Three Restaurants to Try This Weekend

Three Restaurants to Try This Weekend

Three Restaurants to Try This Weekend Recommendations for those looking to get out of their comfort zone Erika Kauder/The Dabney Need dining inspiration for this coming weekend? Don’t fret — Eater’s here to help. Each week, the site’s editors select a new group of restaurants worth visiting throughout the weekend. These picks range from brand new restaurants to old, reliable favorites. Some pair well with fun weekend activities; others reflect recent happenings. Diners probably won’t get to every place in one weekend, but that’s what next weekend is for, right? Friday, February 1 For lightened-up winter soup: For me, chicken and dumplings is a country comfort food that brings to mind a warming bowl of tan broth thickened with residual flour from squares of chewy dough. With its Eastern Shore style — distinguished by slippery ribbons of dumplings — the Dabney has managed to pail out most of the heft without losing any soul. The broth tastes like a well-nurtured chicken stock, but it’s consistency stays thin. A medley of greens, carrots, and radishes takes up equal space in a small Dutch oven, adding bright colors and varying layers of vegetal crunch. Sour cream and a spicy vinegar kick bring to mind another humble flavor: Buffalo chicken. 122 Blagden Alley NW — Gabe Hiatt For accommodating deli food: I’m one of the many, many people who went Whole30 this January, so spoiler alert: eating out at D.C .restaurants is kind of a pain. It can be difficult to nail down which restaurants may have hidden sugar, soy, or dairy lurking in their dishes. Attempts to email or call ahead with menu questions don’t always get returned — I’ve had better luck getting responses in cities like New York and even Hershey, Pennsylvania. One bright spot, though, has been diners. They have inherently broad menus (eggs and potatoes are allowed on the diet), and they don’t bat an eye when you ask questions or request substitutions. One recent positive experience was at Parkway Deli in Silver Spring. Everything from their roast chicken dinner to salads and even chicken soup (hold the noodles) could be modified to work for my restrictions. Plus, you can’t knock a place that has its own pickle bar. I’m looking forward to returning when I can eat knishes and Hungarian goulash again. But keep it in mind for lunch the next time YOU’RE on a weird diet and go duckpin bowling in Maryland, as one does. 8317 Grubb Rd, Silver Spring — Missy Frederick For the best of Bethesda: Ask hands-on owners Abraham and Martha Melles about the meaning behind the gold spoon trophy showcased behind the full-service bar at Delina’s Eritrean Urban Kitchen . They’ll tell you that right after opening their veggie-forward restaurant in October, they got an epic neighborhood welcome: the title of “Bethesda’s Best Bite” at the fall Taste of Bethesda. Diners are encouraged to fill up on small-sized orders (under $5) spread across an injera canvas. Go with the crunchy korosho-dorho fit-fit (t omatoes, onions, garlic, and jalapenos mixed with injera pieces) with a hard boiled egg or a’ter (split yellow peas with onion, garlic, ginger, turmeric and oil). “Tibsi” dishes (chicken, shrimp, or mushroom) come sautéed with chef Martha’s special sauce. Anything on the menu can be tweaked to mild or hot spice levels. Guests waiting on to-go orders can conveniently grab six-packs of beer housed in a large fridge in the back. Feel like Eritrean without leaving home? Delina’s is listed on a ton of delivery sites . 4914 Cordell Avenue Bethesda, Maryland — Tierney Plumb Friday, January 18 For catfish and chips: When a restaurant offers fish and chips, cod or haddock are typically what gets dropped in the fryer. Ivy City Smokehouse in Northeast, however, eschews the classic white fish for something blue. Parent company and fish purveyor ProFish breaks down whole Chesapeake blue catfish — some about the size of a pitbull — in its 15,000-square-foot warehouse and sends pieces to the tavern around the corner. According to a representative for the company, fish that big don’t always have to resort to bottom-feeding, which lends it a cleaner flavor. The batch I tasted on a recent visit was devoid of any muddy or silty flavor, and I was told the catfish covered in light beer batter was swimming hours before I ate it. 1356 Okie Street NE — Gabe Hiatt For experimenting at a D.C. favorite: Ellē, Eater D.C.’s 2018 Restaurant of the Year , is constantly moving things on and off the menu. Chef Brad Deboy says the kimchi toast with labneh and XO sauce is the only thing that’s remained a constant since the all-day cafe opened in Mount Pleasant last spring. Until today, all of Ellē’s desserts were pre-prepared pastries made to survive an extended period in a case attached to the coffee counter. But tonight the restaurant will attempt its first plated dessert — a black rice pudding with blood orange meringue, fermented chili powder, and pumpkin seed granola. Deboy will also audition two new entrees starting Saturday: a swordfish with spaetzle and a pimento cheese plate with lamb ham, a biscuit, and a fried green tomato. 3221 Mt Pleasant Street NW — GH For joining a packed house: If you’re lucky enough to score a spot at Bombay Street Food , a blockbuster addition to Columbia Heights, you’re in for a treat. On a recent Friday night, first come, first serve guests were spilling out into the cold waiting to hear their names called. Once settled inside the lively 70-seat addition, start with an order off the monsoon menu full of comforting dishes that people in Mumbai like to eat, including light and crispy vegetable pakora ($8). Bombay biryani, listed as a “must try,” lives up to its printed recommendation; a piping hot pot is filled with basmati rice, spices, and a protein (chicken, lamb, goat, or shrimp) all baked together. Ubiquitous stateside orders like creamy chicken tikka masala don’t disappoint, either. Hands-on owner Asad Sheikh will likely come by suggesting a bottle of wine to help beat his entrees’ heat. 1413 Park Road NW — Tierney Plumb Friday, January 11 For a bubbly flute in the sky: Rosslyn’s Observation Deck at CEB Tower debuts its new 32nd-story Champagne bar on Saturday, January 12 at 5 p.m. Jet to the top and find tie-wearing bartenders pouring bubbly from a compact and circular glowing bar, transporting drinkers to what looks like an airline’s first class fuselage with soft seating and sleek wood accents. Glasses start at $9 for prosecco and rise up to $18 for a Domaine Chandon sparkling rose. Total ballers — like Nestle execs headquartered across the street — can toast a sweet new deal by dropping $475 on a bottle of 2006 Dom Perignon (see full menu below). It costs visitors an additional $22 to access the View itself — but the actual views atop the area’s first 360-degree public observatory are arguably priceless, stretching all the way to MGM. 1201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, Virginia — Tierney Plumb For a refreshed brunch ambiance: Georgetown’s 7-month-old 1310 Kitchen & Bar by Jenn Crovato is finally getting around to erasing traces of its former life as Daily Grill to better reflect its modern small plates menu. A fresh white paint job brightens up the previously dark and outdated space. After being closed for about a week, 1310 was originally supposed to reopen Friday, but caulking errors delayed that plan. “Sunday we are open, 100 percent,” Crovato tells Eater. Its popular brunch (7 a.m. to 2 p.m.) includes a hot turkey Cubano with fries and banana-stuffed Challah French toast. To keep positive during the minor renovation fail, Crovato scribbled motivational quotes on the windows this week (like author Loretta LaRoche’s “stressed spelled backwards is desserts”). Come March, a full makeover will be complete with new tabletops, chairs, floors, flatware, and lighting. 1310 Wisconsin Avenue NW — TP For a throwback cocktail: The Sheppard in Dupont Circle is a liquid time machine, taking drinkers back to the days of jazz in a throwback setting. There are no windows or clocks, so you forget what time it is — in a good way. Even the mode of accessing the inconspicuous speakeasy from co-owner David Strauss ( Morris American Bar ) is from another era (the elevator was broken on a recent visit). If you go to next-door Kabin’s entrance, head upstairs past a broken chandelier, you can ask a lone hostess for availability. On a recent night there was no menu, so bartenders simply asked what you like and went from there. Go now while you can — the bar is slated to close this year to make way for a modern boutique hotel. Team Sheppard, which includes Spike Mendelsohn ( Vim & Victor ) and Vinoda Basnayake ( Heist ), is currently eyeing a handful of replacement locations. 1337 Connecticut Avenue NW — TP Friday, January 4 For a boozy underground workout: Spin , the weeks-old subterranean ping-pong social club downtown, offers 9-to-5ers a solid stress release. Menus and hours won’t be in full swing until January 17, but there’s still plenty of ways to fuel up now. Former Le Kon sous chef Patrick Tanyag just unleashed his lineup of tacos — go with the veggie or carnitas — and the za’atar house fries are addicting. Bar manager Reda Bouizar’s go-to cocktails include a mezcal and salt air-topped drink called “The Don” and the super potent “Vesper Royale.” A bottled Gin Rickey makes double-fisting paddles even easier. There’s also a way to drink for free on Friday nights: A round robin-style competition pits the masses against pros, and anyone who returns a rapid-fire serve get a shot on the house. Before leaving, hop into its bathtub full of Spin-branded balls for a drunk photo op. Disclaimer: There are no clocks or windows, so time flies. 1332 F Street NW — Tierney Plumb For a shutdown-centric special: There are tons of bars and restaurants sympathizing with the 800,000 government workers going without a paycheck these days. One of the most innovative money-saving offers is at DC Brau ’s tasting room, which matches discounts to the amount of days the partial shutdown lingers in the new year. Because Saturday, January 5, would be the 15th day of the shutdown, furloughed workers will receive 15 percent off on-site or to-go purchases at the Northeast brewery. Fridays are not included because there is already a 50 percent discount. There’s also free public tours on Saturdays for all from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. 3178 Bladensburg Road NE — TP For California vibes in the cold: Foggy Bottom’s newly revamped Arc the Hotel debuted its modern American restaurant , Notti 824, just before the dead of winter. The minimalist respite , with lots of neutral tones, stone, and smooth wood detailing, is reminiscent of a wine cave in Napa. Fittingly, there’s lots of California labels poured on-site (like Silver Oak, Ecco Domani, and Coppola Winery). For food, go with the meatballs, broccolini-topped chicken flatbread, and braised short ribs. Keep the night going with tickets to Miss Saigon nearbyat the Kennedy Center. 824 New Hampshire Avenue NW — TP Friday, December 28 For a sampling of Thomas Jefferson’s favorites: Michelin-rated Plume is going back to its roots for the holidays, offering a six-course pairing menu inspired by ingredients and dishes America’s founding fathers ate in winter 1776. The collaboration between The Jefferson ’s in-house historian Susan Lagon and chef Ralf Schlegel includes Chesapeake oysters with caviar and borage, heirloom vegetables reminiscent of Jefferson’s Monticello gardens, wild boar filet medallion with boar bacon and gin cream sauce, and apple pandowdy — a favorite of First Lady Abigail Adams. Diners can mix and match vegetarian options for the nostalgic meal, which disappears after Sunday, December 30. 1200 16th St NW — Tierney Plumb For a prime date night option: Dupont Circle newcomer the Sally , hidden inside the Fairfax Hotel’s modernized lobby, is one of D.C.’s best-kept secrets right now. The month-old kitchen is churning out some carefully crafted lounge items from executive chef Ricardo Planas, including a tangy lobster ceviche that features a generous helping of shellfish mixed with serrano chiles and grapefruit pearls; a bright bowl of roasted beets with fennel, goat cheese, pistachios, and citrus vinaigrette; and ahi tuna with kimchi salad alongside dollops of avocado-ginger puree — a playful imitation of wasabi. A wider menu is coming in the new year, Planas tells Eater. Diners shouldn’t be blamed for swiping his leather coasters — they say, “This coaster was stolen from The Sally” — especially after a few cocktails. Keep the date going at the hotel’s new Nook bar off the lobby. The alcove has pool tables, pop art, and a roaring, glass-enclosed fireplace. 2100 Massachusetts Avenue NW — TP For a North Bethesda night: The Pike & Rose shopping center is filling up fast, with recent arrivals from Mexican-inspired Nada, Jinya Ramen Bar (which is offering a shutdown deal), and most recently, Julii. The French- Mediterranean bistro , from the founders of Cava Grill, comes alive at night with glittering details from its gold utensils to a golf leaf ceiling hovering over the packed bar. Chef Sasha Felikson, who’s making impeccable presentations of foie gras torchon and roasted bone marrow (which sold out on a recent night), doubles as live entertainment: He’s known to belt out a tune while parading his ice cream-making trolley to diners’ tables. Have too much wine? Stay the night at the quaint new Canopy hotel across the street. 11915 Grand Park Avenue — TP Friday, December 21 For surprising miso placement: It’s not easy to snag a seat at Johnny Spero’s open kitchen at Reverie right now, but I had no problem getting a seat at the bar as soon as I walked in earlier this month in Georgetown. Dripping with a mixture of smoked cheddar and house special sauce, the burger lives up to the hype, and a scallop crudo plated on a buttermilk dill mixture was equally impressive. After waffling on whether to get dessert, ordering the chocolate turned out to be the best decision of the night. A cube of aerated white chocolate was an enjoyable contradiction, fluffy yet still creamy. Brown butter crumbs in a pool of a sauce somewhere between caramel and butterscotch made it even richer. But the mind-blowing piece was a peanut miso paste that smacked the whole plate with a sweet fermented funk. 3201 Cherry Hill Lane NW — Gabe Hiatt For a creamy, sour cocktail: I’m not a huge fan of the word “whimsical” when it comes to food and drink descriptions, but it’s tough to paint the “Charlie and the Chapuline Factory” cocktail at Poca Madre any other way. A pink flower garnish on top of the orange-yellow drink prepares you for something light and sour. Oaxacan chapulines — or grasshoppers — and pineapple lend the requisite tang, but those ingredients are offset by ground Japanese peanuts and shaken farm eggs that thicken the mix. Mezcal, lemongrass, and sambal chile paste make sure it’s far from cloying. 777 I Street NW, Washington — GH For five-alarm chicken tikka: Anyone who’s read anything about Pappe, which opened in Logan Circle this past June, knows that chefs Sanjay Mandhaiya and Shankar Puthran first attracted the attention of eventual partner Vipul Kapila with the potent heat of their lamb vindaloo. As I learned from a take-out order the other day, the spicy chicken tikka is even hotter. Thanks, Kashmiri chiles. 1347 14th Street NW — GH Friday, December 14 For extraordinarily plump mussels: Christmas lights popped from the front windows of the small shops along the main drag in Del Ray, setting up a scene on a cold night that felt pulled from a 1950s sitcom. So walking into Evening Star Cafe , I was thinking about a blue plate special, not huge blue mussels that barely fit in their shells. Neighborhood Restaurant Group sources the mollusks from Hollander & Deköning, a business run by a fifth-generation Dutch mussel farmer who relocated to Maine. It claims to be the only mussel farm in North America utilizing a Dutch style of cultivation that requires growing the mussels on a horizontal seabed instead of vertical ropes. At the Evening Star, they’re simmered with apples, fennel, and white wine, yielding an intoxicating broth for customers to sop up with grilled bread. It was the highlight of a recent meal from chef Jonathan Till, who came aboard the Evening Star this fall. A committed forager, Till has a way with mushrooms. He dispatches the fungi on a creamy wild mushroom bruschetta and in an acorn fettuccine — made with house-milled acorn flour — that comes with maitake and oyster mushrooms. 