The Black Seed Oil Market: Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecasts 2019-2025

The Black Seed Oil Market: Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecasts 2019-2025

The Black Seed Oil Market: Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecasts 2019–2025
Sarasota, FL — ( SBWIRE ) — 04/18/2019 — Global Black Seed Oil Market: Overview Black cumin seed oil, which is also called as black seed, kalonji, and nigella sativa. It is local to North America and South-eastern Asia; with an aroma and taste reminiscent of onions, black pepper, and oregano. The black cumin seed oil has got acknowledgement for its usage in the Middle Eastern and Indian cuisine, such as soups, curries, vegetables as well as meat dishes for a peppery kind of flavor. Download Free PDF Research Report Brochure @ https://www.zionmarketresearch.com/requestbrochure/the-black-seed-oil-market Global Black Seed Oil Market: Growth Factors The black cumin seed oil is likely to gain extensive popularity and demand on the backdrop of its manifold benefits. Some of the best features of black cumin seed oil which are mainly propelling the global black cumin seed oil market are its prospective utilization to alleviate allergies, asthma, and other respiratory problems, that usually balance the immune system, induce anti-inflammatory properties for encephalomyelitis, reduce cancer tumor, peritonitis, colitis, oedama, and arthritis by the suppression of the leukotriens and inflammatory mediators prostaglandins, fight microbes which consist of viruses, bacteria, helminths, and fungus, decreases gas, aid digestion, stomach pain and bloating, to treat different skin problems like psoriasis and eczema, improve healthy cholesterol levels, inhibits Candida and fungus development and normalizes blood pressure. The major restraints of the global black cumin seed oil market are comparatively few but are potential enough to affect the global market as well as include the weak penetration in the global market due to the lack of knowledge amongst the people regarding the product & selection of prospective alternatives. In addition to this, several cases have been reported due to the many side-effects of black cumin seed oil, for example, the onset of contact dermatitis, allergic reactions, and hypotension. Global Black Seed Oil Market: Segmentation The global black seed oil market is fragmented on the basis of form and application. In terms of form, the global black seed oil market is bifurcated into oil and capsule. On the basis of application, the global black seed oil market is categorized into personal care and cosmetics, which is further divided into fragrances, skin care, and hair care. In terms of application, the global black seed oil market is segregated into pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, flavors & dressing and culinary. In terms of nutraceuticals, the market is segmented into functional food and food supplement/dietary supplement. https://www.zionmarketresearch.com/sample/the-black-seed-oil-market Global Black Seed Oil Market: Regional Analysis The South Asian regions such as Indonesia, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and others are likely to lead as the major manufacturers as well as exporters of the global black cumin seed oil market which is expected to be followed by Europe and North America. Majority of imports is likely to be registered by the countries like Germany, the U.S., China, UK, France, Saudi Arabia, and others. Asia is likely to remain as a prospective market featuring to the increasing economies of China and India. In addition to this, great prospective in the global black cumin seed oil market is likely to be attributed to its diverse usage. Global Black Seed Oil Market: Competitive Players Some of the most important market players in the global black seed oil are Z-Company, The Blessed Seed, Amazing Nutrition, Hab Shifa, Complete Organics., Organika Health Products Inc., are among others. Global Black Seed Oil Market: Regional Segment Analysis North America

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The tech that makes Swiggy tick — and what’s coming next​

Photography & Design by Vasu Agarwal
April 18, 2019
The sprawling ninth-floor office in a tech park in Koramangala, a southeast Bengaluru suburb, could easily be the digs of a large tech enterprise such as IBM or Infosys. Rows and rows of coders hunched over their laptops. Black workplace chairs, white tables with frosted glass partitions. Conference rooms with print outs of screen mock-ups jostling for space on glass walls with marker-pen scribbles and Post It notes.
This is a code factory with a difference — it is the engine that delivers thousands and thousands of food orders every day in over 100 Indian cities.
Welcome to the headquarters of Swiggy, the food delivery app busting the charts in India.
But Swiggy is not just any average food delivery venture. Its business is valued at over $3 billion – ranking it among the top five startups by valuation – and is active in over a hundred Indian cities. It counts the likes of Naspers, Tencent, DST Global, and Accel Partners among its top investors.
Back to the Swiggy corporate office. It is literally bursting at its seams, with hundreds of engineers, data scientists and product managers crammed close.
A large overhead LCD screen flashes names of new joinees every few seconds. Another screen above a huddle of engineers in the “RNG team” – short for revenue and growth – has a graphic highlighting spikes in traffic and other demand projections.
Accentuating the kinetic look-and-feel of the corporate quarters is the IPL cricket season, which has forced Swiggy’s top executives to create specific, designated “war rooms” where employees and executives strategise and brainstorm on newer ways to handle frequent spikes in user traffic. The IPL season is peak food delivery time, typically, and the business gets a boost with offers like discounts or cashbacks on orders made at the exact moment Andre Russell hits a six.
As if that were not enough, the top managers at Swiggy are scrambling to finish year-end appraisals of hundreds of employees. Swiggy employs about 5,000 odd people now — not including thousands of delivery agents ubiquitous in black t-shirts with the orange Swiggy logo.
Outside the Swiggy battle stations that vacuum terrabytes of data, India’s food-tech wars continue to scale new peaks, with Swiggy attempting to fend off and sweep aside its closest competitor, Zomato, and others such as Uber Eats and Ola’s Foodpanda.
Very soon, Swiggy will move its headquarters to a much larger space in Bengaluru. And it won’t be the first time it has done that – as Swiggy’s scale grows in leaps and bounds in the past four years. The company has been forced to relocate headquarters at least three times.
Seeing where it is today, it’s hard to fathom how Swiggy came out of the blue in 2014 and turned the business of food-delivery on its head canoeing its way through an Internet funding boom and the subsequent bust that had several food-tech ventures falling by the wayside.
So, what separates Swiggy from the rest? SEPARATING ITSELF FROM THE PACK
Swiggy was not an early entrant in the food delivery business. Far from it.
In 2014, Zomato was the foremost venture in the business of food-tech and was attempting to desperately crack the market. As were a dozen others like TinyOwl and FoodPanda.
But none of them succeeded. From their failures emerged the Swiggy blueprint. But not before teething troubles.
Swiggy did not operate an app during its initial months. And even after it was released, the mobile app was a far cry from its present-day spiffy avatar – even though it was miles ahead of competitor apps then from a usability perspective.
What it lacked in tech sophistication at the time, it made up for other bold strategic bets at the time – most significantly, the decision of the founders to invest heavily on building its own in-house logistics . Which roughly translated to building their own delivery fleet.
While others such as Zomato were following the marketplace model and simply connecting users to restaurants and outsourced deliveries to third-parties, Swiggy figured out quickly that the model was unsustainable — simply because it compromised customer experience, as delivery executives from third-party operators provided inconsistent quality of deliveries.
For founders Sriharsha Majety and Nandan Reddy, in particular, building their own logistics operations for Swiggy came naturally — prior to starting Swiggy, the duo had attempted to build a technology product called Bundl that focused on logistics and helped ship products across the country.
Next, they realised that their technology needed to stand out from the rest of the pack. To that end, they swiftly brought on former Myntra tech executive Rahul Jaimini as their third co-founder. Myntra is a fashion retailer part of the Flipkart group.
Over the years, Swiggy has scored well on three counts over rivals on the tech front.
Firstly, the Swiggy app has the best user interface among all food-delivery services. Unquestionably. What is also not very widely known is that Swiggy’s tech teams operate and monitor fours apps — one each for users, restaurant partners, delivery executives, and an in-house team app. All these apps talk to each other at any given point of team, ensuring seamless coordination between all parties involved for smoother deliveries.
Secondly, Swiggy took a punt on data sciences earlier than others — it crunched the vast troves of data it collected from users and bet heavily on personalisation, a feature that made its app far more easier to navigate than others.
Thirdly, Swiggy invested big in “cloud kitchens” — the practice of setting up kitchen spaces in areas where restaurant partners don’t operate, with the idea of being accessible everywhere. Swiggy wasn’t the first in the game to talk about cloud kitchens, but it perfected the model. No restaurant would be out of reach for users in any part of the city. Well, almost.
