The Grain Diaries: A High-Stakes Battle for Stomach Space

The Grain Diaries: A High-Stakes Battle for Stomach Space

The Grain Diaries: A High-Stakes Battle for Stomach Space S3IDF 11 By Julia Bunte-Mein, S3IDF 2019 Intern
My flight to Bangalore arrived on January 16, 2019, just in time for the ‘Organic & Millets 2019 — International Trade Fair,’ held in the city from January 18th -20th at the Bengaluru Palace. Just as it has for the past two years, the State of Karnataka erected an enormous covered tent on the palace grounds, filled with close to 300 colorful stalls displaying baskets of various organic and millet produce, labeled in their English and local Indian language names. This three-day annual fair was organized by Karnataka’s Department of Agriculture and is the third of its kind since its inauguration in 2017.
The fair was a tremendous, at times overwhelming, feast for the senses. Herded along with the throngs of people on that first day, my colleague and I entered through a 20-ft tall archway and were met by colorful Rangolis, traditional south-Indian patterned floor artwork, created out of all the varieties of millets. Young men and women dressed as Millet Maga and Millet Magalu, mascots from the state government’s campaign for millets, stood at the entrance gates, outfitted in red capes and face paint. I entered into the first tent and began the felt red-carpet walk through the stalls. The space was loud and echoed with conversations about ragi (finger millet), jowar (sorghum), bajra (pearl millet), and navane (foxtail millet).
Even with my generally good sense of direction, I quickly lost my place in the airplane-hangar sized exhibition area. This millet mela , as the name implies, was filled with as many millet devotees as a Hindu festival. It was a maze of millet cookies and displays, each stall boasting its own collection of bowls to sample from. I had never seen so many millet products — biscuits, muesli, bars, puffed snacks, baby food, protein shakes, baked goods, and instant mixes. I was glad to have eaten a light breakfast, for the obligatory sampling was a full meal in itself. The range in organizations was vast — everyone from grocery-shelf regulars like Soulfull to unknown farmer collectives, to start-ups displaying their cutting-edge hulling machinery. Wide-eyed visitors flocked to an exhibit boasting colorful marketing materials and smiling salespeople handing out pamphlets, while just beside it stood an unadorned stall staffed by farmers sitting on the ground chatting in Kannada. This lackadaisical group had only a slapdash poster pinned to the back of their tent and bags of raw millets sparsely laid out on a plastic table. The wide variety in millet representatives demonstrated the range in stakeholders involved. Beyond the exhibition stalls, the trade fair included panels with renowned ministry speakers, B2B networking events, farmer training workshops, live cooking demos, and inspiring keynote speeches by government research organizations.
Why Millet? You may be wondering, as I was, “What is the big deal about millets?” Or, if you live in India, you may have already caught on to the fad. Millets are those brown or yellow-colored grains you may have seen in health-food stores. This course grain comes in about seven main varieties , each having their own unique nutritional profiles. As this extravagant trade fair demonstrates, these inauspicious granules seemed to have captured, or more precisely, “re-captured,” the heart of India. Let me explain.
Millets are some of the most ancient grains first domesticated in Africa and South Asia. In fact, the earliest known archaeological finding of finger millet in India dates back to the second millennia BC . These small-seeded, nutrient-rich cereals grow well in semiarid, hot regions with rocky soils, characteristics that made them a staple crop across the globe for thousands of years. Since the 1960s, however, millets have all but disappeared from mainstream diets. A report by the Karnataka State Department of Agriculture documents the drastic reduction of land acreage for millet cultivation in the last fifty years. From 1960 to 2016, cultivation for small millets in particular reduced by 70%. In an interview with the Economic Times , former Prime Minister Gowda called ragi (finger millet) and jowar (sorghum) are part of the basic identity of the south and north Karnataka, respectively. Yet declining production has questioned that deeply rooted identity. Jowar production fell by almost two thirds, from 29.69 lakh hectares in 1960–1961 to 10.95 lakh hectares in 2015–2016.
The decline in millets is largely credited to the Green Revolution, the transition to what we now know as ‘modern agriculture.’ This global movement involved the introduction of high-yielding seed varieties, irrigation, chemical inputs, and efficiency-maximizing agriculture machinery. Often called the “Wheat Revolution,” these changes stemmed from the newly discovered semi-dwarf variety of wheat by American agronomist Norman Borlaug and extended to India by M.S. Swaminathan. Rice came soon after, and these two irrigation crops came to dominate western, as well as emerging markets, as millets and other grains fell to the wayside. In India, taste preferences and attitudes changed, and Indian cuisine became centered around these two grains. Dinesh Kumar, the director of a non-profit training Indian farmers how to grow millet, explains to NPR , “Millets began to be seen as a food for the poor… Rice was aspirational. White became right, brown became wrong.”
Grains and the Green Revolution The Green Revolution represented a transfer in technology and knowledge. Traditional agriculture was replaced by new technologies. Subsistence farming, the dominant lifestyle for thousands of years in which farmers grow a diverse range of crops primarily to feed their own families or to trade with their neighbors, gave way to an export-based market economy. All in the span of two decades, the gap between rural and urban areas radically diminished (as farmers engaged more in markets), and so too did the diversity of crops. Across the globe, the Green Revolution was viewed as a huge leap forward. In India, the most promising agricultural areas having access to resources and high irrigation potential were selected as part of the Intensive Agricultural Areas Program (IAAP) and the High Yielding Varieties Program (HYVP). The aggressive cultivation methods coupled with access to credit and marketing facilities led to quick and dramatic productivity increases writes researcher Parayil in the Journal of Technology and Culture. The states of Punjab and Haryana experienced two to three-fold yield increases in rice and wheat. This massive boom in the 1960s could not have come at a more opportune time for India, as the country was on the brink of famine after fifteen years of rapid industrialization at the expense of agriculture. The agricultural changes allowed India to become self-sufficient in food grain, no longer relying on direct food aid from the West. With this newfound food security and economy came changes in diet, culture, and a clear ideological shift towards a technology-driven, scientific mindset. This shift was made possible through the massive political campaigns, international partnerships between governments, donor agencies, and research institutions, and universal recognition that science and technology is the path to the future.
Millet Buddha Bowl at “Go Native” in Jayanagar, Bangalore. Despite the massive production boom, many regions and populations were excluded. The selective IAAP program exacerbated regional disparities in economic production and favored large farmers who could take on the substantial investments required for inputs. The vast majority of Indian farmers, most growing on small and marginal plots, did not experience the sweep of the revolution. Furthermore, those farmers that were included did not fare so well down the line in terms of their own health and that of their soil. The complex, economic, political, and social outcomes make the Green Revolution an extremely contested debate today.
Lingering Effects Now, just over fifty years later, India and our entire planet are facing the unintended consequences of the Green Revolution. While the Green Revolution’s “miracle” crop varieties did massively boost food production, it was a solution that put us one step forward and three steps back. In an interview, Oliver King, a Ph.D. researcher from the M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation, captured the ambiguous Indian attitude towards the Green Revolution well — ‘It was a ‘time-solution’ — a solution for the crisis at that time .” The immediate goal was food production for the masses, which it did, skyrocketing yield and plummeting price for rice and wheat. Yet all the while Indian granaries were overflowing, the revolution’s promise to end hunger for all and increase small farmers’ income was not realized. The heavy adoption of inputs like chemical fertilizers and pesticides made it so the small and marginal cultivators could not afford to buy their own products and were unable to keep up with the agri-business giants dominating the commodity industry. The switch to monoculture, export farming made farmers completely dependent on the market, as they could no longer be self-sufficient from their land.
Furthermore, fifty years of intensive monoculture farming reliant on chemicals has ravaged soil health. Combined with the increasing effects of climate change, yields have, to the horror of faithful Green Revolution-proponents, also plummeted. Although the Green Revolution was originally seen as a way of helping farmers, it has instead contributed to a vicious cycle of debt that has resulted in thousands of farmer suicides. Now, faced with thousands of debt-laden and desperate farmers, depleted soils, and urban populations facing nutrition-related chronic illness, India has started a new movement with a new mission. Front and center stage is millet.
Millet thali at Vaathsalya Millet Cafe in JP Nagar, Bangalore. Growing “Smarter” Dubbed a “smart food” by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), millet symbolizes their health crusade on three fronts –health of the planet, health of consumers, and health of farmers. There are a number of reasons why millets have emerged as the 2.0 “miracle crops.” First of all, these naturally drought-resilient crops require 2.5 times less water than rice and can tolerate high temperatures and low levels of fertilizer. Fewer inputs mean cost savings and low barriers for small and marginal farmers. Furthermore, millets can grow in almost any type of soil, recover quickly from weather-related stresses, and have a capacity for carbon sequestration. These natural characteristics make them more resilient to the effects of climate change currently taking a large toll on agriculture, such as droughts, heat waves, and flash floods. In addition to their ecological and economic benefits, millets contain more fiber, protein, and micronutrients than rice or wheat. Because of their low glycemic index, the introduction of millets into mainstream diets is also one method of addressing the increasingly urgent levels of type 2 diabetes, malnutrition and obesity on the rise across India as processed fast-food options are more readily available in urban centers.