2000 Mt. Vernon Avenue, Alexandria, Virgini a — Gabe Hiatt For tender goat curry: A Miami expat who lives in Columbia Heights recently tipped me off to Karibbean Kitchen, a Jamaican joint that opened this summer just around the corner from Thip Khao. The place was mostly empty during dinner time the other night, but it was encouraging to hear the jerk chicken spends time on a charcoal grill. The meal proved to be uneven. The rice and peas were undercooked. The chicken, although pleasantly smoky and covered in a sweet-and-spicy sauce, came out cold. The goat curry, however, was flawless. Small bones bobbed in a bowl of dark green sauce, surrendering tender strips of goat meat packed with spices that balanced out the fattier bites. 1400 Meridian Place NW — GH For a scene-y and secluded drink: With a Tom Sietsema-approved restaurant christened by Run-DMC and a packed events calendar, downtown’s months-old Eaton DC has solidified itself as a place to be. Just this week Sen. Cory Booker (D-New Jersey) moderated its new literary series, followed by an afterparty with a DJ at its rooftop bar Wild Days. Its Allegory speakeasy tucked off the lobby is also a prime drinking destination, with strong and carefully-crafted cocktails from gregarious Gibson alums. They recently lost a team member, however: Eater learned one of its heavy aluminum frog-shaped water pitchers was swiped by a guest. 1201 K Street NW — Tierney Plumb To get a seafood fix: The stone and fireplace-lined Dyllan’s Raw Bar Grill helped elevate the Georgetown dining scene upon its opening this summer with wasabi ‘martini’ shots. Seafood options for the holidays include mussels in Thai coconut lime broth and orange-habanero lobster and shrimp ceviche. The latter makes its way into a $250 surf sampler alongside rare tinned cockles and smoked fish. Eater learned Clint Eastwood and Co. had a private party there this week for the opening of The Mule . Next door, steal a peek inside Rosewood Hotel’s construction site for Wolfgang Puck’s fancy steakhouse Cut , which will add to the neighborhood’s restaurant renaissance next year. 1054 31st Street NW — TP For other celebrity-endorsed meals: Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka were in town this week to promote their ties to Capital One’s dining rewards Savor card. The New York City power couple stayed at the Four Seasons and ate twice at Bourbon Steak , followed by a hosted dinner at A Rake’s Progress at the Line Hotel in Adams Morgan. They just missed Bourbon Steak chef Michael Mina, who visited his decade-old restaurant last weekend and prepared his famed ahi tuna tartare — a game-changing dish when he first put it on plates in 1991. At A Rake’s Progress , Spike Gjerde was spotted making hearth roasted chicken, roasted trout, and slow-cooked beef short rib along with cheddar scalloped potatoes. A Rake’s Progress, 1770 Euclid Street NW — TP Friday, December 7 For a lazy late brunch: Toro Toro has sat at the scenic foot of Franklin Square for four years now, but Richard Sandoval’s Pan-Latin destination just switched up its weekend brunch format — trading a big buffet-style spread to a la carte ordering from waiters (which means customers can stay parked with constantly refilled blood orange mimosas). Best bets at the dim restaurant, complete with attractive an onyx bar, include huevos rancheros, sweet corn-stuffed empanadas, and bacon drizzled with chipotle agave honey and spiced sugar. The deal is pretty sweet: $39 for endless cocktails and food with a two-hour limit. It runs all the way until 5 p.m. So the meal is an ideal pregame for Abigail’s new Sunday night industry party nearby. 1300 I Street NW — Tierney Plumb For birthday party beef: To mark its second year at MGM National Harbor, Voltaggio Brothers Steakhouse just rolled out a new prime rib special that’s carved tableside. The 45-day dry-aged cut comes with au jus and horseradish cream sauce and is topped with an aged beef fat popover. Keep the celebratory calories coming with an epic loaded potato topped with smoked sour cream, bacon bits, chives, white cheddar foam, lardons, crispy shallots, and brown butter. Be prepared for the multi-staff spectacle to draw all eyes to your table, which gets a “V”-shaped knife set to dig in to the dish. On a recent visit, Bryan Voltaggio himself was the star carver. Not feeling like a carnivore? Order house-made pastas at MGM’s new Italian-inspired Osteria Costa , which has a sister location at The Mirage in Vegas. 101 MGM National Avenue, Oxon Hill, Maryland — TP For a Chinatown crawl: Cirque du Soleil’s new ice show is all weekend at Capital One Arena , and the weeks-old watering hole next door is paying homage to the event with a bright blue cocktail. Dragon Bar — Circa’s new D.C. sports-themed venue downstairs — is serving Ice, Ice, Baby ($10) through Sunday with ginger, lime, blue Curaçao, Torres orange Curaçao, Belle Isle Grapefruit, and Peychauds bitters. For half the price, patrons can order beers and bites like “All Caps” barbecue nachos for $5 each all night. Still hungry after the show? Warm up with a bowl of New England clam chowder at Legal Sea Foods — a direct shot across the arena. 781 Seventh Street NW — TP For carbs that give back: Pizzeria Paradiso and DC Brau are teaming up for the eighth year to cut down on food waste and support local charity Bread for the City . DC Brau’s spent grain from brewing makes its way into a special Pizzeria Paradiso crust, available at all five locales through Monday, December 24, for $2-$3 extra. The surcharge goes towards the nonprofit. The homegrown brands have a lot going on lately: Pizzeria Paradiso opened its latest location in Spring Valley this week. On Saturday, December 8, DC Brau will release a German unfiltered pilsner — dubbed Keller Pils — in 16-oz. baby blue tallboy cans and on draft across the city. 4850 Massachusetts Avenue NW — Tierney Plumb Friday, November 30 For Japanese Salisbury steak: It had been a few years since I’d snagged a table at Daikaya’s second-floor Izakaya in Chinatown, but a visit to sample the updated fall menu this week confirmed that chef Katsuya Fukushima still has his fastball. An updated hambagu shows how Fukushima welcomes interlopers into his Japanese drinking cuisine. The dish treats the hamburger steak like filet mignon with a French-style Rossini approach, a technique that calls for cooking the beef in butter and topping it with foie gras. A black truffle “demi glace” serves as the basis for a Salisbury steak comparison. Those two influences are listed on the menu. Another, from the sight of a gravy-covered patty on top of an immaculate pedestal of white rice, is Hawaiian hamburger steak. 705 6th Street NW, Washington, D.C. — Gabe Hiatt For smoky sandwiches: You don’t have to trek to Union Market — or Baltimore — to get Neopol Savory Smokery anymore. The outfit’s location on Grace Street in Georgetown opened in October, adding new wave of turf-based proteins to the seafood-heavy menu from the shop at the NoMa food hall. There’s smoked turkey, chicken breast, and pork loin now, but the pastrami sandwich immediately caught my attention. Thin slices sampled cold showed off a strong cure that wasn’t over-smoked or too peppery. Try it in a sandwich with melted Swiss, tomato, house slaw, and horseradish aioli. The pastrami holds it own, but the smoked salmon BLT my lunch companion ordered was the best thing we tried. 3210 Grace Street NW — GH For a road-trip brunch: The fervor surrounding Baltimore favorite Woodberry Kitchen has cooled ever so slightly in recent years, which means one good thing for would-be brunch-goers: it isn’t all that hard to get a table there right now. A recent mid-afternoon meal there featured super-attentive service and some true delights, such as an incredibly rich duck paprikash with spaetzle. Woodberry continues to find new ways to promote its Maryland roots and local mission — “pit beef” carpaccio makes for a well-balanced, fun appetizer, and regional spirits dominate the cocktail list. The restaurant still has its twee moments — toasts are labeled “adorable” on the menu — but it isn’t quite as precious as Spike Gjerde’s D.C. restaurant, A Rake’s Progress. Woodberry is probably still a cheaper meal even if you count the gas money required to get to Baltimore. 2010 Clipper Park Road, Baltimore — Missy Frederick For dinner with your vegetarian friend : This week I went to Eden Center mainstay Rice Paper for a ladies night (yes, we party hard). I was kind of surprised to discover the dishes I was gravitating towards were vegetarian: a crispy, delicate bánh xèo chay crepe and an addictive fried tofu dish spiked with lemongrass and a little heat. I’m glad our crowd forced me to graze beyond the meat-heavy items on the table like shaky beefand spring rolls — both still worthy orders, of course — and explore new corners of the expansive menu. It was one more reason why this is a great place to bring a group. 6775 Wilson Blvd, Falls Church, Virginia — MF Friday, November 16 For a new way to eat your carrots: Ballston is about to welcome a sea of new dining options, but one cozy and wood-lined restaurant is still going strong after nearly a decade: Neighborhood Restaurant Group’s Rustico . One starring dish is its bright carrot hummus with lamb ragu, feta cheese, and grilled pita. It’s a popular order that’s stayed put for years. For a bigger dish, go with the comforting Tuscan chicken pizza with sundried tomatoes. Can’t make it to Arlington? Its sister Alexandria spot has the same menu. 4075 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, Virginia — Tierney Plumb For girl-powered drinks: A record number of women are heading to Congress, and Sauf Haus D.C. is celebrating the historical moment this weekend with a karaoke party covering female artists and female-fronted bands. The always-packed biergarten perched above Dupont Circle is enlisting nonprofit Flashband and This Could Go Boom! records on Saturday, November 17, to get the party started at 7 p.m. Go if you want to belt out Lady Gaga with a boot-shaped drinking glass in hand, then imagine it’s summer on the weatherproof garden patio. 1216 18th Street NW — TP For classic tapas: Jaleo has so many great versions of classic tapas — garlic shrimp, ham and cheese croquettes — not to mention its own iconic dishes (three words: bacon-wrapped dates), so it can be a hard sell to experiment with the rest of the menu. But one dish worth adding to the rotation is the patatas con cabrales. The fried potato dish, garnished with sharp cabrales cheese and tossed in a demi-glace sauce, is almost reminiscent of poutine. In Bethesda this week, the dish was on a section of the menu devoted to throwback dishes brought back for another round. For the uninitiated, it’s definitely worth a try. Multiple locations — Missy Frederick Friday, November 9 For Southeast Asian breakfast sandwiches: Pedestrians on 14th Street may have noticed that a growing number of people lately are sitting by the windows at Doi Moi with egg yolks running down their wrists. Birds Eye, the breakfast and lunch business inside Doi Moi, has undergone several tweaks since chef Johanna Hellrigl took over for Sasha Felikson in the spring. A revamped version of the daytime menu (8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekends) came out in August. The star player is a banh mi ($9) filled with five spice and fish caramel glazed bacon, sunny side up eggs, and pickled vegetables on toasted bread from Lyon Bakery. 1800 14th Street NW — Gabe Hiatt For classic steakhouse appetizers: The annual Capital Food Fight was at the Anthem this week, bringing a crush of chefs hoping to impress one another with samples of inventive dishes handed out at stalls. One of the most memorable bites of the night was a steak tartare from the Voltaggio Brothers Steakhouse that was mixed with potato chips and capped with an aerated caramelized onion foam — a dead ringer for onion dip. That’s not on the menu at the restaurant at MGM National Harbor, but the success of the dish could be an endorsement for both the tuna tartare and the oyster Rockefeller with aerated bechamel, smoked shoyu, and bacon. 101 MGM National Avenue, Oxon Hill, Maryland — GH For a beer and bite: Across the Pond is a solid, yet still under-the-radar sports bar in the heart of Dupont Circle. Forget everything you know about crummy Irish pub fare and dip its battered pork sausage app into spicy mustard ASAP. On weekends, brunch fans can pair football with a two-hour mimosa deal for $14.99. It’s also a featured stop on Saturday’s 7th Annual D.C. Beerathon , an epic beer crawl boasting 26 unique pours at 13 bars. 1732 Connecticut Ave NW — Tierney Plumb For a food-filled holiday market: The annual two-day Emporiyum marketplace is back this year at Union Market with a smorgasbord of edible treats, trinkets, and shrub sets offered by 90 vendors hailing from coast to coast. Local players are also in on the action, like D.C. food truck Swizzler . Come hungry; they plan on serving whole portions of their heaping burgers. 1309 5th Street NE — TP Friday, November 2 For a cozy carnivorous bite : The eponymous Capital Burger at Mount Vernon Triangle’s dressed-down sister to downtown steakhouse Capital Grille is a warm way to welcome in winter, topped “French onion style” with caramelized onions, Wisconsin Grand cru gruyère, and shallot aioli. Don’t be shy with the tangy complimentary pickles plopped on every table, made on-site daily. There’s also happy hour seven days a week (3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.) with $7 hot honey margaritas and wine. 1005 7th Street NW — Tierney Plumb For an atypical brunch: New fall brunch offerings tucked inside Blagden Alley’s Tiger Fork include a funky fusion of Hong Kong-meets-Western classics. Cantonese ingredients and techniques make their way into the Hong Kong egg sandwich with truffle sauce and ham, with offbeat pastries like matcha croissants and pineapple buns from Sunday Morning Bakehouse. Not feeling like breakfast? Go with dim sum selections like the tasty BBQ pork bun or rice noodle roll with shrimp, pork and sweet soy. Map out your meal plan here , with brunch served 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. One go-to cocktail whipped up behind its octagon-shaped bar is the “Bad Girl Mimi,” a tropical twist of prosecco, passion fruit liquor, guava, and pineapple. Saunter over to Calico next door and keep the party going with a “Sassy Kitty” — a gin-filled juice box for adults. 922 N Street NW — TP For surprising sides: At a recent meal at St. Anselm , the least-impressive plate was a perfectly-medium rare hanger steak topped with garlic butter. That’s not a dig. It’s just that the bites, salads, and sides are that strong. In designing the menu, chef Marjorie Meek-Bradley has shown she knows just how firmly to squeeze — or grate — a citrus fruit. Grilled squash tattooed with char marks takes on a lighter dimension in a salad mixed with grapefruit puree, hearty beets, hazelnuts and thin slices of a spicy red pepper. Crispy beef fat potatoes with parmesan sound as if they’d land with a thud, but a sprinkling of lemon zest makes the side a proper foil for rich, buttery beef. 1250 5th Street NE — Gabe Hiatt Friday, October 26 For a modern American feast: Three-month-old Prather’s on the Alley has hit its stride in the heart of Mount Vernon Triangle. Highlights from chefs Akhtar Nawab and Dan Izzo include pork ribs — a fall-off-the bone app alongside yogurt, Indian spices, sweet onions, and lychee — and pillowy potato gnocchi packed with three types of mushrooms. The airy and industrial design by Natalie Park ( Gravitas ) features exposed ceilings, potted hanging plants, and a splashy turquoise tiled bar. The music soundtrack is also on point, as it should be: The space formerly housed iconic creative studio Gold Leaf, once graced by rapper Wale and indie band U.S. Royalty before the neighborhood exploded with development. Toast to its history with the Alley Cat, a carefully crafted riff on a Negroni featuring mezcal and cacao. 