USA Africa Dialogue Series – African Leadership University

USA Africa Dialogue Series – African Leadership University

BY ARYN BAKER/MAURITIUS JUNE 11, 2019 With its modernist buildings, spacious grounds and airy cafeteria packed with young adults slinging backpacks while scrolling through their Instagram feeds, the African Leadership University on the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius looks much like any other college campus. Except, perhaps, when it comes to the library. Here you will find no silent temple to books and knowledge; in fact, the university’s Pure Learning Library has no books at all. Instead there’s a cacophonous din of competing ideas, as students convene in animated groups around communal tables, shouting out solutions while feverishly diagramming them on the whiteboards that panel the walls. “We aren’t really encouraged to be quiet here,” explains Jeremiah Nnadi, a second year Computer Science student from Nigeria, with a shrug. “We believe that the best way to learn is from our colleagues. Regurgitating the stuff you memorized from books just to pass an exam isn’t really going to solve Africa’s problems, is it?” While books can be found elsewhere on campus, ALU’s approach to educating the next generation of African leaders looks a lot different from the traditional Western universities it was once modeled upon, starting with the scope of its ambition. When the Ghana-born, Stanford Business School-educated entrepreneur Fred Swaniker opened the Mauritius campus in 2015, he not only pledged to build 25 more like it in Africa, he also promised to produce 3 million young African leaders over the next 50 years. The first class of those leaders, made up 79 people hailing from more than 40 countries across the continent, graduate on June 12. For Swaniker, this graduation serves as the first milestone in an ambitious program to reinvent education for a new generation in a uniquely African context. It is also the solution to an unanticipated problem that sprung up when he first sought to disrupt African education. In 2008, Swaniker launched his African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg, recruiting high school students from across the continent and promising to prepare them for the best universities the world had to offer. But once they got into those Ivy League and European universities, they rarely came back. “I realized we were actually contributing to the brain drain,” says Swaniker. “So I said it’s time that Africa had its own Stanford and MIT and Harvard. But instead of replicating the universities that were built for another era, we should build a university that looks to the future, that educates the leaders Africa needs.” Fred Swaniker attends the TIME 100 Gala 2019 Dinner at Jazz at Lincoln Center on April 23, 2019 in New York City. Dimitrios Kambouris—Getty Images for TIME The Mauritius campus, with a residential program catering to 355 students, focuses on collaborative learning and pan-African leadership examples. Each classroom is dedicated to a influential African leader or artist — the Sankore wing, referencing one of the oldest universities in the world, in Timbuktu, Mali, features classrooms named after Ethiopian runner Haile Gebrselassie, U.N. general-secretary Boutros Boutros-Ghali and South African writer Bessie Head; the faculty lounge celebrates South African anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko. The four dormitories are dedicated to the great African civilizations, such as Axum, Kongo, and Songhai. Even the cafeteria aspires to pan-African cuisine, though Nnadi, the Nigerian computer-science student, says the attempt to create his nation’s national dish, jollof rice, “needs a lot of help.” Complaints about cafeteria food being a universal college constant, the real difference at ALU can be found in the classrooms. ALU emphasizes real-world problem solving, starting on day one. Incoming students are presented with a list of challenges currently facing African countries, from climate change to health care, education, urban growth or immigration. For the rest of the year they are expected to research the issue, discuss it with classmates, teachers and outside specialists, and present concrete solutions. Developing leaders for the 21st century, says Swaniker, goes beyond academics. “The whole idea is to create problem solvers who have learned how to learn, rather than regurgitate knowledge. That means developing vital skills: critical thinking, leadership, communication, entrepreneurship, data analysis—this is what we need to develop Africa.” Instead of majors, students have missions. Last year, one student established—and found funding for—a shelter for the island’s street dogs. Another team developed a campus-to-town transport system, vital for co-eds itching to get away from the sugar-cane fields surrounding the university for something more lively. Group work is encouraged because it develops leadership skills, says Nnadi, 20. “Going into real life from this point, I feel like there is no problem I won’t be able to deal with because I have seen it all: slackers, fights, conflict.” And summer internships are mandatory. The school coaches students through the rigorous internship research and application process; by the time they graduate, most will have at least a year’s worth of work experience in Africa, and have applied to multiple jobs, giving them a head start in the real world. Nnadi has two internships lined up this summer—one at the Bank of Kigali in Rwanda developing an online platform for mobile banking, and another back home in Nigeria, mostly, he admits, so he can fill up on jollof rice before starting another school year. The laser focus on problem solving means that graduates should be well prepared to tackle whatever comes their way, from finding a job to taking on some of the continent’s biggest issues. But the ALU experience has also raised the bar, making it harder for some students, like 25-year-old Kaone Tlagae from Botswana, to go back home. “I left home with the idea that I would come back and create change, but now that I have seen what the other countries [in Africa] have to offer, the other opportunities out there, I’m not sure it’s the right place for me anymore.” Maybe, she admits with a twinge of guilt as she contemplates taking a job in Kenya instead, ALU isn’t so good at stopping the brain drain after all. Swaniker disagrees. The point of ALU, he says, is to create a cadre of African leaders and entrepreneurs who are trained to solve African problems, not just local ones. “We want a generation of Africans who are thinking on a continent-wide scale, who have networks across the continent, who can build pan-African businesses and grow economies and drive trade.” It’s not a brain drain, he says, but cross-pollination. “If someone from Botswana wants to develop a project in Zimbabwe, then there is probably someone from Zimbabwe who sees opportunity in Botswana.” A major part of entrepreneurship, after all, is spotting opportunities others might have missed. Contact us at .