Because of these recognized nutritional, resource efficiency, cost, and climate benefits, millets have suddenly become the focus of newspaper headlines and, as I personally witnessed, enormous trade fairs. The popularity of millets is no mysterious phenomenon. The spike in market demand is the result of aggressive promotion by international and government research institutions like ICRISAT and IIMR (Indian Institute of Millet Research). As agriculture is a state-controlled domain in India, the promotion of millets varies by region. Thanks in large part to the state of Karnataka which is leading the promotional campaign, though, millets have taken hold nationally.
Beyond the media campaigns, the state has promoted millets through policy as well. The state’s chief minister HD Kumaraswamy announced in 2019 a new scheme to offer farmers 10,000 rupees directly into their bank accounts for each hectare of small millets grown. This package, called Raithi Siri, is the part of the state’s goal to expand millet to 10,000 hectares. India’s central government included millets in its food distribution programs for the first time in the 2013 National Food Security Act, but Karnataka’s program offers an even higher procurement price than the Minimum Support Price (MSP) announced seven years prior (M. S. Swaminathan Institute 2019).
Millet — Not such a simple story By Sunday, the last day of the Organics and Millets Trade Fair, my bag was overflowing with business cards of innovative millet start-ups, representatives from millet promoting institutions, and small farmer collectives — and of course, two boxes of delicious millet laddu made with ragi, jaggery, and ghee from the Timbaktu collective.
The trade fair was an extremely informative, intensive course on India’s agricultural environment surrounding millets, organics, and small farmers, but I exited the fair gates for the last time with more questions than answers. In the following weeks and months of interviewing experts and actors along the millet supply-chain, I came to realize the millet movement is much more complicated than the sweet and simple story presented by those calling it “the future of farming.”
When asked what he thought about the millet movement, Oliver King chuckled and astutely said, “It’s like looking at an elephant. Depending on your angle, what you see is vastly different.” Trying to get the whole picture, I now believe that while millet has become the icon of this multi-faceted movement, the actual key term is “diversity.” The three-fold mission of ‘smart foods’ — helping the planet, consumers, and farmers, all comes down to bringing back diversity into our diets and our soils. From the consumer side — bringing back micro-nutrient-rich foods into our diets and from the planet side — revitalizing depleted soils by maintaining or reintroducing traditional techniques of crop-rotation, intercropping, and growing a multitude of crops without chemical inputs. Healthier soils and diverse crops also increase the sustainability of small farmers, who can thus support themselves off their own land. This is not to denounce calls for change. There is clearly a problem that needs to be addressed, and the people supporting the millet movement have the right intentions, I think. As we progress, we have to keep diversity as our guiding principle, not millet. Yes, we need “more” — but not in quantity, rather in variety! Parvez Mulla, the owner of a small organic food store in Bangalore, told me, somewhat exasperatedly, “The problem is not rice or wheat — the problem is over-processing and a lack of diversity.”
Could Millet Go Too Far? The danger in building a movement around a single grain, granted one that has over a dozen types, each with a handful of sub-varieties, is that it verges on applying the same template as the Green Revolution. It doesn’t take a genius to rationalize that applying the same process will result in the same outcome. Using one cookie cutter, regardless of the ingredients of the recipe, will result in the same shape. Many farmers in India never stopped cultivating millet, but they grew it along with a variety of other crops. With the spike in urban demand, mission-driven NGOs are encouraging small and marginal farmers to shift more of their production to millet, to sell to the market. Adithya B, a millet store and café owner in Bangalore looked at his near-empty shelves and told me, “The supply can’t keep up with the demand!” Like in the case of rice or wheat, encouraging mono-cultures of millet depletes the soil and makes subsistence impossible. Perhaps the urban consumers are getting healthier diets, but what about the farmers that can no longer afford their once-staple grain? Could millet fare the same fate as the now-controversial quinoa in the United States?
Quinoa: A Lesson in Supply and Demand The quinoa trade is a concerning example of how health and ethics-led consumers unintentionally jeopardized farmer food security by turning staple crops into premium export goods. Due to high western demand, many farmers in Peru and Bolivia who once relied on this staple grain, can no longer to eat it themselves. Stealing headlines as the high-protein “miracle grain of the Andes,” quinoa became the ethical choice for meat-avoiding, health-food store regulars in the US and Europe. As demand spiked, price followed, tripling since 2006. In Peru, quinoa became more expensive than chicken. Families for whom quinoa was part of their culinary history for generations are now turning to cheaper imported convenience food.
No Such Thing as a Miracle Crop This cautionary tale reminds us that there is no such thing as a “miracle crop.” Rather than viewing millet as a trifecta of benefits, perhaps it is more accurately three divergent forces that, when in excess, trade-off one for the two others. Higher nutrition for the urban masses may come at the cost of the soil health if increased production of one type of millet reduces overall crop diversity. Similarly, value-added millet products — shakes, snacks, and instant mixes — although bringing higher returns, trade-off nutrition as processing strips away the fibrous brans. Furthermore, leaving processing in the hands of the traditional supply-chain, with farmers selling their raw material to intermediaries, subverts the mission of increasing rural income.
On the last point, King says the movement needs two main changes. First — “Leave some millets for the farmers!” and second, “Bring the tools to the farmers!” Millets need to be processed to be consumed, and in many rural areas, women spend hours preparing millets by hand (1.5–2 hours to process only 5kgs.) Simply buying millets from farmers will not help them — farmers need to have their own value-addition procedures themselves. Investments in bringing processing machinery to the farmers themselves are one direct way of doing that. With this technology, farmers can sell the surplus for extra cash, while keeping enough for themselves. Of course, getting the finance to invest in such technologies is another hurdle of its own.
A Holistic Viewpoint Investment in infrastructure and resources to ensure the smart-food balance is actually smart requires more than just market forces. Seated on a stool in his small organic food shop in Pulikeshi Nagar, Mulla said to me, “None of the stakeholders in the whole system have a holistic picture of food keeping environment, soil, farmers, and consumers in mind… the aggregators, distributors, and retailers like me only fulfill demand created by the consumer and somewhere individuals like Dr. Khader become the authority of what people should eat. This, in turn, dictates what farmers should grow.” These unchecked supply and demand forces are why public policy is also so important.
Many state governments, with Karnataka leading the way, are doing more than just offering attractive procurement prices for millets. Karnataka’s agriculture department also set up a consortium with ICRISAT and four state agricultural universities to develop a genetic hybrid for higher-yielding varieties of millet . Increased productivity encourages more farmers to switch from cash crops like cotton and maize to millet, which has an overall net positive effect for the smart-balance equation. Where we have to be more careful though, is to not accidentally incentivize farmers to start monoculture, commodity farming of only one type of millet, like ragi which has more than doubled the demand in Bangalore than other millets.
The good thing about the Green Revolution’s dismissal of dryland crops like millet is that its robust diversity has, luckily, survived to this day. Let’s not create a single, high-yielding millet variety (sound familiar?), killing the rest in the name of doing good.
Cautiously Optimistic With all these caveats and asterixis checking the overwhelmingly positive attitude surrounding the millet movement, I’m starting to become unsure how to feel about it.
The similarities to the green revolution make me fearful. Increasing production lends itself to standardization, mechanization, and decreased diversity. I don’t want this well-intentioned movement to make the same mistakes of the past.
Yet I am comforted by the knowledge that the vastly different context around millets from that of rice and wheat almost guarantees that the trajectory will be different. The formula of the green revolution worked for water-rich farmers. Irrigation was the critical ingredient. Those without it, the small and marginal farmers, were excluded. This exclusion, however, is precisely why millets survived. Millets are the domain of the small and marginal farmer, and so the model for growth will be based around their needs. Low input farming, crop rotation, regional soil differences, and cultural considerations must all be part of the discussion.
I have hope that this millet movement, built on the foundation of small and marginal farming, will progress in a way that goes beyond ensuring the three-fold smart balance. I have hope that it will also promote community-led innovation, valuation of indigenous agricultural knowledge, cultural sensitivity, joining together different stakeholders for the cause of our planet.
The views expressed in this article are those personally of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the organization.

