The Most Successful Ethnic Group In The U.S. May Surprise You!

The Most Successful Ethnic Group In The U.S. May Surprise You!

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE
Because you don’t know what it means to hustle … until you meet a Nigerian-American.
At an Onyejekwe family get-together, you can’t throw a stone without hitting someone with a master’s degree. Doctors, lawyers, engineers, professors — every family member is highly educated and professionally successful, and many have a lucrative side gig to boot. Parents and grandparents share stories of whose kid just won an academic honor, achieved an athletic title or performed in the school play. Aunts, uncles and cousins celebrate one another’s job promotions or the new nonprofit one of them just started. To the Ohio-based Onyejekwes, this level of achievement is normal. They’re Nigerian-American — it’s just what they do.
Today, 29% of Nigerian-Americans over the age of 25 hold a graduate degree, compared to 11% of the overall U.S. population, according to the Migrations Policy Institute. Among Nigerian-American professionals, 45% work in education services, the 2016 American Community Survey found, and many are professors at top universities. Nigerians are entering the medical field in the U.S. at an increased rate, leaving their home country to work in American hospitals, where they can earn more and work in better facilities. A growing number of Nigerian-Americans are becoming entrepreneurs and CEOs, building tech companies in the U.S. to help people back home.
It hasn’t been easy — the racist stereotypes are far from gone. Last year, President Donald Trump reportedly said in an Oval Office discussion that Nigerians would never go back to “their huts” once they saw America. But overt racism hasn’t stopped Nigerian-Americans from creating jobs, treating patients, teaching students and contributing to local communities in their new home, all while confidently emerging as one of the country’s most succesful immigrant communities, with a median household income of $62,351, compared to $57,617 nationally, as of 2015.
NIGERIAN-AMERICANS ARE BEGINNING TO MAKE A MARK IN SPORTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND THE CULINARY ARTS
“I think Nigerian-Americans offer a unique, flashy style and flavor that people like,” says Chukwuemeka Onyejekwe, who goes by his rap name Mekka Don. He points to Nigerian cuisine like jollof rice that’s gaining popularity in the U.S. But more importantly, Mekka says, Nigerians bring a “connectivity and understanding of Africa” to the U.S. “Many [Americans] get their understanding of ’the motherland’ through our experiences and stories,” he adds.
The Nigerian-American journey is still relatively new compared with that of other major immigrant communities that grew in the U.S. in the 20th century. The Nigerian-American population stood at 376,000 in 2015, according to the Rockefeller Foundation–Aspen Institute. That was roughly the strength of the Indian-American community back in 1980, before it emerged as a leading light in fields ranging from economics to technology. But Nigerian-Americans are already beginning to make a dent in the national consciousness. In the case of forensic pathologist Dr. Bennet Omalu, he’s helping fix hits to the brain.
The 49-year-old Omalu was the first to discover and publish on chronic traumatic encephalopathy in American football players (Will Smith played him in the 2015 film Concussion). ImeIme A. Umana, the first Black woman elected president of the Harvard Law Review last year, is Nigerian-American. In 2016, Nigerian-born Pearlena Igbokwe became president of Universal Television, making her the first woman of African descent to head a major U.S. TV studio. And the community has expanded rapidly, up from just 25,000 people in 1980.
A FOCUS ON EDUCATION
Traditionally, education has been at the heart of the community’s success. But success isn’t so easily defined within the culture anymore. Nigerian-Americans are beginning to make a mark in sports, entertainment and the culinary arts too — like Nigerian chef Tunde Wey in New Orleans, who recently made headlines for using food to highlight racial wealth inequality in America.
It was education that brought an early wave of Nigerians to the U.S. in the 1970s. After the war against Biafra separatists in the ’60s, the Nigerian government sponsored scholarships for students to pursue higher education abroad. English-speaking Nigerian students excelled at universities in the U.S. and U.K., often finding opportunities to continue their education or begin their professional career in their host country. That emphasis on education has since filtered through to their children’s generation.
Dr. Jacqueline Nwando Olayiwola was born in Columbus, Ohio, to such Nigerian immigrant parents. Her mother is a retired engineer, now a professor at Walden University; her father is a retired professor, now a strategist at a consulting firm focused on governance in Africa. “Education was always a major priority for my parents because it was their ticket out of Nigeria,” Olayiwola says. Her parents used their network of academics to get Olayiwola thinking about a career in medicine from a young age — by 11, she was going to summits for minorities interested in health care. Olayiwola was constantly busy as a kid doing homework and sports and participating in National Honor Society and biomedical research programs, but it was the norm, she says; her Nigerian roots meant it was expected of her.
Today, Olayiwola is a family physician, the chief clinical transformation officer of RubiconMD, a leading health tech company, associate clinical professor at University of California, San Francisco, instructor in family medicine at Columbia University, and an author. Her new book, Papaya Head, detailing her experience as a first-generation Nigerian-American, will be published later this year. Olayiwola’s siblings are equally successful – her older brother, Okey Onyejekwe, is also a physician, her younger brother, Mekka Don, is a lawyer turned rapper, and her sister, Sylvia Ify Onyejekwe, Esq, is the managing partner of her own New Jersey law firm. But Olayiwola feels she needs to do more. She doesn’t want America’s gain to be Nigeria’s permanent loss.
NOT FORGETTING THEIR ROOTS
Olayiwola and her brother, Okey, stay active in the Nigerian-American community. In 1998, they co-founded the Student Association of Nigerian Physicians in the Americas, which organizes at least two medical mission trips to Nigeria each year. Between 2000 and 2004, the siblings often flew the nearly 8,000 miles to Nigeria to perform screenings for preventable diseases. They took blood pressure, advised patients on diabetes and obesity prevention, and provided prenatal counseling in rural areas.
“I feel a tremendous sense of wanting to go back [to Nigeria] and help,” says Olayiwola.
It’s a sentiment shared by many in the Nigerian-American community. But it’s easier said than done for some of America’s most qualified professionals to leave world-class facilities and a comfortable life to return permanently to a nation that, while Africa’s largest economy, remains mired in political instability and corruption.
