the way. Firstly, Yo! Tuk Tuk is situated in the back room of the Windmill Inn on Lairgate in Beverley. It’s your typical town centre pub that mainly relies on a dwindling crowd of regulars to stay afloat. Enter chef Aminul Choudhury and his plan to offer modern Indian cuisine in the back room. Secondly, the name – Yo! Tuk Tuk. I’m as annoyed by that ill-placed exclamation mark as you are. Let’s leave it there. Least said, soonest mended.
The concept is Indian street food (which isn’t new, of course, but it is still relatively novel in the East Riding), so the menu introduces us to favourites from Delhi and Lucknow and various other parts of the subcontinent. There’s fish curry from Goa and burner chicken from Bengal and they’re fairly familiar and will appeal to the confirmed comfy curry-head. More intriguing, though, are the personalised and fusion dishes.
The first of these that struck me was Amins bangers and mash. I’m assuming this is a dish created by Amin but the lack of apostrophe left me guessing. It’s basically just bangers and mash served on a banana leaf, but the sausage is made of lamb and spiced up a bit. The mash is tinged with masala and you are offered a choice of methi gravy – mild, hot and I-wouldn’t-go-near-it. Hot or not, it’s a solid starter and a welcome twist on a classic.
I forgot to mention, along with the menu I was given a little cone filled with Bombay mix. Nothing unusual there, but this had fresh onion, coriander and other stuff mixed in with it. First time I’d had it like that and it improved the experience. I can’t go back to just dry mix now.
Before mains, a flourish. To the table was delivered a bamboo basket, billowing dry ice pouring from it. Inside a test tube filled with mango lassi. Just a mouthful to cleanse the palate and provide some theatre, but most welcome.
I went for railway lamb curry just to see how they fared with relatively straight dishes. Very good it was, too. Tender lamb, well-spiced and served with a half-pint mug (literally) of plain rice. I’d have liked a choice of rice but there wasn’t one. I’m also assuming there isn’t a tandoor oven in the kitchen as the chapatis were a little flaccid and doughy. I merrily forced it all down, though – along with a side order of Bombay potato – and then went back to the bar for another pint of lager.
This is a good juncture to discuss the downsides of running a restaurant in a pub. You have to go to the bar for your drinks. No table service here. As I was dining alone, I found this a bit annoying. Others may not. The decor is a little tired as well. My final gripe is other people. Because the pub has doors front and back, there is steady through-stream of punters who have just nipped out for a fag. This adds unfortunate and unwelcome wafts of smoke, which could easily deter the more sensitive diner.
On returning with my fresh pint, I found another palate cleanser bamboo basket arriving, billowing dry ice again. This time it contained a couple of spoonfuls of delicious pistachio ice cream.
Then came dessert. Yet another billow of dry ice, this time shrouding a medical-looking sort-of gourd thing with gulab jamun and more delicious pistachio ice cream. The warm and cold and sweet together worked superbly but I could have done with a bigger portion for it to really satisfy. Also, sorry to sound a bit of a misery, but the dry ice thing gets tired quick. It’s great once, but three times? As my nana used to say when one of us grandkids did our party trick too often: “You’re a good turn but you’re on too long.”
All in all, a mixed bag. I really admire that Yo! Tuk Tuk is having a go in an unusual setting, I like much of what they’re doing with their food and I’ll definitely return to try some other dishes. I hope, though, that the Windmill is just a step toward a more permanent, dedicated location and I hope also that they find a large enough clientele to prosper. I spent just over £28 (excluding drinks, obviously) and that’s good value for what I experienced. People can be much pickier than me, though, and the little things may stack up just enough to discourage them.
Windmill Inn, 53 Lairgate, Beverley, HU17 8ET. Tel: 01482 881 955; Open: 5-10pm, Tuesday to Sunday.
Ratings:

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REVIEW: Have the infamous Curry Brothers been turned by a vegan Indian feast?