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What is Edible Beauty and Is It Suitable for Vegans?

What is Edible Beauty and Is It Suitable for Vegans? April 18, 2019 0
A growing trend over the last few seasons, the concept of edible beauty – or nutri-cosmetics – refers to the process of improving outward appearance by using supplements to provide the body with the right balance of vitamins, minerals and adaptogens to fight antioxidants, reduce inflammatory skin conditions like acne and psoriasis and replenish the microbiome. Every bodily system has a unique microbiome — the term refers to the microscopic organisms that share body space with human beings. When the skin’s microbiome falls out of balance, pimples, premature wrinkles and ashy flakes make skin look unhealthy and dull. Does it work?
Supplements have been part of the wellness and health conversation for years, but as the edible beauty trend grows, they are now beginning to be considered as a step in boosting physical beauty as well as inner well-being. However, e xperts disagree on the efficacy of such beauty regimens. Certain vitamins, such as vitamin C, have proven their anti-inflammatory power, as has turmeric, a spice used traditionally in Indian cuisine. However, it remains to be seen whether the nourishing ingredients in these products make it to the skin, hair and nails in a form that produces noticeable beauty benefits after digestion.
Many of the ingredients in edible beauty products mirror those found in skincare serums traditionally applied topically. Collagen, for example, features prominently in many preparations. Collagen makes up the connective tissue that gives skin its elasticity. While many experts believe consuming supplemental collagen poses few health risks, they assert more research is necessary before determining whether or not ingesting such a supplement will lead to improved appearance.
Other common ingredients in edible beauty products include adaptogens such as ashwagandha, an Asian herb long used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat several health woes. Omega-3 fatty acids such as those in walnuts and avocados likewise make the list. Research suggests Omega-3 fatty acids improve the appearance of the skin and nourish the hair, all while playing important regulatory roles in our reproductive, cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems.
Any diet that bumps up overall nutrition can result in looking and feeling better. Many of the ingredients in such products pose few risks, although women do well to consult with their doctor before taking any supplement, as some herbs may make medicines like birth control and antibiotics less effective. Is edible beauty suitable for vegans?
Vegans who want to improve their appearance, not just maintain their sense of conscience, can do so by using a combination of eating the right foods and trying certified organic supplements. Diets high in omega-3s benefit skin, hair and nails . Foods such as seaweed, chia seeds, edamame and flax seeds contain high amounts of omega-3s. Green, leafy vegetables such as kale and spinach contain high amounts of vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant.
Dr Sara Diaz, R&D consultant at vegan edible beauty brand, says: “ Her1 superfood nutritional range is currently made up of three potent formulas for a daily dose hit of female health and self-care; Skin Glow, Natural Youth and Inner Beauty, which allow women to tailor their supplementation to specific health issues, be it gut health, skin ageing and damage or inflammation and dehydration. Vegans can particularly benefit from these entirely natural, chemical-free and vegan blends because often supplements can be full of hidden synthetics and chemicals which can be damaging to optimal health. Most crucially, when following a vegan lifestyle some nutrients required for complete health can be tricky to take in only from plant-based sources. For instance, most sources of collagen (essential for glowing skin) are animal-based, which is why Her1 Skin Glow includes kelp (a precursor of collagen) as a vegan-friendly ingredient. Likewise, amino acids are also typically found in meat and probiotics in dairy products, which are needed for good gut health. However, Her1 Inner Beauty uses vegan friendly probiotics and pea protein to provide excellent plant-based alternatives to nourish colon cells. reduce inflammation and bloating. Antioxidants foods like broccoli, moringa and strawberry (protect cells from free radicals) which feature in Her1 products have all been carefully included to ensure that nutritional deficiencies in key vitamins like A and D (common for those following a vegan diet) are avoided. Lastly, strategic adaptogens like ashwagandha (increases stress resilience), reishi (heightens immunity) and rhodiola (fights fatigue) to boost the body and the skin’s ability to withstand damage from everyday life (like stress and pollution). “
Those preferring to use a combination of diet and supplementation can give any products on the list below a try. All are vegan-friendly.
Her1 Inner Beauty contains a vegan version of lactic acid- these probiotics help balance intestinal flora as well as improve skin’s condition. This dietary booster boasts only seven natural ingredients.
ZoJo Elixirs revolves around adaptogenic herbs, including ashwagandha and barley grass. Barley grass contains more calcium than dairy milk and helps keep teeth and bones strong.
Edible Beauty is an Australian brand that stands as a forerunner in the edible beauty world. They carry a native, plant-based collagen powder to help grow longer, thicker hair and restore skin’s natural elasticity.
What we consume in our diets affects every cell in the body, including those making up our largest organ, our skin. Edible beauty may or may not transform an ugly duckling into a swan overnight, but eating well and nourishing the body will result in better health and increased energy.
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Indian Shrimp Market : Revenue, Opportunity, Segment and Key Trends 2019-2024

