The Top 6 Restaurant Trends to Watch Out For This Spring

The Top 6 Restaurant Trends to Watch Out For This Spring

The Top 6 Restaurant Trends to Watch Out For This Spring February 21, 2019 featured
Having been working with clients in the hospitality sector for 18 years, hospitality marketing communications is my agency’s, Big Cat’s , bread and butter. The diversity of the sector keeps it so exciting and the ever-changing food trends, changes in health and nutrition and new products and concepts mean that restauranteurs and those working in hospitality need to make sure they are one step ahead and keeping their finger on the pulse for what’s emerging and attracting customers.
Here’s a list of six food and drink trends to look out for this Spring! More plant-based meat-free options
Everyone is aware of the growing trend in plant-based diets (it may be worth noting now that ‘plant-based’ is the key dining buzz phrase rather than ‘vegetarian’ and ‘vegan’) and it is safe to say that this is not just a fad; it’s here to stay. Sales of meat-free and vegan items increased by 14% to £352.1m year-on-year to August 2018, whilst just under 300,000 people signed up to Veganuary 2019 (up from 168,542 in 2018). 52% of British shoppers (rising to a huge 68% of 18-24 year olds) say that they either follow or are interested in following a plant-based diet, whether this be vegetarian, vegan or flexitarian. Even a quarter of meat eaters plan to reduce their meat consumption across the next 12 months, probably aided by the introduction of impossibly meaty faux meats, such as the aptly named Impossible Burger.
With the increasing popularity and the obvious demand for food which fits into these diets, it’s becoming increasingly important for restaurants to have a separate plant-based menu that offers a wide variety of options, rather than just a measly cheese and onion pie squeezed onto the bottom as an afterthought. For our client Ember Inns, we incorporated a lot of messaging regarding Veganuary on social media, which received a large amount of engagement. We are even starting to see some brands offer a completely meat-free menu once a week. Street food
Street food, of course, is another trend which is still continuing to flourish with Indian and Mexican options leading the way in terms of favourite cuisine, particularly with 15-34 year olds. However, there is a new street food favourite on the horizon; Israeli cuisine. Specialties from Lebanon, Syria and Turkey are particularly gaining momentum among hip forward-thinking restaurants. With a huge current awareness of health and wellness (‘healthification’), and a generation of foodies in search of exotic and regional foods, consumers want healthy but flavoursome fast food. Restaurants are starting to reimagine classic dishes, replacing ingredients with vegetable-based alternatives or a healthy spin. Healthification
Healthification is a movement which has seen a reduction in the consumption of carbonated drinks and the rise of non-alcoholic fruit and vegetable based shots, providing a quick dose of goodness to boost the wellbeing of concerned consumers. This wellness trend has led to consumers wanting more transparency in what goes into products and evidence of authenticity. This has resulted in a trend of using natural botanical extracts as ingredients and flavourings because of the ‘promise’ of additional health-related benefits. Cannabidiol, or CBD, is currently being used in pretty much everything, from skincare to coffee and cocktails, and even to pet food. Whilst clinicians say that more research still needs to be done on the health benefits of CBD, consumers report relief from anxiety and pain, which has increased demand and growth in this area. Premiumisation
Related to this is the trend of ‘premiumisation’, which is no longer just about price, but also about quality and experience. Consumers know what they want more and more from a brand, which has led to an increased appetite for specialised food and drink options, such as gin bars and a wide variety of craft ales. Consumers believe that ingredients or preparation processes that are of higher quality are worth paying more for. Eatertainment
Further to this is a trend of ‘eatertainment’. Dining is becoming more of an immersive experience now and consumers want some form of entertainment along with their food, which is why we’ve started to see the rise in popularity of ‘activity bars’. This has been particularly noticeable in Birmingham with the recent openings of Ghetto Golf, Lane 7 (offering bowling, shuffleboard and arcade games) and Kongs (arcade games and table tennis). Instagram-worthy offerings
Directly related to the eatertainment trend is the desire for social currency which is the benefit of being able to share photos from your meal, drinks or general experience on social media. A huge 69% of 18-34 year olds take a photo or video of their food before eating. When deciding which restaurants and bars to visit, consumers are seeking out Instagrammable settings and colours, which is why drinks such as pink gin have proved so popular recently, whilst chefs are adding finishing touches to food to make it ‘Instagram’ ready. Restaurants now not only need to have great food and drink worth talking about, but also interesting and attractive décor that creates the right atmosphere and draws people in to take their Instagram-perfect shots. Visitors to Birmingham’s Nocturnal Animals crowd the white corridor pictured below to pose and add to their Instagram profile, while even more crowds flock to Dirty Martini in London, Birmingham, Leeds, Cardiff and Manchester to pose in front of the well-placed angel wings. Search #dirtymartini on Instagram and that’s all you’ll see.

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There are an enormous number of variations to these dishes, because 1). India itself is a very large, diverse country, 2). Many of these dishes have come from Indian food globalizing and spreading to other places in the world, which has really exploded in the last few decades. And as they do that, what might’ve been one “original” dish (or even a set of more consistently similar dishes) have had to adapt to local tastes and availability of local ingredients outside of India, sometimes becoming “fusion” cuisine. For example, it’s not even clear that tikka masala type dishes originated in Indian at all (they may have been invented in Scotland from Indian or Bengali immigrant cooks, and one of the first examples of mainstreamed international food from the region).
And because many of these dishes have a history of being served in restaurants or hotels, rather than homes, the selection of them is different (they are considered “restaurant food” rather than “home cooking”, often are some of the richer or more flashy dishes rather than the more mundane or healthy ones, and are only the ones that could fit into a restaurant setting, like depending on more long lasting ingredients, or being quicker to make rather than taking hours to make).
This base of expectations for the way the dish “is supposed” to taste has spilled over into the internet age, and many recipes you’ll find are influenced by a mix of these factors. And Indian food continues to evolve as customer or individual preferences around the world continue to change. As more and more people are seeking healthy or environmentally friendly options, for example, recipes will continue to change to fulfill those desires.

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7 Best Indian TV Shows on Netflix That You Must Watch

Namrata Gogoi 21 Feb 2019
Netflix carries an impressive library of movies, TV shows, and documentaries. And browsing through all of them is not an easy task. Unless you know a show by its name, it’s rather difficult to traverse the whole range. So, if you are searching for some good Indian TV shows on Netflix, let us tell you that we have it covered.
In this post, we have covered some of the best Indian TV shows on Netflix that you can watch during your leisure time. Note : The certification of the movie is displayed next to the show title. Also on Guiding Tech Read More 7. Raja, Rasoi Aur Anya Kahaniyaan (All)
Let’s start the list with something good — Food. It’s immensely satisfying to watch a plate of hot Jalebi with a dollop of rich Rabri or watching a batch of Kachoris going for a dip in a pot of hot oil, and the aroma of a freshly made platter of Chaat — the list can go on.
If you are salivating at the very thought of these mouthwatering dishes, then Raja, Rasoi Aur Anya Kahaniyaan is the perfect show for you.
The first season of the show explores the cuisine of the Indian royal houses and the rich history behind food discovery and its influences over the modern day kitchen. The show originally premiered on The EPIC Channel in 2014, and now available on Netflix. The cinematography is excellent, and so is the narration.
This show carries a rating of 8.3 on IMDB, and if you are someone who loves to know the history of a place and its food, this is a must-watch show. The show’s second season is available on YouTube. Watch the Show Here 6. Yeh Meri Family (7+)
I know, I know, you’d love to reminisce your pre-teenage years. Who wouldn’t? The simplicity of human relations, sibling fights, the eagerness of waiting for vacations, and so much more remains unmatched.
TVF Play’s Yeh Meri Family is a combination of all these beautiful things intertwining with a sweet and emotional storyline. It follows the life of twelve-year-old Harshal Gupta, his family, and their struggles as they go about their everyday life.
Set in Jaipur in the late 90s, this series has an ensemble of excellent actors including Mona Singh and Akarsh Khurana. The first season has seven episodes of thirty minutes each and is rated 9.5 stars out of 10 in IMDB.
I loved every moment of this beautiful mini-series, and I am sure you will too. Watch the Show Here 5. Little Things Season 2 (16+)
If Yeh Meri Family is all about the good ol’ days, Little Things is about modern-day relationships. This mini-series follows the life of Kavya (Mithila Palkar) and Dhruv (Dhruv Sehgal), an adorable couple and how they get their happiness out of the little things in life.
Dice Media produced the first season of Little Things, it is available on YouTube. This series won many accolades for its simple and believable take on the complicated modern life. You’ll be able to relate to it almost everything that this series has to offer — job frustrations, financial discussions, life insecurities, food cravings, and much more.
The second season, which is on Netflix, follows the same paradigm albeit with a generous dose of maturity thrown in. Watch this series for its enjoyable presentation of all those little things we do in our daily life, a fresh take on relationships, and above all for the awesome chemistry between the lead pair.
If you have to watch Little Things, I suggest you clear everything off your to-do lists and sit down for a marathon session over a weekend, just as I did.

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Meriden Spice 【無料】 – フード/ドリンク – Zohur Miah

You can now order your food directly from Meriden Spice in Meridan. Order directly through our website and mobile app and receive extra discounts and loyalty points which you can use against future orders. Order now and have your food delivered straight to your door. Meriden Spice offers Indian food lovers a unique and exceptional experience of Indian food. Our aim is simple- to provide the best food and service, at the right price to our customers, so they can experience the real taste of Indian cuisine. Our chefs offer a taste experience beyond the ordinary with our food. All food is freshly prepared using only the finest ingredients, all expertly blended with exquisite aromatic. herbs and spices. WITH FAST AND COURTEOUS SERVICE making it the first choice for Indian meals. Meriden Spice has a fine balance of traditional and modern Indian dishes, well spiced and flavored. このアプリはiPhone、iPadの両方に対応しています。

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5 Reasons My Next Vacation will be in Bangalore