455 I Street NW — Tierney Plumb For a beer-fueled beginning to Halloween: This weekend marks the unofficial start of Halloween, and expansion-minded Dacha Beer Garden kicks off the celebration on Friday, October 26 by transforming its Shaw beer garden into a spooky “Dacha Fear Garden.” Guests are encouraged to sport costumes every day through Halloween on Wednesday, October 31, with prizes dished out daily to the best ones. Its logo — a mural of Elizabeth Taylor — was temporarily tweaked to serve as outfit inspiration (she’s donning a mask worn by Hannibal Lecter from Silence of the Lambs ). For more Halloween ideas, go here . 1600 7th Street NW — TP For a crash course on whiskey: W Hotel’s subterranean bar The Root Cellar just debuted a series of whiskey flights that cover a gamut of prices, distilleries, and ages. Director of restaurant operations Adrian Mishek, who’s well-versed in the spirit, guides guests through selections like American Rye 101 (Old Overholt and Manhattan Hudson Rye) and Quarter Century Club (Balvenie 25 year and Macallan 25 year). Pappy van Winkle fans can go with the Pappy’s Best (Pappy 20 year and Pappy 23 year). 515 15th Street NW — TP For a new downtown hit: American Son ​ delivers diners an all-day option for inventive American dishes from D.C. chef Tim Ma. The scene-y newcomer , an ode to Ma’s experiences growing up as a second-generation American in Arkansas, sits on the lobby level of the months-old Eaton DC hotel. Best bets include the beef cheek with charred peach, a charred romaine salad, and potato croquette — a savory spin on a funnel cake. Cocktails also have a playful twist, with a booze-soaked Rice Krispies Treat floating in one. 1201 K Street NW — TP Friday, October 19 For a taste of Thailand: Dupont’s 1-year-old Thai Chef Street Food replicates dishes found along bustling streets of Bangkok and imports classics to Connecticut Avenue. Must-try orders at the colorful D.C. destination include Crying Tiger Steak with spicy dipping sauce (rice powder, hot pepper, red onion) and the fiery Poh Tak Seafood bowl, packed with shrimp, scallop, squid, and mussels stir fried with homemade paste and fresh chili peppers. The food comes from mother-daughter duo, who run another location in College Park, that immigrated from Bangkok. Then head to lively next-door Mediterranean neighbor Barrafina for strong late-night cocktails and heavy wine pours to cut down on pricey Friday night Ubers. 1712 Connecticut Avenue NW — Tierney Plumb For a brand new brunch: D.C. has endless options when it comes to brunch , and the latest eatery to tack on the popular weekend meal is Georgetown’s months-old America Eats Tavern . Go for the Hangtown Fry (scrambled organic eggs, fried oysters, caramelized onion, bacon, oyster ketchup) or dessert waffles with macerated strawberries, and bourbon vanilla ice cream. While you’re there, cheers with mimosas to the fact its restaurateur-turned-humanitarian José Andrés just fed another devastated hurricane community in Florida through his nonprofit World Central Kitchen. 3139 M Street NW — TP For a Spanish-style Thanksgiving feast: Ser , located near the newly revitalized Ballston corridor, just unveiled a seasonal menu with impressive family-style platters. Groups can order roasted suckling goat or pig alongside Navarra potatoes and jus. Some cuts are so tender, they’re sliced using a plate’s edge — a traditional table side technique in Spain. Take a second to look up at its brand new ceiling; the restaurant shuttered a few weeks this summer after a pipe burst in the building — right as owners Christiana and Javier Candon ( Joselito Casa de Comidas ) were traveling on vacation to Spain. Now they’re planning a less-stressed family trip to Candon’s native country this Christmas. 1110 N Glebe Road, Arlington, Virginia — TP For new-to-town Peruvian: Pisco y Nazca has had a few months to work out any kinks since the Peruvian “Gastrobar” from Miami opened in Dupont Circle . Nearly half the menu was sampled at a recent exorbitant lunch, and missteps were minimal. Despite a lingering toughness that might’ve been corrected with a less aggressive sear, grilled beef heart anticuchos were a crowd-pleaser. Plancha pulpo, or octopus cooked on a flat top, had a pleasant char and a forgiving texture. Both the pisco sours and the ceviches resonated with the right balance of acidic tang. For dessert, order the pionono a la mode — a rolled sponge cake stuffed with wheels of dulce de leche and Nutella, crusted with caramelized sugar, and topped with Kahlúa ice cream. It’s worth the splurge. 1823 L Street NW, Washington, D.C. — Gabe Hiatt For old-school Italian in Maryland: D.C. residents who lament the lack of a classic Italian-American red-sauce joint haven’t been to Pasta Plus in Laurel, Maryland. That’s understandable, because it’s a trek, but the payoff is a meal from Abruzzo, Italy, natives who know exactly how fresh, bright, and sweet a marinara sauce should taste. The line quickly fills up a narrow hallway and spills out of the front door, but it moves quickly. Fried calamari comes with that tomato sauce, and while the squid is lightly battered and salted well enough, eating the marinara straight with a spoon is equally enjoyable. Gamberi Fra Diavolo (spicy shrimp pasta) had a fresh, fortified shellfish flavor that suggested shrimp stock was swimming in the white wine sauce. There’s a pizza oven, and some couples elect to eat a slice of pie as an appetizer before packing the rest to take home. A mountainous calzone comes out looking fit for two people — or maybe just one if you’re Bill Addison . 209 Gorman Avenue, Laurel, Maryland — GH Friday, September 7 For a meaty affair: Old Town’s Brabo Brasserie debuted a new steak frites program this summer that’s still going strong, featuring four varieties of dry-aged butcher cuts from Creekstone Farms. Its gregarious chef Sebastien Rondier whips up seasonal sauces designed for dunking fries, including dijon made with whole grain mustard, a spicy harissa aioli, and whipped mayonnaise. 1600 King St, Alexandria, Va. — Tierney Plumb For yoga and with a side of tapas: Barcelona Wine Bar , proving it’s not just all about boozing up its 14th Street NW clientele, is hosting a yoga class on Saturday, September 8 followed by juice offerings and a light breakfast buffet. Tickets are $20. Can’t make it? There’s also a second session scheduled for Saturday, September 22. 1622 14th Street NW — TP For an Asian-themed fete: Celebrity chef Edward Lee just transformed the upstairs bar and lounge at his Southern-style Succotash Penn Quarter into Mr. Lee’s, a bar inspired by lively night markets in Asia and his Korean heritage. The colorful pop-up integrates produce plucked from the Penn Quarter farmer’s market. Asian plates ($9 to $24) include hand-cut noodles with beef-black bean sauce and dumplings stuffed with duck confit or sweet potato and edamame. The waiters know how to curate a good time — and will likely keep the sake pours coming. 915 F Street NW — TP Friday, August 31 For a French feast inside Union Market: Those daring enough to brave weekend crowds at Union Market should head to La Petite Lou Lou, which just solidified a permanent spot inside the sprawling Northeast food hall. The Purcellville, Va.-based Parisian crêperie and cafe features chef Stefano Frigerio’s French menu packed with airy croissants, quiches, and sweet and savory crêpes ($4 to $18). The whimsical 150-square-foot installation encourages day drinking, thanks to addicting apricot spritzes and frozen passion fruit mimosas. 1309 Fifth Street NE (next to DC Empanadas) — Tierney Plumb For Latin American hot dog: Shaw’s all-day cafe The Royal just reopened after a quick break, complete with new art and an expanded kitchen. A best seller is the colorful Bird Dog, featuring house chicken and poblano sausage, red chimichurri, sweet chili aioli, avocado, and grilled cabbage. And on Labor Day, the dog is discounted to $8 during its 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. happy hour. Wash it down with a $3 Miller High Life or $7 daiquiri. 501 Florida Avenue NW — TP For a revitalized restaurant: Downtown’s glitzy Mirabelle returned this month with a new chef manning the menu. Keith Bombaugh whips up inventive dishes like a tagliatelle made on-site, showered in summer truffle, parmesan cream, and hazelnut. And the impeccably presented poached Maine lobster with baby corn and a shoot salad comes alongside a crumbly bacon-hazelnut “sand” — reminding diners of Bombaugh’s background at Grant Achatz’s imaginative Alinea in Chicago. Ask general manager and wine director Jennifer Knowles for a glass of Chateau Guirard to wrap up the meal. While it’s a splurge ($25), the 13-year-old white dessert wine is a relatively rare find. 900 16th Street NW — TP For a timely D.C. drink: The Hay-Adams’ subterranean Off The Record bar consistently remains a good call for a night cap right across from the White House. Meet a new neighbor while planting a draft beer atop one of many satirical political coasters, like a new caricature of Sarah Huckabee Sanders flanked by blue Twitter logos. Feel free to pop one — or a few — in your pocket (the accommodating bartenders don’t mind). 800 16th Street NW — TP Friday, August 17 For a cup of Joe from Jeff: Prolific restaurateur Jeff Black ( Pearl Dive , BlackSalt ) debuted Black Coffee with his wife, Barbara, in the Palisades this spring. The all-day java gem has been perking up its sleepy Northwest neighborhood ever since, offering items like a fried egg breakfast sandwich with an airy brioche bun alongside house-cut fries. Spot the soft accents throughout the welcoming space, like a pink espresso machine and magenta-toned walls leading to the bathroom. A new daily happy hour on its turquoise patio (4 p.m. to 6 p.m.) includes seasonal bruschetta and calamari. 4885 MacArthur Boulevard NW — Tierney Plumb For a scenic sip: All-Purpose Navy Yard quietly debuted its rooftop bar last month, and as of this week, the casual addition overlooking the Anacostia is firing on all cylinders. The 50-seat respite, flanked by a red-and-white canopy, high top seating, wicker chairs, and growing ivy, offers a condensed menu featuring Italian hits from the months-old restaurant below. Go with the fried mozzarella, tomato-braised meatballs, and one of its signature pies that made Washington Post restaurant critic Tom Sietsema an instant All-Purpose fan years ago. Wash down the carbs with the ubiquitous drink of the season: an Aperol spritz. 79 Potomac Avenue SE — TP For a summer body bite: Plant-based eatery Fruitive in CityCenter is constantly filled with health-conscious workers, tourists, and locals any day of the week. Its avocado toast remains its destination dish, but another go-to lunch option is its Southwest wrap, stuffed with hummus, romaine, tomatoes, cucumber, avocado, wild rice, black bean corn salsa, and vegan ranch. Look for its next D.C. location arriving downtown in early fall. 1094 Palmer Alley NW — TP Friday, August 3 For macaroni and tiki time: Capitol Hill’s Barrel is a dual venture these days, with its downstairs space transformed into the tropical-themed Politiki bar for the summer. It just joined D.C.’s month-long annual Tiki Trail , serving strong elixirs out of specially-made ceramic mugs that resemble presidents of past and present. Before heading down there to imbibe, fuel up on Barrel’s gooey macaroni and cheese and famed fried chicken. 613 Pennsylvania Avenue SE — Tierney Plumb For a deconstructed In-N-Out Burger: The Ritz-Carlton’s Westend Bistro just released a new happy hour menu (Tuesday to Friday, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.), and for a high-end hotel restaurant, the bar bites are a steal. Go with the duck wings dripping in a honey glaze ($8 for six), Maryland blue crab hushpuppies ($8), and addicting truffle popcorn ($4). The priciest order is the $12 “Animal Style” cheesy fries with chunks of meat — inspired by countless In-N-Out burgers chef de cuisine Alvin Dela Cruz devoured while working in California at The Ritz-Carlton, Half Moon Bay. He stays trim as an instructor at Crossfit in Old Town, but customers can burn burger calories at the Equinox upstairs or Squash on Fire across the street. 1190 22nd Street NW — TP For award-winning paella: Glover Park’s Slate Wine Bar draws a steady stream of regulars for its 200 types of wine, but the six-year-old neighborhood restaurant is also known for its paellas. Hands-on chef and owner Danny Lledó is competing in the international paella finals next month in Spain, so he’s constantly in the kitchen these days trying to perfect his recipes. On a recent visit, he suggested pairing paella with Merry Edwards pinot noir from Sonoma Country, where he splits his time (his wife works in San Francisco’s tech world). D.C.’s unseasonal amount of rain has had an interesting effect on business: He says he can’t remember another summer he sold this much red wine. 2404 Wisconsin Avenue NW — TP For a buzzy brunch: The Line hotel’s Brothers and Sisters is on everyone’s lips — including Bon Appétit’s — and for good reason. The stylish interior makes diners feel like a million bucks, and though prices aren’t low, they aren’t insane either. The avocado salad is a must; it sounds boring but it’s so freaking good. Save room for the restaurant’s cakes — made by apparent genius Pichet Ong — because they’re worth the splurge. The London (a crepe cake with Earl Gray cream) is by far my personal favorite. The restaurant also just introduced afternoon tea . Guh. 1770 Euclid Street NW — Alison Baitz To rosé this way: Bethesda stalwart Black’s Bar & Kitchen just made summer even better with the installation of a brand new outdoor rosé bar. Yeah, there’s food — flatbread with strawberries and mascarpone, brie with vegetable crudite — but that’s not the real draw. Ten rosés will be on offer, as will rosé popsicles. The bar opens Friday, August 3 and runs through September. 7750 Woodmont Ave., Bethesda, Md. — AB Friday, July 27 For a banh mi in Old Town : Be prepared to write your name down on Caphe Banh Mi ’s list to wait for a table, because this tiny place off King Street is a big draw for neighbors craving pho and pork belly banh mi. The filling sandwich is nestled into a perfectly-sized wire basket and overflowing with fresh cilantro. Even though it’s seriously humid out, that didn’t stop diners from ordering noodle soup here either. 407 Cameron St, Alexandria, Va. — Adele Chapin For a pasta party: Two-year-old Hank’s Pasta Bar is an ideal spot to curb carb cravings in Alexandria. The seasonal “Jamie’s Favorite” spaghetti primavera, named after Hank’s owner Jamie Leeds, packs in the highlights of the summer (zucchini, squash, asparagus, cremini mushrooms, olives, corn, cherry tomatoes, basil, marinara, and parmesan). The best seat in the house is a super soft leather couch, designed to let guests sink as they drink. Ask to sample wines sourced from Northern Italy, as there may be some left over from a Piedmont-themed wine dinner on Thursday night. 600 Montgomery Street, Alexandria, Va. — Tierney Plumb For some crabby eats: The popularMaryland blue crab spaghettini is back at DBGB City Center, and crab also makes its way into a stuffed whole branzino for two. Its NYC-based celebrity chef Daniel Boulud has been all over town this week, fresh off of watching his country’s World Cup win at his family’s home in Lyon. He proceeded to cook a media dinner at RdV Vineyards in Delaplane, Va. before heading to Capitol Hill to taste test the menu his daughter and her wedding party will soon eat at Charlie Palmer Steak . (Make it there? Try chef Mike Ellis’ crab-stuffed squash blossoms.) 931 H Street NW — TP Friday, July 20 For one night in Spain: As the Columbia Room staff waits in New Orleans to hear if they’ve snagged the “Best American Bar Team” award at the 2018 Spirited Awards, chef Johnny Spero is taking over on Saturday, July 21 with a Spanish menu inspired by beloved neighborhood bars he frequented while living and working in San Sebastian. Wash down bites like shishito peppers and uni tortillas with Anxo ciders, sherry wines, and a “Johnny G&T” with BWC Shot Tower Gin, San Pellegrino tonic, and allspice bitters. 