게시판 Indian Shrimp Market : Revenue, Opportunity, Segment and Key Trends 2019-2024
mronindia ・ 52분 Market Reports on India Provides the Trending Market Research Report on “ Indian Shrimp Market: Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2019-2024 ” under Food & Beverage category. The report offers a collection of superior market research, market analysis, competitive intelligence and industry reports.

Indian Shrimp Market reached a volume of 0.67 Million Tons in 2018. Shrimp refers to an invertebrate marine animal with an elongated body which is often used as a food product. It is regarded as nutritious since it contains proteins, selenium, antioxidants, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, iron and vitamin B12. Some of the health benefits associated with shrimp consumption include weight loss, fighting aging, improving bone health, decreasing menstrual pain and preventing cardiovascular diseases. In India, fisheries represent a significant economic activity and offer vast growth opportunities. This is due to the country’s varied resources and potentials.

Request a free sample copy of Shrimp Market Report @ http://www.marketreportsonindia.com/marketreports/Sample/Reports/956271
Easy availability of shrimp and their high nutritional content represent the major growth-inducing factors. They form an important part of various cuisines being one of the most traded seafood species. With the rise in demand for disease-free and healthy shrimps, India has become one of the largest shrimp exporters to the US and the European Union. One of the key trends witnessed in the Indian market is the expansion of the food industry owing to the rising demand for ready-to-eat food products. This is supported by forces such as rapid urbanization, changing lifestyles, hectic work schedules and increasing working women population. As a result, the shrimp market in India is witnessing a healthy growth. In addition to this, a rising demand for shrimp worldwide has positively influenced shrimp imports from India. Moreover, increasing health consciousness amongst consumers, escalating disposable incomes and improving standards of living remain some of the other major factors which are further augmenting the demand for shrimps. Looking forward, our report expects the market to reach a volume of 1.13 Million Tons by 2024, exhibiting a CAGR of around 9% during 2019-2024.

This report provides a deep insight into the Indian shrimp industry covering all its essential aspects. This ranges from macro overview of the market to micro details of the industry performance, recent trends, key market drivers and challenges, SWOT analysis, impact of macro and micro environment, value chain analysis, etc. The report also provides a comprehensive analysis for setting up a shrimp processing plant. The study analyses the processing and manufacturing requirements, project cost, project funding, project economics, expected returns on investment, profit margins, etc. This report is a must-read for entrepreneurs, investors, researchers, consultants, business strategists, and all those who have any kind of stake or are planning to foray into the shrimp industry in any manner.

Browse our full report with Table of Contents : http://www.marketreportsonindia.com/marketreports/indian-shrimp-market-industry-trends-share-size-growth-opportunity-and-forecast-2019-2024/956271

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Vegan Restaurant Week Denver restaurants, food trucks, specials

What Denver flapjacks do you flip for? Vote for your favorite in our pancake poll.
Himchuli Indian and Nepali cuisine has a whole vegan menu of curries, pakoras (chickpea battered vegetables) and Tibetan momos (vegetable dumplings), plus veggie samosas. 3489 W. 32nd Ave., 303-728-9957; himchulidenver.com ; 11 a.m.-3 p.m., 4:30-9:30 p.m.
Next Door American Eatery in Stapleton, Glendale, Highlands Ranch and downtown Denver is making a roasted veggie bowl with quinoa, sunflower seeds and tahini dressing. Next Door Union Station: 1701 Wynkoop St., 720-460-3730; nextdooreatery.com; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. daily
Whole Sol Blend Bar will serve tofu scrambles, matcha smoothie bowls and homemade Newtella with cacao, hazelnut and açaí topped in the house chocolate hazelnut spread, raspberries, granola and cacao nibs. 1735 Chestnut Place, 720-372-7862; wholesol.com ; 6 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday through Friday, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
And The Veggie Whisperer food truck is offering falafel salads, pitas and platters, avocado and peanut harissa hummus, gourmet French fries and tahini milkshakes. Multiple locations throughout the week, 303-500-7921; theveggiewhisperer.com ; check facebook.com/the.veggie.whisperer for hours and locations.
For updated menus and more participating restaurants, keeping checking Vegan Restaurant Week . More about the neighborhood: Denver 0

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Culinary journey of Chef Monisha