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Our holidays are coming up and it’s time to see where we’re going next.
After putting much thought into our budget and expectations for the trip, our choice was clear: Bangalore, India.
Why Bangalore? Oh, let me count the ways…
Below are the 5 reasons why Bangalore is our next travel stop and why it should be yours, as well. 1) It’s ridiculously affordable
Here’s a quick search for hotels in Bangalore … notice anything? The prices are super affordable
These aren’t just any hotels either – they are all 4-5 stars. To put it into perspective, this is the cost of an overnight hostel in New York City or a studio Airbnb in my city.
The prices for 4 -5 star hotels start at $39. If you really want to lower your daily expenses, 3 star hotels go for $8 a night. YES – $8.
As a frugal lady, these are my kind of numbers. I love to vacation in beautiful areas that offer affordable hotels with top-level services. Why not bask in comfort and luxury for a great price?
According to Numbeo , inexpensive meals are $2 a pop while a mid-range, three-course meal is only $7.
And we’re talking about Indian food here, which is one of my favorite cuisines. I’ll be happy to enjoy the tastes of authentic Indian food, especially at a great price.
They say you can always understand the difference in costs by comparing McDonald’s combo meals. A combo meal in Bangalore is only $3.51. Compare that to the whopping $16 I pay in my city.
What does it all add up to? Well, at these great rates and prices, I can actually afford to have a very fun, active, interesting and delicious vacation in Bangalore. 2) It’s the garden city of India
Bangalore’s nickname is actually the ‘Garden City of India’ or the ‘Green City’.
This is because of its combination of wonderful weather, green trees, lush public parks and the heavy rainfall that makes the entire region bloom.
Bangalore is also made up of over 25-30 natural and man-made lakes, making for beautiful areas to sit and enjoy nature.
There are many parks and gardens across the city, and canopies of trees line most main roads on both ends.
Although city planning has taken over some of the green from the city, it retains its most famous parks, including the famous Cubbon Park and Lal Bagh Gardens , so it’s still deserving of its nicknames. 3) The food, of course!
As I mentioned above, I’m a huge fan of Indian cuisine. I always like to try authentic food, desserts and spices wherever I travel.
After all, there is no better way to experience a country, its culture and its people than through their food.
Bangalore has great South Indian food from both restaurants and street food. Personally, I like to have a mix.
Word is that street food in Bangalore is just as good as five-star restaurants and having experienced similarly in Bangkok, I believe it.
I’m looking forward to trying staples of South Indian cuisine like masala dosa, kesari baat, aloo gobi and any new, interesting dishes I’m unfamiliar with.
It will certainly be a culinary adventure and I’m hoping to find tastes I have never experienced before! 4) The rich history and tourist attractions The stunning Bangalore Palace (Source: Mukesh Barnwal on Wikipedia)
I love learning about the history of locations I visit and Bangalore has a particularly fascinating and rich history to share.
Having started as just a mud fort built in 1537, the city has grown to become the capital of its state and a developed, thriving megacity with a population of 12 million.
It’s been through sultanates, conquests, colonization and in the past century alone, independence and tremendous industrialization. That makes for a fascinating lesson on history.
Aside from walking tours, I’ll be visiting some of their best-known landmarks and museums including: The Bangalore Palace Tipu Sultan’s Summer Palace Vidhana Soudha (grand state government office building) Visvesvaraya Industrial & Technological Museum (yay for science museums!) Cubbon Park
So exciting! 5) The nightlife
Bangalore is a great party city. As a matter of fact, it has the highest number of pubs in Asia !
Nowadays, they are open until 1am, which is great for me, because I like to start my partying early and end early. A busy traveling woman has to sleep. J
Party culture is engraved in the city and its people. Since the IT boom of the 90s, the city has been flooded by young people and with it came an influx of bars, clubs and pubs.
Whatever you’re looking to celebrate – you’ll find the perfect spot. For me, it’s all about dancing, so I’ll be going to some nightclubs to enjoy the great music and energies.
If clubbing is of less interesting, as the cultural hub of India, the city also hosts many classical music concerts, theater shows, music events and art displays.
It’s impossible to be bored in Bangalore – there is so much to do! Have you been to Bangalore or would you like to visit? Share with us below!

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Why These Eight Mexico City Neighborhoods Are Worth Planning Your Next Trip Around