124 Blagden Alley NW — Tierney Plumb To load up before a picnic: Chevy Chase’s quaint Brookville Supermarket is an ideal — and cheap — stop to grab lawn-friendly fare, with a back deli that makes an assortment of to-go options and sandwiches on the spot. On a recent trip, creamy slaw, colorful pasta salad, and chicken breast rang in under $7. Forget to grab cold beer? It’s conveniently located right next to the checkout line. 7027 Brookville Road, Chevy Chase, Md. — TP For a smoking meal: Toki Underground is experimenting with a smoker this summer to come up with new dishes like smoked salmon steam buns. Its owner has also been playing around with smoke to recreate a butter cod dish he had in Denmark this year. Toki’s also smoking togarashi, a Japanese chili powder mix, to make Japanese chorizo. The newly expanded summer menu is also packed with lots of vegan options. Try the shiitake and cashew dan dan noodles or bright avocado and beet soup with chilled ramen, pickles, summer vegetables, and grilled tofu. 1234 H Street NE — TP July 13, 2018 For a French-themed weekend: Bastille Day falls on Saturday, July 14 — the day before its country takes on Croatia for a potential World Cup win — and Ladurée Georgetown is whipping up a special French flag-decorated pastry to mark both historic events. The hazelnut biscuit with strawberries and vanilla mousseline cream, covered with red velvet, is $8 at the pastry counter and $11 for diners. 3060 M Street NW — Tierney Plumb For hot dogs away from MLB-related craziness: D.C. is overflowing with MLB All-Star attendees , so one out-of-town option for baseball grub is dining at Towson, Md. newcomer College Town Dogs . The tiny late-night hangout slings hot dogs slathered in a spicy meat sauce — a recipe from the Greek diner chef Nick Ascione worked at as a teen (hot dogs also hail from his native Rochester, N.Y.). His five-year-old goldendoodle, Sammy, is the dog-themed eatery’s logo and mascot — and the inspiration behind popular “garbage bowls” loaded with mac and cheese and fries. Still need a baseball fix? The Orioles are playing on their home turf this weekend. 7 E. Chesapeake Avenue, Towson, Md. — TP For a cool summer bite: Longtime downtown Italian eatery Bibiana switched things up this year by modernizing the restaurant and hiring executive chef Loris Navone from Miami, who naturally knows how to cool off hot customers. His new chilled summer menu, available through the end of the month, includes picks ($11 to $36) like watermelon gazpacho with tuna crudo, burrata and caper dust and tagliolini with compressed caviar, vodka, and crème fraîche sauce. 1100 New York Avenue NW — TP July 6, 2018 For queso: The $7.95 Poblano’s queso dip looks (and smells) so intoxicating that once Eater ordered it at Taqueria Poblano in Del Ray, every table in the vicinity also ordered it. The smooth melted cheese blend is studded with chorizo and then broiled before diners dive in with tortillas and chips. Find it at Taqueria Poblano’s Arlington location too. 2400-B Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria, Va. and 2503A N Harrison St., Arlington, Va. — Adele Chapin For a mini staycation: The Hyatt House on the Wharf houses a cute and compact lobby-level drinking destination dubbed H Bar. Take the drink to go and walk outside to its wraparound patio to soak up sun (and soak up the alcohol with H Bar’s antibiotic-free chicken or Korean tacos). Craving higher views of the boat-filled Southwest waterfront? Across the way, the Canopy by Hilton’s rooftop Whiskey Charlie bar is a prime spot to perch and people watch during the Wharf’s first official summer. 725 Wharf Street SW — Tierney Plumb For TGIF time: Columbia Heights’ resident beer garden Midlands features a live music act every Friday at 9 p.m. (last week’s band was rocking out some awesome renditions of Eagles, Tom Petty, and Counting Crows songs). And with a roster of beers from all over the globe, it’s also a top pick for watching the World Cup — as is NoMa’s Wunder Garten . (Speaking of, yours truly is chatting about D.C.’s beer garden boom on WTOP on Saturday, July 7.) 3333 Georgia Avenue NW — TP June 29, 2018 For frozen treats with a side of history: It’s much too old to make any sort of heatmap . And there’s nothing innovative about adding candy/cookies/fruit to ice cream. Still, locals line up every night at 50-plus-year-old Kline’s Freeze with their kids/extended family/friends for lots and lots of soft serve, yes. But also for a taste of how things used to be. Kids wander around with dripping cones; young couples split thick, cookie dough-spiked shakes; and grandparents joke about earning the right to eat whatever they want as they dig into fudge-covered sundaes. Good times. 8200 Centreville Road, Manassas, Va. — Warren Rojas For an Indian feast: Logan Circle’s color-soaked newcomer Pappe has been packed since opening earlier this month , and Eater recently found out why. Dishes are consistently good across the board, with some — like the vindaloo — featuring more fire than others (luckily water-holding waiters are always on standby). And pretty much any order pairs well with the addicting basmati rice. One of the best parts of the dining experience is the details; the smoked black lentils, for instance, are served in an ornate copper cup. Star anise is, well, a star in many dishes — from the braised lamb curry to flavorful cocktails to creme brûlée. 1317 14th Street NW — Tierney Plumb For a satisfying snack while being athletic : Like most hotel restaurants, Pinea serves all the high-end fare (gourmet burgers, something tartare, monster steaks) tourists/lobbyists don’t think twice about dropping big bucks on. But nobody’s interested in novelty dishes while playing bocce on the patio. Enter the easy to digest “afternoon” menu, which features handheld delights such as beef carpaccio brightened by balsamic vinegar and piquant radishes, and crab cake sandwiches sporting caper-spiked mayo. 515 15th Street NW — WR For a ridiculous amount of pancakes: There’s no better time than the Fourth of July to celebrate America’s art of over-eating and drinking. Pennsylvania 6 is serving endless red, white, and blue pancakes for brunch this weekend, topped with strawberries, whipped cream, and blueberries for $9.50. Pair the comical pancake portion with its bottomless mimosa bar, which is half off. (For more brunch inspiration, check out our newly updated heatmap ). 1350 Eye Street NW — TP June 22, 2018 For a pick-me-up after play time : Worn out from executing gory fatalities on Mortal Kombat 3 or scoring turkeys in mini-bowling at NoMa’s new Eleanor ? The game-filled bar’s got just the thing. The drinks team has come up with two refreshing swizzles, including one crushed ice-filled creation combining local rum, wildly fragrant falernum, and spicy bitters. Hungry? A deli-style sandwich layered with creamy chicken liver mousse, savory fried mortadella, and tangy Russian dressing hits the spot. 100 Florida Avenue NE — Warren Rojas For an aquatic adventure: Wharf newcomer Lupo Marino is a refreshing addition to the Southwest waterfront, with a rustic and European look that transports diners across the globe. Go with the bright spaghetti verde (the owner’s favorite) with wild pork carbonara, cured egg yolk, and still-in-season pickled ramps. The pillowy gnocchi is also a good call. This week, the restaurant got a surprise celebrity guest: Modern Famil y’s Ty Burrell. 40 Pearl Street SW — Tierney Plumb For prime rooftop drinking: The soaring views atopW hotel’s rooftop bar POV never get old. And now there are new summer drinks ($17 each) to try. The Cali Shandy combines Absolut Elyx, spiced watermelon shrub, and Corona in a twist on micheladas, while the Royal Derby marries bourbon and Earl Grey-mint foam. Need a snack? The bar swaps in crunchy chicharrones for crackers in its charcuterie plates. 515 15th Street NW — TP For a blast from the past — and a taste of the future : The years-long renovation of cherished dive bar Quarry House Tavern is nothing short of amazing. The subterranean watering hole as been faithfully restored since the fire, welcoming back regulars with dim lighting, fabulously kitschy decor, and rock-punk records in the vintage jukebox. Baskets of fried tater tots still hit just about every table; spice things up with a side of the fiery Korean barbecue dipping sauce. And there’s plenty of specialty burgers to choose from — including the option to swap in a plant-based Impossible Burger that mimics meat better than other vegetarian substitutes. 8401 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring, Md. — WR For a change of pace on the noodle front: Akira Ramen , which opened last year in Rockville, Maryland, just added a lineup of udon and soba offerings. Consulting chef Shuichi Kotani is behind the new menu and spent a week training staff in the art of making mori (plain cold soba) and gluten-free towari. Debut dishes like seasonal vegetable tempura, and fried pork are served along side cold noodles with dipping sauces. Another go-to order is the uni and salmon roe with grated radish, also served with udon. Up next: adding green tea noodles into the mix. 1800 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Md. — TP June 15, 2018 For not-your-average bar snacks in Georgetown: New beer hall Church doesn’t just pour giant brews. The kitchen now serves Mexican-style street corn ($4) chef Justin Clements tells Eater his Latin American line cooks have signed off on. And the lightly fried sweet potato tots served with roasted garlic dip and harissa ketchup ($8) are a nice departure from traditionally super-greasy varieties. Need a drink? The Interlude Saison from Maine’s Allagash Brewery Company is refreshingly sweet. 1070 Wisconsin Avenue NW — Tierney Plumb For a celebrity sighting and dining: Georgetown mainstay Cafe Milano has proven that old school spots can keep reinventing themselves. This month, the Italian eatery has welcomed everyone from the Stanley Cup-winning Washington Capitals to actress Suzanne Somers. A recent bowl of creamy fusilli, packed with fava beans and artichokes, was a filling lunch order without overdoing it. Take a seat at the airy bar and take in the sights for one last time; management tells Eater the restaurant is going to get a big month-long makeover in late July — its first since 2000. 3251 Prospect Street NW — Tierney Plumb For underwater vibes in suburbia: Fair Oaks Mall’s sushi-centric Kona Grill is an ideal break from typical shopping center fare. There’s a mesmerizing 800-gallon aquarium, lots of TVs to catch the World Cup, and a breezy bar that spills outside. The “angry” edamame order ($6) is super hot, slathered in a spicy sauce. Still, it’s hard not to devour the whole bowl. 11724 Fair Oaks Mall, Fairfax, Va. — TP For award-winning cocktails and more: Shaw’s Espita Mezcaleria — which just took home the Rammy for best cocktail program of the year — is tasty as ever. The vegetarian-friendly mole verde — made with spiced broccoli, chintextle trumpet mushroom, romanesco, and eggplant — was just added to the menu, as was a colorful and beautifully presented ceviche featuring hamachi, pickled cherry, cacao, and pomegranate. Agave-fueled cocktails are super strong and packed with unlikely ingredients that somehow work together. Try the Tehuana Girl, made with mezcal, honey, wheat beer, lemon, yellow chartreuse, and elderflower. 1250 9th Street NW — TP June 8, 2018 For a full-on pork carnival : The latest Filipino restaurant to break into the local dining scene may be the most accessible option yet. New arrival Kuya Ja’s doesn’t have a PR team or a fancy location — its quick-service eatery has just a handful of tables — but it does have slow cooked pork with audibly crunchy skin and insanely buttery meat. The featured belly is sold in half-pound portions at a time, and sales are currently capped at two pounds per person. ”At least until we get a bigger kitchen,” staff says of the safeguards they’ve put in place so early risers don’t cart off all the lechon first thing in the morning. 5268-H Nicholson Lane, Rockville, Md . — Warren Rojas For a quick bite next to the Stanley Cup’s new home: Fast-casual Honeygrow in Chinatown just brought back the brand’s Chesapeake crab stir-fry. The seafood treat is served in newly released Chinese takeout-style boxes sporting a hip design from a female Philly-based street artist. Pro tip: leftovers taste just as great cold. 716 Seventh Street NW — Tierney Plumb For a Mexican meal that just won’t stop : Restaurateur Ivan Iricanin got locals comfortable with trying different Serbian dishes at Ambar by making it as easy as possible to sample things regret-free via all-you-can-eat deals. He’s doing the same at airy Buena Vida — just that know he sends out endless plates of meatballs sprinkled with cotija cheese, creamy guacamole, gourmet tacos, and more. A bottomless brunch option, which debuted June 2, keeps fruity drinks coming including mimosas, sangrias, and bloody marys. Soak it all up with a pork-poblano chile hash that sports nice pineapple kick or enchiladas filled with sweet corn and crab meat. 8407 Ramsey Avenue, Silver Spring, Md . — WR Buena Vida’s all-you-can-eat brunch includes bacon-laced quesadillas, oddly sweet fried chicken, heary taco hash, and more. Warren Rojas/Eater DC For a happy hour (sorta): D.C.’s debut Nobu opened last fall, but its weekday happy hour is fairly new. Prices are a little comical — “discounted” bites are still around $10 — but $6 bottles of imported Sapporo are sort of a steal. The best part about the two-hour deal (5 p.m. to 7 p.m.) is the people watching at the sleek wooden bar: the clientele is a hodgepodge of tourists, well-dressed West End lawyers winding down, and hot dates. 2525 M Street NW — TP June 1, 2018 For a Gallic take on a favorite snack : Many local diners are diehard Neapolitan pizza fans. Others swear by New York-style pies. How about some love for French pizza? Not the baguette-like stuff found in the frozen food section at the grocery store. But the savory bacon-onion tart at Central remains a thing of beauty. From the cracker thin crust to the squiggles of fresh cream, every bite is a delight. 1001 Pennsylvania Avenue NW — Warren Rojas For a TGIF picnic : Every Friday this summer, the centrally-located Mayflower is rolling out a to-go picnic spread complete with a blanket. The picnic is tied to the nearby (free) Friday Golden Cinema series in Farragut Park. Picnic picks (four for $24 or six for $32) include a tapenade trio, a charcuterie and cheese plate, or a tried-and-true assortment of movie theater candy such as Sour Patch Kids or Swedish Fish. The June 1 feature is The Post, with a special pre-movie talk by former Washington Post executive editor Leonard Downie, who consulted on the award-winning film. 1127 Connecticut Ave NW — Tierney Plumb For day drinking for professionals: Barracks Row’s resident rooftop gin bar the Betsy might have D.C.’s most impressive gin collection in town, with 40 different brands and 40 gin and tonic combos. A solid choice is the Plymouth Navy Strength Gin, a 114 proof gin paired with apple, lemon twist, a blueberry ice cube, and Q Grapefruit tonic. Or go with the “I’m Still Ginny From the Block” with Glendalough gin. On Saturday, June 9, the gin bar is taking over sibling restaurant Belga Cafe ; look for gin giveaways and a signature gin and tonic. 514 8th Street SE — TP For a family-style feast: D.C.’s newest the Smith is buzzing with business, granting U Street NW a needed large-scale gathering place to eat and drink. Head to the glossy-tiled bar for a frozen French 75, then sit at one its airy street-facing tables to absorb all the action going by. For the main event, splurge on the lobster paella or split a spicy pepperoni pizza. The tangy ceviche is also a good call. FYI: Nightly weekend specials include scallops on Friday, short ribs on Saturday, and chicken Parmesan on Sunday. 1314 U Street NW — TP For street food with a bit of polish : Burgeoning chain Bartaco recently set up shop in Mosaic District ; next up: moving into Ballston’s forthcoming Quarter Market food hall . The casual taqueria serves small but flavorful selections including cauliflower sparked by zesty romesco sauce, grilled pork belly brushed with tangy chile sauce, and fried cod nestled in chipotle slaw. Wash it all down with a refreshing, grapefruit-laced paloma. 2920 District Avenue, Fairfax, Va . — WR More From Eater DC