A lady who has shattered the glass ceiling and is ‘fabulous’ in the true sense is Chef Monisha Bharadwaj, who dons many hats. She is an award winning author,a food historian and owns a successful Indian cookery school in London – Cooking with Monisha (www.cookingwithmonisha.com) in London, UK
She is a trained chef from the Institute of Hotel Management, Catering Technology and Applied Nutrition, Mumbai and has been a food consultant to the Times of India (India’s largest media group) creating menus for celebrities such as the deputy Prime Minister of India as well as several top film stars.
After her short professional stint in Mumbai, she moved to England and worked at the Bombay Brasserie(a Taj Group restaurant) in London.Soon, she met her literary agent, and through her, her publisher, Kyle books, one of the UK’s leading publishing houses. They commissioned her first book, ‘The Indian Kitchen’, which went on to win several awards. She was then commissioned to write her second book. From the books, there came TV and her cookery school. Since she has studied history, she also gives lectures on food history. The success of one book led to the other and she has written 15 books.
The Early life
Chef Monisha was born in Mumbai and attended the Bombay International School and then St Columba School. Her junior college was HR College of commerce after which she joined the Institute of Hotel Management, Dadar in Mumbai, India.
She started her training in Bharatanatyam at the age of 4 and has studied this classical dance form for 30 years. She has performed all over the world professionally, and was invited to perform at the opening of the Nehru gallery, Victoria and Albert museum, in the presence of HM the queen. She has created and taught her courses at other cookery schools such as Divertimenti, The Bertinet Kitchen in Bath, The Ashburton School in Devon, seasoned in south Derbyshire and The Bristol School of Food and Wine. She teaches several classes a week, from training chefs from all around the world to teaching people with special needs. Her specialty being the Indian Cuisine, she feels that India and Indian food is so diverse, it has got its roots in many different aspects in different regions. One should understand that Indian cooking is easy to do and focuses on good health. One can keep it simple by using locally sourced ingredients, which are in season. She believes that turmeric is the ‘super spice’ since it has antioxidants, is anti- inflammatory; making it a wonder spice. She herself loves turmeric tea and has been having it for many years; she believes that it has kept her immunity high. She was invited to be a part of the BBC radio 4’s programme, ‘The food programme’ on turmeric last year.
She feels that physical stamina is extremely important for chefs as they have to spend a lot of time workingand standingin hot kitchens and small spaces. The physical demands of the job are many.Her success mantra for a professional chef: “Be good at teamwork, have appropriate knowledge and skill sets with a wish to keep learning and innovating”.
Shehas been a guest chef at Benaras, a Michelin star restaurant in London and at the Intercontinental Hotel, Park Lane.She is often invited to judge food events and has been a regular judge at the Guild of Fine Food’s ‘Great Taste Awards’ for the past few years. In 2013, she was invited to be Guest Lecturer at SOAS, University of London, to give a series of talks on ‘The History and Culture of India through its Food’. She was invited to be guest speaker at Kew Gardens for the Indian Orchid Festival 2017 where she talked about healing plants used in Indian cookery. In 2017, Chef Bharadwaj developed and gave a lecture on ‘How the British Fell in Love with Curry’ at The British Council. More recently, in 2018, she was invited to bethe brand ambassador ofVeetee Basmati rice in the UK and Europe.
Her Take on the famous ‘curry’ She says, “Today, everyone considers curry a national dish in the UK. It started with the East India Company as returning officers and wives took back recipes from India. However, the right ingredients and tools were not available, and so the British used substitutes and British cooking techniques to cook Indian dishes. For example, they used apples instead of raw mangoes.As time went on, more Indians came to the UK, started their own restaurants. Bengali boatmen, who were taken back by the British, started working in the fish and chip shops. This is where they started cooking curry, which white men discovered, was a good meal to have after a few beers, given that curry was spicy!”.
Awards and accolades She was awarded ‘Cookery Writer of the Year’ in 2003 and her books have been shortlisted for awards such as the Cordon Bleu World Food Media Awards, the Andre Simon Award and the Jacob’s Creek World Food Media Awards. She has also won the prestigious food award from the Deutschland Akademie Ausgezeichnet in Germany. Her books have sold almost a million copies in 8 languages. She contributes to several magazines and newspapers such as Elle, Delicious, The Mail on Sunday and the Sunday Telegraph and has cooked on TV for Great Food Live and Bites on UK Food and for the South African Broadcasting Channel. She has been a judge on Iron Chef America (The Food Network, USA) and cooked for ‘Chef on a Shoestring’ (CBS Network, USA). She has also done BBC’s ‘Food and Drink’ show and ‘Inside the Factory’, ITV1’s ‘The World’s Best Diet’ and Sky One’s ‘Fat Families’. She has also been nominated ‘celebrity chef of the year 2018’ by the London curry awards.
Read more at : http://www.theiwh.com/chef-monisha-bharadwaj/ Website: http://www.theiwh.com

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Top Female Chefs in the San Francisco Bay Area