0 comment INDIAN cooking is so much more than just curry, so why is it taking so long for the message to get through?
Chefs from the Subcontinent are constantly battling against entrenched attitudes formed by decades of beery late night lamb madras and chicken tikka masala.
No one has done more to rewrite the rules of Indian cooking than chef Vivek Singh, whose small group of Cinnamon Kitchen restaurants boasts a branch in Oxford’s Westgate – arguably, the smartest place there.
Having re-educated us on the finer points of Indian cuisine, Vivek has now taken it upon himself to do the same for vegan food.
Unless you jumped into Veganuary (and full points if you made it to February without a snifter of meat or dairy), you don’t need to hear about it again. Yes,it’s wholesome, but can veers towards being sanctimonious.
Having written about curries in this newspaper for more years than I care to recall, my photographer friend Ed and I had as much sensitivity for our plant-munching chums as that of Piers Morgan being served a vegan sausage roll in a Brazilian steak house.
It was, quite simply, not for us.
So when invited to try Cinnamon Kitchen’s new vegan menu we were hardly enamoured..
Oh, how wrong we were.
Consisting of five small, but tasty, courses, the repast opened our minds as much as our taste buds.
We started, reassuringly with pints of lager, but instead of the traditional popadoms came beautiful little parcels of chutney potatoes in semolina shells, with tangy mint water on the side.
Then crispy puffs topped with pomegranate, mine was eaten in one satisfying bite – a thermonuclear explosion of flavour.
It was spicy but not hot… delicate but complex, an enjoyable contrast of crunch and soft vegetable. Clearly great efforts had gone into their construction and it felt wrong to devour it in one munch.
But I was right. Ed attempted a few nibbles and lost the contents on the table.
The amuse-bouche was followed by starters of grilled aubergine with sesame, tamarind and peanut or chargrilled fruit chaat in gem lettuce cups.
Again, both plates were beautifully presented. The fruit cups were a riot of colour – as well as fresh, sweet, juicy and refreshing – almost dessert like.
The aubergine was sublime. Perfectly cooked, its texture and bite was more than a match for any piece of meat, and the combination of sweet and sour tamarind and rich peanut was so mouth watering.
So far, so flipping amazing – and we were still only on starters.
Main courses were a choice of tandoori mushroom, green mango and coriander sauce with steamed rice, or garlic tempered green pea ‘kichri’ with broccoli and cauliflower floret pickle. We tried one of each.
The clear winner was the mushroom – each cap the size of a hand, gently cooked to keep its firm bite yet also juicy, with an irresistible tandoori kick. The coriander sauce was fresh and vibrant and tickled the tastebuds rather than bludgeoning them.
I would happily trade my traditional chicken or lamb curry house staples for this piece of exotic loveliness any day. And yes you can quote me on that.
The kichri was also fine. While obviously lacked the pleasing texture of the mushroom, it was gently spiced and bursting with flavour.
These were served with sides of chickpea curry and a tandoori roti. That smooth creamy chickpea curry was, despite its gentle simplicity, perhaps the loveliest dish of the night – with a naughty kick. I could have devoured bucket-loads of the stuff.
Then, a palate-cleansing dessert of ever-so delicate saffron-poached pear filled with dried fruit (a feat of culinary engineering) and a tangy refreshing lemon-thandai sorbet.
We emerged, not bloated and burpy as usual, but bouncing with health and a missionary zeal of the life-enhancing benefits of a vegan lifestyle, which lasted right up until the bacon sandwiches the next morning.
Coming in at £35 a head, you are paying for true quality and imaginative fusion dining at the hands of top level chefs. Meat or no meat.
So for a taste of the future Vivek’s vegan menu is the way to go.
Cinnamon Kitchen, Roof Terrace, Westgate Oxford
cinnamon-kitchen.com

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Gossipy schoolmate on Facts of Life / SAT 2-9-19 / Servant to Queen Amidala / Manor occupant of yore / Prefix with spore sperm / Popular 1950s vehicle making comeback in 2010s / Lucky Rabbit’s name in early Disney films / Tree pictured in van Gogh’s Starry Night / Chinese snack with marblelike patterns on outside