In the 1970s and ’80s, some foreign-educated Nigerian graduates returned home, but found political and economic instability in a postwar country. In 1966, the country’s military overthrew the regime of independent Nigeria’s first prime minister, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa. It was the first of a series of military coups — again, later, in 1966, then in 1975, 1976, 1983, 1985 and 1993 — that were to deny the country even a semblance of democracy until 1999.
“My parents were expected to study in the U.S. or U.K. and then go back to Nigeria,” says Dr. Nnenna Kalu Makanjuola, who grew up in Nigeria and now lives in Atlanta. Her parents did return, but with few jobs available in the economic decline of the 1980s, many Nigerians did not. Within a few years of their return, Makanjuola’s parents too decided it was best to build their lives elsewhere.
Makanjuola, who has a pharmacy degree, works in public health and is the founder and editor in chief of Radiant Health Magazine, came to the U.S. when her father won a Diversity Immigrant Visa in 1995 — a program Trump wants to dismantle. Makanjuola’s father moved the family to Texas so his children could have access to better universities. Makanjuola intended to one day pursue her career in Nigeria as her parents had, but it’s too hard to leave the U.S., she says: “Many Nigerians intend to go back, but it’s impractical because there’s more opportunity here.”
WANTING TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE
As an undergraduate student in Nigeria, Jacob Olupona, now a professor of African religious traditions at Harvard Divinity School, was a well-known activist in his community. He considered a career in politics, but a mentor changed his mind. The mentor told Olupona: “Don’t go into politics because you’re too honest and don’t join the military because you’re too smart.” So Olupona headed to Boston University instead, to study the history of religions — a subject he had always found fascinating as the son of a priest. Like Olayiwola, the importance of education was instilled in him from a young age but so too was the importance of spreading knowledge. “When you educate one person, you educate the whole community,” Olupona says. That belief is what translated into his career as a teacher.
Olupona stresses that Nigerians have also achieved a lot in their country of origin. Moving to the U.S. isn’t the only route to success, he says. Still, he believes the many academic opportunities in the U.S. have benefited Nigerians. “There’s something about America and education that we need to celebrate,” he says.
Marry those American opportunities with an upbringing that emphasizes education, a drive to serve the U.S. while not forgetting their roots, and a growing penchant for success, and you have a unique cocktail that is the Nigerian-American community today. Anyone from the Nigerian diaspora will tell you their parents gave them three career choices: doctor, lawyer or engineer. For a younger generation of Nigerian-Americans, that’s still true, but many are adding a second career, or even a third, to that trajectory.
Anie Akpe works full time as vice president of mortgages at Municipal Credit Union in New York City, but she’s also the founder of Innov8tiv magazine, African Women in Technology (an education and mentorship program) and an app called NetWorq that connects professionals. Raised in the southern port city of Calabar, she had the Nigerian hustle baked into her upbringing. “There was no such thing as ‘can’t’ in our household,” she says. Akpe’s banking career fulfilled her parent’s expectations, but she wanted to do more. Four and a half years ago, she launched Innov8tiv to highlight success stories back home in Nigeria and throughout the African continent. Through her magazine and through African Women in Technology, which offers networking events, mentorship opportunities and internships, Akpe is helping propel women into careers like hers. “Africa is male-dominated in most sectors,” she says. “If I can show young women there are ways to do things within our culture that allow them to grow, then I’ve been successful.”
Like Akpe, rapper Mekka Don took a traditional career route at first. He got a law degree from New York University and worked at a top-10 law firm, but he had always wanted to pursue music. At 25, Mekka, who is the younger brother of Jacqueline Olayiwola, and Sylvia and Okey Onyejekwe, decided to take the plunge.
Fellow attorneys ridiculed him, asking incredulously: “Who leaves a law career to become a rapper?” But his family was understanding — part of a shift in attitudes that Mekka says he increasingly sees in his parents’ generation of Nigerian-Americans. “My parents see how lucrative music can be,” he says, adding, “They also get excited when they see me on TV.”
The lawyer turned rapper has been featured on MTV and VH1, has a licensing agreement with ESPN to play his music during college football broadcasts and just released a new single, “Nip and Tuck.” He still has that law degree to fall back on and it comes in handy in his current career too. “I never need anyone to read contracts for me, so I save a ton on lawyer fees,” Mekka says.
A HUNGER FOR SUCCESS
The community’s drive to succeed sounds exhausting at times, particularly if you never feel you’ve reached the finish line. Omalu, the forensic pathologist, was recently in the news again after his independent autopsy of Sacramento youth Stephon Clark showed that the 22-year-old was repeatedly shot in the back by police officers, which conflicted with the Sacramento Police report.
But if you ask Omalu about his success, he’s quick to correct. “I’m not successful,” Omalu says, adding that he won’t consider himself so until he can “wake up one day, do absolutely nothing and there will be no consequences.” Part of Omalu’s humility is faith-based: “I was given a talent to serve,” he says. Omalu has eight degrees, has made life-changing medical discoveries and has been portrayed by a famous actor on screen, but he doesn’t revel in his accomplishments.
And what about Nigerians who come to the U.S. and don’t succeed? Wey, the activist chef, says there’s a lot of pressure to fit a certain mold when you’re Nigerian. Choosing the right career is only one part of that. “You have to be heterosexual, you have to have children, you have to have all of those degrees,” he says of the cultural expectations he was raised with. “It limits the possibilities of what Nigerians can be.”
While others agree it can be stressful at times, they say the high career bar isn’t a burden to them. “I don’t know anything else,” says Olayiwola about being raised to value education and success. Akpe feels the same. “You’re not thinking it’s hard, it’s just something you do,” she says.
THE SKY IS THE LIMIT
Now that doctor, lawyer and engineer are no longer the only acceptable career options within the community, the path to professional achievement is rife with more possibilities than ever before. Sports, entertainment, music, the culinary arts — there are few fields Nigerian-Americans aren’t already influencing. And the negative stereotypes? Hold onto them at your own peril.
SOURCE (abridged/sectioned): https://www.ozy.com/fast-forward/the-most-successful-ethnic-group-in-the-us-may-surprise-you/86885