Why These Eight Mexico City Neighborhoods Are Worth Planning Your Next Trip Around Why These Eight Mexico City Neighborhoods Are Worth Planning Your Next Trip Around The Palacio de Bellas Artes, one of the most iconic buildings in the Centro. Lindsay Lauckner Gundlock There are few places as dynamic, diverse, or downright enormous as the Mexican capital. In a city layered with history, in which change is an essential part of residents’ DNA, where to begin planning a trip? Michael Snyder gives his breakdown of the key colonias to visit, whether your focus is shopping, food, art, or design. Michael Snyder February 22, 2019
A little more than two years ago, I moved to Mexico City more or less sight unseen, taking it on good faith that this urban giant could find space for one more body among the 21 million that already called its metro area home. I came, like many foreigners before me, with vague ideas about its vibrant food and art scenes; its crooked glamour and effortless cool; its rich colonial and modern architectural landscape. I expected to find moments of enervating chaos and sometimes choking smog. But I was rejuvenated by gracious parks and sublime weather, by crisp autumn mornings and springlike afternoons, by spasms of rain and hail and thunder that gave way, just in time, to marigold sunsets blooming across the horizon. Mexico City, it seems, is able to turn a different face to each and every one of its inhabitants.
That’s because, in the past five centuries, Mexico City has become a master of transformation. Flung wide across a seismic, high-altitude plateau, North America’s largest city has survived colonial conquest, years-long floods, a bloody war of independence, a bloodier revolution, and, in 1985, a catastrophic earthquake that killed more than 9,000 and decimated much of the historic central borough of Cuauhtémoc. Thirty-two years later to the day, in 2017, another quake shook the city to its core, bringing down over 40 buildings and damaging many more. Within weeks, the city had bounced back from that, too. Chilangos, as residents are known, continue to deal with shoddy governance, shoddy infrastructure, and fluctuating levels of security. Given the choice, many would just as soon return to the villages they left a generation or three before. But many more — myself included — wouldn’t live anywhere else.
No one trip is enough to unlock the city’s many wonders. For a first-time visitor, sticking to the leafy neighborhoods in and around the Delegación Cuauhtémoc offers an ideal introduction: a walkable, manageable microcosm of the city’s wild, sophisticated whole. From the cockeyed grandeur of the Centro Histórico to the discreet galleries of Santa María la Ribera and the glamorous cafés of Condesa , these are the eight districts every visitor should get to know. Centro Histórico
Late one Sunday morning, I set out from my home on the far side of the Zócalo, Mexico City’s spectacular central plaza, to the Mercado San Juan. It wasn’t a particularly long walk, but, like most routes through the Centro Histórico, it encompassed many pasts, many presents, and many possible futures. Here you’ll find opulent colonial palaces, crooked Baroque churches, murals by Diego Rivera at the Palacio Nacional and the Secretariat of Public Education headquarters, and the magnificent ruins of the Templo Mayor, the axis of the Aztec Empire’s religious and political universe.
Until the late 1800s, the Centro was Mexico City. Then, from the turn of the century onward, modernity-obsessed elites began abandoning their ancestral homes and moving to the newly created suburbs in the west and south. After the 1985 earthquake, the Centro was all but abandoned. It remained an important place of protest and celebration, but it was not a place you lingered.
Entering the open doorway of the Mercado San Juan, I passed vendors selling rambutans and mangoes, plastic boxes of microgreens, and giant clams from Baja. But I hadn’t come here to shop (for that I go to Mercado la Merced, the bigger, crazier, more beautiful wholesale market on my side of the Centro). Instead, I had come to eat at Don Vergas , an eight-seat market stall that, for the past year, has been turning out some of the best seafood in Mexico City. From left: Scallop ceviche at Don Vergas, in the Mercado San Juan; a building in the Centro Histórico, where young chefs and gallerists are bringing new energy to Mexico City’s oldest neighborhood. Lindsay Lauckner Gundlock
Chef Luis Valle, who hails from the northwestern coastal state of Sinaloa, had opened shop only an hour earlier, but already a rowdy line had filled the aisle, singing along to the banda music playing through a loudspeaker perched precariously over the tiny kitchen. “How many crab tostadas?” Valle shouted over the music. Hands shot up: 15 orders.
I slipped behind the bar to help squeeze a few limes and hang out with Valle, who makes great company, no matter how busy he is. I asked how many people he would cook for today. “About 400,” he said. I asked how he coped. “I don’t!” he laughed, then turned back to the crowd, shouting: “How many scallops?”
Even a decade ago, you’d have been hard-pressed to find such excitement surrounding a restaurant in this part of town. But in the past year or so, pop-up parties have begun to appear on rooftops, in basements, and at run-down cantinas like the bizarre and beautiful La Faena , decorated with dusty shadow boxes of toreadors’ costumes. Edgy art galleries have appeared in former office buildings. Bósforo , still the top place in town for mezcal almost 10 years after it opened, draws crowds on weekends, while the nameless restaurant next door serves impeccable Oaxacan food by flickering candlelight.
But despite the fact that a new, younger generation is now gravitating to the Centro, it’s still a place that belongs to everyone. Activists stage regular protests in the Zócalo. Residents from around the city come to shop at stores selling everything from spices to light fixtures and giant handmade candles decorated in lacy wax flowers. Government workers stop in at century-old cantinas for an afternoon beer (try La Ópera for gilded old-world opulence, or Salón España for the city’s best tequila list). Even the exorbitantly expensive Mercado San Juan, where Luis Valle slings his seafood, has a raucous weekend party. Nowhere in this immense, stratified city is more democratic or more beautiful. Roma & Condesa
At the northern edge of Colonia Roma, a trickle of young, stylish people wandered in and out of a heavy glass door that swung open onto Calle Puebla. They followed a bend of stairs past tall white gallery walls and out onto a sunny roof terrace surrounded by treetops. Monserrat Castera, beer in hand, led me from the open patio into a small, glass-walled room at one corner to show me around the latest edition of her pop-up shop, Momo Room — one of a growing number of nomadic retail spaces now at the vanguard of Mexico’s fashion scene.
This iteration, she explained, was inspired by Juan Rulfo, the mid-20th-century writer whose works are widely considered to be among the finest ever written in Mexico. Rulfo set two of his most important books in a fictional town in the small coastal state of Colima. Among objects selected from local designers, Castera had scattered photographs of Colima, burlap sacks of the state’s famous sea salt, and handwoven straw hats. There were also playful sunglasses from French-Mexican collective Stromboli Associates; handmade box bags in wood and leather by Aurelia, a brand run by three sisters from Guadalajara; and embroidered linen kimonos dyed with indigo and cochineal from local label Korimi Kids. None of these designers had a brick-and-mortar shop. After all, in a city obsessed with collaboration, and replete with spectacular spaces ideal for short-term group exhibitions, what would be the point?
When Mexico City was named the World Design Capital for 2018, many ascribed the distinction to an aesthetic that brings Mexico’s disparate creative traditions — from textiles and earthenware to the great Modernist boom of the 1950s — into conversation with one another. Though that sensibility has existed in Mexico for generations, it has become newly fashionable in Roma and Condesa, two of the capital’s most design-forward neighborhoods. You can witness it at stores like quirky clothing boutique Hi-Bye , at the shops lining the uneven sidewalks of the beautiful Calle Colima, and at Ven a Mi — an appointment-only showroom selling unusual crafts from around the country. From left: A lounge area at Ignacia Guest House, which inhabits a converted town house in the style-centric neighborhood of Roma; the neighborhood of Condesa, near the Parque México. Lindsay Lauckner Gundlock
After the 1985 earthquake, many residents fled Roma, and it was well over a decade before artists and designers began moving back into its gracefully dilapidated Beaux-Arts mansions. Condesa, which was the city’s most cosmopolitan neighborhood during the 1930s and 40s, experienced a shorter decline, having rebounded by the mid 90s. With its pretty Art Deco and Mission-style apartments and even prettier residents, Condesa is today the grande dame of Mexico City colonias — stylish, elegant, but never trying too hard. Condesa and Roma were also among the areas most heavily damaged in the 2017 earthquake , but this time both returned to life with remarkable speed. Were it not for a handful of empty buildings dotting the area, deep cracks running like vines through their white plaster exteriors, you might not know that anything had happened here at all.
And while the dialogue between tradition and innovation found its way into restaurant kitchens at least a decade ago in places like Enrique Olvera’s Pujol, in the swanky Polanco area, Roma and Condesa have taken the lead in translating it into more casual — though no less ambitious — settings. At the year-old restaurant Meroma, wife-and-husband team Mercedes Bernal and Rodney Cusic offer some of the neighborhoods’ most refined cooking, taking inspiration from local ingredients, rather than traditional dishes, to create a subtly eclectic menu. And at El Parnita, a family-run taco joint that got hip as the district did, young diners line up for a lunch of fish tacos and craft beer.
And at the chaotic, nameless open kitchen next door, a young chef named Jesús Salas Tornés creates consistently delicious, interesting dishes that bring the flavors, techniques, and oddball informality of the countryside straight to the heart of the city. Santa María La Ribera & San Rafael
Not long after I moved to Mexico City, I climbed a flight of terrazzo stairs leading to a buzzing, dimly lit terrace in Santa María la Ribera, an otherwise quiet residential neighborhood northwest of the Centro. Glamorous in its turn-of-the-20th-century heyday, Santa María, the first planned suburb of the Centro, was, by the 1950s, overshadowed by neighborhoods like Roma and Condesa. On that chilly evening, however, it was hard to imagine anywhere more elegant.
In the 17 years since Zonamaco, the city’s mammoth weeklong art fair, launched, Mexico City has become an essential stop for regulars on the international art circuit and young artists looking to create and show work in a dynamic, affordable environment. A few nights before the gathering on the terrace, Art Week had started — an annual event that includes Zonamaco and its daring younger sibling, the Material Art Fair. Around me was a crowd of local gallerists, artists from Mexico and abroad, and assorted global movers and shakers. They’d come to celebrate the recent opening of the Mexico City outpost of Casa Wabi, the Tadao Ando–designed artists’ retreat in Oaxaca, on Mexico’s southern coast. Mezcal flowed freely as fairy lights twinkled along with the neon sign for a cheap hotel across the street.
Related : How to See Mexico City’s Most Stylish Spots in Three Days