TEA EGG ( 14D: Chinese snack with marblelike patterns on the outside ) — Tea egg is a typical Chinese savory food commonly sold as a snack , in which a boiled egg is cracked slightly and then boiled again in tea , and sauce or spices. It is also known as marble egg because cracks in the egg shell create darkened lines with marble -like patterns. Commonly sold by street vendors or in night markets in most Chinese communities throughout the world, it is also commonly served in Asian restaurants . Although it originated from China and is traditionally associated with Chinese cuisine , other similar recipes and variations have been developed throughout Asia . (wikipedia) ••• This one WHIFFS pretty bad, which makes this week’s themelesses a complete disappointment for me. I rely on these days to be good. Great even. Yesterday’s was more a matter of taste—the puzzle wasn’t empirically bad, it just missed me. Today’s puzzle, however, has real problems. Constructors have to stop convincing themselves that stuff like IBANKS and CSCALE are good. I have seen IBANKS precisely once before, and I complained about it then, and I’m doing it again, both because it’s not a great abbr. and because I want to soak in the world of investment banking about as much as I want to bask in the presence of the white supremacist terrorist organization that is the NRA ( 19A: Its PAC is the Political Victory Fund ). What the hell kind of “comeback” is the TWO-TONE CAR making?! Where?! Also, further, what the hell is a TWO-TONE CAR ?! I mean, I can infer that it is a car whose surface is painted two different colors, but honestly, that answer, especially as one of only two very narrow ways out of the NW corner, can go b p itself. Who’s up for a fun day out of BAYONETING !? (a ridiculous present participle). The ABS are SCULPTED? I’m squinting up my nose at that. WASHBOARD ABS is a tight phrase. SCULPTED ABS … is just a phrase. DESSERT crossing DESERT ? Make better choices! But IBANKS and CSCALE are both *gold*, however, compared to the stuff that’s waiting for us in the SW. DOAFAVOR teeters on the edge of stand-alone-worthiness and is definitely about to fall off. THE NILE is superdumb with the definite article. INAREA is the worst thing in this grid and possibly any grid. And ” WHAT A LOSER !” is just mean. More: TORCH RELAYS are in no way “preparations.” They “prepare” nothing. Antecedence is not “preparation.” UDON NOODLE is redundant, and also hilarious in the singular. There’s more, but I’m done. So grateful I know something about baseball, as INDIANS really helped me out. Same thing with Dickens / “Little DORRIT ” ( 2D: Dickens’s “Little ___” ). But mostly I solved this from the corners in. Got NW, then nothing; NE, then nothing; SW got me TORCH and then BUSHLEAGUE , which then got me the SE corner. And finally ” WHAT A LOSER !” gave me the “S” I needed to see CYPRESS , which finally give me real traction in the center (where I finished). Oh well at least I learned what a TEA EGG is. See you tomorrow.

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Haldiram’s inks pact with France’s Brioche Dorée