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Why Noma’s René Redzepi is the most relevant chef of our generation | VOGUE India

Food visionary, superstar chef, master locavore and foraging frontliner—Noma’s René Redzepi isn’t done achieving all the superlatives. The Copenhagen based chef is driven to redefine Scandinavian cuisine to the world Image: Pankaj Anand
In the 1900s, a Michelin star could make or break a chef. Fine dining was about changing napkins and crumbing between courses, and the best kitchens around the world were ruled by French chefs in white aprons who determined how many teaspoons of flour would make an ideal béchamel. If a chef from that period walked into Noma today, he would probably cry as if the birchwood of his Miyabi had just chipped off. Because René Redzepi’s utopian world is far from the stereotypes that culinary supremists had us believe. Gymnastic rings sway outside the kitchen for the staff to pump up before or after service. A wooden barrel that is actually a sauna to thaw from the Nordic winter also operates as a space to “meditate in.” Despite being one of the most famous restaurants in the world, Noma offers Saturday nights off in an industry where it’s unheard of. Inside its haloed walls lie pared-back interiors where the restaurant upends all popular expectations of fine dining— there are no white tablecloths, and diners can casually walk in wearing sandals and shorts.
Standing lean in a dark blue T-shirt is 41-year-old Redzepi. A self-assured, articulate and curious man, on any given day he can talk his way through Gandhi, garum and gooseberries. In the digital era, his Instagram game is as on point as the dots of walnut wood oil on his wild blueberry sorbet. He may not be easily pleased, but the savvy chef confides that the ‘ok hand sign’ is his most-used emoji.
The Refshalevej-based restaurant is designed by Studio David Thulstrup and is styled as per its theme every season
In pop culture parlance, Redzepi reminds you of Bradley Cooper’s Eddie Morra from Limitless , except there are no drugs involved, only lots of mushrooms of the civilised kind. “Once you have tasted so much, you have a memory bank and are full of experiences, conversations, books, images, people and journeys, and if you are able to take all that, have an intuition as razor- sharp and as athletic as an Olympic sprinter, and then taste something, it will take you two seconds to decide if you want something or don’t,” says Redzepi about designing a menu so complex, sometimes its elements take months to perfect. The smoked seaweed shoyu from their coveted fermentation lab is one such example—it has been pickling at the lab for a year. Seasonal eatings
Sea buckthorn and blackcurrant butterfly
At Vogue , we romance seasons and track time as the cowrie necklaces of spring/summer turn into the power shoulders of fall/winter. That Noma takes its seasons as seriously as 10 Corso Como is evident in its menu, where the quince-simmered cod bladder from the seafood months makes way for the pickled leek stuffed with lovage cream in the vegetable season.
From June until September, the plant kingdom from the Nordic region blooms on their menu with ingredients such as blue bell flowers and rosehip from Greenland and Faroe Island, and ramson, onion cress, black currant shoots and spruce cones from Denmark . These are sometimes paired with borrowed flavours such as chocolate and hot pasilla, morita and ancho chilies from Mexico and produce from other countries. “The Noma pop-up was a significant moment. Before, we only travelled in the Nordic region searching for ingredients. Then about six years ago, we went to Japan, and that was when things changed and we became less Nordic in our mindset. Now, we are rooted here but we see value everywhere,” says Redzepi.
T he greenhouse doubles up as a waiting area for diners and to grow some of the produce used in the kitchen
After the Tokyo pop-up in 2015, Noma travelled to Sydney in 2016 and Tulum in 2017, and the word’s out that reservations for their last pop-up in Mexico sold out nearly as fast as the Louis Vuitton x Supreme collection—within two hours. “We don’t go to places thinking we know what is going on; we come as people who want to learn.” At these pop-ups, his team works with local techniques and ingredients but looks at them through the Noma lens. Living on the veg
The vegetable season experiments with greens like spruce pine and onion cress