And the rest is history. Such was the gulf between Swiggy’s user experience and the rest, that older rivals such as Zomato were eventually forced to copy the Swiggy playbook. The two even briefly held merger talks, although those conversations did not lead anywhere . THE EVOLUTION OF SWIGGY
Unlike most consumer internet startups that connect the user to a service provider (think Uber), Swiggy is not just a two-way market. Uber, for instance, is a classic two-way market where passengers are connected to drivers on the move. Swiggy is a three-way market where there’s a customer, the restaurant (service provider), and the delivery fleet run by Swiggy. Which means there are more moving parts: a user trying to decide what to eat, a delivery executive on the move, and a restaurant readying the next order.
About three years ago, the company had a basic looking app which helped users order food online. Around this time, the company started asking itself how to rank restaurants better? How can it personalize the experience for a user and his tastes? Is there a supply demand mismatch? How long does it take to deliver?
Talking about restaurant choices, Anuj Rathi, who leads product management at Swiggy, says: “It’s a non trivial problem and it takes a lot of machine learning to figure out how do we balance a user’s experience with the mass user experience. All this needs to work in real time.” The company also optimises a user’s experience based on various other parameters such as the time of day, previous orders, payment methods, and so on.
Once an order is placed, questions are about assigning the right delivery executive, the best route to take, and so on. In the meantime, the restaurant needs to start preparing the food ordered so that it is, ideally, ready by the time the delivery executive reaches the location. “The idea is to get the food to the user hottest, freshest and in time,” says Rathi, who was one of the earliest product managers at Flipkart.
Before the launch of every new feature, many different versions of a user’s journey are tested out.
“When you are hungry, you are also probably ‘hangry’. That’s why we need it to be a really simple user experience,” Srinath Rangamani, who heads design at Swiggy. Users very often start searching for food when they are hungry. So for the company, it’s not only enough to reduce delivery time but also to reduce the discovery time.
“It takes a lot of machine learning to balance a user’s experience with the mass user experience”, says Anuj Rathi, who leads product management at Swiggy. He was one of the earliest product managers at Flipkart.
Swiggy Pop was born out of some of these insights. It was taking more than 10 minutes and several steps at the time to choose and discover the dishes they wanted to order. “How can we build a product that can make ordering a 3-step process,” says Rathi. At present, most users are shown similar items within Swiggy Pop but as the company personalizes its product more, the choices will be different, Rathi added.
Swiggy broadly started applying machine learning techniques in two areas around two-and-a-half years ago. One, in discovery and personalisation. The big question here is: how to get the best food to a particular user in time for that occasion depending on the kind of persona. Then there’s the post-order journey which involves delivery executives and restaurants.
Two, bringing down the time to deliver is another area where Swiggy has spent a lot of technology resources. Optimising the route a delivery executive needs to take, factoring in the time taken by the restaurant, traffic and weather conditions, and also the overall availability of delivery executives in an area. THE NEXT 100 MILLION — AND THE FUTURE OF FOOD-TECH
Even though metros still form a core part of Swiggy’s overall business, the company is starting to train it sights on the next 100 million potential customers, lying deep in the Tier-2 and Tier-3 heartlands of India.
Artificial intelligence is at the core of all things future at Swiggy as it aims to expand rapidly from beyond 100 cities, says Dale Vaz, head of engineering and AI at Swiggy. “Just on scale and complexity of the business perspective, we just will not be able to manage the business the way we were doing it the old way. We have to enable our teams with smart systems — part of what we’re doing is looking at AI as an existential need for Swiggy. It is not something that we’re looking at as just a cool thing to do,” says Vaz, an Amazon veteran. He rates AI as about the only thing Swiggy needs to do to scale in the long term — “if we have to go from 100 cities to 300 or 400 or 500 cities”.
“We’re preparing for that future,” he adds.
“We’re looking at (personalisation) from a broader lens of 100 million customers. We can add language as another dimension of what a customer needs. Maybe some customers like to place an order by voice, while using the app. Some people want to chat more. So, we’re trying to understand our customers better, their needs and building those products for them. That’s the journey we are on,” sums up Vaz.
AI is an existential need for Swiggy, says Dale Vaz, head of engineering and AI at Swiggy. Vaz is an Amazon veteran.
As part of this future, Swiggy is making a series of bold, futuristic bets that will give it an edge in the next phase of the food wars.
To that end, it has set up a new applied research team comprising of leading data scientists and AI experts that will focus on futuristic moonshots. There are four people on that team, at present. That number will grow.
This team will work on three key areas — voice, natural language and vision.
“Even as we solve the current problems, there are some of these deep, hard, unsolved problems that require a much more experimental and long-term research-like activities…..We also recently acqui-hired a start-up called the Kint.io that is now part of Applied Research. We’re continuing to look for more talent that will help us with that,” says Vaz.
He insists “voice, vision and natural language… will give us leverage over the business.”
Most of these moonshots are still at an early stage and Swiggy declined to share details on the kind of projects it is working on. But there are other new initiatives that Swiggy is working on right now that will be rolled out soon. One of them is around creating a Netflix-like experience for food delivery. THE FOOD GRAPH — THE NETFLIX OF FOOD DELIVERY
The concept of a “food graph” is relatively new in the Indian food-tech business. Swiggy, however, is attempting to make that part of its daily experience for users.
“Catalogue intelligence is one big area that we’re looking at. One of the things we’re looking at is how do we identify understand food better — which means, on a conceptual level, there is a food graph, which is the equivalent of a social graph,” explains Vaz.
Suppose A knows B, C knows A. It is possible C will know B though the link may be lighter. Vaz draws a similar analogy for food with ingredients, recipes, cooking style, calorie value etc. “What we’re trying to do is give customers a Netflix-like experience for food discovery — on Netflix, you get suggestions based on movies you’ve already watched. On Swiggy, we are trying to bring a really nuanced understanding of what the food is and recommend accordingly. So, we want to get to that level of detail where we then understand food better and then start linking them together on what we call the food graph,” he explains.
Swiggy is also putting in place a new machine-learning model that classifies and separates vegetarian and non-vegetarian food. All in, it’s a relentless pursuit of crunching and bringing down delivery times — Swiggy now delivers an average dish at roughly 32 minutes per dish, which is down from the average of 42 to 45 minutes it used to take when it first started out.
Already Swiggy has automated classification of vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes by inspecting the contents of a dish. “The next thing that we’re doing is launching a model that does cuisine based classification…what that’s helping us do is improve our delivery times. When we are estimating a time to prepare an order, we are using this as an input. Previously, we used to say, this is a restaurant, this is an order, it’ll take 20 mins. Now, we’re actually able to say that this is a restaurant, but the order is going to be for a pasta versus a burger. So we know that pasta will take more time to prepare, so we add a little more time to our estimates. So the estimation accuracy on the order prep time has gone up by bringing in the dimension of what kind of food it is,” says Vaz.
Other inputs into dish classification are also in the works. “We’re actually working with a company to get recipe content into our database, so that we can start to mine that and build that into the next level of data,” says the Swiggy head of engineering.
Clearly, Swiggy is in the swing of things with data and machine intelligence. And that edge looks set to help it power even faster ahead of its peers as it steps into new adjacent businesses like Swiggy Stores . Subscribe to FactorDaily
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Disclosure: FactorDaily is owned by SourceCode Media, which counts Accel Partners, Blume Ventures, Vijay Shekhar Sharma, Jay Vijayan and Girish Mathrubootham among its investors. Accel Partners and Blume Ventures are venture capital firms with investments in several companies. Vijay Shekhar Sharma is the founder of Paytm. Jay Vijayan and Girish Mathrubootham are entrepreneurs and angel investors. None of FactorDaily’s investors has any influence on its reporting about India’s technology and startup ecosystem.