Haldiram’s inks pact with France’s Brioche Dorée 6:41 Business
Snacks maker Haldiram’s has signed its first partnership outside the family and entered into an exclusive master franchisee partnership with French bakery cafe Brioche Dorée.The venture with the world’s second-largest bakery chain is led by Ashish Agarwal, a fourth-generation member of Haldiram’s promoter family, through individual entity HR Bakers.One Brioche Dorée outlet is already functional in Connaught Place in New Delhi. Another four are expected in the first year of operations, Agarwal said, and they could be located in the National Capital Region and other markets.“This marks the first time Haldiram’s has tied up with a company outside the family. With Indian consumers experimenting with a lot more international cuisine and eating out growing at a rapid pace, we believe this is the right time to venture in this space,” Agarwal, the MD of HR Bakers, told ET.The Brioche Dorée cafes will serve only vegetarian food, a first for the French bakery, said Agarwal. “We have redesigned and developed our products keeping the relevance to Indian palates,” he said. The products include croissants, breads, desserts, sandwiches, pastries, salads and other snacks.“An investment of about ?4-5 crore has been infused in the initial stage for getting the brand off the ground,” Agarwal said, adding that HR Bakers is open to exploring more synergistic tie-ups with other brands.Brioche Dorée, which debuted in 1976 in Brest, France, was founded by entrepreneur Louis Le Duff and is positioned as a maker of freshly baked, urban French cuisine.Groupe Le Duff has a global turnover of over €2 billion and serves more than a million customers every day, according to information posted on its website. Brioche Dorée has a footprint of over 500 outlets globally, including in the US, Switzerland and China.On speculation that Haldiram’s and US cereal maker Kellogg are exploring an alliance, Agarwal said: “There is no such plan.” “Multiple investors keep approaching us routinely — there is nothing in the immediate future on that front,” he added, dismissing reports that Haldiram’s is in talks with private equity funds for divesting a minority stake.Haldiram’s operates through three entities and is present abroad in the UK, the US and Japan, among other countries.

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Romantic Seychelles

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Seychelles is known for its quixotic beauty and monumental luxury. Considered to be a play field of the riches, it is slowly emerging as the best honeymoon destination as it offers everything you’d want on your honeymoon – glimmering beaches, exquisite beauty, delish delicacies, heart-warming people and carnival-like spirit of the place. Situated off the eastern coast of Africa in the Indian Ocean, Seychelles is an archipelago of 115 granite and coral islands that will enchant you with its beauty. Topping it up with visa on arrival that is free of cost for tourists and direct flights from India, this paradise destination makes for a great getaway with your loved ones. Fantastic reasons to visit the paradisiacal islands of Seychelles this year: Enjoy at some of the world’s most gorgeous beaches For those who like less crowded beaches must visit Seychelles to enjoy some private moments on the world’s most photographed beach Anse Source D’Argent on the La Digue Island or visit Anse Lazio on Praslin Island which is widely acclaimed to be the world’s most beautiful beach on earth. Enjoy motorised water sports like jet-ski and parasailing on Beau Vallon, the longest beach on MahéIsland or go sailing, snorkelling, diving, surfing, kayaking and paddle boarding on any of the other beaches. Island hopping whether by boat, plane or helicopter is recommended to experience the diverse character of each island. Experience the serene underwater world Indulge in snorkeling or scuba diving to experience a kaleidoscope of marine life. Spot turtles, spectacular coral reefs, nudibranchs, variety of fishes like Angel fish, Sweepers, Squirrel fish, Soldier fish, Butterfly fish, Octopus, Lobsters among many others and ifyou’re lucky, you can also swim alongside 40-foot long Whale Sharks. Experienced divers have spotted as many as 800 different species of fish on a single dive. The ones, who are less adventurous to go diving, have the option to discover marvelous underwater world through a glass bottom boat or semi submersible vessel. Spot some of the rarest species of flora and fauna Seychelles islands are home to 13 species and 17 