The starting point of every menu at Noma is an experiment slow-simmered in memory and nostalgia. “I used to hate those stories about French chefs who said, ‘Oh, I cooked with my grandmother.’ Why are all the French talking about their grandmothers and mothers?” But while designing the current vegetable-season menu, Redzepi did think a lot about his own childhood in the Greek countryside. “Macedonia made me develop a love for vegetables. The food was simple, seasonal and focused… beans and lentils, pots simmering with herbs, vegetables and spices. There was cooked corn, yoghurt drinks, rice, always chilli on the side,” recalls the chef .
Apart from unique produce, this season sees culinary feats like black currant wood hammered into oil or mould-covered vegetable charcuterie made from plums, hip berries and spices. “There will be certain optional drops of meat ferments. And we also work with insects, which I personally align with the vegetarian world,” says the chef, who served his famous ants and grasshoppers at Justin Timberlake ’s listening party at the launch of Man Of The Woods last year. A farmed life
As most major-league restaurants go, consistency is key to keep the stars and rankings intact. This makes relying on foraging a risky proposition but one typical of Noma. They work with full-time foragers who chew their way across Scandinavia and bring back inspiring ingredients, such as wild berries that are then transformed into vinegars or juices for their juice pairings, or edible woods that are pounded into oils, or roots and tubers turned into hearty mains. Currently, the menu comprises 20 per cent wild produce, with 80 being farmed.
Fried marigold.
Noma’s been working in cohesion with nature, even before the farm-totable revolution took over. “If it wasn’t for the discovery of its bounty, we would not be sitting here. Cooking with fresh produce roots you as a cook, it gives you a firm grounding, and on a mental and spiritual level being close to nature is very important.” This explains his involvement with non-Noma projects like The New Nordic Food Manifesto (2003), which revolved around ethical cooking, the MAD Symposium (2011), a platform Redzepi co-launched to discuss sustainable solutions, and the tentatively titled Gastro-Akademi, a government-supported school to train chefs in waste reduction and promote gender equality. Work culture
Noma’s fermentation lab experiments to create pickled berries, cherries and other fruits
If Redzepi is the chef who parlayed reindeer meat, ants and edible soil into countless culinary accolades, the “Noma effect” can also be seen in his illustrious alumni. In Denmark, there’s Matthew Orlando of Amass; Christian Puglisi’s Michelin starred Relae; Dan Giusti, former head chef, who is revolutionising school cafeteria meals in Copenhagen; and closer to home there is Garima Arora of Bangkok’s Gaa, who became the first Indian woman to get a Michelin star. But Redzepi doesn’t see this as a sign of gastronomic alchemy in his lineage. “Of course we didn’t invent anything, we just focused on what was there,” he says.
The juice pairing menu features combinations such as saffron and pumpkin, quince and lovage, tomato and fig leaf
Since Noma’s kitchen is a multicultural mix, diversity is at their disposal and ultimately finds a way into their menu. Recently, a Korean intern developed a kimchi recipe using traditional techniques but with ramsons, a wild Nordic garlic shoot. Conversely, a Nordic chef made his version of a Spanish gazpacho using Scandinavian berries. “What is native or indigenous? With humans it is a complicated question. Here in Denmark, it is about the colour of your skin, your religion. But for a plant, you put it in the ground, and if it grows here it belongs here. I feel the same way about people.”
Preserved morels. Photographed by: Pankaj Anand
In 2017, he made Ali Sonko, a Gambian immigrant and his former dishwasher, his co-owner at Noma. If this hints at Redzepi’s equity in the kitchen, then Noma’s perpetually reserved tables talk about his appeal outside. Add to this his single-minded approach to sustainability, his attention to mental health among chefs and focus on fair-trade produce, and you know why Redzepi is the most relevant chef of his generation.
Forager Michael Larsen scours through the Nordic region to bring back wild ingredients for the test kitchen. Photographed by: Pankaj Anand
. Photographed by: Pankaj Anand

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Best-reviewed restaurant in South Dakota is in Sioux Falls, and it's in a mall