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Jazz Fest Bucket List

Coming Up Jazz Fest Bucket List
Everybody has his or her own personal fest ritual, sure, but we’re sharing our own Jazz Fest Bucket List. Who’s up for the challenge? April 17, 2019 Trombone Shorty at Jazz Fest. (Photo: Paul Broussard)
It’s finally here, folks. Jazz Fest brings with it new opportunities in addition to lasting favorites like food and flagpoles. Everybody has his or her own personal fest ritual , sure, but we’re sharing our own Jazz Fest Bucket List. Who’s up for the challenge? The Bucket List in Full
Dance, clap, and disco nap your way through the biggest festival of the year. Whether you’re a first timer or a fest veteran, here’s what to do: Drink a pre-fest Bloody Mary at Liuzza’s Arrive at the fest early and run to claim your spot at the Acura stage Design and bring your own flag and pole Grab a partner and dance at the Fais Do Do stage Snap a pic with a Mardi Gras Indian Meet a pal at the Flag Pole spontaneously – no cell phone planning allowed Splurge on the annual Jazz Fest shirt (or dress, ladies!) Nosh on some crawfish Monica Wash it down with a refreshing strawberry lemonade Head off the beaten stage path and catch a local performance Take in the talents of beading, woodworking, or basket weaving in the Louisiana Folklife Village Indulge in WWOZ ’s Mango Freeze Snooze with a 30-minute disco nap, hat over face preferably on a blanket or sarong Take a 10-minute refresh sesh in one of the mist tents. Bring beer and make new friends. Sink your teeth into a cochon de lait po-boy Find your rhythm in the Blues Tent Art-gaze in the contemporary crafts section Take in the vibrant Louisiana culture and cuisine (and a little air-conditioning) in The Grandstand. Walk upstairs to get a bird’s eye view of the fairground and fest. Clap your hands in the Gospel Tent After fest: regroup with your fest krewe and continue the quest for live music at the Seahorse Saloon Up Next:

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The best restaurants in Cape Town: Where to eat in 2019

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From hot new chefs and go-to favourites to hip tapas spots and ramen joints, the range of restaurants in Cape Town seems to grow year on year. To make it a little easier, here’s our guide of the best restaurants in the Mother City serving up every food type.
This selection comprises all the Cape Town restaurants that made the cut for the 2019 Eat Out 500, the list of best restaurants in the country as rated and reviewed by our panel of critics for the 2019 edition of Eat Out magazine ( on sale now ). But we know the city is crammed with loads more gems and mainstays that didn’t crack the nod. Please tell us about your favourites in the comments section at the end!
African The Americas Asian-inspired Bistros Cafés Fine dining Indian-inspired Italian-inspired Mediterranean Middle Eastern Modern & tapas Seafood Steakhouses & meaty fare
African Ons Huisie (Blouberg) – 2018 Best Country-style Eatery
Winner of Best Country Style at the 2018 Best Everyday Eateries. While it’s tempting to stick to seafood at this seaside setting, there’s a very good chicken pie rich with mushrooms and a generous burger. Then there’s traditional bobotie or lamb bredie done with a green-bean sauce. The fish cakes and the mussel pot make for delicious starters and will having you coming back for more. Opt for Cajun-style calamari for something with a bite or go for the prawn-and- fish combo. The house dessert is traditional souskluitjies: home- made steamed dumplings sprinkled with cinnamon and slathered with custard.
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A post shared by Ons Huisie Restaurant (@ons_huisie) on Aug 20, 2018 at 7:58am PDT
The Americas Clarke’s Bar & Dining Room (City Bowl)
It’s evident that each menu item is well thought-out at this trendy diner. The croissant French toast stuffed with Nutella and boozy bourbon bananas is a winner. At 11am the lunch menu becomes available, featuring a superb selection of sandwiches like the Reuben with grain-fed beef brisket that’s cooked slowly for 12 hours. It comes served with braised cabbage, blue-cheese dressing and is finished with emmenthaler cheese. Clarke’s has a superb burger selection – the buttermilk-fried chicken option is highly recommended – as well as vegan and gluten-free options. Try the Sabich: hummus with re-roasted brinjal, cumin carrots, beetroot, salted cucumber, tomato, cabbage and yoghurt.
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A post shared by Clarke’s bar & dining room (@clarkescapetown) on Dec 9, 2018 at 12:04am PST
The Deckhouse Crab Shack & BBQ (Gardens)
The Deckhouse Crabshack offers a dining experience inspired by the cuisine of the southern coast of the States. Namibian golden crab comes lightly steamed and tossed in a sweet, spicy and sticky Indonesian sauce. Other standout dishes include the moreish popcorn shrimp served with a spicy mayo and the chicken wings, served in a home-made Jim Bean basting sauce. If you have space for it, end with a Mississippi mud pie comprising a cookie layer topped with a chocolate cake-like batter and whipped cream.
The Dog’s Bollocks at Yard (Gardens) 🍽
Expect a slightly unorthodox dining experience here: write your name on a blackboard and collect your order from the kitchen. Drinks are delivered to your table, with waitrons shouting orders to the bar, adding to the exuberant atmosphere. On offer are burgers with options for patties (including a vegetarian one), toppings and sauces, served with either a side salad or chips. The burgers are huge and extremely satisfying.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
One of the enormous burgers from Dogs Bollocks. Photo supplied.
El Burro (Green Point)
The food here is delicately spiced, fresh and flavourful. For starters, try the rellenos (stuffed jalapeños) or the ceviche. The esquites – sweetcorn dressed with parmesan cheese, lime juice, coriander and butter – are truly moreish. For mains, choose from a selection of tacos filled with pulled pork, lamb or vegetables. The line fish tacos have large pieces of delicately battered fried fish cooked to a tender flake, served with guacamole, tomato salsa and pickled onions. There is also a choice of quesadillas, as well as chicken mole and baked enchiladas. Dessert choice is limited but you can’t go wrong with churros.
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A post shared by EL Burro (@_el_burro) on Jun 21, 2018 at 5:18am PDT
El Burro Taqueria (Tamboerskloof)
This is fast but delicious food. The chilli rellenos at this taqueria live up to their reputation: smoky, cheesy and hot! For mains, the concept is simple: choose from single-serving quesadillas or tacos. The fish taco is a must, filled with Baja-style fish coated in spices, pink pickled onions, smoked jalapeño mayo and avo. The chilorio pork taco is twice-cooked and served with chilli and garlic. When they say ‘hot’, they mean it. The crispy duck taco is another great option; the crispy sweet duck is balanced with a hot chilli salsa. Vegan options include wild mushroom quesadillas and cauliflower-and-chickpea tacos served with a spicy peanut salsa. For dessert, the options are simple: Las Paletas ice cream lollies or churros.
House of H (City Bowl) 🍽
Run by chef Heinrich Koen and his wife, Christina, House of H takes a very barbecue-forward approach: there is a slow-cooked brisket sandwich alongside simply grilled sirloin and rump steaks, as well as burgers and winning wings, which are deep-fried and served with a sweet and spicy dipping sauce. The dish everyone talks about, though, is the oyster mushroom burger. A hefty mushroom is thrown on the open ames and brushed with a herby basting sauce before being topped with halloumi and sandwiched on a ciabatta roll. If there’s space for dessert, they offer brownies and waffles.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
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A post shared by House of H (@houseofh_112loop) on Jun 12, 2018 at 3:10am PDT
Hudson’s – The Burger Joint (Claremont) 🍽
This is a burger joint, pure and simple. There are more than 20 different burgers on o er, with some seriously creative flavour combinations. Of course there’s nothing wrong with the classic bacon-and-cheese combo in The Original Royale, but tossing bacon jam and dusted onions (The Bacon Jam) or BBQ sauce and brisket (Jack the Pickle) on top adds a new level of texture and flavour. While most burgers are made from veld-fed, free-roaming beef, you’ll also find ostrich, chicken and vegetarian options. If you just can’t decide, there’s a decent selection of sliders. Burgers aside, you’ll find grilled pork ribs, salads and pizzas on o er.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Jerry’s Burger Bar (Observatory)
It’s handmade burgers all the way here. Look out for the Jack D burger with a touch of Jack Daniels basting sauce and caramelised onions. Vegetarians will be happy with the Whoop Whoop burger made with a 100% chickpea patty with cheddar cheese topped with mushroom or pepper sauce. The FAB (feta, avo and bacon) burger does the trick nicely. If you must be different, try the BBQ ribs or an American- style corndog. To snack on, the Killer Kimchi with cheddar, mozzarella and Mexican pickle, fried and served with gochijang mayo sparks the interest. End with a huge waffle smothered in sauce. There’s a kids’ menu too.