subspecies of birdlife that can be discovered only here, making the islands an Aladdin’s cave for avid bird watchers, naturalists, ornithologists and eco- tourists. Go on mountain hikes and nature trails that are arranged on each island to discover these living treasures. Spot the Seychelles national bird‘Black Parrot’, rarest Jellyfish Tree, famous ‘Black Paradise Flycatcher’, world’s smallest frog, largest nut ‘Coco-de-mer’, Indian Ocean’s only flightless bird as well as some of the most spectacular seabird colonies in the world. One of the largest tortoises in the world, the Aldabra Giant Tortoise can be spotted here, especially on Curieuse Island. Relax your mind, body and soul From the signature treatments of dedicated spas offering relaxing massages with exotic herbal oils, scrubs, detox baths, wraps and invigorating wet-treatments, yoga & meditation to a full range of beauty and grooming services; spas in Seychelles hold the answer to your complete renewal of mind, body and soul. Self drive through the islands or cycle your way to the beaches Did you know that you can self drive with your Indian driving license in Seychelles as the islands have same side driving as India. That’s a great way to explore the main island interiors and visit local shopping markets, cultural spots and museums to learn about the heritage and ancient pirate history of these islands. If you wish to be away from the hustle bustle of the city, visit La Digue which is a car free island that offers cycling and walking as the only mode of transport. Relish delicious local cuisine The food setting in Seychelles is a mixture of a number of cuisines. The French settlers brought the French cuisine while the immigrants from China and India added their Asian flavors to the Creole cuisine. Sample some tasty dishes like Ginger Crab and Filet Coral Fish served in a passion fruit sauce in Mahé. The palm-heart salad served with curry leaves and truffles is also a unique speciality of Seychelles. Another must try is a local beer manufactured on the island called Seybrew, and the popular Takamaka Rum infused with interesting flavors. Visit to the distillery offers travelers a chance to witness the complete process of how the spirit is brewed followed by an interesting tasting session of the various flavors of the rum available. Attend the vivacious cultural festival Seychelles culture is a reflection of the harmonious fusion of ethnic diversity. The Seychelles International Carnival of Victoria also called as the Creole Festive is a three day-long event, generally held in the month of October on Mahé island every year. With participation from 30 countries around the world, visit the island during this period to witnesses a fun-filled parade where different countries showcase their cultures through singing, dancing and acrobatics. Witness the activities galore Seychelles offers interesting nightlife options which include clubs in Victoria and Eden Island region, and casinos in Victoria and Beau Vallon region of Mahé. Most of the large hotels have public bars that often host entertainment programs of local dance. Zip-lining and rock climbing are some of the other thrilling options available at various resorts for children as well as adults. For the sophisticated Golf lovers, Constance Lemuria Hotel in Praslin has a 18-hole championship course with breathtaking views. Awesome accommodation The Seychelles Islands offer a varied choice of accommodation options for every budget. From signature properties of major 5-star international hotel chains and exclusive private island retreats offering the very best in island-style luxury to the rustic charms of smaller hotels, guesthouses, self-caterings and island lodges with that authentic Creole touch and ambience- Seychelles has something for everyone. Perfect weather throughout the year Although Seychelles is close to the Equator, it is outside the cyclone belt and the temperature there ranges between 24 degree Celsius and 32 degree Celsius all year round.The months from December to March witness rainfall and humidity, whereas May – September is relatively drier and cooler, but activities like water sports, trekking and zip lining are operational all round the year. Well connected Air Seychelles which is the national carrier operates direct 4 hour 10 minutes flight from Mumbai while airlines such as Emirates, Ethiad, Sri Lankan Airline, and Ethiopian Airlines also connect major Indian cities to Seychelles via their hubs. So go ahead and plan your next trip to Seychelles, without having to worry about which time of the year to visit!