Between them, Santa María and the adjacent area of San Rafael are home to more than a dozen galleries and art spaces. Some represent internationally recognized artists, but most are like Casa Wabi: alternative, informal spaces for young Mexican artists. On a recent morning, I stopped by the gallery to see an exhibition of earthenware pieces by a Swiss resident at the Oaxaca center, displayed alongside Midcentury Modern furniture sold by the design shop Decada. The small space on the ground floor showed work by a photographer from the northern state of Sonora — endless desert horizons punctuated by fragments of industrial architecture. “Mexico City is a nursery for the rest of the country,” said Carla Sodi, director of the Casa Wabi Foundation, as we sat one morning on a balcony overlooking an ordinary street that was waking to the working day. “Eventually, these artists will go back home and plant those seeds.”
Santa María and San Rafael have always been low-key repositories for Mexican design. Around Santa María’s gracious alameda, or central park, families move up and down the marble stairs of the gorgeously old-fashioned Geology Museum, built in 1910, while old couples dance beneath the flamboyant glass dome of the Moorish Kiosk, erected here in the same year. The Art Nouveau towers of the Museo Universitario del Chopo, an important center for contemporary art, soar over a street that, in the early 1980s, was the locus for the city’s punk and goth scenes. The ruins of Cine Opera, a now-defunct Art Deco cinema, stand like a sentinel at San Rafael’s northern edge. And the abstract minimalism of the Museo Experimental El Eco , built in the 1950s by the celebrated artist and designer Mathias Goeritz, brackets San Rafael’s south.
Yet despite all these monuments, both neighborhoods remain typical middle-class barrios. Santa María’s neighborhood tamale shop, Cintli , is my favorite in all of Mexico City. Beer and tequila abound at the local cantina Salón París , and La Polar in San Rafael serves steaming bowls of birria, a regional beef stew, accompanied by raucous mariachi bands playing late into the night. From left: Chicken with mashed potatoes and tortillas with octopus at Salón Ríos, in Colonia Cuauhtémoc; the Angel of Independence, on Paseo de la Reforma in Juarez. Lindsay Lauckner Gundlock Juarez & Colonia Cuauhtémoc
The glass-and-steel towers lining Mexico City’s grand ceremonial avenue, Paseo de la Reforma, burst from the low-slung concrete grid like volcanic peaks, monuments to globalist prosperity erupting from the city’s ancient lake bed. Reforma connects the Centro to the Bosque de Chapultepec, the city’s biggest park, and the trio of art institutions clustered at its northern end — the Museum of Anthropology, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Tamayo Museum for contemporary art.
For much of the last century, the neighborhoods that flank Reforma — Colonia Cuauhtémoc to the north and Juarez to the south — were the center of the city’s international population. Wealthy Mexican families, foreigners, and diplomats were drawn here by embassies and banks and streets named for the great rivers and cities of the world they once called home: Ganges, Danubio, and Rhin; Londres, Hamburgo, and Berlín. From their development in the early 20th century onward, these areas have expressed Mexico’s global ambitions. They still do.
Ryo Kan , a guesthouse that opened in April in Cuauhtémoc, takes its neighborhood’s global spirit to heart, bringing the intimate calm of the traditional Japanese inns it’s named after to the heart of the Mexican capital. While other new boutique hotels in the city revel in Mexico’s mid-century elegance, Ryo Kan is tranquil and subdued, compact and efficient, a meditation in pale oak and terrazzo. “Japan and Mexico have a lot in common — our ceramics, our textiles, our uses of natural materials. We wanted to find those parallels,” says Regina Galvanduque, the lead architect on the Ryo Kan project.
Ryo Kan is the most recent of a number of Japanese-inspired businesses to open along Cuauhtémoc’s subdued, tree-lined streets. In the past six years, the Edo Kobayashi restaurant group, run by Edo López, has created a small empire there, with an izakaya and ramen spot called Rokai, a tiny bar called Le Tachinomi Desu serving sake and natural wines, and a listening bar inspired by Tokyo’s Ginza Music Bar.
Wander a few minutes south into the Zona Rosa, the historic gay neighborhood at the center of Colonia Juarez, and you’ll find it hard not to feel transported. Banners for cheap cafés, Korean lunch joints, and neon-lit gay bars obscure the façades of old houses built in an inexplicable (and inexplicably pleasing) hodgepodge of architectural styles from France, Italy, Britain, and Spain.
In the evenings, crowds spill onto the broad pavement of Plaza Washington from the garage-like edifice of Cicatriz , an all-day café run by a sister-brother team of American expats, Scarlett and Jake Lindeman. Most of their customers — who come for coffee and cocktails, natural wines, and fried-chicken sandwiches — wouldn’t look out of place in New York, Los Angeles, London, or Paris. That’s because many of them hail from just those places: the most recent group of immigrants to call Juarez home. San Miguel Chapultepec
The long communal table that runs down the center of the restaurant Masala y Maíz had been laid out with bowls of spices — some of them familiar to Mexican palates (cumin, cinnamon, cloves, and black pepper), others (coriander seed, ginger, and star anise) less so. Chefs Norma Listman, originally from the nearby town of Texcoco, and Saqib Keval, born in northern California to an Indian family from East Africa, circulated, greeting guests. Seated at the center of the table, the restaurant’s first artist in residence, Sita Kuratomi Bhaumik, began her talk on the origins of Indian chai. The conversation then segued to the spices in front of us and how some made their way into Mexican kitchens. Chefs Saqib Keval and Norma Listman of Masala y Maíz restaurant, in San Miguel Chapultepec. Lindsay Lauckner Gundlock
Masala y Maíz had opened a few months earlier in the quietly elegant colonia of San Miguel Chapultepec, a triangle of leafy streets that separates Condesa from the Bosque de Chapultepec. Right away, it was a space obsessed with hybridity: an artists’ residency, an ambitious full-service restaurant, and a coffee shop serving house-made doughnuts from a window connecting the kitchen to the street. That evening, it was also a workshop for a handful of curious people, an event that was local in its reach, yet cosmopolitan in its vision.
For Listman and Keval, the menu at Masala y Maíz is a reflection of the mestizaje, or cultural mixing, that has defined Mexican culture since the Spanish conquest. Here, huevos rancheros come with South Indian uttapam flatbreads in place of tortillas. Giant prawns are coated in Ethiopian berbere and served with jicama and rose water. Patra de hoja santa, a riff on an Indian snack of spiced chickpea batter, trades the traditional taro leaf for southern Mexico’s emblematic herb, hoja santa.
San Miguel was not an obvious choice for this kind of restaurant. Peaceful and residential, the area is best known for its access to the Bosque de Chapultepec, never more than a few blocks away; for the pretty cobblestoned lanes that line its southern side; and for the beloved white-tablecloth cantina, El Mirador de Chapultepec, that has been a favorite among city politicians for decades. It’s also notable for its proximity to several essential design institutions, including the influential gallery Kurimanzutto, which turns 20 this year. Casa Luis Barragán, the former home of Mexico’s Pritzker-winning 20th-century architectural master Luis Barragán, lies just beyond the colonia’s western edge, and the renowned Archivo de Diseño y Arquitectura exhibition space sits right next door to Barragán’s house.
San Miguel is a perfect place for peaceful walks past magnificent private homes secreted away behind humble Neocolonial façades, for whiling away hours in quiet corners of the Bosque de Chapultepec, or for sipping hibiscus mead brewed right here in the city, a specialty at Masala y Maíz. It’s also a perfect place to reflect on something Chilangos have known for ages: that Mexico City isn’t just the capital of the Spanish-speaking world, or the biggest city in North America. A city of immigrants and innovation, built and rebuilt with a zealous lust for the new, blasted by tragedy, sustained by passion and pragmatism — Ciudad de México is, and always has been, the great city of the Americas. Plan a Perfect Stay in Mexico City
For a manageable microcosm of this vast metropolis, stick to these parts of the historic Cuauhtémoc borough. Pick one as your base, and spend your days exploring the others. Getting Around
Despite its size, Mexico City is relatively easy to navigate, particularly if you stay within the central neighborhoods. Comfortable year-round temperatures make it a great city for walking. The Metro is the most efficient way to cover longer distances, though it’s best avoided at rush hour. Uber is also a good option here. Centro Histórico
Hotels
The Downtown Mexico (doubles from $230) , set in a 17th-century palace, has an elegant rooftop bar and pool.
Eat & Drink
Arrive early to avoid the crowds at Don Vergas (21 Ernesto Pugibet; entrées $7–$32) , a stall in the Mercado San Juan that serves some of the city’s best seafood. Dip into a historic cantina like Salón España (25 Avda. República de Argentina) , La Ópera (10 Cinco de Mayo) , or La Faena (49 Venustiano Carranza) to break up a day of sightseeing. For dinner, stop at the beloved mezcal bar Bósforo (31 Luis Moya) , then try the chic, nameless restaurant next door (entrées $8–$12) .
Activities
Shop for whimsical fashion at Hi-Bye , and pick up a bottle of mezcal at Sabrá Diós (15 Avda. Veracruz), in Condesa . If you’re interested in local crafts, make an appointment to visit the showroom at Ven a Mi and keep an eye out for retail pop-ups like Momo Room . Santa María la Ribera & San Rafael
Hotels
The boutique hotel El Patio 77 (doubles from $125) makes for a peaceful base in a central but relatively unexplored area.
Eat & Drink
Find the best tamales in the city at Cintli (174 Calle Sabino), a no-frills storefront in Santa María la Ribera. Salón París (152 Jaime Torres Bodet) is a great traditional cantina, while La Polar (birria $7) makes superb birria (beef stew).
Activities
The magnificent Geology Museum , in Santa María’s main plaza, has a beautifully displayed collection. For contemporary art, don’t miss Casa Wabi (casawabi.org) and the Museo Experimental El Eco , a masterpiece of mid-century Mexican design. A temporary exhibit by the artist TO at Museo Experimental El Eco, in San Rafael. Lindsay Lauckner Gundlock Juarez & Colonia Cuauhtémoc
Hotels
The newly opened Ryo Kan (doubles from $150) brings Japanese tranquility to the city’s business district.
Eat & Drink
You’ll find some of Mexico City’s best international restaurants in these neighborhoods, from small plates at natural-wine bar Le Tachinomi Desu (small plates $5–$8) to a remarkable omakase at Sushi Kyo (set menus from $75). Salón Ríos (218 Río Lerma; entrées $8–$30) is a great place for updated Mexican classics, while Cicatriz (entrées $3–$6) is ideal for a salad or an evening cocktail.
Activities
The Anthropology Museum has an extraordinary collection of Mesoamerican artifacts. Next door, Museo Tamayo shows modern, contemporary, and folk art, while the Museo de Arte Moderno focuses, as its name suggests, on modern art. San Miguel Chapultepec
Eat & Drink
The menu at Masala y Maíz (small plates $5–$9) explores the commonalities among the cuisines of Mexico, India, and East Africa, while El Mirador de Chapultepec (sharing plates $7–$10) is one of the city’s classic cantinas.
Activities
Book well in advance for a tour of Casa Luis Barragán , former home of the Pritzker-winning architect. Nearby, Casa Gilardi , the last house Barragán built before his death, also offers tours by appointment. Next door to the Barragán house is the Archivo de Diseño y Arquitectura , a small exhibition space and reading room devoted to Mexican design with a beautiful garden in back. Twenty years after opening, Kurimanzutto , in the neighborhood’s peaceful heart, is still among the most influential galleries in North America.  You May Like Sign Up for our Newsletter Receive exclusive travel deals, insider tips, inspiration, breaking news updates, and more.