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A post shared by Jerry’s Burger Bar (@jerrysburgerbar) on Feb 3, 2019 at 9:58pm PST
Lefty’s (City Bowl)
You know it’s good when the menu is concise, yet you’re torn on what to order. Order the chicken and waffles because it’s Lefty’s and you have to. Portions are generous, and the bacon and lightly yeasted waffle perfectly complement the syrup, while the tender chicken crunches wonderfully. The tender smoked pulled-pork sandwich with a tangy slaw is worth returning for, but it’s hard to imagine going wrong with either the Texas brisket sandwich or the sticky pork ribs. There’s also a selection of pizzas with classic toppings. Dessert is clearly not a priority here. Have another waffle – this time with ice cream.
Marrow (City Bowl)
Blink and you could miss this beautiful culinary gem that’s spooning up some of the best broths in Cape Town. The signature clear broth packs a punch: crunchy julienned carrot, smoky paprika chorizo, tender chicken and the sweet, light sting of spring onion. The brown broth with venison, lentils, flaked almonds, zucchini and Turkish apricots is brilliant. If you’re vegan (or even if you’re not), the white broth is wonderful, with a vegetable base made with coconut milk, miso and lemongrass, and it’s served with roasted aubergine, tofu, turnip and basil dressing.
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Royale Eatery & Royale Kitchen (City Bowl)
This legendary burger spot offers choices of beef, chicken, sh, lamb, ostrich, vegetarian or vegan patties. The El Burro burger is a 160g beef patty made with chorizo, chillies and coriander. It’s topped with mozzarella cheese, roast tomato salsa and guacamole. The patty, perfectly cooked to medium, is fantastic with their basting. Vegetarians and vegans have plenty of options, with patties made of soya mince, lentils, roasted veg, beans, chickpeas, tofu and more. The upper floor’s menu also features pizzas.
There are two desserts on the menu: a Lindt chocolate brownie and malva pudding, both served with ice cream.
Asian-inspired Active Sushi (City Bowl) 🍽
This sushi spot is popular for its all-you-can-eat specials and platters. Kick things o with a tasty miso soup with chunks of tofu, seaweed and spring onion. For budget sushi, it’s decently put together and tasty. Begin with classics like salmon roses and progress to some of the wackier signature dishes, which feature everything from strawberry and cream cheese to beetroot and even cognac. The deep-fried calamari roll is a pleasant fusion of a classic seafood dish and crunchy sushi roll. There’s also a selection of ramen dishes, salads, banting sushi and poke bowls. End with deep-fried ice cream.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
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A post shared by Active Sushi (@activesushi) on Dec 4, 2018 at 9:05pm PST
Cheyne’s (Hout Bay)
This popular Hout Bay eatery offers fantastic Asian-inspired tapas. The food abounds with flavour and originality. The menu is divided into four sections: sea, earth, land and happy endings. Oceanic highlights include the soft-shell crab with roasted fennel, miso and lime aïoli, while a hot and sour risotto with prawn ‘popcorn’ totally knocks it out of the park. The baby back pork ribs with sweet yakiniku glaze and toasted sesame will have you licking your fingers, while croquettes of duck, lime leaf and miso are served on squares of fresh watermelon. It’s a revelation.
Haru (Rondebosch)
Expect a mix of Japanese and Korean specialities. Kick things off with the rich but tasty crispy salmon skin, and a double order of gyoza – the delicate and well-executed pork or chicken dumplings are a highlight. Sushi is popular: try one of the specials, like the dragon rolls with tempura prawns or flaming salmon rolls with velvety torched salmon and teriyaki sauce. Ramen is delicately flavoured and filling. Try the ton-kotsu ramen with pork bone broth, pork belly chashu, spring onion, bean sprouts, nori, and a toffee-like seven-minute egg. The donburi – Japanese rice bowls – come with beautifully crisp-crumbed chicken katsu (a panko- crumbed schnitzel).
Ramen at Haru. Photo supplied.
Hesheng Chinese Restaurant (Sea Point)
The menu is extensive at this Sea Point gem, so it’s advisable to order a range of dishes to share, family-style. Begin with the feather-light dumplings – fried potsticker-style or steamed in bamboo baskets. The beef dumplings are glorious, dipped in a combo of vinegar and soy. Another highlight is the leek pancakes: golden, flaky dough conceals a layer of sweet leeks. Tuck into melt-in-the-mouth eggplant in oyster sauce or nibble on the firm jellied pig’s ear salad laced with chilli. Finish with a glorious bowl of Szechuan beef: it arrives steaming, the broth brimming with chilli, and the beef is scrumptious. There are no desserts on offer.
Kyoto Garden Sushi Japanese Restaurant (Tamboerskloof)
Miso soup with tempura scallops is a perfect way to kick things off: sweet, succulent scallops are offset by a salty miso broth. For mains, the ramen with prawns satisfies a big appetite, while The Saute – tofu, oysters, salmon, mushrooms, prawns, octopus, langoustine and mixed greens – sends your taste buds into overdrive. Other mains include duck with udon noodles, seared tuna and Japanese curry chicken with soba noodles. Sushi and sashimi are well represented. Desserts include ice creams such as black sesame, yuzu, cherry blossom and chocolate, tempura green tea and toasted tofu with ginger
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Korean Soju (Sea Point)
This hole-in-the-wall spot serves up absolutely authentic Korean fare. The umami mushrooms have extraordinary depth of flavour, full of hints of anchovy, soya and dashi. There is great satisfaction in assembling the bulgogi, which is pork and beef basted with a sweet soy sauce with chilli and other condiments in a crisp lettuce envelope. The bibimpap is a feast of aroma and texture: beef strips cooked on a hot stone plate at the table and served with rice, vegetables from the owner’s garden and topped with an egg.
Nobu One & Only (V&A Waterfront) – NOMINEE
Start with salted edamame beans to whet your appetite. A selection of Nobu’s superb sushi should follow. Want to break from tradition? The new-style salmon sashimi never fails to impress. Then, move on to the tempura or the succulent kushiyaki (grilled skewers) of scallops, langoustine or salmon. A side dish of Nobu’s spinach salad with yuzu truffle and dried miso wouldn’t hurt. The extensive dessert menu adds a Japanese twist to a range of classic sweets. Always dreamed of tofu tiramisu or matcha fondant? You’ve come to the right place. There is also a range of set menus on offer, including the seven-course omakase tasting menu.
A Nobu spread. Photo supplied.
Saigon (Gardens) 🍽
The vast menu can be daunting, but start with crisp golden spring rolls served with rice noodles, lettuce cups, cucumber and mint and juicy lamb pot stickers. Interesting sushi options include a hearty tuna crunch sushi roll topped with mayo and sweet chilli. For mains the pork ribs are literally finger-licking good: sweet and sticky, topped with crispy fried garlic and fresh spring onion. The colony beef fillet is pan- fried to a perfectly succulent medium rare then topped with a soy dressing and served on a bed of crunchy broccoli and green beans. End with coconut an or deep-fried bananas.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
SHIO (De Waterkant) – 2018 Best Asian-inspired Eatery
It’s all about sharing here. Nibble on edamame beans with a tangy dipping sauce and glorious golden duck-fat fries with truffle salt as you peruse the extensive Japanese-inspired tapas menu. Order at least one portion of the forbidden black rice risotto with fragrant tom yum coconut cream and topped with cray sh popcorn. The pork belly roast with red miso and nashi pear sauce is predictably good, as is the beef fillet tataki with miso aïoli and coconut cream. The tempura butternut with pickled butternut and ponzu mayo is a triumph. Finish with a Kyoto coffee with Nikka black whiskey, coconut cream and a cinnamon doughnut.
South China Dim Sum Bar (City Bowl)
Championing fuss-free dining well ahead of the craze, this tiny spot serves up the finest dim sum dumplings and pot stickers in the city. The steamed har gao of translucent wheat-and-tapioca dumplings stuffed with prawns, water chestnuts and spring onions is delicious. Along with vegetarian options, more substantial dishes such as noodles or steamed buns are available. The braised beef short rib boasts tender meat smothered in hoisin, chilli and star anise served on a mound of fragrant jasmine rice. Leave room for a scoop or two of ice cream.