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Down under with marron and mead

India has two other armies apart from its main Armed Forces: the Swami Army and Bharat Army. Inspired by the Barmy Army (British fans travelling with the English cricket team and rooting lustily for their side), these two groupie gangs are peripatetic, vocal Indian cricket fanatics. In their wake lies one collateral benefit: tourism dollars. The recently concluded Australia series has seen a spike in Indian tourism spending, encouraging different states Down Under to push the envelope, promote different varieties of tourism. Enter Western Australia and agritourism.
Also known as food tourism, this format has tourists trying to understand where their food and wine comes from, how it is grown and processed. The experience includes appraising the entire value chain and savouring the end product. In the global competition for the additional tourist dollar, many regions have been trying to use agritourism as a key ingredient in constructing a tourism strategy.
Increasingly, breaks from work have become experiential and an essential part of the holiday experience is learning how others live and eat, or even grow their food. The Indian middle class has developed an appetite for gastronomy, whetted by international cookery shows like MasterChef and books by celebrity chefs.
Western Australia (WA) is a recent entrant to the world of agritourism; the region is off the beaten track for most Indian tourists, who usually restrict their sojourns to Sydney, Melbourne or Brisbane. This is despite the state being geographically closest to India, thus requiring shorter flight times. WA and its capital Perth provide a combination of urban pleasures, forests, vineyards, fruit orchards, beaches, rivers and farms. WA is the country’s largest state, occupying close to one-third of the country’s land mass. But that anodyne data point conceals the fact that it is also among the world’s most diverse biological regions, yielding a profusion of local produce—from exorbitant truffles to premium wines, from luscious marine products to crunchy fruits.
WA’s food journeys include walks among fruit orchards; visits to vineyards with wine tasting and food experiences; stopovers at packhouses and processing facilities for a behind-the-scenes understanding of how fruits are grown, picked and packed; walks in forests with towering jarrah and karri (eucalyptus variants) trees; meetings and conversations with local farmers; plus, a truffle session (prices for WA black gold truffle usually fluctuate between $2,000-3,000—around ₹ 1.4-2 lakh—a kilogram).
These tours offer visitors an opportunity to sample local specialities. For example, there is marron, a local variety of freshwater crayfish that is native to WA. This crustacean, the third largest crayfish variety in the world, figures prominently in WA’s home-grown cuisine. The other indigenous freshwater species is barramundi. Then there is mead, wine of the gods. The southern forests are abundant in tree species, including eucalyptus, and yield over 4,000 tonnes of honey every year. This natural bounty has found its way into the brewing of mead, a drink that demands a separate category for itself. Mead—basically honey fermented with water, with some preferring to flavour it with either fruits or spices—has found renewed patronage in the US, Europe, and, now, WA.
Food-focused journeys use Perth as the focal point, with trips radiating out mostly towards the south. Perth is a city with a small-town heart. Lying along the pretty Swan river, it has lots of nice little quirks, interesting dining and drinking options; the city’s architecture is a delightful mishmash of styles, reflecting its historical conversion from a sleepy town on the west coast to a gold rush centre, from the free-form modernism of the 1950s to a cookie-cutter downtown business district, interspersed with Gothic churches or administrative buildings in the Federation Free Classical style. A good example of Perth’s architectural diversity is the unique design of its new cricket stadium, inspired by the state’s “sporting, cultural and Aboriginal heritage”. The city’s nonconformist attitude is reflected in its reluctance to open shops on weekends.
But then the city is just a starting point. About 300-odd kilometres to the south lies Southern Forests, home to a cornucopia of fruits, vegetables, nuts, marine products, wine, cream, eggs, lamb, beef and honey, among other farm products. The region has a unique combination of weather, soil and rain that allows for year-round crops: WA harvests 11 varieties of apples alone, 10 varieties of cherries, each one at different times of the year. Consequently, the four major centres in the area—Manjimup, Pemberton, Northcliffe and Walpole—organize a number of food-themed festivals through the year. December sees the Cherry Harmony Festival, April has Unearthed in Pemberton, April-May and June is time for Truffle Kerfuffle. The soil and climatic conditions also help produce some fine Bordeaux-style wines: Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Merlot, Shiraz, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon. Interestingly, the wineries do not offer only tasting opportunities; the Sandalford winery regularly hosts music concerts on its undulating grounds, with Sting, Steely Dan, Neil Diamond, Leonard Cohen and Carlos Santana having performed there in the past.
One of the main driving forces behind the region’s agritourism is an organization called Southern Forests Food Council, founded in 2010 by local growers and initially funded with a $5 million grant from the WA state. The council organizes food and wine tours, with the package including accommodation, transport in the region, all meals (made from local produce) and visits to farms and packhouses.
Part of the council’s role includes curating the brand “Genuinely” which is displayed on the region’s produce headed for supermarket shelves. The “Genuinely Southern Forests” stamp on vegetable cartons and fruit boxes not only provides product identification but promises safe and quality products. The brand can be displayed by local farms that adhere to certain quality standards. For example, apple packhouses—which use automated processes for cleaning and sorting apples (depending on their quality and colour) as well as packing the fruit—insist on protective shoe and head coverings for visitors to minimize transmission of pests or diseases. Even the state’s cafés and restaurants can display the logo on the condition that a majority of ingredients in at least one “signature” dish must include items grown locally.
Indian tourists—especially the well-heeled and well-travelled—are in WA’s cross-hairs. Not surprising, since India is among the fastest growing outbound travel markets, with around 24 million departures from the country in 2017; the UN World Tourism Organisation estimates this will double to 50 million by 2020. Australia received 335,000 Indians during 2017, an increase of 25% over the previous year. However, WA received only 28,000 Indian tourists.
WA has been negotiating with the Indian government for a direct flight from either Mumbai or Delhi to Perth. Once that happens, the well-seasoned agri-trail of the southern forests should open up for food-loving itinerant Indians.
( The writer was in Western Australia at the invitation of the Australian government).