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Here are California’s hottest Michelin-rated restaurants

by Bloomberg Pursuits | June 12, 2019
As if further proof were needed that California has become the center of America’s food universe, consider this: Michelin historically bestows its famed stars only once a year. Last November, the international food guide showered the Bay Area with stars. Seven months later, Michelin is back again, this time to recognize the entire state.
The inaugural stars of the 2019 Michelin Guide California include seven three-star restaurants in California, all in San Francisco or Napa Valley. That number is fewer than a year ago, but the overall number of restaurants with stars has increased to 90.
The new guide features restaurants in greater Los Angeles, Monterey, Orange County, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Barbara.
The guide named 14 two-star restaurants, split between San Francisco and Los Angeles. The newly two-starred include N/naka, a kaiseki restaurant in Culver City; Providence, a fish temple in Los Angeles; and Campton Place, the rare Indian restaurant to claim two stars. Saison, a San Francisco restaurant with a $298 tasting menu, fell from three stars to two. A dish at Single Thread, awarded three stars by Michelin.
Even so, San Francisco still has two more three-star dining rooms than New York does. The new guide demonstrates the increasing importance of California in the culinary world, as well as that of secondary cities away from traditional epicenters such as New York.
“From the wine country to San Diego, this unprecedented expansion of the Michelin guide gives full credit to California and its leading role as culinary powerhouse,” says Gwendal Poullennec, international director of Michelin. “It is one thing to have amazing local produce, but having very talented chefs who can work their magic on it is the key.” Chef Niki Nakayama of N/naka.
A belief in California’s culinary prowess isn’t the only reason Michelin expanded its star search here. The state’s tourism board, Visit California, is paying Michelin US$600,000 to make it happen, reports industry newsletter Family Meal .
Poullennec acknowledged the payment, but said it came after Michelin decided to launch a California-only guide and began seeking financial partners. A dish at Monterey’s Aubergine, a new addition to the Michelin guide.
Now 57 restaurants in the Bay Area hold Michelin stars. Last year, that number was 55. Five new places were awarded one star this year.
For those on a budget, Michelin recently announced its inaugural California Bib Gourmand awards. The list includes 151 places recognized for high-quality, reasonably priced food (specifically, $40 for two courses, plus wine or dessert) with cuisines ranging from burgers at Father’s Office in Los Angeles to tacos at Gabbi’s Mexican Kitchen in Orange County. San Francisco’s Bar Crenn, awarded one star in the 2019 Michelin guide.
Diners use the guide to help determine which restaurants to visit, so the latest awards should boost business for the honorees.
Here are California’s Michelin winners. The 2019 California guide will go on sale on June 6. (An asterisk denotes a new entry; neighborhoods are designated by Michelin.) Three stars An avocado-and-caviar dish from triple-starred the Restaurant at Meadowood.
Atelier Crenn, San Francisco

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Why Indian food has not gone mainstream in America