It specializes in burgers and offers 24 rotating beer taps. Guess who? Post to Facebook Best-reviewed restaurant in South Dakota is in Sioux Falls, and it’s in a mall It specializes in burgers and offers 24 rotating beer taps. Guess who? Check out this story on argusleader.com: https://www.argusleader.com/story/news/business-journal/2019/07/11/best-reviewed-restaurant-south-dakota-sioux-falls-and-may-not-who-you-think/1691867001/ Cancel Send A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Posted! A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Join the Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Comments
This conversation is moderated according to USA TODAY’s community rules . Please read the rules before joining the discussion. Best-reviewed restaurant in South Dakota is in Sioux Falls, and it’s in a mall Jeremy Fugleberg , Sioux Falls Argus Leader Published 1:01 p.m. CT July 11, 2019 | Updated 4:22 p.m. CT July 11, 2019 CLOSE
A burger and fries from TapHouse 41 in Sioux Falls. (Photo: Submitted) What the best restaurant in South Dakota? Turns out, it’s in a Sioux Falls mall: the Western Mall. Say congratulations to TapHouse 41, the best-ranked restaurant in the state, according to Reviews.org , based on data culled from review app Yelp. The site’s Tyler Abbott looked at highest-rated restaurants on Yelp, then winnowed them down based on number of reviews. Essentially, The more and higher reviews, the better. TapHouse 41 pulled out the win, with 4.5 stars and 277 reviews, Reviews.org said. TapHouse specializes in burgers, made from a 50/50 blend of Midwestern Angus chuck and brisket. It sells the Classic burger, keeping it simple unlesss you want to dress it up. But the restaurant also offers gourmet burgers, including: PBR (beer cheese, duck fat fries, jalapeno, tomato, onion, pickles, roasted garlic mayo); Egg (sunny up egg, chorizo sausage, American cheese, Hatch chili aioli, salsa verde, hot sauce, lettuce, tomato, pickle, onion, roasted garlic mayo); Q (Tennesee sauce, cheddar cheese, haystack onions, pickles, dixie slaw). TapHouse 41 certainly has local competition for the title of South Dakota’s top restaurant. Other restaurants in Sioux Falls with 4.5 stars include: Ode to Food and Drinks (114 reviews) Jacky’s Restaurant (109 reviews) Everest Indian Cuisine (28 reviews) 22TEN Kitchen Cocktails (27 reviews) Since Reviews.org rankings were weight by number of reviews, Taphouse 41 pulled out the victory. TapHouse 41 is located in the Western Mall, facing West 41st Street, located at 2101 W. 41st St. in Sioux Falls.

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The only con that I feel should be put here, is that the complimentary boat transfers end at 4:30 PM. So It’s difficult to plan a full day if you want to do activities or if you came here for the night life, which I am sure will not be your goal if you chose this place for relaxation.
It’s hard to begin with how amazing this resort was, so I’ll start with the pros and then move on with the cons, which are honestly almost a non factor if you know why you chose this place. The resort is located in a small island close to the main island of the country (Mahe Island), and a complimentary boat takes you to and from the island. The first thing you will notice is the fantastic scenery this place has to offer, with EXTREMELY welcoming staff. We were treated to breakfast and juice while they finished setting up the private villa. The villa itself was secluded, it’s like being in your own house, extremely private. My wife and I enjoyed this aspect the most. The swimming pool is amazing and offers views of the Indian ocean like no other. The villa was clean, and was cleaned daily. The showers and toilet also offer views of the Indian ocean, it truly felt like I was someplace magical. Now onto the restaurant, I just want to get something out of the way, you will not find anyplace that serves food as delicious as this resort across the country. You see, the food and cuisine of Seychelles is not well developed, so the resort manager Mr. Borac told me one of his goals was to make the food amazing. And to that I say, he did and impressive job. The seafood was one of the best my wife and I ever tasted. The crown jewel of this place though is the extraordinary staff, who are very welcoming and extremely attentive, and went the extra mile towards pleasing the guests. All my requests were made and they were made swiftly. The restaurant staff were very friendly and spot-on with their timing and orders. The reception and front desk employees were beyond helpful, a special thanks to Jean-Luc and the rest of the reception crew. Mr. Borac, I highly praise you for such a great staff and familial feeling that you have managed to achieve. Thanks to all the staff for making this stay one of the most memorable for my wife and I.
Stayed in July 2019

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JW Marriott Mussoorie Walnut Grove Resort & Spa appoints Executive Chef – Chef -Simran Singh