Photo via Atelier Crenn Facebook Top Female Chefs in the San Francisco Bay Area Sponsor Ad
San Francisco and the Bay Area are communities proud of their diversity and welcoming spirit. They’re also proud to be known as a culinary mecca . Nowhere is this double dynamic as evident as in the region’s strong legacy of female chefs and women-owned restaurants. From Alice Waters, who helped found the local and organic food movement back in 1971 when she opened Chez Panisse in Berkeley, to Joyce Goldstein fusing Mediterranean flavors with California’s bounty for the first time in 1984 at San Francisco’s Square One, women have been on the front lines of the Bay Area food scene for decades.
Check out our top 10 list of female chefs currently driving the Bay Area culinary scene to new heights. Jun 6, 2017 at 8:11pm PDT Dominique Crenn
Few culinary superstars have risen as fast as San Francisco chef Dominique Crenn. After bringing her five-course tasting menu and intimate small dining room experience to the Marina District with Atelier Crenn in 2011, she opened up Petit Crenn in Hayes Valley in 2015. The first female chef in the U.S. to earn two Michelin stars and author of the cookbook, Atelier Crenn: Metamorphosis of Taste , French-born Crenn is famous for her attention to detail on both the dinner and brunch menus, the latter featuring stand-out items like the Brittany Coast style buckwheat crepes filled with lobster mushrooms, aged goat cheese and eggs. Aug 16, 2017 at 4:03pm PDT Melissa Reitz
After running the kitchen at San Francisco culinary institutions such as Zuni and Bar Agricole , as well as Camino in Oakland and Bantam in Santa Cruz, veteran chef Melissa Reitz now runs the show at Locanda on Valencia Street (sister restaurant of Delfina ). Her three-star menu here focuses on modern Italian Osteria-style classics such as veal saltimbocca with prosciutto, cheese and sage, all melted gloriously together on top. Locanda also does an extremely popular brunch menu, which features items like French toast with strawberries and pistachio butter. Jul 11, 2016 at 8:28pm PDT Pim Techamuanvivit
Born and raised in Bangkok, Pim Techamuanvivit has single-handedly upped the game on Thai food in San Francisco at critically acclaimed Kin Khao (which means “let’s eat”). Items like Khao Mun Gai (chicken fat rice, ginger-poached chicken and Pim’s own secret sauce) created from produce and meats sourced from local farms, have helped to win Kin Khao a Michelin star. The coconut and black rice pudding dessert is also a crowd pleaser. May 16, 2017 at 6:03pm PDT Traci de Jardin
When Jardiniere first opened its doors back in 1997, it helped transform Hayes Valley from a neglected neighborhood to the trendsetting city center oasis that it is today. Besides masterminding the French-influenced menu at Jardiniere (think duck confit with peaches and chrysanthemum), Traci de Jardin is also the chef/owner of both Mijita in the Ferry Building and The Commissary in the Presidio, as well as a partner in the Public House, where she creates sustainable pub food. May 17, 2017 at 11:21am PDT Melissa Perello
Michelin-star winning chef/owner of both Frances in the Castro and Octavia in Pacific Heights, Melissa Perello is a star of San Francisco’s competitive fine dining scene. Her seasonally changing menus are creative and expressly influenced by the Pacific Rim, with items like tagliatelle with sea urchin butter, jolly tomatoes, and shishito appearing on the menu. In 2016, Perello was a semi-finalist for the James Beard Award for “Best Chef West.” Jun 16, 2017 at 7:45pm PDT Preeti Mistry
The genius behind the Indian street food-inspired menu (including curry topped pizzas) at both Juhu Beach Club (now closed, much to our chagrin) in Oakland and Navi Kitchen in Emeryville, Preeti Misti went from working at the Google cafeteria to appearing on Top Chef to becoming one of the hottest young chefs in the Bay Area. The author of the Juhu Beach Club Cookbook , which promises Indian Spice with an Oakland Soul, Mistry’s menu items – like tamarind coconut curry with cremini mushrooms and summer eggplant – have a devoted and die-hard following. Jul 5, 2017 at 9:27am PDT Gabriella Camara
Chef/owner of both Contramar in Mexico City and Cala in San Francisco, Gabriella Camara has the honor of running what many consider the most authentic upscale Mexican restaurant in the Bay Area. Plates like her signature dish, trout tostadas with chipotle and avocado, gets rave reviews and have helped define “modern” Mexican cuisine across the country. Jul 5, 2016 at 8:56pm PDT Cecilia Chiang
Born near Shanghai in 1920 and raised in Beijing, Cecilia Chiang is a living legend in the San Francisco restaurant scene, as she is credited with bringing Mandarin style Chinese food to the Bay Area. Although her restaurant closed in 2006, her influence is still strong, and she has been the subject of several recent documentaries including one by director Wayne Wang ( The Joy Luck Club ). Mandarin classics like Peking Duck and Beggar’s Chicken have now become a staple of San Francisco cuisine largely because of her. Jul 7, 2016 at 4:16pm PDT Wassana Korkhieola and Lalita Souksamlane
With six locations of their San Francisco institution Osha Thai, as well as Lao Table in SoMa (which specializes in Laotian fare), sisters and co-owners Lalita Souksamlane and Wassana Korkhieola have been pleasing taste buds across the city for decades. From Dungeness Crab Rangoon to beef wasabi rolls, the menu at Osha is as open-ended as San Francisco itself, though it is grounded in Southeast Asian specialties.

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Pojomojo :
We are recruiting to fill the following positions below:
1.) Cook,
2.) Fryer,
3.) Cashier
4.) Host
Loaction: Gbagada, Magodo, Ikotun, Lekki, Lagos
Job Type: Full-time
Job Description
We are seeking to recruit team members(cooks, fryers, Cashiers and Hosts) for the following locations:
Gbagada, Ikotun, Magodo, Lekki
Preparation of food according to recipe
Ensure food is prepared as per food preparation requirements
Ensure meals are produced on time, and sufficient quantities are available.
Maintain stock levels of all restaurant supplies.
Qualifications
SSCE or OND holders Only.
Excellent cooking skills with ability to prepare several dishes
Able to work in a fast-paced environment/ under pressure
Strong knowledge of proper food handling and sanitation standards.
How to Apply
Interested and qualified candidates submit their CV at any of these underlisted locations :
Chicken Republic,
12, Coker Road,
Ilupeju – Lagos State.
Or
Chicken Republic,
Plot 86, Block IV,
Omole Residential Scheme,
Ojodu, Ikeja – Lagos State.
Or
Chicken Republic,
8 Okota Road,
Isolo Lagos State.
Or
Chicken Republic,
5 Ajah-addo Road,
Badore Ajah Town,
Lagos State.
Note: Only SSCE or OND holders would be considered for the roles. B.sc can apply if they are ready to earn less. where to send cv to? 3 Likes Re: Updated-New Job Vacancies 2.0 by panache00 ( f ): 5:21pm On Apr 16 Pojomojo :
Legit Thank you. Do you by chance know what they are into? 3 Likes Re: Updated-New Job Vacancies 2.0 by Pascopele : 7:38am A reputable hospitality company located in Festac, Lagos has the following role to fill:
*1. ASSISTANT CHEF*
• Excellent knowledge of *INDIAN CUISINE*Knowledge of food preparation and existing health and safety standards
• Pastry knowledge will be an added advantage
• Ability to effectively manage, direct, and lead a team
• Communication abilities with employees, vendors, and customers
• Problem solving capabilities and willingness to thrive in a fast-paced and sometimes high-pressure environment
• Collaborative attitude with an emphasis on excellent customer service
• Time management strengths with the ability to multi-task
• Minimum of 2 years of experience as an Assistant Chef
• Solid understanding of cooking methods, ingredients, kitchen equipment, and related processes
• Proven track record of effectively leading and managing others
• Familiarity with best practices in the industry
Interested and Qualified candidates should forward their CVs to suntrailcareers@gmail.com using the Job Title as subject.
*Deadline is Tuesday April 23, 2019*

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Rishikesh: “Scenic beauty, Adventure and thrill all at one place”!