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SMALL LUXURY HOTELS OF THE WORLD™

SMALL LUXURY HOTELS OF THE WORLD™ SMALL LUXURY HOTELS OF THE WORLD™ February 20, 2019 HOTELS INTRODUCES STYLISH HOTELS IN EPIC LANDSCAPES Small Luxury Hotels of the World (SLH) is celebrating the month of love by introducing three new romantic hotels in breathtaking destinations including Comporta in Portugal, Raa Atoll in The Maldives and Santa Teresa de Cobano in Costa Rica. Each hotel blends into its natural environment, surrounded by lush vegetation and offering unparalleled sea views that are meant to be enjoyed with loved ones. Ski lovers will also be delighted with the introduction of two elegant mountain retreats in South Tyrol and Zermatt that fuse contemporary style with Alpine chalet charm. These latest SLH member hotels offer an ideal snapshot of the independently minded portfolio. Visit www.slh.com to find out more. Quinta Da Comporta Wellness Retreat, Comporta, Portugal 61 Deluxe rooms, 4 Pool Villas and three bedrooms from MYR1,350 per night including breakfast www.slh.com/hotels/quinta-da-comporta Opens 15 th March 2019 Located in the heart of Comporta’s idyllic village, Quinta da Comporta is the new sustainable signature project envisioned and designed by renowned Portuguese architect, Miguel Câncio Martins. Nestled on a stunning 17-hectare estate, surrounded by undulating umbrella pines and cork trees, wild sand dunes, stunning rice fields and over 60km of pristine, white-sand beaches, the hotel features whitewashed walls and cool-toned touches, reflective of both traditional Portuguese style and contemporary design. Each room has a luxurious beach hut feel, with rustic-style furniture drawn from a natural colour palette and sun-bleached woods that merge seamlessly with the hotel’s beautiful surroundings. The restaurant serves organic and fresh produce that is locally sourced and harvested in the hotel’s Bio Garden. Rising out of the Rice Fields just over the heated Infinity Pool, Oryza Spa uses rice as the core element of inspiration, sourcing its health and holistic benefits through the development of innovative treatments and products that are exclusive to the spa. SLH Insider Tip: Guests should pay a visit to Comporta Café on Comporta beach, a rustic lounge bar featuring a row of white cabanas and DJs spinning house music at sunset. It is a great place to enjoy a cocktail or a plate of seafood. Faarufushi Maldives, Raa Atoll, Maldives 80 rooms from MYR3,577 per night including breakfast and dinner www.slh.com Opens March 2019 Bringing barefoot luxury to the remote northern Raa Atoll, Faarufushi Maldives will welcome guests from March 2019 with 80 spacious villas that offer a striking realisation of contemporary design amidst a naturally stunning seascape. Hidden among palm trees are 10 Beach Bungalows and 27 Beach Retreats, whilst 39 sleek Ocean Retreats with Pool are positioned over the island’s sparkling azure lagoon. For the ultimate indulgence, the Island Residence comes complete with an individual expansive infinity pool overlooking at its very own stretch of the Indian Ocean. The hotel’s Nika Spa blends into the lush vegetation of the island with six treatment rooms and a garden compound with a hydro pool surrounded by outdoor lounges and relaxation pavilions. The Faarufushi house reef boasts magnificent coral overhangs and swim throughs, allowing guests to discover the abundant marine life that lies beneath the waves. This spectacular reef will be the ideal experience for divers and snorkelers alike. SLH Insider Tip: At the reef’s edge, the overwater bar with alfresco seating provides the perfect sunset view as well as a great location to enjoy floral and tea-inspired cocktails. Hotel Nantipa, Santa Teresa de Cobano, Costa Rica 15 rooms from MYR1,493 per night including breakfast www.slh.com Opens February 2019 Immersed in the surf culture of Santa Teresa on the Nicoya Peninsula, Hotel Nantipa is set to make waves in this picturesque part of Costa Rica with every design element inspired by the ocean and the sky – right down to its name, which means ‘blue’ in the native Nicoya tribal language. The cloud-nine boutique retreat offers beach-edge suites and bungalows with hammocks and garden, pool or ocean views ensuring guests have the sand between their toes and the soothing sound of the sea in their ears from dusk til dawn. Beautifully positioned right on the beach, Nantipa’s restaurant serves creative Costa Rican cuisine with a side of sunset views. The zingy ceviche assortments and the grilled seafood are staples on the authentic menu that also features favourites like tacos, gallos, casados among other local delicacies. With the wildlife-rich jungle behind and the ocean in front, there is plenty to do in the area from surf lessons and beach horseback riding to visiting the mighty Montezuma Waterfall or taking a boat to the talcum powder sands of Tortuga Island. SLH Insider Tip: The beach in front of Nantipa has scenic rocks with small tide pools perfect for children to dip in before enjoying a swim in the 270 square meters pool at the center of the property. Hotel Schweizerhof, Zermatt, Switzerland www.slh.com Re-opened 21 st December 2018 Recently acquired by Michel Reybier, the iconic Schweizerhof Zermatt at the foot of the Matterhorn in the heart of The Alps, re-opened on 21 st December, transformed, ready for the 2019 ski season. The new style is warm and bold, with alpine charm, including soft rugs and wood which are present throughout. Some of the in-room technology includes Chromecast devices for screen mirroring, Netflix and Spotify account access, smart lighting control and RFID room keys. A client app also enables guests to book their table and pay their bill, book spa treatments, open their room, speak with the in-house teams, reserve ski equipment and check the slope conditions. The Spa by Schweizerhof offers an exclusive list of spa treatments created with cosmeceutical products from Nescens, the Swiss anti-ageing science. Guests will also be kept entertained with an indoor swimming pool, three saunas open 24/7, a Turkish bath and a fitness centre, while yoga masterclass and private fitness coach are also available. SLH Insider Tip: The Valais region is honoured in each dish at the hotel’s Cheese Factory: a table with a decidedly Swiss “stübli” feel, where raclette and fondue can be shared in an atmosphere roused by the Alpen horn and Swiss folk music. Try one of the unashamedly rich desserts on the menu including the meringue with red berries served with Gruyère double cream. Hotel Montchalet, South Tyrol, Italy 17 rooms from MYR2,100 per night including breakfast www.slh.com Set in the idyllic mountain village of Ortisei, in Val Gardena, Hotel Montchalet is surrounded by the soaring natural wonders of the Dolomites, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The property combines four ranges of luxury suites (silver, gold, platinum and VIP) featuring pebble tones and crisp whites, silver tints and charcoal accents – alongside beautifully exposed wood. Some of the suites even include their own private infrared saunas as well as steam baths and outdoor Jacuzzis. Its spa and wellness area has been designed to ensure deep relaxation boasting unique facilities such as futuristic floating sunbeds by NU RELAX, an indoor pool, experience showers and a fitness area with Technogym machines. When it comes to gastronomy, the smartly-dressed dining room exudes a sense of high-altitude glitz serving wellness cuisine with reimagined traditional Tyrolean recipes. The property provides daily Maserati transfers to Europe’s finest slopes as well as sleigh rides and snowshoeing during the winter. SLH Insider Tip: Guests looking to enjoy active holidays need only ask the hotel’s knowledgeable concierge team. From organising golf or tennis lessons, mountain biking, paragliding to hiking routes in the Dolomites, they know the region like the back of their hands. And in other news… Casa Madrona Hotel & Spa Completes Multi-Million Wellness Renovation – Sausalito, USA Overlooking Sausalito’s boat-filled harbour on Richardson’s Bay, Casa Madrona Hotel & Spa is unveiling a multi-million-dollar renovation with a focus on the lobby and a new Wellness Experience. The recent renovation focused on the following spaces: newly constructed modern lobby with 20 foot stone wall and co-working space; the spa with three bright treatment rooms; a dedicated Wellness Courtyard with a 62-inch television featuring Fitness-On-Demand workouts; and nine dedicated Wellness Guest Rooms, with tech forward amenities. The final stage of the renovation, due to be completed in Spring 2019, is a cutting-edge fitness room with Peloton spin bikes and classes. Giving guests a glance into the future, Casa Madrona will be the first hotel to introduce a sleep fitness program leveraging innovative technology and personal biometrics. Rockliffe Hall’s Gym Gets Makeover – Darlington, United Kingdom Rockliffe Hall has invested £200,000 in a complete refurbishment of its gym to help maintain the five red star resort’s position as one of the most prestigious in the UK. The gym includes the most up-to-date cardio, resistance and functional training equipment from Technogym, official supplier to the Olympic and Paralympic Games for the last two decades. Rockliffe Hall’s gym has also been completely redecorated to finish off its fresh new look. The new-look gym also includes a larger free-weight and functional area, while retaining the Kinesis Wall and MyWellness software. Stein Eriksen Residences Unveils New Restaurant The 7-8-8-0 Club – Utah, USA Stein Eriksen Residences , the finest mountain lodging experience in modern luxury, welcomes guests to its onsite dining establishment, The 7-8-8-0 Club, now open for the 2019 winter season. The latest addition to Stein Collection’s world-renowned restaurants, The 7-8-8-0 Club features an innovative menu of new favourites and savoury foods with convenient ski-out/ski-in access for skiers enjoying the slopes of Deer Valley Resort. Menu items include delectable dishes like Short Rib Poutine, Edamame & Cashew Hummus with Crudité Vegetables, and Utah Smoked Trout Mousse. Winter season brings an après-ski experience that is impeccably complemented by the spectacular snow-capped mountain views while cool summer nights pair perfectly with the open terrace and inviting fire pits – not to mention the expansive vistas. Mi Amor Presents A New Program of Culinary Styles that Deliciously Push the Boundaries – Tulum, Mexico Headed by award-winning Chef Paul Bentley, Mi Amor’s culinary program broadens its horizons with an exciting program of guest chefs. The series runs through May, with one dinner per month, welcoming diners interested in new urban flavour sensations and fanciful cocktails. The dates and menus for the upcoming months are April 19, Justin Smillie from Upland Restaurant in New York will be introducing a menu of Asian and Italian influences with a California overtone; and May 29, Chef Christian Page from Los Angeles will be offering an evening of Mediterranean fare. Jasper Soffer of NYC’s acclaimed Mulberry Project has also designed an ingredient-driven cocktail program exclusively for Mi Amor, categorized under such headings as Gin & Tonic, Champagne Cocktails, or with fun creations like Sonny & Cher, a tangy mix of tangerine and Aperol. Eat Jersey Food Festival Returns to The Atlantic Hotel in March 2019 – Jersey, Channel Islands Celebrating 25 years of SLH membership this year, The Atlantic Hotel will be toasting the return of the Eat Jersey Food Festival from 22 nd to 23 rd March 2019 with two events at the Ocean Restaurant. On Friday 22 nd March, Executive Chef Will Holland will be joined by a line-up of acclaimed chefs from Jersey and Britain to celebrate the finest island produce and dining. On Saturday 23rd March, Ocean Restaurant embraces ‘Social Saturday’, an exclusive pop-up restaurant for one day only in partnership with the renowned Social Eating House, London. Will Holland will be joined by Chef Patron Paul Hood for a collaborative ‘four-hands’ menu of dishes for lunch and dinner service. ABOUT SMALL LUXURY HOTELS OF THE WORLD: Small Luxury Hotels of the World™ (SLH) matches independently minded guests with independently spirited hotels. The diverse collection of over 500 hotels in more than 80 countries around the world includes everything from cutting edge design hotels and city centre sanctuaries to historic country mansions and remote private islands – all SLH hotels are consistently different, however, they are all united by the fact that they offer the best locations, highest quality, personalised service and a truly authentic way to discover a destination. Guests can join SLH’s loyalty programme, INVITED, to receive Small Luxuries from their very first visit. Reservations for any SLH hotel can be made online at www.slh.com or via the iPhone app, by contacting a travel agent or calling a Small Luxury Hotels of the World reservations office; click here to view a listing by country. SMALL LUXURY HOTELS OF THE WORLD™