June 11, 2019 4:25 pm Indo Canadian Chef Akshay Bharadwaj, Corporate Chef at Eastman Colour Restaurants.
Indo Canadian Chef Akshay Bhardwaj says Indian food can change the culinary culture in North America. Follow @ambazaarmag
Chef Akshay Bhardwaj is no stranger to food trends. He has been observing the discerning palate of foodies for years across the continents, while working in some of the most prestigious kitchens around the world. In fact, Bhardwaj honed his culinary skills at Rene Redzepi’s Noma, in Copenhagen, Denmark, which was voted as the World’s Best Restaurant in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2014. He has also taken care of the kitchens at Cosa Nostra in Canada.
Having travelled the world, Chef Bhardwaj has been observing that Indian food often does not get its due in some of the most celebrated world tables, due to its dated presentation.
The chef, who grew up learning about food by observing his grandfather making chutneys, insists that the Indian food philosophy of using fresh, local, seasonal ingredients, as well as an emphasis on condiments, is something that the most gourmet cuisines in the world follow.
Though a lover of Indian fare, he specializes in European entrees. He says that the more he studies European food, the more similarities he finds with the ancient kitchen culture of India.
He is currently stationed in Delhi as the corporate chef for Eastman Colours Restaurants’ culinary ventures, including a world tapas bar, La Roca in Aerocity, Delhi.
ALSO READ: ALSO READ: Why Indian food version 2.0 will be a hit in the West (May 4, 2019)
Bhardwaj, who spent most of his life in Canada observing the Indian food and its acceptance in the West, talks to the American Bazaar on why Indian food has not yet gone mainstream in America.
America is a melting pot of cultures and a place where every immigrant community brought along its own food culture. Now, despite Indians being one of biggest immigrant communities in the US, it can’t be said that Indian food has gone mainstream in America. What do you think are the reasons?
To understand the immigrant history of America and how it is linked with the popular food plates, you have to understand it in phases. The first food exchanges happened in America, when the first immigrants mostly from Northern European countries began coming in America. Toward the early 19 th century, a lot of Jews from Eastern Europe began coming to the US and brought their own food culture. It was also around that time when the Italian food became very popular in the US. As far as Indian food is concerned, I would say it began making its presence only during the most recent phase of food exchanges where Asian, and particularly Chinese food, became a rage. Indian food is not yet mainstay but it is also ahead of the exploratory stage. Almost every American would have had tikkas or dals more than once in their lifetime. It may be noted, however, that the same cannot be said for all the European countries. So there is a lot of territories that Indian food needs to break into.
But some of the earliest Indian settlers in the US came from Punjab, way back in the 1900s, with thousands of Sikhs settling in California. Why did the food exchange not begin early as in the case of other communities?
If you look at the pattern, then you will see that most earliest Indian settlers belonged to rural India and though farming was a mainstay in the community a lot of them looked at other jobs to survive in a new country. Also, Indian food with the curries and masalas was not something that the early Americans would have taken to easily. This was alien food! It also requires a lot of confidence for a community to come and introduce their cuisine to the new country. The earliest Indians were on a survival mode and exchanges only begin when the community is either too big or too sure of their acceptance. However, around that time another interesting food fusion took place which unfortunately is not documented as much as it should have been. The earliest Sikhs married Mexican women and their household food became an amalgamation of tortillas and makhni dal. It must have been an interesting phase!
You have worked in Canada, where a sizeable population also has Indian roots. What would you say about the early Indian food exchanges in North Americas?
I would say that the problem why Indian food took longer to be accepted as a gourmet cuisine was because, while from Europe many immigrants brought along their excellent home cooking techniques, Indians failed to so, or did not explore the medium of promoting their food. The new generation of educated chefs from India came to the scene very late, but a lot of early Italians in America were not trained chefs but excellent home cooks who continued their preparations. Most Indians, who immigrated, unfortunately, looked at food as a business proposition and not a passion project. That’s why there was an emergence of pop and mom shops who sold Indian food but discredited its real preparation. It was often to cut costs or to attract customers but overall it did a very bad PR for Indian food in the West. We are coming out of that phase slowly but surely.
You said that it was at Noma, the world famous two-Michelin star restaurant, that you began noticing the parallels between your earliest food memories practiced in your Indian family kitchen and the world standards of sustainability, simplicity and love that make a dish. Explain to us.
Every Indian who has had the pleasure of being fed by his or her mom, grand mom or any elder in the family would know that love is the primary ingredient in all our home dishes. At Noma, we followed the philosophy of infusing love into each dish to create magic. I remember growing up my grand dad would make chutneys with locally grown, often ingredients that he himself sowed, tended and cared for. He would also prepare it as an extension of love he had for his family. After I became a chef, that emotion stayed on with me. Most world-famous chefs are passionate about every dish they plate and isn’t that the case with Indian moms too in our home kitchens? Indian food in America is still evolving but if we were to bring back the secrets of our past into our cooking, the immigrant Indian food would be a big revolution across the world.