/ Rishikesh: “Scenic beauty, Adventure and thrill all at one place”! Rishikesh: “Scenic beauty, Adventure and thrill all at one place”! Tripoto https://www.tripoto.com/ “Let’s explore mountains and rivers together”, uttered heart silently! All set, bags packed and the journey begins ! It was a pleasing Saturday morning when we were filled with excitement to explore Yoga Capital of the “World”- Rishikesh (it’s considered as yoga and spiritual centers of India), since thousands of years turned out as a gratifying destination to explore. Seen as a gateway to the Himalayas across the banks of Ganga River- this place is a perfect blend of “Yoga, meditation and adventure sports”. Once we started our journey from Noida in the morning the aurora of sun coupled with peace made the view mesmerizing for us. Also, the calmness of the morning sky with my all-time favorite “Old Classics” was cherry on the cake! Major attractions: The Scenic Beauty: Right from beginning our journey to reaching the destination, the complete journey was mesmerizing. Beautiful views of Ganges is the place where beauty and adventure collide. Early Morning Road View!The Food: Poha with tea. Being healthy Indian cuisine (made of Whole wheat flour, Semolina, salt and fried in oil) is must-have for usual travelers to Rishikesh. When coupled with “Tea”- (an Indian beverage), the taste is enthralling. Chotiwala: Traditional restaurant to have “Indian Thali”, Palatable and pleasant-tasting, it’s a perfect combination to satisfy our soul as well as our taste buds. Travellers across the world who have the love for vegetarian food must try this place. Food has all the Indian flavours which are really value for money! Camp Adventure: “Red chili Adventure camp”, undoubtedly staying with them is a complete adventure. With river rafting and trekking being their prime services, stay cottage is a treat for sure. Camp area is surrounded by tents on either side to offer the friendly homely experience for the traveller. Heavenly with the essence of nature, to be desolate and simultaneously with nature is ethereal. Incessantly. A lonely place for travelers to be with nature! River rafting: A good stretch of 26 km, finishing at Laxman Jhula came up an indeed exquisite and worthy experience. Once you reach the rafting space, the instructors make sure that each and every group is briefed with relevant safety instructions. Primarily, Instructions include safety briefing so that travelers have a safe and secure journey. All of us Together! Rapids: With 13 major rapid challenges, across the complete rafting stretch of Rishikesh travel journey. Ranges between 2 to 4+ sites, the instructor elaborately about the rapids with history along names and grade details defined. Sweet 16, CrossFire, The Blind Mice, The Wall, Roller Coaster, and the Golf Course and with all new rapids it turned out an altogether new experience to travel. Experience in water: The unfathomable rapids and velocity of the running river, honed scary feelings among most of us. Being scared to plunge into Ganga is a natural phenomenon. With exquisite experience for carrying full-fledged rafting experience, somehow I managed to gather all the courage to dive into Ganga. The Raft Group! Vikram: While travelling from Muzzafarnagar to Haridwar, Vikram auto (a featured product in the family of auto’s). It’s cost-effective for inter-state travel, but I think it’s the design and colour of Vikram which fascinates the travelers. The air suspension bridges are one of its kind attraction during a travel journey. Rock climbing experience: Rock climbing, an activity (where one’s hands, feet, or any other part of the body is tied to rope for climbing up the rock). It was unusual experience of climbing. Kayaking: kayaking, first choice for travelers. Out of apprehension and curiosity, I questioned the paddler, what might be the depth of this river? He uttered 150. Ahh! The very next question which popped into my mind was what happens if our kayak turns upside down in this water? He replied with sarcasm, “Niche Laxman Jhule par hi miloge fir Madam, agar Zinda bach gye to” (if in case you are saved, we can meet base came where Ganga starts). His reply was scary! Bonfire: Remembering my childhood days from upper north of India in Jammu, where Kanger(an earthen pot which is woven with filled hot embers) is used regularly for keeping warmth in winters, as we had already done water activities-“Bonfire”, was the need of hour! We made few friends, had some good food and left the place. Travel Tips! Some pre-trip preparations: Travel bag, Camera, T-shirt/ shorts-1 extra pair for water activities, torch and floaters! Rishikesh, known for shopping religious items, clothes and handicrafts. Walking along the market gives you time to interact with other travellers. we have tried to cover almost everything in this blog post, with specific emphasis about things which are unique during our travel experience. As we are sharing our journey but “You must visit this heavenly place once for sure”! Enjoy!

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10 Mexican Restaurants For A Taco And Burrito Fiesta

Image credit: @rust_in_pain
Baja Fresh Mexican Grill has been serving Tex-Mex cuisine in the USA since 1990, and expanded its chain of fast and casual salads, fajitas and burritos to Singapore in 2012.
Portions here are massive – great for starving SMU students, whose campus is just a five minute trek away. Build your own Burrito from $12.95 , with all the usual accessories and fillings on offer. The Enchilada Style (+$3.45) option is what’s special here. Ticking that box gets your a hefty wrap smothered with red chile sauce, melted Monterey Jack cheese, pico de gallo, and sour cream. I’m no nutritionist, but you’ll probably want to hit the gym after eating all that.
Address: 9 Bras Basah Road, #01-03, Rendezvous Gallery, Singapore 189559 Opening hours: Sun-Tue 7:30am to 11pm, Wed-Sat 7:30am to 4am Tel: 6337 7300 Website | Full list of outlets 8. Afterwit Mexican Taqueria
Another halal Mexican option on the list is Afterwit Mexican Taqueria . This no-frills Arab Street joint has Mexico-inspired decor and green walls, but the menu encompasses a multitude of fusion flavours that are familiar to the local palate.
Peking Duck With Sweet Bean Sauce ($13++ for two, $18++ for three tacos) is typically an atas Chinese restaurant dish, but this taco version makes it a whole lot more affordable. Mexican food is renowned for its spicy kick, and the Nusantaco ($13++ for two, $18++ for three tacos) , which contains sambal beef lung, as well as Curry Prawn ($13++ for two, $18++ for three tacos) are two tacos that retain a fiery heat while injecting familiar local flavours.
Address: 778 North Bridge Road, Singapore 198746 Opening hours: Sun-Thur 12pm-10pm, Fri-Sat 12pm to 12am Tel: 6291 1773 Afterwit Mexican Taqueria is a halal-certified restaurant. 9. Los Jefes
Image credit: Los Jefes Taqueria’s Facebook page
Initially starting as a delivery service, Los Jefes has blossomed into a full-fledged eatery. Tacos are their speciality, with only a small selection of Mexican staples on offer.
The Lamb Barbacoa Tacos ($15) caught our eye, with fall-apart tender lamb braised in banana leaves. Those on a tighter budget can plump for Pastor Tacos ($10), with flavourful spit-roasted chicken or pork and bright pineapple salsa that will have you asking for more, por favor .
Address: 1 West Coast Drive, #01-73, NEWest Mall, Singapore 128020 Opening hours: Tue-Fri 1pm to 9:30pm, Sat-Sun 11am to 3pm, 5pm to 9:30pm Tel: 9817 4990 Website 10. El Cocinero
El Cocinero is a hidden gem in the heart of Novena. Nestled snugly in a quiet apartment block, this humble cantina serves up some supremely affordable, authentic Mexican grub. Their taco selection is headlined by the smoky and juicy chicken Tinga ($7.90 for three tacos) and luscious classic Carnitas ($8.50 for three tacos) . Each taco is topped with sharp diced onions, piquant salsa, and earthy coriander to give a fresh edge to your tortilla-licious experience.
Burrito fanatics aren’t left out, especially with the fantastically filling Beef Picadillo Burrito – an absolute steal at $10.50 . Make sure you have an empty stomach, because this gargantuan burrito is stuffed with ground beef and potatoes – on top of the usual portion of rice and beans. A layer of gooey melted cheese is also slapped on for an undoubtedly sinful meal.
Address: 275 Thomson Road, #01-45, Novena Regency, Singapore 307645 Opening hours: Tue-Sun 10am to 9pm Tel: 8307 5163 Website Burritos and tacos to unleash your inner Latino
With heaps of bold flavour and immensely satisfying meats, it’s no surprise that Mexican cuisine is on the rise in Singapore. Head to these joints to expand your culinary horizons and just maybe, you’ll end up jumping on this tasty Latin American bandwagon.
If explosive flavours are your thing, check out our list of affordable Thai food or our article on Indian restaurants in Singapore .
Share your favourite spots for Mexican food with us in the comments below!
Photos taken by Pepita Hope Wauran. 301