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Nashville recycling, rural hospitals and a sweet adoption story: The Dose.

Cayce Homes Resident Association President John Zirker outside of his home in the Cayce Homes in Nashville, Tenn., Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019. (Photo11: Andrew Nelles / The Tennessean) Public housing in the United State is chronically underfunded, leading to an insurmountable backlog of deferred maintenance. The Department of Housing and Urban Development estimated that $25.6 billion in repairs were needed in 2010. In many cities, aging subsidized buildings have been demolished but not replaced.
Hope springs eternal : John Zirker, president of the Cayce Place Resident Association, has been watching construction crews build his new home from his apartment.
“It’s going to be beautiful,” he said from his porch. “We are holding our breath in prayer that the promises will be kept.”
Meet the recycling ‘police officer’ who puts ‘OOPS!’ stickers on your contaminated bins Public Works veteran Ricky Lloyd goes out inspecting recycling bins several times a week.
Do they have plastic bags, Styrofoam or glass inside? OOPS! He slaps on a sticker.
Buy Photo Public Works employee Ricky Lloyd inspects a resident’s recycling can to look for non-recyclable items. He will place a sticker on the can to notify residents of items not allowed in the recycling stream. (Photo11: Shelley Mays / The Tennessean)
It’s Lloyd’s way of helping 102,000 Nashville resident recyclers learn what they can and cannot recycle. The biggest recycling “no no” is plastic bags. That includes grocery bags, baggies, shopping bags and even wine bags.
For more of the “no, nos” and “uh ohs,” here’s Ms. Cheap’s column on her mistakes .
GET THE DOSE IN YOUR INBOX : News for your family and your life
44-year-old Nashville bar, the Gold Rush, closes its doors. Here’s why. Customers used to stream into Gold Rush after concerts for a beer and a cigarette.
Buy Photo The Gold Rush in Nashville opened in 1974. (Photo11: Shelley Mays, /Tennessean)
The decades-old bar is a historic part of Nashville’s “Rock Block” — a place so named as one of the few locations in town where live rock music, rather than country, is a regular feature at the Exit/In venue across the street.
But, General Manager Frank Hall says, Gold Rush just isn’t drawing like it used to.
“We tried everything we can,” he says. “We just can’t get enough people in here.”
A developer is interested in replacing the brick bar at 2205 Elliston Place with a luxury boutique hotel. But plans aren’t finalized.
Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Some of the former Nashville restaurants that closed their doors for good Fullscreen Post to Facebook Posted! A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.
Buy Photo Ronnie and Mindy Thomas of Nashville enjoy their dinner at Arthur’s at Union Station Hotel June 27, 1998. Ricky Rogers / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Guests at Arthur’s watch Joe McGovern, the captain, making the cafe diablo while the flaming bananas foster is cooking June 27, 1998. Ricky Rogers / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Arthur’s executive chef Julio Orantes, left, laughs with Marc Silverstein, host of “The Best Of” on the food network, as they tape a show for the cable network while visiting Nashville March 18, 2002. Bill Steber / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Marc Silverstein, left, host of “The Best Of” for the Food Network, interviews Arthur’s co-owner Jaime Camara in the lobby of Union Station for an episode of the show set in Nashville March 18, 2002. Bill Steber / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Clay Coble, right, a retired educator makes his way through the line at the Belle Meade Cafeteria as Bukurie Zymeri hands him his plate Dec. 31, 2003. The cafeteria is the city’s oldest free standing restaurant and maintains it old charm and classic taste. Matthew H. Starling / For The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Bobby Spurlock, a waiter at The Belle Meade Cafeteria carries a tray to a guest as the lunch time crowd fills the room Dec. 31, 2003. Matthew H. Starling / For The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Robert Zirter, Corey Nix, Jeff Watson and owner Brian Glasser stand in The Belle Meade Cafeteria Dec. 31, 2003 which is the city’s oldest free standing restaurant. Matthew H. Starling / For The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Kelly Mattox, left, of Nashville reads “The South Beach Diet” while dining at the Belle Meade Cafeteria Sept. 14, 2004. Mattox eats at the restaurant on Harding Pike once a week. Mandy Lunn / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Gus McGlasken has been working at the Belle Meade Cafeteria “for some 25 plus years now,” he says as he carries food to his tables Dec. 21, 2006. Owner Corey Nix said he expects about 40 jobs to be lost when the restaurant closes. Billy Kingsley / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Courtney Dodge, left, is making desserts at the new Candyland Restaurant Sept. 4, 1985. The eatery in the Westgate Shopping Center is the first major expansion of the 65-year-old downtown Candyland. Kathleen Smith / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Anne Beasley Fahey, a loyal Candyland patron, celebrates her 90th birthday with a sandwich and Coca-Cola at the new eatery in the Westgate Shopping Center Sept. 4, 1985. Kathleen Smith / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The Captain, Paul Vandenbergh, front, serves up seafood Jan. 16, 1975 at his Captain Paulo’s restaurant tucked into a cluster of shops at the corner of Riverside Drive, east of the river off Gallatin Road. The restaurant squeezes up to 1,200 hungry, devoted customers into its three small rooms each day. Kit Luce / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Don Dickerson, 32, the first Nashvillian to buy a mixed drink here legally, carefully inspects a cocktail menu at the Cross Keys Restaurant Nov. 16, 1967. The state Alcoholic Beverage Commission approved licenses for five applicants in the Nashville area recently. Bill Preston / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Sonny Durante, right, division director of Shoney’s Big Boy Enterprises, talks Dec. 27, 1973 with Shoney’s president Ray Danner in front of the new Fifth Quarter Steak House and Cocktail Lounge at the intersection of Thompson Lane and Murfreesboro Road. Jack Corn / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo A sign at the Fifth Quarter Steak House reads “God Bless America” Sept. 12, 2001, a popular slogan for numerous businesses along Murfreesboro Road after the World Trade Center aftermath. Lisa Nipp / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Linda Joyce Simpson gives the thumbs up sign as she hefts a mug of beer following an exercise in equal rights at the bar of the Gerst Haus Restaurant March 1, 1975. Angered by reports that the restaurant had refused to serve unescorted women at its bar, about a dozen women from Nashville Women’s Center marched in at high noon to test the policy. Frank Empson / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo A bratwurst sandwich, center, and other German cuisine awaits diners as kitchen manager Don Scott cooks up more orders during lunch at the Gerst Haus Restaurant Aug. 14, 1998. The Nashville landmark is moving due to the building of the football stadium. Jared Lazarus / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Benny Still, left, and Drew Denton high five as they enjoy beers with Keith Vaughn at the Gerst Haus Restaurant Aug. 27, 1998. Vaughn has been going to the Gerst Haus since it opened at the present local. The Gerst House will closed those doors for good Aug. 29 because of the football stadium. Nina Long / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The patrons packed the bar as they enjoy the Gerst Haus Restaurant Aug. 18, 2000. Billy Kingsley / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Waiter Angela Sanders gets ready to carry plates of food, including sausage, pork and Kielbasa, to guests at the Gerst Haus Restaurant Aug. 18, 2000. Billy Kingsley / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Terry Hundley and Audrey Brown talk over dessert as they enjoy their meal at the Gerst Haus Restaurant Aug. 18, 2000. Billy Kingsley / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Patron Tim Lowery of Nashville enjoys a cigarette at the bar of the Gerst Haus Restaurant despite the smoking ban Sept. 30, 2007. Sanford Myers / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Indian portraits, antique chandeliers and the familiar “Nashville” sign from the Robert Altman film all blend in to give the Gold Rush here Sept. 9, 1976 a look straight out of the Old West. The Elliston Place establishment recently reopened its doors as an expanded restaurant. Robert Johnson / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo In the new addition to the Gold Rush here Sept. 9, 1976, one can enjoy sandwiches on “Texas Toast” or Mexican food in an atmosphere harking back to the stand-up saloon days of the wild, wild West. The Elliston Place establishment recently reopened its doors as an expanded restaurant. Robert Johnson / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo In the new addition to the Gold Rush here Sept. 9, 1976, one can enjoy sandwiches on “Texas Toast” or Mexican food in an atmosphere harking back to the stand-up saloon days of the wild, wild West. The Elliston Place establishment recently reopened its doors as an expanded restaurant. Robert Johnson / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Austin Casassa, left, Ryan Casassa, Julie Casassa and Curt Casassa wait for their food at Ireland’s Nov. 23, 1997. Delores Delvin / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Danny Proctor, left, and Daryl Pike eat dinner at Ireland’s restaurant Nov. 23, 1997. Delores Delvin / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Popular singer Trini Lopez, right, visits with Mario Ferrari at Mario’s Restaurant March 27, 1968. Lopez, whose variety of calypso songs made him famous, is in Nashville to record a country music album. Frank Empson / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo World heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali, left, talks with Mario Ferrari, right, owner of Mario’s Restaurant, during dinner April 23, 1975. Ali was in Nashville for a taping of a special musical production featuring Fisk University. Frank Empson / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Mario Ferarri, owner of Mario’s, is celebrating his restaurant’s 40th year anniversary as he looks out the window Aug. 24, 2005. Doug Keese / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Mario Ferrari, right, owner of Mario’s and daughter Gina Ferrari , left, wait by the entrance of the restaurant which was gutted by fire early morning Nov. 1, 2006. John Partipilo / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Fire comes through the windows at Mario’s restaurant in Nashville Sept. 16, 2008. Sanford Myers / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The newly-opened Maude’s Courtyard at 1911 Broadway is opened for lunch, like here May 17, 1978, dinner and Sunday brunch. The restaurant, owned by Morton Howell and Houston Thomas, is in the site of the former Olive Tree restaurant. Jimmy Ellis / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The newly-opened Maude’s Courtyard at 1911 Broadway is opened for lunch, like here May 17, 1978, dinner and Sunday brunch. The restaurant, owned by Morton Howell and Houston Thomas, is in the site of the former Olive Tree restaurant. Jimmy Ellis / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The newly-opened Maude’s Courtyard at 1911 Broadway is opened for lunch, like here May 17, 1978, dinner and Sunday brunch. The restaurant, owned by Morton Howell and Houston Thomas, is in the site of the former Olive Tree restaurant. Jimmy Ellis / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Michele Rose, left, and Marilyn McCabe enjoy coffee and food at Provence Breads and Cafe in Hillsboro Village Oct. 25, 1999. Robert Johnson / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The addition of French berets for Bastille Day in the Village, along with their French aprons, Devon Hedgecoth, left, Kelda Olson, Jessica Limbird and Whitney May help serve customers at Provence Breads and Cafe July 14, 2000. Randy Piland / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Dallas Mayberry counts loaves of Tuscan bread as the bread makers shape the dough at the new Provence wholesale site on 12th Avenue South Dec. 11, 2001. Lisa Nipp / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Pastry Chef Megan Williams works in the Provence bakery on the Gulch July 30, 2009. John Partipilo / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The popular lunch spot, Satsuma Tea room at 417 Union St. in downtown Nashville, is closed Oct. 30, 1985 as repairs are being made. Kathleen Smith / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Betty Smith, an owner of the Satsuma Tea room, is standing in the kitchen of the closed restaurant Oct. 30, 1985 while son David takes a break from pouring concrete in the basement of the building at 417 Union St. The Truman Smith family, operators of the restaurant for 20 years, is making repairs in hopes of re-opening the popular lunch spot. Kathleen Smith / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo .A long line goes out the door as customers waits to get lunch at the Satsuma Tea Room downtown on it’s last day of business as it closed the door on one of Nashville’s oldest restaurant April 13, 2001. Ricky Rogers / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The Duck family, Joe and Cindy, with their two daughters, Emilie, right, and Erin, eating lunch as others wait to get their table April 13, 2001. Cindy Duck, who worked downtown and has been a regular at the Satsuma Tea Room, plans for the family to have lunch there because the kids were out of school. But she didn’t know that the restaurant was closing it’s doors for good after today. Ricky Rogers / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Satsuma Tea Room waitress Bevelry Moss waits on the famous men’s table for the last time April 13, 2001 as the restaurant is closing it’s doors for good. Moss has worked there off and on for the past 23 years. Ricky Rogers / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The “ribs” of the greenhouse front at Spats newly opened restaurant make a strong design in an ornate setting inside with ferns, flowers and Art Deco chandeliers. Designer Herbert L.V. Hughes of San Francisco, posing here Aug. 15, 1978, is responsible for the redesigning of Spats after its fire last April. Gerald Holly / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Pat Weaver of Mt. Juliet is munching on a rib from Spats at Belle Meade Mansion for the “Taste of Our Town” event Sept. 21, 1985. Kathleen Smith / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The Spats restaurant, here at 1601 21st Ave. S. Oct. 6, 1987, was established in 1973 by Howard Lippmann’s Hillsboro Foods. The successful restaurant was the first place in Nashville where you could order ribs and eat them sitting down. Robert Johnson / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The Spats restaurant, here at 1601 21st Ave. S. Oct. 6, 1987, was established in 1973 by Howard Lippmann’s Hillsboro Foods. The successful restaurant was the first place in Nashville where you could order ribs and eat them sitting down. Robert Johnson / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Laura Cooke, serves up plates at the Sunset Grill at 2001 Belcourt Ave. April 6, 2000. Nina Long / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Randy Rayburn, left, owner of Sunset Grill in Hillsboro Village, set up the orders in the kitchen Oct. 17, 2006 during the lunch crowd. Cookers are Al Rubio, center, and Randy McClendon. Ricky Rogers / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Servers wait on the dinners Oct. 17, 2006 patio of the Sunset Grill in Hillsboro Village. Ricky Rogers / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Server Adam Maxwell, back right, takes the dinners order Oct. 17, 2006 at the Sunset Grill in Hillsboro Village. Ricky Rogers / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Chef Chris Cunningham working at Sunset Grill March 25, 2014 in the Hillsboro Village. Larry McCormack / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo The chowder is served with a song at The Fisherman restaurant on West End Feb. 7, 1975. Waitress and co-manager Donna Ragan serves Mrs. and Mr. Mike Grace at the unique seafood establishment. Jimmy Ellis / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Bill Carmen, owner of The Shack Seafood Restaurant, is getting ready to welcomes patrons June 9, 1987 with a complimentary bowl of peanuts – and isn’t at all distressed when the floor is littered with shells. The Shack, in a building reminiscent of coastal seafood shanties, is about two miles north of Rivergate Mall and has been serving the area for 13 years. Rick Musacchio / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo John Fitzgerald waiter and soda Jerk at Vandyland whips up some shakes for a couple of kids Aug. 14, 2000. Freeman Ramsey / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Michael Mayo, left, 10, and Will Holt, 9, students at Oak Hill School enjoy a big chocolate shake at Vandyland on West End Aug. 14, 2000. Both youngsters are regular customers. Freeman Ramsey / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo A crowd gathers outside Vandyland on West End Sept. 21, 2000 to listen on speakers as George Bush talks with supporters inside the ice cream parlor. Larry McCormack / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Vandyland owners Bea and Mitchell Givens and their daughter Malinda Abell stand outside the Vandyland store off West End May 14, 2002. Michelle Lord / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Wyatt Allen, left, 63 and Glenda Higgins, 64, both been faithful patrons for several years, enjoy their meal at Vandyland May 14, 2002. Michelle Lord / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Customer fill the inside and line the outside as they wait for a chance to sample the food at Vandyland one last time May 19, 2006 before the longtime eatery close its doors. Larry McCormack / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Buy Photo Long time customer Ham Wallace gets a hug from waitress Malinda Abell, left, and owner Bea Givens in the final minutes that Vandyland was open May 19, 2006. Larry McCormack / The Tennessean Buy Photo Fullscreen Interested in this topic? You may also want to view these photo galleries: Replay 1 of 62 2 of 62 3 of 62 4 of 62 5 of 62 6 of 62 7 of 62 8 of 62 9 of 62 10 of 62 11 of 62 12 of 62 13 of 62 14 of 62 15 of 62 16 of 62 17 of 62 18 of 62 19 of 62 20 of 62 21 of 62 22 of 62 23 of 62 24 of 62 25 of 62 26 of 62 27 of 62 28 of 62 29 of 62 30 of 62 31 of 62 32 of 62 33 of 62 34 of 62 35 of 62 36 of 62 37 of 62 38 of 62 39 of 62 40 of 62 41 of 62 42 of 62 43 of 62 44 of 62 45 of 62 46 of 62 47 of 62 48 of 62 49 of 62 50 of 62 51 of 62 52 of 62 53 of 62 54 of 62 55 of 62 56 of 62 57 of 62 58 of 62 59 of 62 60 of 62 61 of 62 62 of 62 Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Last Slide Next Slide Numbers worth knowing Rural hospitals are collapsing in Tennessee, creating health care deserts in poor, far-flung towns Residents in rural areas can be the most vulnerable among us. But as health care has become more expensive and health insurance lags, many rural hospitals have been unable to pay their bills, causing them to shrink or shut their doors .
In Tennessee, the crisis of hospital closures falls to new Gov. Bill Lee, who campaigned as a countryside candidate who would protect the state’s underserved, rural areas . So far, Lee has promised money, but it remains to be seen if the governor can find a fix before more facilities shut down.
Here’s a look at the issue by the numbers:
Nine rural hospitals : Have closed their doors across Tennessee since 2012. A 10th facility, Cumberland River Hospital, is scheduled to close in March. Others have eliminated all inpatient services, becoming husks of their former selves.
Rural hospitals and doctors have not seen a boost in the number of insured patients under the Affordable Care Act, in large part because many in their communities live and work beneath the threshold that makes health care affordable. (Photo11: File / AP)
62 years: How long Copper Basin Medical Center, an independently owned hospital with about 25 beds, served Ducktown, Copperhill and the other old mining communities of Polk County, which is home to 17,000 people in Tennessee’s southeastern corner. Mounting debt pushed Copper Basin to close its doors for the final time 16 months ago.
$3 million : Amount set aside by Tennessee lawmakers last summer when they passed the Tennessee Rural Hospital Transformation Act. The money goes toward hiring consultants to help rural hospitals become more financially viable and stop the hemorrhaging.
CLOSE For 62 years, Copper Basin Medical Center, served Ducktown, Copperhill and the other old mining communities of Polk County. It closed in 2017. Ayrika L Whitney and Shelley Mays, Nashville Tennessean
GET THE DOSE IN YOUR INBOX : A weekly shot of news you can actually use
All the good feels 60-year-old Franklin woman finally looks for her birth family — and finds her mom in Greece While riding to dinner after a busy day, Linda Carol Trotter finally got a chance to check her email. One subject line caught her attention.
“Take a seat first,” it read.
The email came from the professor who had been helping her track down her long-lost biological family in Greece. Trotter’s stomach jumped into her throat.
Tennessean columnist Brad Schmitt tells us more about a Tennessee woman’s ocean-crossing search for the birth mother she didn’t know she had .
Linda Carol Trotter, left, hugs her birth mother, Charikleia Noula Foka, days after they were reunited in Greece in June 2017. (Photo11: Submitted)
Quote: of the week “We want to make sure that in this moment of prosperity, that no matter who you love or what you look like, or no matter what your background or gender … you have a level playing field and fair shot at prosperity.” — Nashville Mayor David Briley as he signed an executive order that made Nashville the first city in the South to recognize LGBT-owned business contributions to the city . The order affirms LGBT-owned businesses as a recognized category for Metro procurement and contracting.
And, speaking of inclusion, last week Tennessee also became the first state in the South with a hate crime law protecting transgender people .
Buy Photo Mayor Briley signs executive order recognizing LGBT-owned businesses in Metro. (Photo11: Yihyun Jeong/Tennessean)
Oh, the things you should do! Expecting? Then visit BabySavings Days : With sales taking place at participating Walmart stores across the country from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, you can save on all things for the little one to come.
Book a room at Moxy Hotel : Expected to open in May, this millennial-focused Lower Broadway hotel is designed to be super hip and all about the experience. For example, arriving guests will get a free drink at check in — which will be at a bar rather than a front desk. We’ll toast to that.
Buy Photo Moxy Hotel is a new hotel coming to Lower Broadway. It’s geared to partiers and millennials with Instagram-ready photo areas and small modern rooms Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. (Photo11: Larry McCormack / The Tennessean)
GET THE DOSE IN YOUR INBOX : If you made it this far, you really should just sign up .
TELL JESSICA WHAT’S UP : Reach out to offer your thoughts for The Dose or on life in general.
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Where To Find The Best Restaurants In Melbourne’s CBD