Tomo Japanese Restaurant (City Bowl)
This new Japanese restaurant’s menu has a sushi section that boasts popular options such as California rolls and tempura crunch rolls. Starters include miso soup, a satisfying bowl of tofu, seaweed and finely chopped spring onions. Other options to kick o the meal include beef tataki and rice-paper rolls. Mains include a teppanyaki selection, dumplings (the steamed lamb dumplings are particularly delicious), tempura, and robata (Japanese braai) section. The tempura udon bowl comes with two giant prawns, silky noodles, rich broth and a scattering of chilli flakes.
Finish with green-tea ice cream or black sesame ice cream.
Bistros Cape Point Vineyards Restaurant (Cape Point) 🍽
Chef Jonathan Galgan has created tempting food-and-wine pairing menus built around the estate’s wines – namely sauvignon blanc, chardonnay and the flagship white blend. All dishes on the set menus come in tapas, starter and main portions, or on an à la carte menu. Hand-caught Cape Point tuna in a fragrant Thai coconut, lime, lemongrass, chilli and ginger sauce is enhanced by an aromatic, zesty sauvignon blanc. Weiss-beer braised pork belly with ham hock pea foam and walnut beurre noisette is perfectly complemented by the richly oaked reserve sauvignon blanc. Don’t miss the signature Silvermine Forest dessert:, a study of dark and milk chocolate cremeux, marquise and frozen truffle.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
The Foodbarn (Noordhoek)
Chef Franck Dangereux’s menu showcases everything from classic techniques to modern twists that create an exciting yet comforting experience. Starters might include bouillabaisse – the rich yet delicate fish soup comes served with grilled fish, prawn, mussels, a saffron-and-garlic potato mousseline, rouille and croutons. There’s also always more than one vegetarian option, like the silken ravioli stuffed with wild mushrooms and ricotta, and enrobed in a truffle-and-fontina cream. Move on to mains like perfect risotto with porcini, parmesan and asiago with a dollop of mustard-seed mascarpone. Meat-eaters will be utterly satis ed with the perfectly cooked pasture-reared beef sirloin. For dessert, the strawberries and milk is a nostalgic dish.
La Boheme Wine Bar & Bistro (Sea Point)
Dishes change according to what’s fresh and abundant at the market. This means braised pork belly could be served as pulled pork and goat’s cheese ravioli with wilted greens, or with roasted butternut, tomato and beetroot chutney. Ditto the rabbit served with accompaniments, such as potato gnocchi, edamame beans and roast cherry tomatoes, or a hefty helping of aubergine and potato purée. The springbok carpaccio with roast garlic, crème fraîche and horseradish is sublime. Vegetarians will typically find a single option each among the starters and mains, which is fine when you land the coconut lentil curry with salted pears. There’s a Mediterranean-inspired tapas menu and crowd-pleasers such as sticky toffee pudding and apple tart for dessert.
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La Tête (City Bowl) 🍽 – NOMINEE
The menu changes daily, adapting to the seasons. Anything with seafood will be a winner, whether it’s the mussels, leeks and bacon; salted hake with jammy eggs on sourdough; famous fish sandwich; or a tangle of octopus salad. Heavier options might include ox heart, a beautiful roasted quail, or rich brains on toast with a bright, acidic vinaigrette. Do also order sides like zingy cauliflower cheese or various salads of tossed and dressed greens or beans. For dessert, it’s impossible to resist the madeleines once their aroma wafts your way, but you would be equally satis ed by lemony tarts, panna cotta or fresh profiteroles.
A dish from La Tête on Bree Street. Photo supplied.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Manna Epicure (Gardens)
Breakfast is served all day, which is great news because their coconut bread is what breakfast dreams are made of. It comes with eggs, done to your liking, sliced avocado and smoked salmon. There are plenty of other breakfast classics: eggs Benedict, waffles, omelettes and muesli. For lunch, the roasted cauliflower salad with fennel and crisp fried halloumi is sublime. Heartier eats include burgers, fish and pasta dishes. Sides include truffle mash, polenta and sautéed spinach. End with cake, crème brûlée or malva pudding.
Mink & Trout (City Bowl) 🍽
Tapas are popular here, and the list features arancini with mushrooms and cauliflower; crumbed pork and grilled calamari with a tonkatsu sauce; ham hock terrine with a kohlrabi-and-apple remoulade; and whitebait with dill-and-lemon mayo. Mains include grilled sh with corn-and-bacon chowder and mussels au gratin, gnocchi with mushrooms, baby spinach and a poached egg; Elgin pork belly with butternut, braised red cabbage and sage; and the signature chicken pie with truffle-and-mushroom sauce. Classic desserts on o er are yoghurt panna cotta, crème brulée and a flourless chocolate cake.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
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Reverie Social Table (Observatory) 🍽
This small city eatery packs a big punch, offering sophisticated and exciting dining at one long table. Chef Julia Hattingh’s food is fresh and interesting. The small lunch menu changes daily. Sunny days might find diners munching on a piquant strawberry, fennel and goat’s cheese salad, or a salad of peaches, coppa, mint and rocket. Both are delectable. Those looking for an immersive experience should take note of Julia’s acclaimed dinners – these multi-course meals are designed to pair with a local winery and have become known for their exciting flavours and innovative techniques. The suppers would make a great birthday bash, if you book the whole table.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Skotnes (Tokai) 🍽
Among the starters are soup, duck biltong salad, calamari with sweetcorn, mielie pap and chakalaka, and heirloom beetroot with almond milk espuma and smoked grapes. The trendy jaffle has an entire section devoted to it. These crowd-pleasers are each served with tomato smoor and sambal. There’s one filled with Cape Malay braised brisket and peach chutney. The bobotie, made with succulent slow-cooked lamb shoulder, doesn’t disappoint. Desserts include banana bread with granadilla ‘glass’ and banana ice cream, a chocolate lamington with smoked chocolate ice cream, and lightly brûléed lemon tart served with Cremora tart sorbet and raspberries.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Upper Bloem (Green Point) 🍽
The set menu is divided into three parts. Start with smoked snoek croquettes and lightly cured kabeljou on a crunchy sago crisp and Cape Malay-style onions. Then there are delicately spiced carrots with goat’s cheese; plump mussels in a flavourful broth studded with samphire and a quail ‘Kabaab’ – a take on the Scotch egg – soft-boiled and surrounded by shredded beef on a bed of beetroot. The hearty third part boasts duck breast with quince and samosa crisp, beef short rib with crisp sweetbreads and thinly sliced pickled tongue with fresh green apple. For dessert try ‘After school’, a play on tinned fruit with evaporated milk.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
A selection of dishes at Upper Bloem. Photo supplied.
Cafés Between Us (City Bowl)
The breakfast menu is divided into four. ‘Grains’ is a selection of cereal, pancakes and porridges. I recommend the honeycomb, cashew butter and fruit compote combo. The egg section comprises scrambled and cooked full breakfasts. If you love mushrooms, try the double mushroom butter scramble. The ploughman’s cheese, fruit and charcuterie boards are perfect for sharing. The menu ends with a selection of scones and the signature rum banana bread. Try the Niçoise, smoked trout or burrata and braised leek versions, for lunch. For something more substantial, there’s oxtail ragu pasta or the cavolo Nero black rice. For meat lovers: Chalmar beef fillet or chargrilled chicken. Finish off with gelato or cheesecake.
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Bootlegger Coffee Company (Muizenberg)
A simple menu and an uncomplicated drinks offering encourages diners to briskly order their pastry and beverage then enjoy their hand-held fare while watching the waves crash onto the shore. Dig into banana loaf, a quattro cheese muffin with cream cheese, cheddar cheese, mozzarella and feta, or decadent pain au chocolat. Kids will love the soft-serve ice creams; adults will enjoy the addition of a Belgian chocolate flake or salted caramel bits as optional extras.