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7 Low-Calorie Indian Recipes You Can Try For Healthy Weight Loss

7 Low-Calorie Indian Recipes You Can Try For Healthy Weight Loss 7 Low-Calorie Indian Recipes You Can Try For Healthy Weight Loss Sushmita Sengupta | Updated: April 17, 2019 17:39 IST Prepare these delicious low-calorie Indian recipes at home Highlights Weight loss could be an overwhelming affair Indian food is often considered to be an out and out indulgent affair Indian cuisine too has it’s share of low calorie options
Think Indian food, and we are almost conditioned to think all things greasy, spicy and indulgent. We tend to forget for a while that all our everyday foods like dal, chapatti, raita are not only Indian but are also, in fact, some of the healthiest foods you can have. If you have been on a weight loss diet, you may have been told to keep your calories in check. But, before you embark on a low calorie diet, you need to understand that calories are not ‘bad’ per say. Every food that you take generates energy. This energy is measured in units of calories. According to experts, in typical low calorie diet you would get about 800 to 1500 calories per day. Your calorie requirement may differ depending upon your height, profession and daily energy expenditure too. Therefore, it is important to understand your body and then its calorie requirement, before you start eliminating things blindly from your diet.
You must ensure that the little calories you take in your low-calorie are loaded with nutrients. Make sure you take enough of lean protein, fibre and good fats and make it a balanced affair. Determine how many calories you are eating every day and gradually reduce hundred to two hundred calories from it. Starving yourself is a bad weight loss strategy. Keep yourself hydrated, people often intermix signals of thirst with hunger that adds up to the calorie load. It is okay to treat yourself with some high calorie treats once in a while. It has been proved that occasional binges help people stick to their weight-loss diet better.
If you are fond of Indian food or your diet is majorly Indian, you have arrived at the right place for low-calorie Indian food options. Here are some low-calorie Indian recipes that you can treat yourself with. 1. Sabudana Khichdi
Sabudana khichdi is one of the most widely consumed dish during Navratri. Made with tender tapioca pearls, tossed in a medley of mild spices and peanuts, this dish makes use of ghee as it is a vrat recipe. You can replace it with any low-fat vegetable oil. However, a bit of ghee is recommended by many expert nutritionists. It is a source of good fat that helps fill you up and prevent untimely cravings. Low calorie Indian Recipes: Sabudana khichdi is one of the most widely consumed dish during Navratri 2. Ragi Dosa
Ragi is a delicious gluten-free alternative to its fattening grainy counterparts. Dosa is usually made with rice or lentil batter, this recipe makes use of Ragi that is rich in fibre. Fibre helps promote the feeling of satiety, since it takes time to digest. If you feel full, you would naturally binge less. You can enjoy this healthy South-Indian treat with piping hot sambhar or yummy coconut chutney. Low Calorie Indian recipes: Ragi is a delicious gluten-free alternative to its fattening grainy counterparts. 3. Green Pea Upma
Upma is famous South Indian breakfast item that is not only nutrient-dense but also weight loss-friendly. This version of upma also makes use of protein-rich green pea. Protein helps regulate hunger hormone ghrelin and check cravings. Low calorie Indian recipes: Upma is famous South Indian breakfast item 4. Low-Calorie Microwave Dhokla
Dhokla is a Gujarati marvel that has become quite a global rage. Dhoklas are steamed, and hence, they make up for a perfect low-calorie snack that you can add to your weight-loss diet. This light and filling treat needs no elaborate cooking too; they can be easily made in a microwave with a handful of ingredients like besan, suji, green chilli, curd and curry leaves. Low-calorie Indian recipes: Dhokla is a Gujarati marvel that has become quite a global rage. 5. Tandoori Gobhi
Tandoori and roasted goods are an excellent way to save calories, since there is no deep-frying involved. They also save you the saturated fats that you often find in deep-fried goods. This delicious tandoori gobhi recipe serves as an excellent vegetarian starter in a quintessential North Indian spread. You can enjoy these as a healthy evening snack also. Cauliflower is a good source of weight loss-friendly fibres too. Make sure you do not put extra butter on top. Low Calorie Indian recipes: Tandoori and roasted goods are an excellent way to save calories 6. Kheere ka Raita
Indian summers and a bowlful of cooling raita share an inseparable bond. This yogurt-based dish is good for gut and digestion. A healthy digestion is an important component of a weight-loss regimen. Hundred grams of yogurt has only 60 calories. This special raita also packs the goodness of cucumber. Cucumber is a yummy summer veggie that can do wonders for your weight-loss diet. About 95 percent of cucumber is just water. The veggie is full of nutrients and fibre. Low-calorie Indian recipes: Indian summers and a bowlful of cooling raita share an inseparable bond . 7. Oats Idli
The puffy, light and ever-so delectable idli is one of the most famous Indian snacks of all times. Made of fermented batter, idli is excellent for gut health. Fermentation also increases the bio-availability of nutrients. Since idli is not fried, you do not have to think about the calorie overload either. This particular recipe is a powerhouse of protein and fibre that you can consider to make part of your diet. Low calorie Indian recipes: The puffy, light and ever-so delectable idli is one of the most famous Indian snacks of all times.
So, what are you waiting for? Don your aprons and start cooking already. Let us know which recipes you enjoyed the most in the comments section below.

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