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Organic Shastra Coriander Powder – 100 gms

Organic Shastra Coriander Powder – 100 gms Coriander powder adds a distinctive taste to all cuisines. Organic Tattva’s Coriander powder is known for it’s freshness, purity and distinctive taste. Health Benifits • It has a cooling effect on the stomach • It has pain relieving properties • Enhances blood circulation Product Description Details Coriander powder is extracted from the seeds of the coriander plant. It lends a mild flavour and aroma to food. Coriander powder is widely used in South Indian preparations such as rasam, kara kuzhambu, vegetable preparations, etc. It is an important ingredient of many curries and gravies as it has a mild aroma that pampers the tastebuds and also incites the appetite. Ground coariander also adds a pleasant taste to pancake and waffle mixtures. Bulk Order
If you are interested in bulk ordering, please contact us at Product Reviews You’re reviewing: Organic Shastra Coriander Powder – 100 gms How do you rate this product? *

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Are you ready for the Curry Cup?

I have a penchant for Indian cuisine. I remember watching my grandmother prepare an assortment of curries for guests when I was younger. As they tucked in their faces lit up with satisfaction.
But, often even the grandmothers need a night off from cooking.
If you, like me, are in search of Indian cuisine that reminds you of home, then I suggest you pay a visit to Vasco’s Resturant at the Hilton Hotel in Durban on a Saturday night.
Their Curry Cup buffet evenings have warmed the hearts of many happy diners as they showcase a range of Indian delicacies that are fresh, spicy and oh so good!
I must admit that I was quite sceptical when I got an invite from Hilton to try out their new buffet option.
The table is set. I was not sure whether I would have liked the meal offerings, considering other Indian restaurants in Durban have always left a bad taste in my mouth.
The Curry Cup evening was quite the opposite. From the time you step in, you are bowled over by staff dressed in saris and the soothing Indian music that plays in the background.
Curry Cup is a new concept similar to the Flavours of the East evenings they hosted last year.
On arrival, guests will be served Bombay Crush in a champagne glass, which might have been too fancy for me, but is a great way to start an evening of indulgence. There are wine and soft beverages available at an additional cost.
Entice your palette with their chilli powder laced pineapples. At R280 per person, guests can tuck into a three-course buffet without having to break the bank.
The food is phenomenal with loads of spices and flavours that we are accustomed to when we eat Indian food.
The potato puri was delightful. I must say the presentation was on another level. Start with their salads and condiments, or go straight to the potato puri (my favourite), samoosas and pizzas. Or you can entice your palette with their chilli powder laced pineapples.
There are four new curry options: Prawn Masala, Chicken Tikka Masala Angara, Shubnam curry and Lamb Masala.
Shabnam curry is one of the vegetarian offerings. The curries, prepared by Anis Ahmed, change every week. My favourite is the Prawn Masala and Shabnam curry ( a vegetable curry with chickpeas and mushroom).
Dessert, I found, sweet. There was vermicelli, a kind of rice pudding, and brownies. My favourite was the bite-sized burfee.
Located at 12-14 Walnut Rd, Durban Central. Call 031 336 8100

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One of the most influential and powerful endorsements for plant-based diets by the Lancelot Medical Journal to save the planet and feed the earth’s population. Yes, we’re on the right track!
Seven dietary changes to protect your health – and the planet
Consider a diet that can prolong your life and, at the same time, feed a growing global population without causing further damage to the environment.
That’s just what 37 scientists from 16 countries (the EAT-Lancet Commission) did for two years. Their findings resulted in recommendations for a healthy diet that can feed the world’s population from sustainable food systems and were published on Thursday in the medical journal The Lancet.
They recognize that food production needs to nourish human health and support environmental sustainability; currently, our food systems are threatening both. Strong evidence indicates that livestock farming is one of the biggest drivers of climate change, biodiversity loss, land degradation, water use and chemical pollution.
The “planetary-health diet,” largely plant-based and low in red meat and sugar, is estimated to feed 10 billion people by 2050 from sustainable food systems. The researchers also believe it will prevent 11 million premature deaths a year caused by an unhealthy diet.
WHAT’S IN THE DIET?
Daily protein comes mostly from plants including beans, lentils, soy and nuts. Whole grains, not refined, are included, and fruits and vegetables fill half of your plate at meals.
The recommended 2,500-calorie diet doesn’t completely eliminate animal foods. It can include, each day, one half-ounce of red meat, one ounce each of fish and poultry and one cup of milk or yogurt. One to five eggs can be eaten a week.
Plant-based oils are substituted for animal fats and added sugars are limited to 31 g a day, in line with the WHO recommendation for sweeteners.
IS IT FEASIBLE?
The planetary-health diet is a huge shift from the way we eat. But eating this way isn’t completely foreign.
The traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s was largely plant-based and contained only 35 g of red meat and poultry combined each day. Many traditional diets (e.g., West Africa, India, Mexico and parts of Asia) contain lots of plant protein and little meat or dairy.
Some people, though, feel that achieving this global diet isn’t feasible.
Not today; that’s for sure. Reaching these dietary targets by 2050, the EAT-Lancet Commission points out, will require policies that encourage healthier food choices, agriculture sustainability, stricter rules around governing of land and oceans and reducing food waste.
TRANSITIONING TO A SUSTAINABLE DIET AT HOME
In the meantime, there are small steps you can take on an individual level to move toward the planetary-health diet.
Replace meat with pulses. Substitute cooked brown or green lentils for half of the ground meat in meatloaf, meatballs, burgers, shepherd’s pie, stuffed peppers and marinara sauces.
Replace some of the meat in tacos and burritos with black beans or pinto beans. Reduce the amount of meat in chili and add extra kidney beans or chickpeas. Eventually, replace all of the meat with beans or lentils.
Replace cheese in sandwiches with hummus.
Use nuts to replace meat. Add almonds or cashews to a vegetable stir-fry instead of beef or chicken. For lunch, have a nut-butter sandwich instead of ham or turkey.
Boost plant protein at meals by tossing toasted nuts or pumpkins seeds into greens salads.
Set a target. Determine how many meatless meals you’ll eat each week and then build on that. Vegetarian chili, tofu stir-fry, salad with edamame, bean burgers, chickpea curry and lentil soup are protein- and nutrient-packed lunches and dinners.
Include plant-based breakfasts, too. Try a smoothie made with fruit, greens and soy or pea milk, whole grain toast with almond butter, oatmeal topped with nuts and berries, quinoa or millet porridge or scrambled tofu.
Pack in produce. Eat a mix of fruits and vegetables, at least five servings a day (one serving is one-half cup of cooked or raw vegetables, a half-cup of berries or one medium fruit). One-half of each meal should consist of these foods.
Consider your snacks. Making snacks 100-per-cent plant-based is an easy step to take. Choose fruit and nuts, homemade trail mix, vegetables and hummus, whole grain crackers with nut butter, soy/pea milk smoothies or soy lattes.
Rethink restaurants. You’ll find a variety of plant-based options at restaurants that specialize in ethnic cuisines such as Indian, Middle Eastern, Mexican, Japanese and Chinese.
Or, pick a plant-based restaurant near you and when travelling.
Reduce food waste. Shop for, store and repurpose foods to minimize waste at home. Avoid buying in bulk; purchase only what you need whenever possible.
Buy “ugly produce,” misshapen fruits and vegetables often thrown away by farmers and grocery stores. Use vegetable scraps to make soup stock.
Store leftovers at the front of the fridge so you don’t forget them; eat within three or four days.
sauce https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life…_Ppz3dDaAe3buE F*ck Cancer
Eat your veggies

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Could have been better

The beach Of course its convenient to have a private beach however the conditions of this one caused discomfort during our first few days- there are many rocks near the shore which could be cleaned up for a more aesthetic look, however caused no problem. It was the big rocks within the ocean that surrounded all of the swimming area available- we were afraid of getting hit against these rocks as the current was dragging us towards them and also it was relatively shallow in most areas. My mother did indeed get a few cuts from these rocks, later on though we got accustomed to this beach setting quickly, but I do believe some of these big rocks should be taken out to avoid any danger to guests, especially because we have been in other places like the Maldives thats also located in the Indian ocean and everything was cleared. The bar Live music every evening, range of drinks (including local rum), open till midnight- what more could we ask for? There were also times where I would wake up last, hence miss breakfast and when I asked the staff at the bar for a breakfast substitute…They delivered! Our only 2 suggestions would be that the menu for lunch be expanded (we found out on our last day that the other restaurant has a larger menu and we think it should be the bar that has more options, since its where most people have lunch) and also for the preparation for the New Year dinner be done further away from the main spots on the day or done earlier on, because we had to have our lunch accompanied by drilling (the construction took place exactly at the bar). Restaurants We enjoyed all 3- the Japanese one allowed us to sit with 2 strangers which was a fun experience and the meals themselves were a different take on the cuisine, for instance we were served sushi with: teriyaki, miso, sweet&spicy (and many more) sauces rather than just soy sauce. We have definitely been to Japanese restaurants where the food was more special though, but we realise that this is just a hotel restaurant and that its not based in Japan either. The other restaurant was lovely too, as their menu changed everyday so the variation was nice and they had Mauritian cuisine too! On our first day though, the service was rather slow but we told the staff this the following day and this was no longer a problem. We would just suggest inspecting the fruits for breakfast because we believe they are fresh, but they lack in taste especially the mangos. Our favourite one was ‘On the Rocks’ because we were right next to the ocean and the cuisine was the tastiest- I would suggest trying the Heart Palm salad. It would be great if another restaurant could be added but the three did suffice. Activities There are many water sports related ones like snorkeling, kayaking and water skiing, however to be able to explore other parts of Mauritius outside of our hotel we had to organize this with an outside guide. We would prefer if the hotel could offer these excursions themselves to make the organization process smoother. Spa My mum said her manicure was spectacular- she was very impressed! As for the improvements, there should be more cosmetics (2 different brands) and more variation in treatments- we would love it if they had the 3rd eye massage again! Rooms The night of our first day, our bathroom was full of insects- not any extremely large ones but I was definitely uncomfortable when they were flying around above me when I was taking a shower. However, we informed the staff the next day and they taped one of the doors and the problem was solved. We do suggest that to improve the conditions of the rooms, the doors should be taped up before the guests arrive. Moreover, there are two entrances to our room- one through the grass and one with a sidewalk. We found it uncomfortable to go through the one with the grass (which we went through more frequently because it was a faster way of getting to the beach), as we got leaves and dirt on our feet (we wore flip flops or sandals). We started to get used to this too and we realised that they water the grass so if there was a sidewalk, people would get wet. However the times for the grass to be watered could be regulated by the times people are walking on the sidewalk. Also, we were there for Christmas and I got a turtle scarf and small storage boxes which was very nice of the hotel! These compliments really do make the difference, therefore we think the hotel should continue doing this. Our last concern was the mosquitoes- there were special candles installed near the restaurants, but we noticed that the housekeeping staff left our doors when they were doing the cleaning. The hotel gave us a device to plug in against mosquitoes in our room, but we were still bit several times. Once again in other places there were chemicals sprayed in order to fully get rid of them. To conclude, we enjoyed our stay and the hotel was very nice! We do recommend staying here, but improvements can be made to turn this from a good hotel to an excellent one!