Simran Singh Thapar appointed as Executive Chef at JW Marriott Mussoorie Walnut Grove Resort & Spa
Chef Simran Singh Thapar has been appointed as the Executive Chef at JW Marriott Mussoorie Walnut Grove Resort & Spa. A dynamic epicurean, Chef Simran is on a quest to offer guests an extraordinary dining experience. Staying true to his roots, he is an expert in Indian and regional cuisines and enjoys cooking the same for his guests. His forte lies in crafting innovative creations and successfully infusing different cuisines to create the perfect blend of unique flavours in conventional dishes.
Chef Simran, started his career in the Merchant Navy as a Navigation Officer, and soon discovered that being a sailor wasn’t his true calling. He realized he was deeply inspired and influenced by his maternal uncle who was a chef, and decided to follow his footsteps. Starting off as an Assistant Kitchen Management to achieving the position of Executive Chef at The Oberoi Motor Vessel Vrinda, Kerala, Chef has truly come a long way.
With over a decade of experience in the hospitality industry, this is Chef Simran’s principal association with Marriott International and he plans to apply his skill set to consistently maintain guest satisfaction. Prior to his recent positioning, he headed the culinary operations at The Roseate – Bird Group New Delhi, in the capacity of an Executive Chef.
His keenness to provide gourmet experiences through personalized attention, appeals to his diverse audience and his outstanding guest reviews are a testimony to the great foundation he has set. Chef Simran was awarded the “Luxurious North Indian cuisine in a five star” – The Roseate House – Kheer by Hindustan Times Hall of Fame 2019. Additionally, he was felicitated for “Exceptional Fine dining restaurant in a five star” – The Roseate – Chini, by Hindustan Times Hall of Fame 2019. Chef Simran’s culinary skills has been appreciated by many national and international dignitaries. During his tenure as the Executive Chef at Maidens Hotel by The Oberoi Group, he was applauded by the Congressman Jack Kingston from Georgia 1st District after he had crafted a lunch experience for the Council team at “The Curzon Room”.
On the new Chef’s appointment, Director of Food and Beverages, Sunil Kumar, said, “We are very glad to have such an experienced Chef taking on the reigns of all our restaurants at JW Marriott Mussoorie. We would like to welcome him on board and are excited to witness the modifications he brings about at the hotel. Our property can use his leadership skills, effective planning, unique approach to guest management and tactful execution skills that have ensured his benchmark performance as a Chef. We extend our full support and under his expert guidance we are sure to excel.”
Chef Simran’s work philosophy is all about the right ingredients and the right cooking techniques. On his new change Chef Simran commented, “I’m eagerly looking forward to work closely with the Marriott International family. And being a nature lover, using the fresh and organic ingredients in the in-house green house at JW Marriott Mussoorie Walnut Grove Resort & Spa, is what I am looking forward to the most.”
In his spare time, he ardently enjoys gardening and believes it not only acts as his stress buster but also immensely contributes to his culinary innovations. Chef Simran has a huge collection of Kishore Kumar’s albums, and his preferred choice for karaoke is any of his hits. Related Posts The Westin Pushkar Resort and Spa appoints General Manager – Mr. Vikas Kumar JW Marriott Kolkata appoints Human Resources Manager – Mr. Arunit Banerjee Pullman & Novotel New Delhi Aerocity appoints General Manager – Mr. Biswajit Chakraborty

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Mauritius Honeymoons: How to Plan The Perfect Trip