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Talking Stick Casino Review, 2019 Review of Talking Stick Resort – Casino

Talking Stick Casino Review Talking Stick Review.
Talking Stick Resort is a luxurious Las Vegas style casino located a mere 12 miles from Phoenix, in Scottsdale, Arizona. There are two golf courses on the property, designed by legendary course architects Ben Crenshaw and Bill Coore.
Aside from golf, you will also find 11 bars and lounges, two retail outlets, a concert showroom, as well as a resort-style pool with cabanas and day beds available for rent. Needless to say, there is no shortage of entertainment options and amenities here. Owned by the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, this resort casino is a landmark in the state of Arizona.
Casino at Talking Stick Resort.
With more than 50 table games including 3-Card Poker, Blackjack, Pai Gow Poker, Let it Ride, Keno and Casino War, along with 800 slot machines – there’s something here for every gambler.
You can find progressive jackpots for both Pai Gow and 3-Card Poker. During our last visit, these jackpots were sitting at $246,000 and $150,000, respectively.
Blackjack at Talking Stick Resort.
The minimum bet at blackjack here is only $5 unless the room gets busy, at which point they will bump that minimum to $10 on most tables. In the high limit room, minimum bets start at $25. Maximum betting in this casino for table games on the main casino floor is set at $1,000 most of the time. However, you can split and double down on the same bet.
There is also a progressive side bet offered on many blackjack tables for making a straight with your first two cards, and they do not need to be in order. For example, it you get a 4 followed by a 3, that is a winner. And any subsequent straight cards you receive that don’t bust you, increases your payout.
Roulette and Craps at Talking Stick Resort.
While you won’t find a roulette table or a craps table here, you will find 12 electronic craps units with dimensional dice, and 8 electronic roulette units.
Video Poker and Slot Machines.
There are 150+ video poker machines to choose from. The paytables on the games at Talking Stick are not very good. You will find video poker machines that pay out much better when visiting more prominent gambling locations like Las Vegas or Atlantic City. The variety of games available at Talking Stick are not great either. You will primarily have to choose from basic GameKing machines with the standard VP variants. If video poker is your game of choice, this casino will not be a viable option for your play.
There are over 800 slot machines here. A number only outdone in the local area by Talking Stick Resort’s sister property, Casino Arizona , which has over 900. Here are some of the newest games on offer:
*There are also 12 electronic craps units with dimensional dice.
The Arena Poker Room at Talking Stick Resort.
Talking Stick Resort has an impressive 49 poker tables, making it the largest poker room in Arizona. It’s a room fit to accommodate the Arizona State Championship Tournament, which is hosted here every August and has a $1,000,000 prize pool.
Daily tournaments are held at 11:15 AM and 7:15 PM. You will find massage therapists working from 12pm to 12am daily, offering table-side massages starting at $15. And an added perk in this poker room is that you not only earn $1/hour in comp, but you can cash those dollars out for cold hard cash!
You won’t find bigger limits anywhere else in the area. On any given day, a $40/$80 Mix game is running strong. That game includes such options as Badugi, Archie, Badacey, Super Stud8, 2-7 triple draw, Big O, and many, many more.
If you happen to be a mid-stakes player, this room certainly has what you need. Limit Hold’em is offered from 3/6 all the way to 40/80, Spread Limit Hold’em is offered from 2/3 to 5/10, Spread Limit Omaha High is offered from 2/3 to 25/25, Stud Hi/Lo / Omaha Hi/Lo is offered from 8/16 to 20/40 and Omaha Hi/Lo is offered at 4/8.
There are an abundance of promotions ranging from bad beat jackpots, to hourly splashpots on weekdays, high hands, royal flush payouts, football score tickets during NFL games handed out every quarter, and on the 2nd Monday of the month, Mad Mondays, where every 15 minutes the highest hand in the room gets $250 from 12pm to 12am!
An important restriction to be aware of when playing poker in Arizona is the betting limitations. You can never bet more than $500 at a time, in poker, in this state. There is also a 3-raise maximum in multiway pots. The only exception is if you are heads up by the third raise. In that case, there is no limit on the number of raises.
Hotel at Talking Stick Resort.