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Food Safari Kuala Lumpur 2019

This Food Safari Kuala Lumpur 2019 is our fifth food safari of Kuala Lumpur in the last seven years.
Check out previous blog posts below: Food Safari Kuala Lumpur 2017 – A blog post on 22 specific food recommendations around Kuala Lumpur. Food Safari Kuala Lumpur 2015 – A blog post of the top 20 eats in Kuala Lumpur. Food Safari Kuala Lumpur 2014 – A series of 10 individual blog posts on top eats in Kuala Lumpur. Food Safari Kuala Lumpur 2013 – A series of 12 individual blog posts covering top eats in Singapore and Kuala Lumpur.
Our Instagram feed also provides a quick reference to our daily food indulgence.
During this one-week food safari in Kuala Lumpur, Mysaucepan and I tasted some of KL’s best-loved restaurants, famed for its take on a melting pot of local Malay, Chinese and Indian cuisine.
We savoured the culinary creativity of local Malaysian chefs compared to the traditional take on Cantonese food by seasoned Hong Kong chefs in Sydney’s Chinese restaurants. Whilst Chinese food in Sydney is generally good with age-old Cantonese and northern Chinese dishes, Malaysian Chinese food should be commended for breaking traditional norms with new flavours and textures.
With so much good food and so little time, we tried planning every breakfast, lunch, dinner and supper so that we could sample as much of the local fare as possible.
Alas, this is a summary of forty eight dishes which I thought worthy of all the calories. We also found that good food tastes even better because we shared it with our family and friends.
And indeed, writing this blog post means reliving the glorious week of feasting with our loved ones. Restaurant Hung Kee
1. Malaysian style wanton noodles Malaysian style wanton noodles with wanton and char siew RM5.50 / A$1.80
Located on Jalan Loke Yew, Restaurant Hung Kee is a sixty-year old institution famous for its Malaysian style wanton mee .
The noodles are fresh with a firm, toothy bite but they become legendary when tossed with Hung Kee’s savoury sweet char siew sauce. Delicious yet true to infamously small Malaysian servings, I can literally chow down this plate of noodles within thirty seconds.
Succulent wantons in its silky smooth skin paired with pickled green chillies in soy sauce add a tangy edge that makes me more hungry as I devour this plate of noodles.
And to think I have yet to dig my chopsticks into a plate of mouth-watering char siew in front of me!
2. Malaysian char siew Malaysian style char siew RM20 / A$6.60
Hung Kee’s char siew is literally charred with glorious smoky aromas.
Combined with chunks of fat and semi lean meat that literally melts in the mouth, every morsel is an eye-closing moment. Loong Grilled Fish Seafood
3. Grilled salt and pepper crab Grilled salt and pepper crab
“Let me book you two for dinner on Monday” says our long-time friend Priscilla.
“Okay, but don’t you take me to fancy schmancy restaurants coz I just want simple and delicious local food okay! I reply.
Thanks to Priscilla and Constance , our dinner at Loong Grilled Fish and Seafood is truly an unforgettable meal. Another dear darling Taki was so kind to pick up Mysaucepan and I from our home and after battling the infamous KL traffic for about an hour in her car, we are rewarded with some of the most creative local fare we have eaten anywhere in town.
Grilled salt and pepper crab is deliciously succulent and sweet right down to its shells licking good. BYO Prosecco and champagne glasses
One of the things I truly love about casual, open air restaurants in Malaysia is exactly what it is – its casualness where we can rock up in our Tshirt, shorts and thongs in addition to copious amounts of alcohol where there is 0 (yes that’s a zero) corkage charge.
Being the party girls they are, Constance and Priscilla come well prepared with the grog and wine glasses. A bottle of Prosecco is enough to set the dinner party off with more whites and reds to follow.
4. Chinese new year raw fish salad Yue sang with raw salmon, pomelo, pear and an assortment of other goodies
It is not quite Chinese New Year yet but it never too early to have a delicious low sang with raw salmon, pomelo and small batons of crunchy nashi pear all mixed together with a sweet and tangy plum sauce.
Best of all, this is quite the versatile Chinese salad that can be washed down with sparkling white or light red wines!
5. Malaysian style chilli crab Malaysian style chilli crab
We almost take for granted how delicious the good old chilli crab is in KL among so many new dishes. Malaysian style chilli crab
The lady boss at Loong advises us on whether to opt for male or female crabs depending on the style of cooking.
She was right because this piece of female crab with its bright orange roe in special chilli-egg sauce is absolutely orgasmic to say the least.
6. Michael Jackson black and white tofu “Michael Jackson black and white tofu”
“Michael Jackson black and white tofu” is yet another creative take on the humble soy protein.
“Black” is where squid ink has blackened chunks of crisp deep-fried tofu with a soft curd centre. Braised silken tofu with mince pork
“White” is a soft silken tofu pillow braised in a rich gravy with mince pork and tung choy or preserved Chinese cabbage.
7. Stir-fried sea whelks with snake beans Stir-fried sea whelks with snake beans
Sea whelks (a less scary term for sea snails) are sweet and crunchy.
Tossed with some ginger, garlic, chilli, dried shrimps, sambal and crunchy snake beans, this is yet another dish that escapes the creativity of Sydney chefs especially when we are blessed with a much greater variety of seafood.
8. Deep-fried baby squid with sweet spicy sauce Deep-fried baby squid with sweet spicy sauce
Thankfully for my tastebuds, these crunchy deep-fried baby squid are not as sweet as they look but rather a very appetizing snack to go with any kind of alcohol.
9. Chinese style pork two-ways Pork two-ways – 1. Crispy deep-fried strips
The chef at Loong might have thought a bunch of alcohol love nuts were coming to dinner tonight.
Crispy deep-fried pork strips with garlic and salt would be crazy good with an ice cold beer, especially in this humid KL weather. Pork two-ways – 2. Stir-fried pork strips with savoury sour plum sauce
Call this second method of cooking Chinese sweet and sour pork if you will.
Pork strips in a savoury sour plum sauce topped with diced raw Spanish onions and capsicum on a bed of sliced cucumber is yet another calling for an icy cold Tiger beer or a glass of crisp and zesty riesling.
10. Chinese bean curd two ways Bean curd two-ways – 1. Deep-fried with lotus root 2. Braised with fish paste
Bean curd two-ways is the third dish done in double take style tonight.
Whether Loong should be renamed Double Take or Two Way Food, I am beginning to think the creativity of its menu is marketing itself ahead of competitors in this Jinjang area of KL. 1. Been curd deep-fried with lotus root
Stuffed with a slice of lotus root and fried into golden brown fritters, this is a clever way to contrast crispy and delicate textures in one mouthful. 2. Bean curd braised with fish paste
Wrapped with a sheet of tofu skin and braised in a rich chicken gravy, this is upmarket yong tau foo in a casual setting with good wine thrown in.
11. Kai lan two ways Kai lan two ways
Yet again, the fourth two-way dish for tonight is kai lan stalks stir fried with shredded leaves deep fried into crispy chiffonade.
Topped with crispy anchovy fries, this is one of the best kai lan interpretations I have ever had.
12. Wok-tossed rice vermicelli with baby clams Wok-tossed rice vermicelli with baby clams
Deft technique with a hot work renders a rice vermicelli ridiculously smoky. Tossed with freshly julienne iceberg lettuce, egg and lala clams, this is yet another must-order dish at Loong.
13. Deep fried turmeric sting ray with sambal belachan Grilled turmeric sting ray with sambal belachan
Unlike ikan bakar or grilled fish from street hawkers, this stingray is marinated with turmeric and deep fried to a golden crisp.
The meat tears away in succulent strands though not smoky like its grilled counterpart. But with a squeeze of fresh calamansi juice and sambal sauce with raw Spanish onions, it rivals any deep fried fish in taste and texture. Kedai Makan Sow Mui
14. Kuala Lumpur style Char kway teow meen Kuala Lumpur style Char kway teow meen RM7 / A$2.30
This KL (not Penang) style char kway teow meen is arguably the best in Kuala Lumpur.
Unlike Penang style CKT, this one does not complicate with unnecessary lup cheong and is darker with black sauce compared to the lighter Penang style.
Deliciously charred & smoky noodles from a fiery wok tossed with egg, nuggets of crispy pork lard & plump blood cockles, this is my fourth plate in just about as many days as I just cannot get enough of it!
15. Roti canai with fish curry sauce Roti canai with fish curry sauce RM2.50 / A$0.80 for 2 pieces
Roti canai in KL is slightly different from roti prata in Singapore although both are essentially the same thing.
Mysaucepan being Singaporean prefers her roti prata in Singapore because it is crisp and flaky almost like a French croissant and I dislike Singapore’s roti prata for exactly the same reasons.
This roti canai is gently crisp outside but slightly chewy in the centre as Malaysian roti canai should be. Drizzled with a spicy tangy fish curry, I can eat two of these roti canai for breakfast every single day before tucking into nasi lemak and CKT for a second breakfast. Everyday! Home-cooked Thai style laksa
16. Home-cooked Thai style laksa Home-cooked Thai style laksa with all its condiments
I have not had this home-cooked favourite for a very long time and I am glad my sister requested for Thai style laksa during our family reunion this trip.
I lugged back to KL two medium sized Sydney barramundi fish where its flaky white meat pairs so perfectly with the spicy stock redolent of beautiful Thai flavours like lemongrass, galangal, coriander and torch ginger. Thai style laksa with julienne cucumber, pineapple, lemongrass, choy po and mint
The fragrance of lemongrass, bunga kantan and mint combined with freshly shredded pineapple, cucumber, choy po and calamansi juice is truly seductive and intoxicating. Restoran Fei Jay
This is another earth-shattering meal at what is affectionately known as “fei jay” or fat sister to my family. We have known the owner YP Koo or Pi jay and have been eating at her restaurant for many years .
Unfortunately, her husband who is the master chef passed away recently and her son is holding the fort temporarily. It is sad that Pi jay will be closing the restaurant for good after Chinese new year.
This is possibly our last meal here and it was spectacular as always.
17. Black pepper crab clab Black pepper crab clab
It may not be the biggest crab claw but this is one instance where size DOES NOT matter.
Because the black pepper ladened crab is one of the tastiest sauces, you will be licking the shells to get every bit of it. Black pepper crab RM300 / A$100
We are early today and are the only diners at the restaurant this late morning.
Quiet as it may be, total silence befall upon us as we tuck into this giant crab platter.
18. “Sa-teen” baby chicken “Sa-teen” baby chicken RM18 / A$6
“Sa-teen” baby chicken is one of my all-time favourites at Pi jay’s restaurant.
Deep-fried to a golden brown, this baby chicken is smaller than a spatchcock and three times tastier with its light seasoning of spices and soy sauce.
19. Special fish cake Special fish cake RM30 / A$10
Not many restaurants will serve fish cake on its own as a menu item but then again, Pi jay’s fish cake is like no other.
Crisp and golden brown on the outside, this fish cake is gently bouncy in the centre and absolutely heavenly when dipped into soy sauce and fresh red chillies.
20. Kwai fah noodles with egg and crab meat Kwai fah noodles with egg and crab meat RM150 / A$50
Kwai fah meen or yee meen is flash fried with egg and generous chunks of fresh crab meat.
This dish needs to be pre-ordered because the fresh crab meat needs to be handpicked. Kwai fah noodles with egg and crab meat
As she knows us so well, Pi jay tells us she has personally handpicked the crab meat for this dish today. I have eaten this noodles on a previous visit and it is still a must-order dish in this restaurant.
Thank you Pi jay for your generous hospitality and for giving us so many delicious and truly unforgettable meals. We know we will miss you and your food dearly! D Village View Restaurant
Perched along the foothills of Bukit Tinggi next to the Karak Highway, D Village View Restaurant is actually located in the state of Pahang near the township of Bentong which is approximately a hour’s drive from Kuala Lumpur CBD.
We would normally dine at this restaurant whenever we visit my brother and his family who lives within close vicinity. The food is excellent yet honest, consistent and at a fraction of KL prices.
The question that lingers in my mind is why aren’t Malaysian restaurants in Sydney offering simple home style dishes like these that would pair so well with the vast array of Australian wines??
Here is four of our perennial favourites.
21. Pork belly with spicy sweet sauce Pork belly with spicy sweet sauce
Though spicy sweet is not exactly my favourite taste, I will make good exception for this particular dish.
Thin and crispy slices of deep-fried pork belly and Spanish onions combine so well with this zingy sauce that is not overly sweet. This is a great dish to complement steamed rice and even better with plain congee on a cold day though these are few and far between in Malaysia’s tropical climate.
22. Crisp eggplant with salted egg yolk Crisp eggplant with salted egg yolk
Salted egg yolk seems to be the craze in KL’s food scene in recent years and I wonder why this trend has taken so long to come by.
From seafood such and crab and prawns to chicken and vegetables, salted egg yolk is used as a coating to add an intense umami taste.
These crisp and fluffy logs of eggplant coated in salted egg batter and flash fried with fresh curry leaves are extremely addictive.
Washed down with an icy cold beer on a hot summer day, these flavour bombs will definitely make the most popular bar snack in a Sydney pub.
23. Wild boar with spicy curry sauce Wild boar with spicy curry sauce
Surrounded by lush tropical rainforests, I imagine a healthy population of wild boar roaming around the vicinity of this restaurant that finds its way into the menu. Wild boar meat is generally darker, leaner and more intense in flavour compared to regular pork meat.
It is even more difficult to detect gaminess in flavour when these super tender wild boar slices are cooked in a rich curry sauce with fresh chilli and onions. This is yet another delicious Chinese dish that has taken on local Malaysian flavours.
24. Deep-fried chicken in coconut and turmeric sauce Deep-fried chicken in coconut and turmeric sauce
I love fried chicken but then again, who doesn’t?
The question is how do you spruce up fried chicken that is already so tasty to another level? Just like the other dishes that come with a sauce, perhaps this dish was conceived from sauce necessity for fried chicken to better complement steamed rice.
These golden brown pieces of fried chicken swimming in a pool of coconut and turmeric sauce can even pass off as Thai or Indonesian. But the genius flavour of this dish is the distinct aroma of fresh curry leaves that makes it rather unique.
Hearty leaves of iceberg lettuce is a clever to way to bridge the sauce and steamed rice in case fried chicken diehards are still not convinced. Restaurant De Maw
25. Jumbo prawns in spicy sweet barley and chilli sauce Jumbo prawns in spicy sweet barley and chilli sauce RM300 / A$100
Why would a chef think of combining barley pearls with prawns ? When you need to add bulk to temper a rich chilli sauce without overwhelming its flavour, the answer becomes quite logical.
These large prawns are firm, juicy and their size is almost a meal in itself. The rich sauce is spicy, generous and absolutely mouth-watering when mopped up with a hearty chunk of prawn meat.
So generous were they with this sauce, we could not let it go to waste. We ended up with a takeaway tub of sauce that was transformed into yet another dish at home when combined with soft tofu the next day.
26. Braised tofu with egg, oyster mushroom and crab meat Braised tofu with egg, oyster mushroom and crab meat RM120 / A$40
The art of a braised dish or stew is in the rich, silky sauce that ties all the ingredients together.
This is yet another elegant dish that combines the sweet flavour of crab meat with silky egg drops , soft tofu and the delicate texture of oyster mushroom .
27. Stir fried baby bok choy with crispy taro chips Stir fried baby bok choy with crispy taro chips RM50 / A$16
At first glance, I thought this dish was baby bok choy flash fried with tofu puffs.
On closer look, these square pieces are taro chips that add a crispy dimension to the crunchy fresh baby bok choy. Home-cooked bonanza
As much as we love dining at our favourite restaurants, we are lucky to also sample some of our favourite home cooked dishes prepared by my parents’ housekeeper, Ah Kum.
Here is just a sample of her mouth-watering dishes this trip.
28. Popo’s steamed taro and pork belly Popo’s steamed taro and pork belly
Steamed taro and pork belly is one of my late grandmother’s signature dish during Chinese new year. And thankfully, this recipe is not lost upon her passing and we fondly remember her whenever this dish is served.
Pork belly is gently deep fried before being cut into chunky slices and assembled with taro slices in a bowl to steam.
It is not quite Chinese new year yet but it sure feel like it when biting into a piece of this pork belly.
29. Chinese lup cheong and yun cheong Chinese lup cheong and yun cheong
Chinese new year is never the same without Chinese lup cheong and yun cheong or liver sausage.
I prefer the liver sausage as the flavour is more intense and the texture more crumbly than lup cheong. My mum tells us these sausages were given to her by a good friend and they are reputed to be the best in KL.
30. Wok-tossed prawns in spicy sweet sauce Wok-tossed prawns in spicy sweet sauce
These wok-tossed prawns are firm and sweet in a delectable spicy sweet sauce.
31. Cantonese style white cooked chicken Cantonese style white cooked chicken
I love this Cantonese style white cooked chicken that is accompanied by a spring onion and ginger condiment mixed with a hearty dollop of premium oyster sauce.
I wonder what took me so long to get this recipe from Ah Kum and she tells me the recipe is dead simple. I believe her because simple recipes are often the best ones too.
A whole, medium sized chicken without any seasoning is steamed for twenty five minutes in a wok on medium heat and then left covered in the wok to cool for about a hour. When the chicken is slightly warmer than room temperature, salt and shao xing wine is rubbed onto the chicken and then allowed to cool to room temperature. That’s it!
Obviously, the quality of the chicken is a pre-requisite to how good it tastes.
32. Abalone with broccoli and fried gluten Abalone with broccoli and fried gluten
I am not fond of vegetarian food simply because I love meat too much.
But I love this abalone with broccoli and fried gluten and convince myself it is vegetarian so I now have a reason to be fond of vegetarian food. Madras Lane, Petaling street
33. Curry mee with chicken curry and cockles Curry mee with chicken curry and cockles RM7 / A$2.30
This curry mee with chicken curry and cockles at Madras Lane is one of my favourites in KL.
Chicken curry on the bone and raw cockles gently cooking to medium rare in this gritty, curry powder soup makes it all the more tastier. Cauldron of simmering laksa stock with chicken curry and other ingredients
The owner of this stall recognizes me by face and knows I would invariably take photos of all her ingredients no matter how many times I have been here. Grand Imperial Restaurant
34. Braised tofu with mushrooms and baby bok choy Braised tofu with mushrooms and baby bok choy RM98 / A$33
It looks like a mushroom and baby bok choy dish at first glance.
But underneath this blanket of thinly sliced white buttons and shimeji mushrooms is a bed of flash fried silken tofu drowned in rich mushroom sauce. Laced with a garland of baby bok choy and sprinkled with crisp shredded dried scallops, this is fine Chinese vegetarian at its best.
35. Spanish style Iberico grilled spare ribs Spanish style Iberico grilled spare ribs RM400 / A$135
You would not expect Spanish style Iberico grilled spare ribs in a Chinese restaurant in KL. Neither did I.
A whole rib rack is plattered with a salad of cherry tomatoes, lettuce, capsicum and onion rings drizzled with a creamy salad dressing. Head waitress cutting up Iberico grilled spare ribs
Our waitress dutifully carves up the rib rack and presents a rib to each of us. Smoky and succulent – Iberico spare rib
Hand gloves are also provided for this dish in case you did not intend to mess up an expensive manicure.
The meat on this rib can be more tender and I found the herb seasoning quite strong. Still I find it rather unusual to be tucking into Spanish in a Chinese restaurant and wonder why a restaurant of this calibre can’t cook up a Chinese style pork rib.
And at RM400, I think this dish is rather overpriced.
36. Braised noodle with mushrooms and black truffle Braised noodle with mushrooms and black truffle RM252 / A$84 This is the second time I am tucking into a braised “mee pok” style noodles with mushrooms and black truffle at this restaurant.
And I can say with absolute confidence this is the best “pasta tartufo al funghi” I have tasted in any restaurant anywhere in the world, Italian and / or Chinese.
I do wonder if this “mee pok” is freshly made because it is impossibly al dente with a sprightly bite that rivals fresh pasta in the best of Italian restaurants in Sydney or Italy for that matter. The earthy and intoxicating aroma of black truffle takes centre stage among a trio of white button, shimeji and enoki mushrooms.
For me, this it a must-order dish at Grand Imperial. Restoran Oversea
37. Pork belly bun with crispy crackling and Chinese ham Pork belly bun with crispy crackling and Chinese ham RM12 / A$4 each
Call this Chinese hamburger if you will.
An earth-shattering slice of crispy pork rind, a sliced of battered pork, succulent Chinese ham, lettuce leaf and hoisin sauce wrapped with a lotus bun, this is one of the tastiest bites of our entire food safari.
There are eleven of us for lunch today and just as well, there are just eleven of these Chinese hamburgers.
38. Superior shark fin soup with crab meat Superior shark fin soup with crab meat RM220 / A$73 for 10 pax
I have not had shark fin soup for a very long time for obvious reasons – it is rather expensive for a bowl of soup which has little proven health benefits.
Being one of the premier Chinese restaurants in KL, Oversea prides itself in executing this traditional Chinese soup to perfection.
A dash of black vinegar to counter-balance coupled with the crunchy texture of fin cartilage against succulent crab meat, this is indeed soup perfection.
Well, it is perfection as long as you sip on this bowl of Chinese delicacy without thinking about finless sharks wriggling in the ocean as they slowly sink to their deaths.
39. Steamed soon hock / marble goby fish Cantonese style Steamed soon hock / marble goby fish Cantonese style RM475 / A$160
I love steamed fish and in Malaysia, there is an array of local fresh water and river fish that would rival the best of Sydney’s sea fish. In Malaysia, patin, jelawat, tilapia, siakap, catfish are the stalwarts of fresh water fish let alone the king of all – soon hock or marble goby which is among the most expensive of local fish.
The marble goby at Oversea today is rather large. When ordering fresh fish from the tanks at Oversea restaurant, you can opt for only the head, body or whole fish depending on its size.
Today, we choose a soon hock without the head as it is a rather large one. Now, it may seem sacrilege in Chinese culture to order steamed whole fish without its head. But as much as our family loves eating steamed fish with its head on, we are fine with our choice on this particular occasion. Steamed soon hock / marble goby fish Cantonese style
Regarded as one of the most prized fish in Malaysia, soon hock tastes like a cross between the succulent flesh of scallop and frog meat.
The flesh is silky and succulent yet bouncy and firm. The Cantonese style soy sauce has the right balance of sweet and savoury to make this mouthful yet another eye-closing moment during this food safari.
40. Malaysian style char siew Malaysian style char siew RM60 / A$20
Char siew connoisseurs in Kuala Lumpur will have their own favourites and nominations for the city’s best.
I have tried enough char siew in KL to say Oversea’s is among the very best. It may be a little more pricey since it is a fine Chinese restaurant with full service but it is well justified.
41. Fried five grain rice Fried five grain rice RM70 / A$23
We finish our meal with a signature fried five grain rice – white, brown, red, black and glutinous rice topped with corn kernels and pine nuts.
This is fried rice at its creative best and I wonder what is Sydney’s answer to this simple yet delicious dish? Dancing Fish
This restaurant serves refined Malay-Indo cuisine and is conveniently located in Bangsar Shopping Centre.
42. Gulai pucuk paku Gulai pucuk paku
True to a “gulai” which is essentially a rich curry-like stew most popular in Malaysia and Indonesia, this gulai pucuk paku combines young jungle ferns with a rich turmeric coconut sauce and garnished with deep fried eschallots.
The young ferns are fresh, crunchy and works deliciously well with the milky gravy. This being the second dish we had this trip which combines coconut milk and turmeric, I remind myself to replicate this flavour, especially with fried chicken!
43. Tahu telur with flossy egg and sambal tahu sauce Tahu telur with flossy egg and sambal tahu sauce
One of the signature dishes at this restaurant, tahu telur is a crispy deep fried tofu tower on a bed of golden brown egg floss and drizzled with kecap manis.
A zingy sambal tahu sauce makes the perfect dip for chunky pieces of crisp tofu.
44. Crispy deep fried fish with sambal dabu-dabu Crispy deep fried fish with sambal dabu-dabu
The namesake of this restaurant is actually a tilapia fish common in Malaysia.
Deep fried to a golden brown, this fish is so crispy you can eat the head, fins and bones.
A sambal dabu-dabu with finely diced chillies, red and green tomatoes, shallots, calamansi juice and soy sauce makes a mouth-watering condiment for the fish.
45. Ikan bakar / grilled seabass with sambal belachan Ikan bakar / grilled seabass with sambal belachan
A seabass ladened with sambal belachan is beautifully smoky from the BBQ.
The white meat is soft, flaky and absolutely delicious when smothered with even more sambal belachan.
46. Bebek panggang / BBQ duck with sambal hijau Bebek panggang / BBQ duck with sambal hijau
Marinated for 24 hours in a blend of herbs and spices, bebek panggang is grilled on a BBQ until charred and smoky.
A mild sambal hijau complements the smoky aromas of the duck.
47. Udang bakar enak with sambal matah Udang bakar enak with sambal matah
Chargrilled fresh tiger prawn basted with traditional Indonesian BBQ sauce is tangy with a lemongrass shallot relish.
48. Chicken satay with spicy peanut sauce Chicken satay with spicy peanut sauce
Chicken satays are hearty and beautifully charred and smoky. Chicken satay with spicy peanut sauce
A squeeze of calamansi juice with a rich and chunky peanut sauce as condiment, these satays are among the best in town.