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There’s absolutely no doubting that Melbourne is a foodie paradise. And the CBD is a great advertisement for everything that’s great in the world of food, especially when you take a walk down Flinders Lane.
But, finding the right restaurant on any given night in Melbourne is always a tough ask, so we’re here to help.
It was a tough job narrowing this list down, but we’ve done our best. These are the best restaurants in Melbourne’s CBD. Iki Jime
A sibling of Melbourne institution, Vue de Monde, Iki Jime is the place to go if you want the freshest seafood going ’round. The menu is sourced from the best local produce. And the name? That’s a reference to the Japanese practice of Iki-Jime, which promotes the humane farming of fish.
Start your evening with some Rusty Wire oysters with lemon myrtle, and follow it with the Josper-roasted Marron with fermented roasted capsicum. Or any selection of their market fish, really, served with brown butter vinaigrette, potato dashi or clam and lemon myrtle. Grossi Florentino
Who isn’t a fan of suckling pig with persimmons or fresh risotto Ortiche with nettles and Baccala? There’s no shortage of top-quality Italian food around the CBD, but really, you can’t go past Grossi Florentino .
It’s one of the city’s truly great fine dining institutions. Our pick? The ravioli with yolk, ricotta, amoretti and balsamic. Pure bliss. Tipo 00
If you’re going eat a bowl of carb-filled goodness, you might as well do it right—and that means getting down to Tipo 00 , the official king of Melbourne’s pasta scene.
For an entrée, treat yourself to kingfish, pickled cucumber and black garlic, and follow it up with the tagliatelle—cooked with a delicious concoction of braised lamb shoulder, olives and pangrattato. And don’t forget the ‘tipomisù’ for dessert, because we love a pun as much as we love pasta (and that’s a whole lot). Chin Chin
If you’ve ever walked down Flinders Lane and wondered what that massive queue was all about, congratulations—you’ve just found Chin Chin .
Still the city’s most buzzing pan-Asian eatery. Just on the other side of that door is some seriously tasty South-East Asian cuisine, in a seriously funky setting. We’re ordering the crispy barramundi and green apple salad, with caramelised pork, peanuts, chilli and lemongrass. And then the Isaan style spicy hot BBQ chicken. And that’s just for starters…get in early if you want to avoid the crowds. Supernormal
It’s only a short stroll to Flinders Lane’s other Asian masterpiece—of course, we’re talking Supernormal .
Andrew McConnell’s crown jewel and home to the most famous lobster roll in Melbourne. The Supernormal menu is changing all the time, but it’s always designed to be shared, so grab a couple of mates and try a serve of duck bao, a whole snapper with burnt butter sauce, wild watercress and shaved kombu, some beef tartare, and whatever else you can fit in. Cumulus Inc.
From one McConnell venture to another. Cumulus Inc . is one of Melbourne’s fanciest all-day eateries: part wine bar, part restaurant, part uber-packed brunch salon.
It’s also worth heading upstairs to Cumulus Up where the team hosts free wine tasting events each month. Honestly, it almost doesn’t matter what you order here. It’s all incredible.
If you need a steer, go for the kitchen charcuterie option, followed by the slow-roasted lamb shoulder with almond and smoked paprika. Vue de Monde
If you wanna talk iconic Melbourne restaurants, you really can’t go past Vue de Monde .
The brainchild of Shannon Bennett, you’re guaranteed to leave feeling satisfied after indulging in some of the city’s best classical fine dining, paired with carefully selected wines by the team’s sommeliers. It certainly won’t be cheap, but we all deserve to treat ourselves every now and then, right? Ezard
What is ‘Australian freestyle cuisine?’ you ask? Head down to Ezard and find out.
You’ll find it tucked down on Flinders Lane. Our picks? Steamed scallop dumplings with aged hon mirin dressing, smoked enoki and fragrant oil, Chinese style duck with black rice, roasted chilli and Japanese turnip and spring onion.
Teage Ezard has been at the helm of the restaurant since 1999. It’s perfect for dates. Don’t miss dessert. Ishizuka
If you’re still rolling with a big budget but have a hankering for some of the best Japanese food Melbourne has to offer, boy have we got the restaurant for you.
Ishizuka screams indulgence, with the menu changing seasonally—and daily. And we’re talking a revolving nightly set menu of 11 unbeatable dishes. And here’s the kicker: it only serves 16 lucky diners each evening. Book ahead for this one. It fills up like weeks in advance. Embla
We’re switching things up here, throwing a wine bar into the mix. Embla do some top-notch food too though, so we’re fairly secure in our decision.
The menu at Embla changes weekly to keep things fresh and be sure to book before you stroll up for an unforgettable lunch, with perfectly paired wines. Expect delicate dishes like charred octopus tentacles with borlotti beans, turnip and walnuts, or veal carpaccio, dusted with oregano, capers and tonnato. Movida
Another Melbourne institution, Movida is the place to go when you’re hankering for some Spanish tapas (us, always).
We’re talking spinach and manchego croquetas, hand-filleted Cantabrian Artisan anchovies with smoked tomato sorbet, charcoal grilled King prawns with Padron peppers and piquillo sauce—we could go on. Plus, the best fresh churros in Melbourne. Osteria Illaria
Osteria brings all the glory of Tipo00…without the pasta. Let us clarify. Co-owner and chef Andreas Papadakis was all about bringing Tipo’s soul to this new venture, but wanted to make it glorious in its own right. And that they have, with some of the best modern Italian food going ’round. We’ll have the charcoal gnocchi with carrot and taleggio cheese. Tonka
Feeling like a bit of spice? Tonka fits the bill. It’s modern, contemporary, fiery Indian cuisine, served on white tablecloths.
For saucy, spicy, succulent curries, punchy tandoor, and everything in between—you’re going to want to get down to Tonka. We suggest booking in advance, because missing out on that lamb curry with roasted coconut, black cardamom and white poppy seeds would truly be a tragedy. A Hereford Beefstouw
We’re taking you all around the world with this list. Next stop: Scandinavia. Specifically the meaty, beefy part of Scandinavia.
A Hereford Beefstouw brings you all the best of Danish cuisine, mostly in the form of steak. Don’t expect plate-sized hangers though: think tender eye fillets, dry-aged rumps and a Marble Score 4+ grass-fed 400g Sirloin that’ll knock your socks off. Don’t forget the salad bar either. Pastuso
How do you feel about Peruvian streetfood? We’re guessing pretty good, particularly after you’ve eaten at Pastuso .
It’s Melbourne CBD’s favourite Peruvian grill, cevicheria and pisco bar, tucked down the famous ACDC lane. Order the Pulpo Al Olivo—West Australian grilled octopus, served with roasted peppers, eshallots and olive sauce, or the spicy fried chicken with lima bean and aji Amarillo dressing, salsa criolla and Asian celery. Or be bold, and try the alpaca croquettes. Coda
Coda’s French-Vietnamese fusion menu is all about innovation and carefully balanced flavours. Nab the crispy tapioca and prawn betel leaf with kaffir lime and green chilli for starters, and chase it down with Beijing crispy aromatic chicken with plum salt.
The rum-roasted pineapple and Thai basil sorbet with whipped mascarpone cream and Sablé Breton is also absolutely insane. Check it out on Flinders Lane. Fancy Hank’s
This barbeque joint is about twenty steps up rom your usual snags on the barbie, but it’s worth hanging up the tongs one Sunday arvo and getting down to Fancy Hank’s for the smoked brisket sandwich, served with Hanks’ barbeque sauce, cheese, pickles and slaw.
Stay for dinner to scarf down whole racks of pork spare ribs, cooked to perfection in custom-built smokers and traditional wood-fired barbeques. Honestly, the smell of this place when you’re climbing the stairs…half the fun’s in the anticipation. Palermo
A little side hustle from the team behind Pastuso and San Telmo . Well, we say side hustle: Palermo has staked out its own spot on the Melbourne CBD dining scene.
In the true spirit of Argentinan culture, Palermo is all about bringing wine, food and people together. And with dishes as good as beef, roasted garlic and prune empanadas, grilled octopus with radicchio, red grapes, lima bean roast garlic and salsa verde and pasture-fed lamb rump with coriander and chipotle, why wouldn’t you want to bring everyone you know here? Don’t miss the empanadas or the asado grilled meats. Bar Lourinhã
An oldie, but a very very goodie. Their tagline is “Serving up happy times. for 10 years and counting!” So if you’re still searching for that hit of Spanish food in the CBD, look no further than Bar Lourinhã .
They’ve got wine, they’ve got tapas, they’ve got queso, they’ve got Raciones. Basically, they’ve got everything you could want. Get the yellowtail Kingfish ‘panchetta’ with lemon oil, and thank us later. San Telmo
When the craving for Argentine food strikes, Melbournians head to San Telmo . Accept no substitutes. We’re talking empanadas, chargrilled sardines, house-made pork and beef sausages, and of course, big hunks of meat.
Lamb rump, flank steak, beef sirloin, ribs, eye fillet—you name it, they’ve got it and it’s cooked damn well (or medium rare, if that’s how you prefer). A lovely mid-week date night option. Annam
There’s a reason the deep fried ice cream from Annam made our list of 50 dishes You Should Have Eaten By Now If You Live In Melbourne . And that’s only the start of what this modern Vietnamese hot-spot can do.
Start with the lamb ribs in a tamarind caramel, before getting stuck into some braised pork belly with bamboo shoots and rice. Head chef and owner Jerry Mai is an absolute genius (if you want something way more grab-and-go, check out her CBD banh mi paradise, Pho Nom ). Flower Drum
We’d be remiss not to mention Flower Drum , one of Melbourne’s most iconic restaurants.
As it should be—with the ultra-high standard of Chinese dishes being served up daily. A dim sum selection to die for, quail san choi bow, crispy pork ribs with a crunchy garlic crumble, whole fish, flavour-packed hot and sour soup—you can see why we get excited about this one. A lot of Melbournians wait for a special occasion to check out Flower Drum, but it’s really good any time you’re hungry. Worth the splurge. Kisume
Let’s round this out with one more Asian restaurant, because Melbourne’s CBD does Asian food better than almost anywhere.
We mentioned the queues on Flinders Lane for Chin Chin, but we forget to mention the lines going the other way to get into Kisume , for Japanese food so good you’ll want to kiss(ume) anyone standing nearby. Awkward if that’s your boss on your lunch break. Whatever, the crispy wagyu truffles with miso are worth it. You could spend an entire evening exploring this split level Japanese restaurant and sake temple. Don’t expect a cheap feed though—this is as fancy as Melbourne gets.