Boston Coffee (Bellville)
Start the day with a Sourdough Scramble: toast topped with bacon, perfectly scrambled eggs and a smattering of feta cheese and baby tomatoes. Sandwiches are impressive, each made with toasted sourdough and home-made mustard. They come elegantly stacked and perfectly crisp, with fillings ranging from chicken and mayo to mince, feta and garlic. If it’s available, grab a slice of the life-changing chocolate cake.
Café Blouberg (Blouberg)
Start your day with the Blouberg: a poached egg with grilled polenta, crispy bacon, mushroom-and-thyme sauce and toast. Traditional eggs Benedict with bacon or smoked trout come with poached eggs and delicious home-made Hollandaise sauce. There’s also a health option with muesli and yoghurt, goji berries and honey. Their baked goodies are legendary: fantastic little cakes, freshly baked scones with preserves and cream, lemon meringue pie and baked cheesecakes. All are fabulous to look at and even better to eat. The meat pies are the best on the West Coast.
The Chicken Shop (Sea Point)
This stylish takeaway prides itself on sourcing the nest ingredients and serving the best-tasting chicken in town. Choose perfectly cooked rotisserie chicken – traditional or Portuguese spatchcock with basting sauces of peri-peri, lemon and herb, Thai or barbecue. Then there’s southern fried chicken or buttermilk chicken – or leg of lamb if you want to stray from the crowd. If you feel like a nibble, chicken popcorn, cauliflower popcorn, chilli cheese bites, potato croquettes and corn on the cob do nicely. Sides include a char-grilled butternut, creamy Danish feta and macadamia salad, while the mac and cheese is superb. No desserts are on offer.
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Cushty (Green Point)
Breakfast options include light home-made granola with seasonal fruits and Greek yoghurt from Gay’s Dairy, and cherry tomato toast with mushrooms, rocket, feta and pecans. If you’re an eggs Benny fan, you can’t go wrong here. Come lunchtime, the deli counter is filled with salads, sides and proteins such as pork sausages, free-range chicken or lamb kebabs and chicken phyllo pies. Pair with colourful veg platters, or go for pasta dishes like Aglio spinach-and-ricotta ravioli with crumbled feta. For something sweet, grab a gluten-free brownie or chocolate croissant on your way out.
Dinkel Bakery (Tamboerskloof)
This family-run spot is the place for traditional German dishes and baked goods made with spelt and rye – great if you’re trying to eat less gluten. From the breakfast menu, try the Dresden with a spelt croissant: you’ll receive a glorious plate of jam, butter and fruit, decorated with tiny violets and mint, and what might be the most buttery, flakiest croissant. Lunches include a range of sandwiches and hearty soups: think mince and leek or German potato soup with a Vienna sausage. The pretty bakery counter offers some slightly stodgy cakes, those stellar spelt croissants, and great Florentines, as well as seasonal bakes during Easter and Christmas.
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Four & Twenty Café & Pantry (Wynberg)
Breakfast is served all day and includes a vast range of banting-friendly options – try the green eggs and ham Benedict with a basil Hollandaise. For lunch, a favourite is the cheeky chicken burger: a marinated chicken breast topped with caramelised onions, fresh avo and a drizzle of mustard mayo. Another signature dish is the home-made chicken pie. Seasonal salads o er interesting combinations. To satisfy your sweet tooth, there are heavenly home-made cakes and pastries that include gluten-free options.
Giovanni’s Deli World (Green Point)
Endless baskets of fresh bread – of every kind, with enough cold meats, condiments and cheeses to match – enables Giovanni’s diners to build the perfect sandwich. Pesto, an assortment of hummus, tzatziki and other spreads are stacked next to a variety of fresh vegetables and salads. From shiny green beans cooked in olive oil to mouth-watering potato salad, vegetarians are well catered for. A wide selection of meat dishes is available, from tikka chicken to schnitzels.
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Honest Chocolate Café (City Bowl)
The café takes chocolate and celebrates the wonders of this beautiful ingredient. The banana bread bunny chow offers a whimsical spin on a savoury classic: a banana bread mini loaf is filled with a silky dark chocolate spread, topped with creamy ice cream and a generous sprinkling of spiced nuts. An offering of St Anna’s lightly salted nachos is available, accompanied by an indulgent chocolate and finished o with chilli on the side. The nachos are gluten-free and vegan. The ultra-moist dark chocolate ganache cake and the gooey nut-loaded chocolate brownie have what it takes to capture the attention in this chocolate wonderland.
Jarryds Espresso Bar + Eatery (Sea Point)
Breakfasts include sweeter options like milk and honey panna cotta, overnight oats with apple and cinnamon, smoothie bowls, waffles and pancakes. Order eggs any which way with a choice of sides, or try eggs Benedict with smoked salmon, sautéed artichokes and mushrooms, or brisket. For something different, go for a summer quinoa breakfast bowl. Lunch offers salads, sh tacos, pasta, wraps and burgers, with tempting sides like rustic-cut fries with aïoli, fully loaded fries with wasabi Japanese mayo, or sweet chilli and firecracker prawn bites.
Jason Bakery (Green Point)
In the morning, look forward to breakfasts such as the spinach-spiked green pancakes, creamy mushroom ragout or fragrantly spiced shakshuka. For mid-morning cravings, indulge in the selection of sandwiches, all served on your choice of home-made Bree Street sourdough, ciabatta or 66% sourdough rye. The afternoon lunch menu has a selection of interesting salads and health bowls, as well as the home-made pie of the day. Also find breads, pastries, tarts and sweets.
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Jason Bakery (City Bowl)
There is an ever-changing display of decadent baked goods at this cool bakery, including apple danishes, pasteis de nata and cookies. If you’re looking to get your hands on one of Jason’s doughssants, you’ll have to get out of bed early on a Saturday because they fly out of the store. There’s an extensive menu of sweet and savoury dishes to eat in. For breakfast, don’t overlook the shakshuka, with eggs baked in a fiery tomato and red pepper sauce. Lunches feature man-sized sandwiches, kick-ass pies and salads.
The Kitchen (Woodstock)
Breakfast consists of charmingly named items that are often vegetarian friendly. Enjoy Bananas in Pajamas: seed toast with cream cheese, banana, honey and gomashio. Watch the salad cam carefully to plan your lunch selection of three salads; for a protein punch, add grilled chicken, a Scotch egg or gammon. Salads are wholesome: think potatoes with green pesto, aïoli and pomegranate seeds; thinly sliced aubergine in tomato paste; spicy Tunisian egg salad. The Kitchen is renowned for nutritious and flavourful lunches, and The Love Sandwich is no exception: bread is generously spread with pesto, aïoli, tomatoes, dressed leaves and then crammed with delicious fillings. For dessert, devour a brownie or lemon square.
Kleinsky’s Delicatessen (City Bowl)
There’s a short breakfast selection with challah French toast, latke Benedict and pastrami hash with eggs. Kleinsky’s is known for its bagels: you could have pastrami with mustard and pickles or a play on a California roll with smoked salmon, wasabi cream cheese, avo and pickled ginger. Or keep it simple with a schmear such as spring onion and chives or sundried tomato and olive. The hot dogs are a revelation: a beef frankfurter comes cradled by a heavenly hot pretzel roll. Toppings include plays on bánh mì and a Reuben sandwich. Finish with New York cheesecake or potato latkes with apple sauce and sour cream.
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Kleinsky’s Delicatessen (Sea Point)
This is bagel and latke heaven, both for breakfast and lunch. The breakfast bagel with egg, cheese, tomato and lamb bacon is a hot favourite. Also scrumptious is the latke Benedict – crunchily firm potato pancakes topped by two poached eggs and a creamy Hollandaise sauce, with optional extras like smoked salmon. Hot pastrami on rye is an excellent lunch choice with smoky home-made mustard adding piquancy. The chicken soup, either with noodles or a matzo ball, is good enough to make even the most ardent Jewish mama nod in approval. Finish with the richly decadent New York cheesecake.
Lime Tree Café (Bergvliet)
While the menu is made up of a great mix of lighter dishes, perfect for lunch, their breakfast offering is what to look out for. Aside from the standard breakfast, they serve a couple of standout dishes. Their Lime Tree Benedict ticks all the boxes, with poached eggs, rocket and smoked salmon served on a courgette and ricotta waffle. The Mediterranean morning – with boiled eggs, sliced avo, olives, cucumber and tomato – is a good option for those who enjoy piecing a breakfast together, and the butter croissant with camembert and home-made jam is all kinds of satisfying.