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India’s long wait for Michelin hall of fame

Strap: In the recent years, international ventures of some Indian chefs and restaurateurs have joined this elite club
Puneetinder Singh Sidhu
Remember The Hundred-Foot Journey, the 2014 dramedy set in a tiny French village? Here, two warring restaurant owners, Helen Mirren and Om Puri, gradually come to acknowledge, accept and celebrate their differences? And how his talented son (played by Manish Dayal), after many a dramatic turn of events, trains under and earns her a much coveted second Michelin star? And, ever wonder how a tyre manufacturing company became synonymous with excellence in fine dining? A stroke of marketing genius is how!
To promote their newly designed product — air-filled tyres — the brothers Michelin, Edouard and Andre, hoped a helpful handbook would encourage French motorists to drive more, often, and further. Habitual of the cumbersome glued-on version up until then, the less than 3,000 or so car owners in France rarely ventured beyond the closest repair shop at the time. The first edition in 1900, distributed complimentary, offered essential information about boarding and lodging, with splendidly detailed road maps. It also obligingly included practical tips on how to install and care for their novel tyres.In the early years of its existence, the Michelin Red Guide remained focused on product maintenance with invaluable tips for drivers. The inventory included pharmacies to tap for gasoline in the absence of gas stations back in the day, sun-setting timetables because highway lighting too was a convenience of the future, a directory of auto repair shops operational year-round, and listings of hotel-housed restaurants, minus ratings. By 1926, it had more or less taken on the guise of a classic travel guide, leading Michelin to introduce region-specific Green Guides so that the Red Guide could remain wholly centred on hotel and restaurant reviews.
Ever since, full-time subject matter experts called inspectors have anonymously eaten and judged their way across not just the length and breadth of France, but also the rest of the world. Today, recognised as the top honour of the culinary world, Michelin continues to retain its travel-related ancestry. A single star is awarded to best in their class restaurants worthy of a stop, two stars to detour-meriting excellence in cooking, and three to exceptional experiences that beg special trips. Evaluating criteria include quality of products used, mastery over cooking techniques and flavours, value for money, and consistency between visits. And while Michelin expects the food to reflect the helming chef’s personality, stars are never — contrary to stated belief — bestowed upon individuals. Historically associated with nouvelle cuisine, when Joel Robuchon burst onto the scene with a starchy tuber in his wake, he put hearty back on the menu. His mashed potato recipe is widely acclaimed to be the world’s best. This rebellious Frenchman, who passed away last August, received 32 Michelin stars during the course of his illustrious innings as a celebrity chef and restaurateur — a feat unmatched thus far. Nothing better determines the magnitude of receiving the Michelin star than Gordon Ramsay himself admitting to having cried copiously when divested of both stars for his restaurant at The London in New York.
Aside from the loss of prestige, being stripped of this hard-won honour hits commercial interests equally hard. Revised annually, the lack of mention could mean a drastic drop in Michelin-wielding food tourist footfalls. Yet, quite undeterred, professionals cook on. In the recent years, international ventures of Indian chefs and restaurateurs have joined this elite club, too. Among others, Vineet Khanna for Junoon in New York, Mural Manjunath for Song of India in Singapore, and most recently, Garima Arora, the first Indian woman chef to be thus honoured, for Gaa in Bangkok. Meanwhile, India waits.