Talking Stick Resort is a 15 story property with 496 Deluxe rooms, which includes Luxury Suites, Executive King Suites, Club Level Rooms, 2 Bay Suites and 3 Bay Suites. Most rooms include a large balcony. All rooms have a minimum of 500sq feet of living space, offer complimentary wifi, include an LED smart TV with cable, and have floor to ceiling windows.
Deluxe rooms start at $139/night on weekdays, and $189 on weekends. The poker room rate starts at a very reasonable $89/night on weekdays and $129/night on weekends.
Deluxe King – Rates start at $139 on weeknights and $169 on weekends. If you opt for the scenic room, add $15 on weekdays and add $30 on weekends.
Signature King – Rates start at $169 on weeknights and $219 on weekends. If you opt for the scenic room, add $15 on weekdays and add $30 on weekends. From here on up you’ll have a large balcony to enjoy.
Executive King – Rates start at $209 on weeknights and $259 on weekends.
Club Level King – Rates start at $214 on weeknights and $264 on weekends. Club Level guests receive a complimentary shoe shine, nightly turndown service, upgraded linens and a complimentary newspaper (available upon request). Guests also receive complimentary access to the Tower Club Lounge for both morning and afternoon receptions. Each morning, enjoy a light breakfast offering a rotating selection of foods, accompanied by a variety of fresh juices, coffee, espresso, and tea selections. Each afternoon, enjoy a selection of light appetizers and snacks, accompanied by complimentary beer, wine or champagne.
2 Bay Suite – Rate is $699/night. This spacious suite offers 1,000sq feet which includes a living room, dining room, bedroom and 1.5 bedrooms. You also will enjoy an oversized balcony overlooking the pool, with entrances both from the living room, and the bedroom.
3 Bay Suite – Rate is $999/night. This spacious suite offers 1,500sq feet which includes a living room, dining room, bedroom and 1.5 bedrooms. You also will enjoy an oversized balcony overlooking the pool, with entrances both from the living room, and the bedroom. An added touch to this suite is the 32-inch LCD HDTV ingeniously displayed within the king bed’s footboard.
Restaurants & Dining at Talking Stick Resort.
Talking Stick Resort offers 6 unique restaurants. The Arena Poker Room also has its own kitchen and menu offered to seated players.
Orange Sky – Orange Sky is the signature fine dining restaurant at Talking Stick Resort with one of the best sunset views in Arizona and an award-winning wine list. Located on the 14th floor of the hotel, Orange Sky has floor-to-ceiling windows that give you a sweeping view of Scottsdale’s beautiful orange sunsets. Hence the name, Orange Sky.
Blue Coyote Cafe – This 24 hour casual dining option offers indoor and outdoor seating and a large menu selection features items for breakfast, lunch and dinner with a Southwestern flair. There is also a full Sushi menu offering sashimi, nagiri and rolls.
Blue Coyote Cantina – The Cantina offers a more upscale atmosphere than the Café. Here you’ll find a Southwestern inspired menu and fun weekly specials like $2 Taco Tuesdays from 4pm to 10pm, $1 Oyster Wednesdays from 4pm to 7pm and Sunday NFL Viewing Parties.
Black Fig Coffee and Birstro – This 24 hour express service eatery is a one stop shop for coffee, tea, soups, salads, pizza, appetizers, sandwiches and cookies. It’s a great late night option for fast premade items, and close enough to the main casino bar that you could continue watching the game and drinking your beer while waiting for something to be cooked.
Ocean Trail – This restaurant is a favorite of casino guests. It offers a 19 seat bar and a few tables with modern lines and colors throughout. This is a very trendy spot, Ocean Trail offers fantastic Cajun style boils, clam chowder and raw oysters. The hot New Orleans style dishes are cooked on open cooking stations right in front of you at the bar, and you can dictate your spice level preference as well. Happy hour is Monday through Friday from 4pm to 7pm.
Wandering Horse Buffet – This award-winning buffet offers the best of Italian, Asian, Mexican, Mediterranean and American cuisines. There are live cooking stations, a carving station, a brick oven pizza kitchen and delectable desserts as well. Sunday brunch for adults is $33.95 and for kids is $16.95. Lunch Monday – Thursday is $13.95 for adults and $8 for kids. Dinner Monday – Thursday is $20.95 for adults and $14 for kids. Breakfast Friday/Saturday is $11.95 for adults and $6 for kids. Lunch Friday/Saturday is $13.95 for adults and $8 for kids. Dinner Friday/Saturday is $33.95 for adults and $16.95 for kids.
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New restaurants in Hong Kong: Indian Curry Corner in Jordan – friendly service, but dishes lacked complexity