Loading Bay (De Waterkant)
The breakfast bun is what dreams are made of: a buttery toasted brioche bun is filled with tomato-studded guacamole, mature cheddar cheese, crispy bacon and an oozy fried egg. The heirloom rainbow breakfast (also just as delicious for lunch) is as colourful as it is flavourful. It serves as a deliciously unexpected combination of rainbow beets, ginger and tomatoes with goat’s cheese and poached eggs. Also on offer is a selection of salads and burgers served with those truffle fries. If you’re after something sweet, try the cinnamon or cardamom bun.
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Mustacchio Caffe (Gardens)
The menu is a mélange of options. It starts o with a customary breakfast selection before moving on to filled croissants (one option is filled with whipped cream and berries). Then comes the pastas, think Bolognese or vegan carbonara. The burgers are trendy: a deep-fried burger is wrapped in phyllo pastry; or try The Black Panther featuring buns infused with activated charcoal. The waffle burger is absurdly good – the sweetness of the waffle pairs perfectly with the savoury beef, bacon and home-made honey mustard. The torta Mustacchio is a must – a coconut cake layered with Nutella and topped with flaked coconut.
Plant Café (City Bowl) 🍽
Start o with soup with tempeh, mushroom tartare, fried cheese sticks or tacos. For mains, the happy salmon burger is tasty with crunchy carrot bits and a slight sweet flavour, served on a bun with a savoury avocado guacamole. Or try the mushroom burger with sautéed mushrooms, cashew cheese, tomatoes and mayo on a bun. A popular dish is the quesadillas with smokey refried beans, vegan cheese and cooked salsa filling. The desserts include brownies and the Superfood raw cheesecake.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
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Scheckter’s Raw Gourmet Health Food (Sea Point) 🍽
This buzzing little vegan café serves up tasty wholesome plant-based food that has even meat-eaters convinced. The wonderfully nutty falafel balls with pink hummus make a great starter to share. Else progress directly to the ‘Best Vegan Burger’ made with lentils, veggie protein, brown rice, oats and flax seeds. Paired with smashed avo, caramelised onions, sweet potato fries and vegan aïoli, it’s a magnificent thing, and looks the part too, with its black charcoal-infused roll. Also on offer: hot dogs, wraps and a range of bowls. Sweets are guilt- free raw, organic treats sweetened with low-GI organic coconut nectar and free from refined sugar, dairy and gluten.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app . SMAK (City Bowl) 🍽
This little deli spot is great for brekkie or lunch, and they make cakes to order. Salads, pastas and burgers are on the menu. The lamb double zero pasta is a winner, with shredded roast leg meat in a creamy sauce on fresh pasta. Other eye-catchers on the menu are the ‘Smoke Bomb’ burger with mozzarella and home-made tomato chutney or try the classic French croque monsieur, to which you can add chips, egg and bacon. There’s no dessert menu but the cheesecakes will do nicely.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
The popular cheesecake at SMAK. Photo supplied.
Starlings Café (Claremont)
This is home comfort food at its best, with delicious aromas coming from the kitchen to greet you as you enter. The intensely rich salmon tart with a red onion base and rich cream cheese centre is a knockout, served with a super fresh salad with a tangy dressing that balances the richness. The aubergine bake is another favourite, redolent with garlic and tomatoes. Put a little spicy edge on things with tasty yellow Asian chicken curry served with cauliflower rice. Finish with the best cheesecake around – baked and irresistible.
Swan Café (City Bowl)
The menu is divided into savoury galettes and sweet crêpes. The savoury selection includes a bacon, egg and tomato breakfast galette, a croque-monsieur, and a galette with a chicken-and-creamy mushroom filling. Speciality galettes include truffled cauliflower, and blue cheese with pear and prosciutto. On the sweet side there’s classic cinnamon sugar with lemon, ever-popular Nutella, and a crêpe filled with home-made salted caramel. Speciality crêpes include orange sauce and thyme, and berries with lemon curd.
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Whole Earth Café (Scarborough)
This delightful new spot lives up to its name, offering fresh, healthy cuisine. The menu is inspired by the owner’s philosophy of using ethically produced, locally sourced ingredients to promote a healthy lifestyle. Specials range from truffled cauliflower soup to vegan lentil dahl. An innovative and contemporary menu offers Vietnamese string salad with crispy noodles and a falafel skewer with aubergine chutney and quinoa tabbouleh. Expect big, fresh flavours with loads of crunch.
Meat-eaters will enjoy the succulent free-range beef burgers with home-made garnishes. Desserts are scrumptious, from gluten-free chocolate cake to Kirsten’s kick-ass ice-cream.
Fine dining Aubergine Restaurant (Gardens)
For lunch, the chef’s menu is a good option, comprising three courses plus coffee and friandises. Starters could include a fantastic salmon soup; mains fish of the day with a bronze fennel emulsion or slow-roasted Wildebeest loin with broad beans; and a plate of local cheeses or a chocolate fondant with glazed nectarines. The á la carte menu, for lunch or dinner is pricier with modest portion sizes. It does present more variety, however, with options like medallions of lamb shoulder or masala-style pork neck. You could also opt for the degustation menu of three, four or five courses with optional wine pairings. Dessert could be a mocha semifreddo with grapes and toasted ice cream.
Buitenverwachting (Constantia) 🍽
Austrian chef Edgar Osonjik follows the seasons with his two menus, Rustic Affairs and Indulge, both highlighting the high level of classical skill in the kitchen. Dishes like a Thai-marinated ostrich carpaccio with black garlic and sesame; and the complex M-S-G (mielie, spinach and garlic soup with lamb fillet, pesto and flammkuchen) show inspiration from his Austrian roots, South African home, and the rest of the world. Sea bass also gets an Asian touch, while perfectly cooked duck is more traditionally served à l’orange. Desserts are Asian-influenced, like lemongrass ice cream with banana ravioli or chocolate heaven – try the Valrhona chocolate brownie.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Catharina’s (Tokai)
Chef Kerry Kilpin and her team turns out delicious food at this upmarket establishment. Classics like hand-chopped beef tartare with truffle remoulade will warm the cockles of any carnivore’s heart; while the Cape Malay fish croquettes with lemon aïoli deliver maximum flavour. The sous vide pork belly with rosemary crushed potatoes has the right amount of crunch but the stars of the show are the grilled venison loin with potato rösti and the grilled beef fillet with Bordelaise jus. You’ll have to go a long way to find a better Amarula crème brûlée, served with churros and chocolate sauce.
The short rib and beetroot tart at Catharina’s. Photo supplied.
Cucina Labia (Muizenberg) 🍽
The menu is inventive. On the starters menu, a Waldorf salad is reimagined with a roasted apple, overflowing with strong roasted brie, a braised endive and goat’s cheese. A cherry-smoked duck comes with a beautiful jelly, made with sliced grapes and duck parfait. For mains, the osso buco is a triumph and the Weskus-inspired fish of the day is similarly successful. Dessert includes chocolate fondant and affogato.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
De Grendel Restaurant (Panorama) 🍽
Chef Ian Bergh keeps dishes fresh and delicious at this gourmet destination; portions are manageable and flavours are intense. Char sui pork belly with kimchi, pear, daikon and crackling is a delight of flavours and textures, slightly sweet and sour with a little bite to keep it all on edge. The tuna tataki with pineapple, cucumber and black bean chilli is a revelation of eastern influences. A white chocolate brownie with mango sorbet and panna cotta makes a delightful ending.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
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Diemersdal Farm Eatery (Durbanville)
Innovative, globally inspired and tasty fare hit the mark here. Start with parmesan and ricotta dumplings, green peas, asparagus, king oyster and lemon foam. The pork belly with crispy crackling, beetroot and palm sugar with rum reduction is a definite recommendation: slow-cooked, tender and full of flavour served with parsnip, pistachio and lemongrass. For a sweet ending, the rich chocolate bomb has a hidden center mousse with a biscuit layer for a perfect crunch and butterscotch that adds a yummy gooey center. Another dessert to consider is the warm brandy tart with vanilla Chantilly and ginger.