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New high-end Indian restaurant to open in Chelmsford

New high-end Indian restaurant to open in Chelmsford restaurnt 0 comment A RESTAURANT in Chelmsford is reopening as a whole new business.
Bridge Street Bar and Grill in Writtle, which specialised in British cuisine, is about to become a high-end Indian restaurant.
It will be called Pakwaan at Bridge Street and will focus on offering a wide variety of Punjabi dishes.
Punjabi cuisine is one of the most popular types of Indian cooking and is known for its spicy and buttery flavours, with a wide selection of both meat and vegetarian dishes.
Examples of Punjabi cuisine include butter chicken, masala channa, paneer tikka and chole bhature.
The owner of Bridge Street, Piotr Ulewicz has joined forces with fellow director Rajesh Chouhan, who owned the famous Pakwaan Pujnabi restaurant in Ilford for 25 years.
Mr Chouhan moved to Writtle three years ago and fell in love with Bridge Street and he and Mr Ulewicz are now friends and business partners.
The pair decided to change the cuisine of the restaurant as serving British cuisine at Bridge Street worked well at the weekends, it didn’t attract enough customers in the week.
Together they want to make Pakwaan “the best restaurant in Essex”.
Mr Chouhan has brought in some top chefs from Michelin starred restaurants in London to run the kitchen, including a new executive chef, a head chef and sous chefs.
Seven chefs are working together to create a Punjabi menu for the restaurant’s relaunch today, February 7.
There will be a grand opening for invited guests including the mayor of Chelmsford, and it will then be open to the public from Friday, February 8.
Although the focus is on quality, high-end Punjabi food.

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How to eat your way through Black History Month in K-W