Lamb Biryani at Indian Curry Corner in Jordan. Photo: Jane Zhang READ FULL ARTICLE Advertisement Advertisement Food & Drink US$16 three cups chicken well worth the cash at Mei Taiwan Cuisine in Wan Chai, Hong Kong Taiwan’s famous dish gets the name from its three main ingredients of sesame oil, Chinese rice wine, and soy sauce – and it all tasted delicious Served in a sizzling casserole filled with savoury hunks of golden brown chicken meat, a mix of basil leaves, spring onions and garlic added fragrance

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NEW DELHI – India has decided to double the import quota for pigeon peas and sell some stocks on to the market to bolster the supply and prevent any shortages of the lentil, a staple in Indian cuisine, the food minister said on Tuesday.
The import quota will rise to 400,000 tonnes and the government will sell up to 200,000 tonnes of the lentils into the local market, Ram Vilas Paswan said via Twitter.
The government will also import 175,000 tonnes of pigeon peas from Mozambique, Paswan said.
(Reporting by Mayank Bhardwaj. Editing by Jane Merriman)

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Wissotzky’s exotic chai teas quench consumers’ thirst for indulgent hot and iced beverages

5, 2019 – 4:21pm
Bayonne, NJ, JUNE 4, 2019– With today’s exploding fascination with international cuisines, American palates are increasingly eager to experience bolder, spicier flavors. That’s why more and more consumers are indulging in chai tea – a blend of aromatic herbs, spices and black tea that can be enjoyed, as Indian custom dictates, sweetened with milk or iced for a uniquely refreshing experience.
Wissotzky Tea Company is satisfying our mass demand for chai – and need for convenience – with its new Artisan Spiced Tea collection. Each blend artfully pairs hand-selected premium black tea leaves with market spices, herbs, and other natural ingredients. Each carefully crafted blend is packed in a delicate pyramid tea bag that allows for the perfect release of aroma and flavor. Four intoxicating varieties are perfect to start off your day, for an afternoon pick me up or an after dinner treat. Simply brew and serve with milk and sweetener as desired or serve them over ice for a flavorful iced beverage. Salted Caramel Chai: a sweet and savory beverage redolent of warm cinnamon, ginger root, cloves, sea salt, and cardamom. Ginger and Turmeric: the earthy flavor of turmeric (known for its health benefits) blended with ginger root, cinnamon, cloves, and cardamom. Spiced Nana Mint: robust, flat-leaf Mediterranean mint complemented by cinnamon, ginger root, cloves, cardamom, and pepper. Pumpkin Spiced Chai: a toasty balance of cinnamon and ginger with pumpkin pieces, cloves, cardamom, black pepper, and chili. HOW TO MAKE PERFECT ICED TEA Hot-Brewed: Bring 8 cups water to a simmer; remove from the heat and add 6 tea bags. … Let steep about 4 minutes, until it’s the strength you like. Remove the tea bags. Let cool, then transfer to a pitcher, cover and refrigerate. Cold-Brewed: Combine 8 cups cold water and 10 tea bags in a pitcher. Cover and refrigerate 15 to 36 hours, until it’s the strength you like. Remove the tea bags. Serve in Tall Glass with Lemon wedge or a few berries for an extra kick of flavor. Like all Wissotzky products, the Artisan Spiced Tea collection is kosher and non-GMO. It is available in packs of 6 per case (MSRP $4.99 per 16-serving box). Wissotzky, Family owned and operated since 1849. Wissotzky travels the world’s tea gardens and exotic spice markets to deliver exceptional blends for tea lovers everywhere.
Its products are distributed by KAYCO ( www.kayco.com ), the leading purveyor of kosher foods in the U.S. Wissotzky Tea is an international, family-owned tea company based in Israel with offices in London and the United States. It is the leading tea distributor in Israel. Founded in 1849 in Moscow, Russia, it became the largest tea firm in the Russian Empire. Follow us on your favorite network:

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13 Awesome Muslim-Friendly Eateries In Kajang (Other Than Satay) That’s Worth The Drive