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The Work Wife – Sneak Peek (Chapter 2)

Welcome back! The Work Wife , my all new standalone, romantic comedy will be yours in FIVE days! As promised, here is the next installment of Charli + Oliver’s love story!
Previous Chapters: Prologue
Chapter One
The Work Wife C.J. MartĂn
All rights reserved Š 2019
Oliver
Chopping and dicing are two of my favorite things to do in the kitchen. I like to lose myself in the monotony of it. The rhythm of the sharp blade slicing through the paper-thin skin of the vegetable, the click-click-click of the wooden handle of the knife as it hits the counter. The perfect, linear cuts creating new pieces from a whole. It soothes me. It also gives me a chance to think, which is why, even with Jason, our prep cook, and Giancarlo, my sous chef, I do most of the prep work myself. Some people sit in the dark chanting, “Om.” Me? I chop vegetables.
Tonight, more than ever, I need to lose myself, because my mind is in fucking overdrive.
It’s an irrevocable, undisputable fact that things either happen all at once or not at all. Three-hundred-and-eighty-nine days ago, my girlfriend Ainsley and I decided to take our relationship to the next level. I popped the question, she said yes, and moved into my house the following week. I wish I could tell you that our love is the life-altering, can’t-live-without-you, stars-in-our-eyes type of love, but it isn’t.
Our love is steady. Calm. Familiar .
By the time I finally proposed marriage, we’d been dating for almost two years. Our relationship isn’t the stuff of Hallmark movies but we enjoy each other’s company, and give each other space to be our own person. I work a lot, and with Ainsley being out of the country for weeks at a time, the relationship is ideal for us both.
So, a little over a year ago, I bought a ring, and over Indian takeout—Ainsley’s favorite—I asked her to be my wife. No over-the-top proposal. No confession of “I can’t live without you.” No talk of finding my soul mate. Looking back, and it embarrasses me even to think this, the whole ordeal seemed rather formal. It was crisp, efficient, business-like, but then, Ainsley isn’t a hearts-and-flowers kind of woman.
The crazy thing is, at the time it all seemed so normal. I told myself that if Ainsley was happy with the way things were, then so was I.
Then, things changed. Three-hundred-and-seventy-three days ago, I met Charlotte Ann Truse, and my world tipped on its axis. Charlotte crashed into my life, literally , with such force that I was drowning in her before my dumbstruck mind thought even to take a breath.
From the day I chased her and that damned dog down the sidewalk, something sparked inside me. It was like a switch had been flipped. Like I had been living in the dark my entire life, and she finally brought the light. My light.
Too corny?  Maybe. But it’s the fucking truth.
Everything about her intrigues me. From her round blue eyes to her pert nose, to the lone beauty mark that sits just above lips so plump and juicy I don’t know how I’ve resisted taking a bite, to the long brown hair she always wears tied up in a loose knot that my fingers itch to run through.
But it’s more than just her physical appearance. Even if I weren’t attracted to her—and trust me, it’s damned near impossible to imagine that—she’d still take my breath away.
A little awkward, a little unsure, a whole lot feisty, she keeps me on my toes. Her take-no-shit attitude keeps me—and my arrogance—in check. I have to fight back a smile every time she scolds me with that smart mouth. A mouth that I ache to have pressed against my lips, my skin, my dick.
But what makes her the absolute total package?  She’s a foodie, just like me. She will try any and everything at least one time. Never turns her nose up, never questions calories or fat content, simply leans in and takes a decadent bite. She enjoys food the way it’s meant to be enjoyed. Slowly. Sensually. With all five senses. And it turns me the fuck on.
I probably shouldn’t admit this, but sometimes I get a boner watching her eat. Not all the time. Okay, usually, yeah, I do. But when these tiny, soft little moans of uncontrolled pleasure escape her mouth, or when she tips her head back and smiles in ecstasy, or when she licks her fingers‌
A man would have to be made of stone not to be affected.
There are so many reasons why I cannot have feelings for Charli. I could write a book about the ways us getting involved is a bad idea. It would probably be a three-part series by the time I finished listing the ways.
For one, I’m engaged. It’s my strongest defense against her and probably the reason why I told her almost instantly about Ainsley. You know how sometimes when a guy is trying to pick up a girl at a bar and the girl casually mentions “her boyfriend?” to ward him off? I know, smooth , right?
But that was me. I was the lame one, spouting nonsense about the significant other to establish clear boundaries. It didn’t even make sense, but on Charli’s first official day, when she was stocking the bar tray, she asked if I liked maraschino cherries. I blurted. “No, but my fiancĂŠe does.”
I don’t know what the hell came over me, but somehow I figured telling her about my relationship would draw a line in the sand between us. After a rather long, awkward pause, she smiled and said, “Good to know.”
Reason number two: she’s my coworker. I’m reasonably certain that Don wouldn’t care if we dated. He’s very laid back and adores Charli. He likes me, too, but mostly because I bring prestige to his restaurant in the form of press and Michelin stars, and he knows it.  I don’t think he’d care if I banged the entire staff, as long as I kept pumping out top-rated dishes and earning glowing reviews from the food critics. But even if Don were on board, things between Charli and me had the potential to get messy. I’m a huge proponent of the mantra “don’t shit where you eat.”
Sighing, I grab three long, fresh carrots that will be used in the mirepoix .
Peel . Slice. Chop. Repeat.
Now, where was I? Oh yeah, three, Charli’s ten years younger than me. On nights when Charli has me really wound up—nights like tonight when she wears a flimsy little floral dress that could easily be undone with a straightforward pull of the tie around her waist—I cool off by reminding myself that she was eight when I was eighteen. That kills any indecent feelings real fast.
Moving on. Number four—
“Oliver.” My dark eyes slowly look up, landing on a perfect set of round, full tits, leaning toward me. Why, God, why do you torture me so?
“Oliver.”
Charli snaps her fingers, and my attention jumps to her face.
“Yeah?” My voice comes out gruff.
Her brow quirks. “You okay?”
“Yeah.” I clear my throat. “What do you need?”
“Let Jason finish that.” She gestures to the round onions and stalks of celery that I’ve yet to touch. “Michael Brown is here.”
I sober in an instant, the color draining from my face. According to the insider tip we received, Michael isn’t supposed to arrive for his evaluation until tomorrow. I haven’t even prepared the salt rub for the bass yet. Goddammit .
“From the Times ?” I wipe my hand on the rag tucked in the front of my apron. “Don told me the tasting was scheduled for tomorrow.”
She shakes her head. “Change of plans.”
Even though on the outside I appear calm and put together, I’m more than a little anxious. Few things rattle my steel-hard resolve. I’ve run two full marathons back to back, gone cliff diving in the Maldives, and even competed in the Colorado Trail Race. It’s safe to say I’m a bit of an adrenaline junkie.
But no matter how many times food critics have sampled my cuisine, no matter how many rave reviews I’ve received, no matter how many awards or accolades trail my name, tastings are nerve-wracking as hell. I mean, the person’s entire job is to criticize, to critique the meal that a chef (a.k.a. me ) has painstakingly prepared. And the Zagat and Michelin associations are not shy about taking stars away if a restaurant (again, me ) doesn’t meet their stringent qualifications.
Reading my hesitation, Charli assures. “You’re a rock star.” Her eyes shine with pride. “You got this.”
A slow smile tips the corners of my lips. “Thanks, Charli girl.”
She swats my ass as I walk past, and I’ll admit, I like it more than I should. “Now, go dazzle Mr. Food Critic with your super sexyâ€Śâ€
I snap my eyes to hers, wanting her to comment on my body—just once.
Arms.
Mouth.
Dick.
I hold her gaze for a moment longer, and her smile widens as though she knows exactly what I’m thinking. “Food, Oliver. Your super sexy food .”
Chuckling, I push the door open.
I’ll take the compliment.
The truth is, I’d take anything from her.
Stay tuned tomorrow for the next chapter! Until then, add to add to Goodreads:
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Available February 26, 2019
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