Posted by German | Jul 12, 2019 | Africa , Honeymoon | 0
Are you planning your honeymoon? Chances are you have started thinking of Tahiti, Bora Bora or other exclusive islands in the Pacific Ocean. However, you can have a wonderful time with your partner without spending a fortune. With its amazing marine life, stunning beaches, unique scenery and wildlife, Mauritius is one of the best options out there. Here we’ll see what it has to offer and why you should seriously consider it for your honeymoon.
Located nearly 1,150 miles from Madagascar on the southeastern African coast and with more than 1.5 million tourists every year, Mauritius is the most visited island in the Indian Ocean. Why Honeymoon in Mauritius?
Its diverse culture, crystal clear waters, white sand beaches, and beautiful marine life attracts visitors from all over the world.
Mauritius is famous for its multicultural ethnicity which reflects its history over the centuries. It was first discovered by the Arabs in the 9th century, then found by the Portuguese at the beginning of the 16th century, colonized by the Dutch at the end of the 16th century, disputed by the French and the British empires during the 18th and 19th century until it finally became an independent nation in 1968.
Even though Mauritius enjoys warm temperatures year round, it has a cyclone season from January to March. Most tourists arrive between November and March so if you want fewer crowds, cheaper prices and great weather, the end of April, May, October and beginning of November are the best months to go. Things To Do During a Mauritius Honeymoon
Mauritius is famous for its turquoise waters, amazing corals, and pristine white sand beaches such as Flic en Flac, Blue Bay, or Mont Choisy. However, it has a lot more to offer.
The island is home to two UNESCO World Heritage Sites: Aapravasi Ghat in Port Louis (a building complex where more than 500,000 laborers brought from India during the 19th and 20th century lived), and Le Morne Cultural Landscape (a peninsula located at the southwestern tip of the island that’s said to have served as a refuge for fugitive slaves).
Additionally, with its diverse cultural heritage and varied architecture, Port Louis is not only the capital of the country but also its economic and cultural center. Here you can find the Blue Penny Museum that has history and art exhibitions and is home to the Orange-Red and Deep Blue, two of the rarest stamps in the world, as well as the Champ de Mars Racecourse , which was inaugurated in 1812 and is said to be the second oldest racecourse in the world.
If you like nature, Mauritius also has great options for you with the famous Pamplemousses Botanical Gardens and its 85 varieties of palm trees, the Black River Gorges National Park with its great hiking trails and stunning scenery, and the Casela Nature Park , where you can take a safari, see giraffes, rhinos, tigers, caracals, and even walk with lions!
Regardless of the type of traveler you are, Mauritius has got you covered. Honeymoon Resorts & Hotels
Tourism is one of Mauritius’ main industries so there are plenty of good hotels and resorts. If you’re looking for a great place to stay during your honeymoon, some of the best options are: Outrigger Mauritius Beach Resort
Located in the nature reserve of Bel Ombre in the south of the island next to the Black River Gorges National Park, this 5-star hotel is the choice for those looking for luxury amidst stunning scenery.
With four swimming pools and three restaurants, Outrigger Mauritius Beach Resort offers super spacious rooms (the smallest is 678 square feet) with sea views, air conditioning, and TV. Apart from buffet breakfast, both local and international dishes, cocktails and refreshments, this resort offers several activities such as kayaking, boat trips and windsurfing. There’s also a spa where you can get massages and beauty treatments.A room in Outrigger Mauritius Beach Resort starts at $340. Sands Suites Resort & Spa
Located in the famous Flic-en-Flac beach on the southwest coast of the island, Sands Suites Resort & Spa has 90 suites with dazzling views.All the rooms are very spacious (at least 560 square feet) and they come with a flat-screen TV, mini-bar and air conditioning. Sands Suites Resort has three restaurants, a spa, sauna, gym, and two tennis courts. Additionally, it offers boat cruises and other activities.A night in this hotel costs approximately $250. SALT of Palma
SALT of Palma is a beautiful 4-star boutique hotel located on the Palmar beach on the east coast of Mauritius. It features a restaurant that serves local dishes and three bars (one on the roof, one by the pool and one on the beach). The rooms are simple but spacious and have a modern design.
A night in this hotel starts at $130 making it great value for money for those looking for comfort and quality for a reduced price. Seapoint Boutique Hotel
Located in Pointe aux Canonniers in the north of the island, Seapoint Boutique Hotel is a 4-star hotel with 24 rooms and suites facing the sea, ideal for those looking for an intimate experience.
It features buffet breakfast, a restaurant that serves delicious food, a wellness center, different tours and activities, and high-quality accommodation for $230 per night. Cuisine
Mauritius, also known as the ‘melting pot of flavors’, has strong Creole heritage and has also been influenced by Asian, European and Indian cultures. Its cuisine is a reflection of its rich and diverse history, distinctive combination of spices and flavors that provide visitors with a unique culinary experience.
Apart from the numerous curries and a great selection of seafood, some of the most popular dishes you should try in Mauritius are: Dholl puri: popular street food considered for many as the national dish. It’s a thin fried wheat bread stuffed with peas, usually eaten with chutney or curry. Mine frite: fried noodles with fried onions, chili, vegetables and sometimes chicken or meat Fish vindaye: very popular among fish lovers, it consists of fried fish in a spicy sauce made with onions, mustard, garlic, and chilies. Alouda: it’s a refreshing sweet milk beverage that can be combined with different fruits and seeds, and it’s sometimes served with ice on top. Millionaire’s salad (or palm heart salad): consists of green leaves, raw palm tree heart, and seafood. It’s called this way because the palm tree hearts can take up to seven years to grow. Culture
Even though Mauritius is famous for its beautiful beaches, its rich history and culture can’t be left behind. This island is a blend of several different cultures after being part of the Dutch, French, and English empires, and has received a lot of Indian immigration. This is reflected in its constitution, which doesn’t mention an official language. Although for many Creole is considered the mother tongue, English and French are also widely spoken.
Ethnically, 68% of the people that live in Mauritius are Indo-Mauritian, 27% are Creole, and the remaining 5% are Sino-Mauritian and Franco-Mauritian.
Regarding its religion, 50% are Hindus, 24% Roman Catholics, 17% Muslims, and 9% follow another type of religion.
Apparently after he visited the island, Mark Twain said: “Mauritius was made first and then heaven, and heaven was copied after Mauritius”. And he was probably right. This island has a great mix of beach, nature, and culture that will make you want to stay longer than you have planned! Share:

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Passion for Food

5 medicinal plants you should be growing in your back garden
There are many plants offering health benefits that can be easily grown in your back garden. From chewing leaves of the feverfew plant to ease a migraine to adding lemon balm to your tea to relieve anxiety — here are five medicinal plants you can […] Like this: Like Loading… Hello!
Hello and welcome to Passion for Food! Passion for Food is all about healthy, seasonal and flavoursome cooking. Passion for Food is run by the Mother & Daughter duo; Multi-Award Winning Kiran Singh ( www.kiransingh.net ) and Award Winning Khushi Kaur ( www.khushikkaur.co.uk ). More about us here . PASSION FOR FOOD – Healthy, Seasonal and Flavoursome Cooking
One of the things we LOVE about cooking is that cooking a meal is one of the most personal things you can do for someone. You’re literally providing plated nourishment made with your own hands and creativity. Even if you’re following a recipe , you picked the recipe and planned the meal, didn’t you?
The speciality about a home cooked meal is the feeling of abundance it provides. Everything you have and need is right in the front of you within arms reach. The fragrance of garlic , the crackle from the skillet, and the sight of a perfectly roasted bird coming out from the oven…. DIVINE! Cooking speaks to all of our senses. It’s a joy we are so proud to know! HOW IT STARTED
Passion for Food is about healthy, seasonal, cooking. It started in 2014 with an attempt to teach Khushi to cook – which resulted in her being a Junior Bake Off Contestant in 2015 !
Having been born and brought up in Norway, of Indian origin, living in London for 10 years AND loving French and Italian cuisine – our cooking is inspired by all of these cultures plus more; from Norwegian Fiskeboller with Curry Sauce to Boeuf Bourguignon with Masala Mash – so stay tuned for delicious, and healthy recipes, must-have kitchen and cooking gadgets , our favourite products , ‘ guides to ‘, interviews and more! Passion or Food is all about…well simply….Our Passion for Food! COOK WITH US
As self-confessed foodies, we decided to become BonAppetour Hosts , which means you can come and cook with us in the gorgeous countryside of Hertfordshire. Our home is surrounded by gorgeous nature with a river and a canal on. View from dining table overlooks the tranquil canal and you see houseboats passing by. So why not join us for a cooking and eating experience?

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Top chef brings Singapore spice to Perth

Top chef brings Singapore spice to Perth July 12th, 2019, 08:30AM Food Chef Tony Khoo. Picture Andrew Ritchie d494457
SINGAPOREAN chef and cookbook author Tony Khoo’s introduction to food came during his childhood from his godmother.
“She would bring me along with her to the wet market for weekend marketing,” Khoo said.
“I would learn a lot from these market visits, and would help her afterwards, pounding the fresh herbs and spices to make into a ‘rempah’ for cooking dishes.
“I think the secret to Singaporean food is its combination of fresh Asian herbs and spices that are used, and the unapologetic flavour punch that they add to Singaporean dishes.”
Based in Singapore, Khoo worked for nine and a half years as Pan Pacific Hotel’s executive chef before promoted two and a half years ago to corporate executive chef.
He is currently in Perth for a July-long residency with a Singaporean-themed buffet of classic and modern South-East Asian cuisine at Pan Pacific Perth’s Montereys Brasserie. Crispy soft-shell chili crab and mandou. Picture Andrew Ritchie d494457
“I’ve shared my thoughts on Asian dishes to the local chefs here in Perth and showed them the authentic methods of cooking Asian dishes,” Khoo said.
“Singaporean cuisine has a combination of Malay, Chinese, Indian and Peranakan influences, with culture bringing their own unique cooking methods and local ingredients.
“It manages to bring these different cuisines together in a way that celebrates each ethnicity.”
Khoo’s signature dish is his Singapore chicken rice that combines fragrant rice with tender chicken and authentic condiments of chilli, ginger, and dark soya sauce.
He said the highlight of his residency has been the wonderful feedback from diners, who loved the traditional flavours of spices used in Singaporean cooking.
“And the heat from dishes like Singapore chilli crab, laksa noodles with rich coconut spiced broth and Hainanese chicken rice. Just like you’d find in Singapore.”

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Famous Indian Restaurant Hoppers Crossing – Ghazal Buffet & Bar (Hoppers Crossing)

Famous Indian Restaurant Hoppers Crossing – Ghazal Buffet & Bar (Hoppers Crossing) Posted on : Friday, 12 July, 2019 10:35 Updated On : Friday, 12 July, 2019 10:45 Expires On : Saturday, 11 July, 2020 17:35 Reply to : (Use contact form below)
Ghazal Indian Restaurant » is famous for Indian food in Hoppers crossing. Our Indian food dishes at Hoppers Crossing persist to delight our customers with unique Indian cuisine. At Ghazal Indian Restaurant we prepare traditional North Indian, South Indian, and Veg & Nonveg dishes with a contemporary twist.
We welcome our customer to experiencing Indian dishes that are drawn from the best cuisine traditions of South & North Indian. If you are in or around Hoppers Crossing and looking for Indian real test, visit our Indian restaurant to enjoy a beautiful meal combined with an extraordinary dining experience! Visit us for Online order http://ghazal.com.au/ » » or Call us 03 9742 4486 It is NOT ok to contact this poster with commercial interests.

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I know it’s not Seattle, but if you’re mentioning non-Seattle areas, the Eastside has to be included in any discussion of Asian cuisine. Chinese and Indian restaurants on the Eastside are phenomenal, and put most places in Seattle to shame. The best hot pot restaurants are in Bellevue, not in the ID.
Also, Downtown Seattle is a hotel and business district. I’d expect great food options as much as I’d expect great food options around Times Square in New York. That area caters to standard business travelers and tourists, not people looking for top notch dining experiences.

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