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Just a 40-minute drive down to the Southeast of Selangor is the underrated Kajang, a huge town with a large Muslim population. There’s even an MRT line that goes direct to Kajang! Unknown to many, there are plenty of hidden food gems to explore and taste in Kajang too.
Credit: Giphy
There are plenty of things to eat from awesome satay (it’s called satay Kajang for a reason) to chic cafes and traditional Indonesian cuisine. We’ve rounded up 13 of the best Muslim-friendly eateries you can find in Kajang (besides satay Kajang) for an awesome food adventure! It’s time you round up the food gang to plan your next trip there 😎 1. Le Moon’s Eatery. Bakery. Zakka
Credit: @evon_spencer on Instagram
Located at a row of shophouses just by the entrance of Jade Hill residences is Le Moon’s Bakery & Zakka Cafe. You’ll see the cafe immediately upon entering the area because of its vibrant turquoise shopfront 😍
With its simple and cosy design, it’s easy to relax and have a calm afternoon there. Enjoy delights of all kinds from a big breakfast, wild mushroom risotto, beef burger, wraps, and their desserts like the almond parfait or their apple sorbet & honeycomb coated with chocolate 😋
The eatery is actually a 3-storey shop lot and has plenty of space for event hosting! There’s also a play area on the top floor for children, so it’s a perfect place for a family lunch or tea time spot.
[P.S. If you’re looking for more kid-friendly spots, here are 9 kid-friendly cafes in KL for a great meal out ]
Credit: @arithinayu on Instagram
Food status: Uses a Muslim chef to purchase and set food ingredients. Alcohol ingredients used for one beverage on the menu. We suggest readers dine at their own discretion. Address: 1/1, Persiaran Jade Hills Utama, Jade Hills, 43300 Kajang, Selangor Opening hours: Sunday to Thursday 8am – 9.30pm, Friday and Saturday 8am – 10.30pm Contact: 03-8741 2697 2. Basil Leaves
Credit: @cpeipei87 on Instagram
Who knew you could find amazing authentic thali meals in Kajang? This air-conditioned restaurant serves some of the best Indian cuisine in town! Their staff and cooks are from Southern India, so it’s as authentic as it gets.
Each Thali meal is served with rice, poppadoms, and 9 dishes or various vegetables and delicious curries. You could also opt for their chicken or mutton biryani which is served with boiled egg, chicken gravy, cucumber acar , and poppadoms. There are plenty of side dishes to order too to enjoy with your thali meal, white rice, or biryani. Enjoy their black pepper mutton or venison, or indulge in deep fried prawns 😋
FYI, they also have vegetarian lunch buffets every Friday.
[P.S. If you’re craving for Indian cuisine, here are 9 banana leaf places in KL you should check out ]
Credit: @eg_karu on Instagram
Food status: Uses halal certified ingredients Address: 85G & 87G, Kajang Dispersal Link Expy, Taman Kajang Sentral, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Opening hours: Wednesday to Monday 7am-10pm, Tuesdays 7am – 12pm Contact: 03-8739 9415 3. Kak Su Nasi Kerabu Narak
Credit: @yinheng1028 on Instagram
Savour some of the best Kelantanese delights at Kak Su Nasi Kerabu Narak to satisfy your East Coast food cravings! You must try the ultimate Kelantanese dish – nasi kerabu (rice with shredded herbs) that is served with gravy, sambal and budu (fish sauce) 😋 Enjoy it together with their tender and tasty ayam percik . There are plenty of other local Malaysian lauk as well too, such as ikan bakar , ulam and a variety of curries.
Overall, this is the place in Kajang to be for a good breakfast if you want something more than the usual nasi lemak or roti canai 😊
Credit: @cupululu on Instagram
Address: 40, Jalan Cheras, Kampung Sungai Sekamat, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Opening hours: 6.30am – 3pm daily Contact: 016-275 2070

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Instant Indian

Instant Indian – Classic Foods from Every Region of India Made Easy in the Instant Pot Discover favorite foods from all over India with the first regional Indian cookbook authorized by Instant Pot! Rinku Bhattacharya — cookbook author and founder of Spice Chronicles — has put together a collection of 100 authentic recipes that showcase the diversity and range of the foods of India, where every state and region boasts its own unique dishes. Whether you crave takeout favorites or want to be introduced to lesser-known specialities, this cookbook brings the best of India to your table in an instant! The Instant Pot ® lends itself perfectly to Indian recipes, making flavorful, nutritious Indian fare (like simmering-all-day dals, legumes and all manner of curries) in minutes instead of hours. Instant Indian features numerous vegetarian and vegan options , and nearly all recipes are gluten-free. With step-by-step instructions and color photos throughout, Instant Indian makes Indian cooking easy and fool-proof using all the functions of this popular appliance.
Purchase Links US – https://www.amazon.com/Instant-Indian-Classic-Foods-Region/dp/0781813859/ UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Instant-Indian-Classic-Foods-Region/dp/0781813859/ About Rinku Bhattacharya
Rinku Bhattacharya (spicechronicles.com) was born in India, and now lives in a house with a vibrant backyard in Hudson Valley, New York with her husband, an avid gardener, and their two children. Rinku’s simple, sustainable approach to Indian cooking is showcased on her blog, Spice Chronicles, and in her Journal News column “Spices and Seasons.”
Rinku has been teaching recreational cooking classes for the past nine years, and works extensively with local area farmer’s markets on seasonal demonstrations and discussions. Rinku is also the author of The Bengali Five Spice Chronicles (Hippocrene Books, 2012), winner of the Gourmand World Cookbook Awards 2013 for Best Indian Cuisine. She writes for the Poughkeepsie Journal, the Journal News, and several online sites, and is a frequent guest on CT Style TV.
https://twitter.com/Wchestermasala https://www.instagram.com/spice_chronicles/ https://www.pinterest.co.uk/rinkub/?autologin=true https://www.facebook.com/spicechronicles
My Review
Having followed the recent rise in popularity of the Instant Pot, an electric pressure cooker, the only thing which put me off, to be honest, was the price. However, if you love authentic Indian cuisine then by following the recipes in this book it could soon pay for itself.
I loved the information about the different regions and the use of different spices. The book has some lovely photos to give you an idea of what the end product should look like. More importantly, it breaks the time down into different sections eg preparation time, cooking time, sauce preparation time etc as well as having sections for vegan and gluten-free.
All in all, it’s a culinary guide to India with some great recipes as a bonus.