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Top Wet Markets And Wholesalers In Singapore To Buy Fresh Ingredients For Your Steamboat

18 Homemade Festive Treats That Make Wonderful Lunar New Year Gifts 1. Tekka Wet Market
Explore Tekka, Singapore’s most culturally-rich market, which is located at the vibrant Little India district. Known for having the longest operating hours, you can find a wide variety of fresh produce and dried goods all in one place. Some exclusive ingredients (that are not readily available at other markets) such as Shark’s Fin can also be found here. Tip: Tekka Wet Market offers chicken, beef and fish at better prices. This is also the best place to stock up on different spices, especially those needed for Indian dishes.
Tekka Wet Market is at 665 Buffalo Road, Singapore 210665. Operating hours: 6.30am to 5.30pm daily. 2. Victoria Wholesale Centre
If you’re looking for dried goods, this is the place. Located in the East, Victoria Wholesale Centre’s also the only dried goods private wholesale centre in Singapore, featuring up to 15 stalls on the ground floor. Stock up on a broad range of dried food products such as ikan bilis, dried scallops, dried shrimps, dried cuttlefish, dried sea cucumber, red dates, dried plums, fish maw, duck web, bird’s nest and more. Expect most items to be pre-packed, but you may also buy some ingredients in a desired amount, and by weight. Other than dried goods, you can also conveniently find party supplies such as plastic utensils, plates and bowls for sale. Check out the list of retailers here .
Victoria Wholesale Centre is at 101 Kallang Avenue, Singapore 339508. Operating Hours: Mondays to Saturdays, 9 am to 6 pm. Visit victoriawholesalecentre.com 3. Geylang Serai Wet Market
If you’re a fan of Malay cuisine, this bustling market is for you. Located near Paya Lebar, Geylang Serai Wet Market is where you can get the best ingredients to whip up some delicious sambal belachan dishes or lip-smacking kuehs. It offers a wide selection of fresh produce, live seafood, fresh vegetables, seasonal and exotic fruit, fresh meat, tofu, noodles, spices, dried goods and eggs. Bonus tip: Don’t be shy; ask the spice stall owners for secret recipes on how to cook the best curry with different spices! Feeling peckish? Head to its food centre for some authentic Malay dishes like beef rendang.
Geylang Serai Wet Market is at 1 Geylang Serai, Singapore 402001. Operating hours: 6.30 am to 12 noon daily. 4. Tiong Bahru Wet Market
Centrally located, this wet market has two floors, with the ground level dedicated to fresh produce such as live seafood, fresh vegetables, seasonal and exotic fruit and fresh meat, and the second level filled with hawker stalls. The special thing about this market is its popularity with expats. Be well surprised by the variety of Western fresh produce that’s available here. It’s been said that Australian and New Zealand beef are obtainable at way cheaper prices than your regular supermarkets. You can also get some beautiful freshly-cut flowers from the floral stalls there. Take some time to check the stalls out and stop by the neighbourhood stretch of hipster cafes for brunch afterwards.
Tiong Bahru Wet Market is at 30 Seng Poh Road, Singapore 168898. Operating hours: 9am to 1pm daily. 5. Pasir Panjang Wholesale Centre
Known as Singapore’s main distribution point for imported fruits and vegetables, the Pasir Panjang Wholesale Centre is a 26-block complex, about 20 football fields in size, and it houses some 1,405 stalls, shops, offices and cold rooms. Located just off the West Coast Highway viaduct, many hawkers get their supplies in bulk here. If you happen to drop by, don’t let the sprawling size intimidate you. Look out for the sign “Auction Hall”. And remember that you can always buy in smaller quantities, but of course, prices get better when you buy in bulk.
Pasir Panjang Wholesale Centre is at 1 Wholesale Centre. Operating hours: 24 hours daily, but it’s most crowded from 12 am to 6 am. 6. Senoko Fishery Port
Senoko Fishery Port is Singapore’s very own version of Tsukiji Fish Market. The port comes to life at wee hours in the morning when everyone else is in deep slumber. It houses over 3,000 local wholesalers, so there are plenty of options for enthusiastic customers who come to seek the freshest seafood from fishermen themselves. Squid, mackerel, crabs, snappers, pomfret and more — you can probably find everything you want at this wholesale market. Most importantly, the price is relatively cheaper than those at heartland wet markets. Definitely worth a visit!
Senoko Fishery Port is at 31 Attap Valley Road, Singapore 759908. Operating hours: Tuesdays to Sundays, 2 am to 6 am. Visit 7. Toa Payoh Vegetable Wholesale Night Market
Veggie lovers unite! You won’t want to miss this unique experience of shopping at a makeshift open-air market that operates at night only. At the Toa Payoh Vegetable Wholesale Market which extends about 120m along Toa Payoh East, most vegetables are displayed haphazardly and openly either in boxes and baskets on the roadside or even directly on the road. Expect to score fresh vegetables such as kailan, cauliflower and lady’s fingers at affordable prices (about 20 per cent cheaper than the supermarkets). Depending on the season, you may even find special items such as Shimeji mushrooms.
Address: Toa Payoh East, outside Pei Chun Public School. Operating hours: Mondays to Saturdays, 11 pm to 6.30 am. 8. Fassler Gourmet
Sashimi enthusiasts, check out Fassler Gourmet, aka salmon heaven, where you can buy fresh cuts of salmon fish at reduced prices. Aside, they also have other quality seafood, soups and sauces, and more. Perfect if you’re planning a seafood party with your friends! Two tips: Cover up as it can get cold at Fassler Gourmet, which is situated at Woodlands Terrace. Do also bring along your own cooler box or bag so that you can keep your seafood purchases fresh.
Address: 46 Woodlands Terrace, Singapore 738459, tel: 6257 5257. Operating hours: Mondays to Thursdays, 8.30am to 5.30pm. Fridays, 8 am to 7 pm. Saturdays, 8 am to 3 pm. Visit fasslergourmet.com 9. Greenwood Fish Market
If you’re uncomfortable with the idea of ‘wet markets’, you’ll love Greenwood Fish Markets, where you can also get quality and some exotic seafood, such as monkfish tails or wolf fish, used in hotels and restaurants. From Boston lobsters to an array of oysters to pink snappers, in-house smoked salmon, mackerels and French black mussels, you’ll be spoilt for choice. For meat lovers, you can find top-grade items like denuded baby lamb, Australian lamb, and beef and veal. Fret not if you are feel lost from the vast array of seafood options available, as there’re fish connoisseurs stationed at each retail market to share their knowledge. Great news, they have introduced a price-drop by 20 to 30 per cent at all outlets, leaving you with almost no reason not to check it out! Psst, you can sign up for their WhatsApp updates to receive firsthand information of weekly shipments (to do so, email info@greenwoodfishmarket.com or drop them a Facebook or Instagram message).
Greenwood has outlets in Bukit Timah, Dempsey Hill, Quayside Isle and Valley Point. Visit www.greenwoodfishmarket.com 10. Chinatown Wet Market
At the basement of Chinatown Complex lies a sprawling wet market consisting of many small stalls selling everything you need to cook Asian cuisines – from fresh produce to imported dried goods. You can also find a good variety of vegetables to cook in your steamboat or dishes, plus many fruit stalls offering fresh whole fruits. The best thing to come here for is the amazing amount of live seafood you can find here, from your usual, prawn, cockles, clams, crabs, fish and lobsters to more unusal ones like frogs, turtles and eels. Everything wallet-friendly, so if you are on a budget be sure to try this place!
Chinatown Wet Market is at Chinatown Complex, 335 Smith Street, Singapore 050335. Operating hours: 8 am to 12 pm daily.

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Travel Bits: Maryland Boat Show, Florida Indian Festival, Swim Nevis in the Caribbean, Ohio Maple Syrup, More

The scoop on travelwriter, columnist, author Janet Groene (say GRAYnee). Copyright Janet Groene Wednesday, January 30, 2019 Travel Bits: Maryland Boat Show, Florida Indian Festival, Swim Nevis in the Caribbean, Ohio Maple Syrup, More Views of this site have passed the 75,000 mark. Return for a new travel tease each day. To ask about placing your ad on all SIX Groene travel, camping, boating and food sites for one year for one low rate, email Scroll down to see travel writer Janet Groene’s credits and bio Janet Groene is a professional travelwriter, author of more than 25 books and thousands of magazine and newspaper features. She blogs at six sites on travel, travel food, family travel, RV and camping, yachting and cruising. Dates below are NOT in chronological order. Scroll down, pick and choose, mark your calendar. APRIL 12-14, STEVENSVILLE, Maryland. One of the largest in-water power boat shows in the East opens the Chesapeake Bay cruising season. See more than 400 sleek boats in a scenic setting at the Bay Bridge Boat Show. See boats, demonstrations, workshops, gear and a children’s area with a moon bounce. Food and beverage stations and a VIP lounge add to the festive, waterfront scene. Admission is charged. Get the latest guide to cruising Chesapeake Bay here . FEBRUARY 15-17, OKEECHOBEE, Florida. Come to the Brighton Seminole Indian Reservation for the 81-year-old Brighton Field Day Festival and Rodeo. See Seminole clothing contests, rodeo action, native arts, dance, snake and alligator handling, storytelling, crafts and cuisine plus a living Seminole Indian Village display. Featured entertainer is blues/rock guitarist Kenny Wayne Shepherd. Get his immortal Blues from the Backroads album, available for streaming, MP3, CD or vinyl at https://amzn.to/2WpSJvO MARCH 31, NEVIS, West Indies. Swim from Nevis to St. Kitts through crystal Caribbean waters. Cross the channel that links the two islands and compete for a Turtle Trophy. Swimmers of all skill levels can take the challenge. Wear snorkel, mask and fins if you wish. Support vessels shepherd the race. Entry fee of $95 (US) includes a tee shirt, swim cap, finisher medal, goodie bag, a breakfast party after the swim and transportation back to Nevis. What a fun way to discover the island where Alexander Hamilton grew up. Get this guidebook to paradise, aka St. Kitts, Nevis, Antigua and Monserrat. Already in love with these islands? Show your loyalty by wearing this hoodie. MARCH, OXFORD, Ohio. The Buckeye State is known for its sugar maple trees and springtime Maple Festivals. Oxford hosts its maple fests on the first and second weekends in March with activities at Hueston Woods State Park with pancake breakfasts, hay rides, nature walks and kettles of fragrant maple syrup. Bring yourself or the whole family to eat, camp, hike or just hang out with nice folks. This book is a guide to the scenic covered bridges of Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. Will 2019 be your break-out year? Quit your job. Take off in a self-contained home on wheels. Be free to travel, work as you go, home-school the kids if you have any, follow the sun or your dreams. Living Aboard Your RV , 4th Edition is available in paperback or e-book. http://amzn.to/29XFEkq Be ready for ice storms, power outages and other emergencies with the Survival Food Handbook . It’s a guide to food preparedness, from provisioning a boat for a cruise to facing the next power outage at home. Only affordable, everyday supermarket staples are needed. This isn’t about high-priced survival rations. Hide your location , protect your online privacy at home and away with a personal IP address . It’s legal, honest, smart and downright necessary these days. TRY 2 WEEKS FREE . Cook for all reasons in all seasons. Easy recipes on Kindle for camping, boating, RV, motorhome, picnics, power outage and busy-crazy days at home. Free trial at http://amzn.to/1Nj5dsM

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5 Hottest Restaurants in Oakville, Burlington, and Milton – Jan. 26 – Feb. 1

5 Hottest Restaurants in Oakville, Burlington, and Milton – Jan. 26 – Feb. 1 January 31, 2019
5. Culaccino
Burlington
There’s no lasagna on the menu and we don’t even care. You won’t miss it. This hip Italian bar-slash-gastropub is one of the newest along Brant St., taking over the former Eatalia spot. I found this place while strolling downtown … the stunning aesthetic caught my eye so I went in to find out more, quickly realizing it’s Burlington’s best-kept (burger, pasta, bread … carb-loading) secret. To start, get the Sourdough Bread plate — with housemade bread, ricotta cheese, and an incredible butter compound. Then, just order the gnocchi and wait … it’s made in-house and you’ll quickly realize you’re in a legit Italian resto. There’s oodles of dairy and flavour and it’s so stellar you may nearly explode with happiness. The friendly owner, Jerod, and staff work hard to provide a stellar experience. Oh, and by the way, they’ve got craft beer on beer on beer on beer! Dozens … close to 100 varieties. Culaccino opened around summer 2016 and weekends are fully booked. Who says Italian restos have to be dark, stuffy, and old-fashioned?
Price range for dinner mains: $16 – $45
4. The Express
Burlington
Downtown Burlington’s food scene just got a boost, Italian-style. The Express Italian Eatery has opened along Lakeshore Rd. at Brant St. and it’s serving up pizza, pasta, steak and seafood. The new restaurant opened last month in the former Salvatore’s spot. It’s from Hamilton — there’s a location by McMaster University and another on Grays Rd. closer to Stoney Creek. Burlington is the third location. The Express is named after the train in Italy which weaved through Bolzano, Milano, Florence, Bologna, Rome, Calabria and Sicily. The menu represents a fusion of northern, central and southern Italian cuisine. What’s in store? Made to order wood fire pizzas, fresh in- house pasta and hand tossed gourmet salads. You’ll really want to get the Ravioli al Brasato di Manzo. Why? Pillows are stuffed with braised beef then topped with sauteed red onions and mushrooms. It’s comfort food that’s flavoured impeccably (and reminds me of my university roommate Tania’s pot roast … gone Italian). The Gnocchi, made in-house, arrives in a dreamy, creamy Rose sauce. It’s topped with fried sweet potato chips for a layer of texture. If you’re into sharing, you’ll want to order the Venetian pizza ($16). It’s got a thin crust plus asiago, soppressata, fresh rapini and pepperoncino, made in-house. It’s fantastic and perfectly crispy. Service is great, and here’s something special for the ladies: They give out blankets on the patio if you’re cold (or inside when the A/C is blasting.
3. Sushi-Ya Japan
Milton
Sushi-Ya Japan is a small restaurant serving up big taste in a prime location: downtown Milton. You’ll find it just off of Main St., along Martin. You’ll see men in suits, depending on the time of day, talking business over maki. Or there may be solo diners who need to get their sushi on, solo. Here you’ll find a relaxed spot serving up rolls, teriyaki, noodle dishes, plus Korean specialties (and you may overhear them speaking Korean in the kitchen). Start with miso soup or salad (with miso dressing) and edamame, then fill yourself up on a salmon or tuna combination. It’s equal parts simple and delicious. It’s a perfect place to eat healthy and stay trendy. This is a classic hidden gem. You’re welcome!
2. King Szechuan
Oakville
A nice modern looking restaurant with friendly service and delicious food! Prices here justify the taste. The Ye He Fried Rice is a house special rice with chicken, barbeque pork, and shrimp. It’s got quite a bit of flavour and can be had as a dish on its own. The sizzling garlic chicken was definitely a blockbuster here! The sizzle was so loud I couldn’t even hear our server speak! The sizzling platter helps to heighten the flavour and aroma of the garlic and the onions in the dish.
1. Machu Picchu
Oakville
Peruvian food might be trending hard in Toronto, but this Oakville resto beat a lot of new arrivals to the punch. This Peruvian/Latin fusion gem has lots of menu items that are a delight to taste. But I’m a devotee of the yellow sauce (it’s called huancaina and made with cheese, potatoes, spices, and hot Peruvian yellow peppers). Between delicious cassava fries (yucca frita) dipped in this mouth-watering sauce, tender beef hearts with roasted potatoes and corn kernels, and tamale on a plantain leaf, our dining experience was off to a great start. The ceviche was fantastic! Our mains included chicken stew (with yellow sauce!), beef stew (it’s incredibly juicy and reminds me of my south Indian mom’s goat curry), and mahi mahi topped with calamari and shrimp (it was good but not as tasty as anything with the yellow sauce). For dessert, the crispy yet soft shortbread cake came with a drizzle of dulce de leche. Overall, it’s a delightful dining experience. Encore!
The 5 hottest restaurants in Halton for the week of Jan. 26 – Feb. 1 were based on the amount of organic page views and searches these restaurants received on inhalton.com. Top 5

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