In 1995, the federal government designated the month of February as a time to recognize and celebrate the contributions that Black Canadians have made in our communities.
For chef Derek Hines, it gives pause for thought.
“I’m hoping we get to a time when we don’t need to celebrate black history once a year because it would be celebrated every month. Black History Month has its good and bad for me,” said Hines, who is of Jamaican descent and operates Boutique Catering in Kitchener.
Black History Month coin celebrates Viola Desmond 6 Black Canadian writers to watch in 2019 I think the unique and delicious flavours of Jamaica, the Caribbean and Africa that we can find in the area are indeed worth regular visits: they include some of the best comfort food going, while at the same time highlighting ingredients and techniques that were brought to North America centuries ago.
While he loves the Jamaican flavours of ginger, allspice, Scotch Bonnet peppers, jerk chicken as well as African ground-nut (like peanut) stews, a favourite dish for Hines is one packed with a significant history.
“Hoppin’ John (rice and beans) goes back to African slaves,” he said. “It’s a dish that symbolizes prosperity, so the more black-eyed peas you get in your plateful, the more prosperous you’re going to be that year.” (His recipe is found below .)
Note: Red peas, an original ingredient of the dish, came from Africa; for more on how slaves shaped food in North America, read this interesting article by Karen Pinchin.
Kevin Thomas of Big Jerk BBQ and Smokehouse fills a plate with “peas and rice.” (Kate Bueckert/CBC) Blended mix Andrew Beckford of Gusto and Beckford Catering adds the unique flavours of Jamaican and Caribbean food comes from blending ingredients properly.
More food columns from Andrew Coppolino “It’s building the spice combinations. It’s not as curry-heavy as say Indian food, but curry is a part of the cuisine. Then you have cumin and allspice balanced with the heat of Scotch Bonnets,” Beckford said, adding that Jamaican isn’t necessarily a regional cuisine, but there are different ingredients used at different ends of the island.
At Mark’s Caribbean Kitchen in downtown Kitchener, chef-owner Mark Vaughan says he draws on those Indian flavours.
“We use spices and ingredients from around the Caribbean and mix them with a little bit of Indian. We do a lot of seafood at dinner too, like pan-fried snapper and curried prawns,” Vaughan says.
Regarding a couple of his dishes, Vaughan throws down a culinary gauntlet: “Ours is a unique style of oxtail, and customers say our jerk chicken is the best.”
“Run dung” is a unique dish of Kevin Thomas’s Jamaican background which he makes periodically. It’s Patois for “run down.” (Kevin Thomas/Supplied) Kevin Thomas at Big Jerk Smokehouse has a commercial kitchen for take-away on Dumart Place in Kitchener. Thomas cooked rice and peas at CBC Kitchener-Waterloo’s Sounds of the Season this past December.
He says “run dung” is a unique dish of his Jamaican background which he makes periodically. It’s a seafood dish in Patois, a lilting English-based Creole language that’s spoken in Jamaica and which has West African influences.
“In English, it’s run-down,” Thomas said. “It’s a thick coconut and curry stew that includes seafood and yams. It’s traditional to use mackerel, but lobster and crab elevate it.”
The idea of “run-down” refers to the reduction and thickening of the stew. Another of Thomas’s favourite dish is ackee (a fruit) that is sautéed with saltfish (salt cod).
Varied food … and a great deal of varied culture too.
– Chef Derek Hines
I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the long-standing Ellison’s Bistro in Kitchener; Elvis Ellison has been cooking the dishes of his heritage for decades in the downtown. Look for lunch specials like fritters of pumpkin and callaloo (leafy greens), island-style fish and several vegetarian dishes.
Although the country is in the Horn of Africa and not Western Africa, Ethiopian restaurants in Guelph ( Warka Tree ) and Kitchener have become increasingly popular. They feature injera, a fermented, spongy pancake-like flatbread, that is used in place of conventional fork and knife.
Muya platter. (Andrew Coppolino/CBC) Both East Africa Café (with its new market store) on Ontario Street and Muya Restaurant on Highland Road offer excellent vegetarian options and the chile pepper-based spice mix berbere. The former venue serves a vegan buffet on Tuesday.
Regardless of where you get your fill of this comforting food, it’s good to recognize and value its place in the community, Hines summed up.
“The interesting thing is that there’s a great deal of varied food here and a great deal of varied culture, too.”
Rainbow ackee and saltfish from the Caribbean Kitchen in Kitchener. (Andrew Coppolino/CBC) Also notable Other local venues you should check out:
Ivey’s Caribbean on Wellington in Cambridge: A small shop that’s been up-and-running for 13 years.
Rainbow Caribbean Cuisine : A fixture on King Street in downtown Kitchener.
The Caribbean Kitchen : Upstairs at Kitchener Market, serving ackee with saltfish.
Guelph Caribbean Cuisine : Located on Cork Street in Guelph. They serve boneless curry goat.
Underground Kitchen : Take-away venue on St. Andrew Street, Fergus, blending Caribbean and Indian flavours. Daily specials like Turmeric Tuesdays for curried meatballs and Be a Jerk Thursday for Jerk Chicken.
There are also a number of southern U.S. barbecue restaurants around the region with dishes that draw on the ingredients, foods and techniques of African American cookery:
Lancaster Smokehouse. SOS Barbecue. Q Public House. Grand Trunk Saloon.

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