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Things you should know about Canadian culture | Toronto Local Movers

Editor I June 12, 2019
The first thing you explore before deciding to move is the country’s customs and culture. It is more likely that your customs will be different from the ones in foreign countries. It is not always easy to move to a country where the customs and culture are much different than you are used to. If your goal is to move to Canada there are a couple of things you need to know about the Canadian culture . It will be easier for you to blend in and adapt to some of the customs . Canada is a multicultural nation
Most of the Canadian citizens descended from immigrants. It was earlier inhabited by aboriginal people until the French and the British colonized it in the 17th century. When you look at the population nowadays, 1 in 5 Canadians speaks a language that is not English or French which is actually their first language. It is very common to hear many different languages when you are walking around Canadian cities. In bigger towns, just as everywhere in the world, there are whole neighborhoods that represent different cultures like Greektown, Little Portugal and so on. There are a lot of shops, restaurants, and festivals which celebrate different cultures . Canadian culture is pretty diverse. Politeness is a part of Canadian culture
People describe Canadians as the friendliest in the world. The first thing you will notice when you move to Canada is how polite people are. It is a big part of their culture. It is common for people to be kind to total strangers. If you are new here, you will be greeted warmly. You will get a lot of smiles from the people you’ve never seen before while having a walk. Don’t be surprised if a stranger asks you how your day is. You can get used to this politeness really quickly and give it back also. It is in their culture to say “ sorry ” all the time. It is considered as a polite gesture, not really an apology.
One of the politest things they do is lining up for the bus . The first people to arrive at the bus stop are the ones who will get to choose a seat on the bus. In many countries, people wait as one big group in front of the bus doors. Anyone can push you, touch you and rob you. But in Canadian culture it is an unwritten rule, you line up and keep your distance. Time
Canadians really value their time, so the pace of life is fast. It would be best if you could arrive at the given time or even a few minutes earlier. That is how you show appreciation for your and the other person’s time, whether it is because you are meeting a friend for a coffee or arriving at a class in college. Informal gatherings such as parties are the one exception to this rule. Languages
Canada has two official languages, English and French . More than 60% of Canadians speak English and around 20% speak French. Canada is a bilingual country and Canadians are required to take both English and French language classes. Canada also has a multicultural nation which implies that there are people who speak more than just the two official languages. When you speak to a Canadian, they expect you to know English, because it is spoken everywhere in Canada. English is the first language when it comes to schools and conducting business. There are two official languages in Canada. Sport
Canadians love their sports, especially ice hockey which is the most watched, played and talked about sport. If you want to assimilate, you should get informed about Canadian hockey teams. The best way to integrate into Canadian culture is to go to the games or watch them in bars as many other fans. You will most definitely find friends during these events. Canadian food
We all know what is Canada most famous for, Maple syrup. Canada produces around 80% of the Maple syrup in the world. It is a signature food of Canadian culture. How much it actually is a symbol shows the Canadian flag, which has a maple leaf on it. Once you are in Canada, the first thing you need to do is try the Canadian Maple syrup . When it comes to national dishes, Canada is not really a country you would think has some intriguing dishes. Poutine is the closest thing Canadians have to their national dish – French fries with cheese curds topped with brown gravy. Canada is such a big multicultural nation, so this explains why there are so many different distinct dishes to try. You can try so many cuisines in Canada. Big cities have unique national restaurants like Italian, French, Indian, Mexican, Japanese, Jamaican and so on. Freedom
Canada is a pretty free and accepting nation. Because of so many nations in one country, they have a lot more understanding of each other. Canadians celebrate their differences and take pride in their heritage and culture. It is an accepting nation, and it showed that when it came to legalizing same-sex marriages because Canada was one of the first countries to do that. People in Canada can speak about things that bother them without being afraid. Women are not an exception to this rule, they can publicly speak about the things they don’t like or support. Generally, Canadians have differences in opinions, but they are free to choose which path they want to go in life. Canadians will always speak their minds. Summary of the points regarding Canadian culture
To sum it all up, here is the list of things you should know about Canada and Canadian culture: Canada is a huge country Canadians love ice hockey Canada has two official languages Canadians are very polite people Canada is a multicultural nation Canadians have some unwritten rules on behaving in public Canadians have an accepting attitude towards other cultures and religions Next Post

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