Greenhouse at The Cellars-Hohenort (Constantia) 🍽 – Top 10
To start, courses include the tasty amuse-bouche set of nibbles. The first few courses deliver oodles of theatre. The steamed blue prawn comprises a raw prawn steamed tableside to create a visual sensation and lingering aroma. The chokka noodle dish is served with waterblommetjies, sour fig gel and a lacquered squid-ink and yuzu sauce. Also unforgettable: the caramel smoked duck with truffled liver mousse, hibiscus beets, cashew and nasturtium crumble. Leave space for not one but two desserts: an apple with salted caramel and white chocolate pap.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
A Greenhouse dish. Photo supplied.
Homespun Restaurant (Tableview)
For starters, the beef tatake is served with light and crispy tempura onion and completed by wasabi mayo and pickled ginger. Other starter options to try are the grilled Patagonian squid or the vegetarian deep-fried goats’ cheese. For mains, the new kid on the menu is the lamb en croûte: slow-cooked lamb neck encased in phyllo pastry with al dente julienned vegetables. Another main to consider is the beef fillet, flame-grilled and served with sweet butternut wedges and fresh spring onions. End with the chocolate torte served with banana gelato.
La Colombe (Constantia) 🍽 – Top 10
Beautiful, visually arresting and utterly delicious food. Chef Scot Kirton has passed on the mantle to his right-hand man, James Gaag, to carry through the philosophy of whimsical fine dining. From a beguiling beginning of a black box of Cape Malay snacks to the famed tuna and then a standout of naartjie-glazed langoustine with Korean duck, fennel and umami broth, flavours are moreish and will have you enjoying every last morsel. The Karoo lamb is a delicious and complex dish of carefully balanced flavours, featuring loin, braised neck, harissa, chermoula, burnt sage and dukkah. A swoon-inducing ending is brought about by a memorable pre-dessert before a summer-island kiss of pina colada and litchi. Leave space for the petit fours.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
A tapas dish at La Colombe. Photo by Andrea van der Spuy.
La Mouette (Sea Point) 🍽 – NOMINEE
Choose between a three- or five-course menu. The five-course option begins with a selection of tapas. The second course is a deconstructed leek and potato soup: smoked mash is served in a bowl with herb oil then the leek velouté is poured at the table. The third course poses a choice between a vegetable kofta and West Coast mussels. The koftas are wonderfully spicy and crisp. Fourth is a choice between herb gnocchi and pork belly. The pork is wonderfully tender and rich, coated with a sticky, flavourful jus. Dessert is a unique interpretation of lemon meringue tart.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Contemporary cuisine from La Mouette. Photo supplied.
Planet Restaurant (Gardens)
Choose from two-, three- or four-courses, plus extras such as oysters and caviar with potato blinis. Start with a Cape wild green salad with a vibrant curry leaf dressing; sweetbreads with prosciutto; or roasted cauliflower salad with buffalo milk yoghurt. For the second course, the roast sea bass with parsley crust and lemon-butter sauce is generously portioned, while the pan-fried trout with Puy lentils and spekboom salsa verde hits the spot. For mains, Asian-style duck breast is perfectly cooked, delivering a peppery tang, while the beef tournedos is a reliable choice. End with peanut-and-chocolate mousse and gingerbread ice cream or a twice-baked parmesan-and-gruyère souffle with apple pâté de fruit.
Riverine Rabbit (City Bowl)
Diners have a trio of menus from which to choose. At its simplest – and most affordable – you’ll find a three-course menu. That ramps up to a nine-course tasting menu. For starters, the delicate burnt leek in brown butter should be top of your list. Prefer something meaty? The honey-cured beef is outstanding. Main courses include sea bream with mussels, kombu and fresh greens, or lamb with legumes and wild herbs. For vegetarians there’s mushroom pithivier. Chocolate fans will love the Koffie dessert: a moist beer cake is topped with Amarula crème fraîche, cocoa nibs and luscious chocolate ice cream.
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Salsify (Camps Bay)
Start with the beetroot amuse-bouche then move on to the assiette of suckling pig, which pairs well with morsels of salted apple and num num. For mains, the pan-seared springbok is beautiful, while the Peking duck breast provides complex flavours from salted sour plums and walnuts. For dessert, the dark chocolate soufflé is impressive, served with a gorgeously creamy quenelle of milk-chocolate ice cream. The roasted pineapple goes beautifully with the tiny coriander sprouts, tangy kefir snow and torn crumbs of dense coconut cake.
The Test Kitchen (Woodstock) – Top 10
Chef-proprietor Luke Dale-Roberts presides over one of the country’s most inventive kitchens. At this bijou dining room, he presents a multi-course feast that straddles genres and continents from sea to terroir. The elaborate menu progresses from the light and subtle to the rich and robust. Dishes deliver tenfold on the promise that their beauty suggests, whether it’s the silky, savoury billionaire’s shortbread of dark chocolate and duck liver, the sweet scallop with crisp celery, or the sumptuous corn risotto with corn foam (from the dedicated vegetarian menu). Whether opting for the gourmand, vegetarian or pescatarian menu paired with iconic wines or tea – expect an expertly balanced menu that will have you enthralled right until the sweet ending.
A dish at The Test Kitchen: Chamomile ice cream, cardamom and brown butter sponge, toasted sunflower seeds. Photo supplied.
Tjing Tjing Momiji (City Bowl) 🍽
Start off with perfectly balanced soy-and-wasabi ice-cream sandwich, or a single cube of home-made tofu with buchu-pickled ginger. The sashimi course includes kob cured in yuzu and hay-seared tuna, which has been smoked in a wood-fired oven. You will love the tongue basted in a Japanese barbecue sauce and served alongside lean Wagyu fillet sprinkled with salt crystals. For dessert, pastry chef Adri Louw combines Japanese themes with local ingredients. The kumquat mochi – a soft ball of rice flour encasing kumquat ice cream – is refreshing, while the zesty yuzu posset is absurdly creamy.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Indian-inspired The Indian Chapter with Prim Reddy (Blouberg) – 2018 Best Indian-inspired Eatery
This is real-deal Indian cooking, elevated by a tandoor oven. Try the chicken or vegetable samoosas done Punjab-style with potatoes and peas, or the tandoori mixed grill with chicken and lamb to get those taste buds going. Go on to the delicious lamb Madras which they call hot – and they aren’t kidding. If you prefer something tamer, try the lamb korma done in a mild cashew sauce. Vegetarians are well taken care of, with items like chickpea curry, deliciously rich, or dhal makhani. The naan breads are superb: have the aloo paratha with lightly spiced mashed potato and finished in the tandoor.
Maharajah South Indian Restaurant (Tamboerskloof) 🍽
Order a range of dishes, starting with the chilli bites: finely sliced onion battered in spicy maize flour and deep fried. For mains, options range from seafood, chicken and lamb to vegetarian curries. The palak paneer is an instant favourite, with generously sized cubes of delicate paneer in a flavoursome North Indian-style spinach sauce. The chicken korma is another delightful option and the mango-and-lime pickle is a tangy accompaniment to balance the spicy dishes. A highlight is the roti. Flaky and flavourful, they’re the perfect companion to all curries. There’s also a short list of non-curry dishes, ranging from grilled masala fish to vegetarian pastas. A short dessert menu offers ice cream and chocolate sauce, brownies or vermicelli pudding.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Prashad Café (Gardens)
North India meets Durban on a menu that tempts with a delicious range of breyani, korma, curry and dhal. All dishes are vegetarian – and over half are vegan. Order on the spice thermometer from mild to medium and hot. You can enjoy most dishes in a bunny chow, wrap, roti or bowl to share. Start with a platter of scrumptious home-made samoosas (the sweetcorn, spinach and paneer or spicy soya mince are firm favourites), poppadam and chilli bites. The paneer is light, the dhal is wholesome, and the breyani is layered with authentic spices. The matar mushroom and peas in creamy gravy and butter bean curry is also very good. Leave space for a slice of vegan chocolate or carrot cake.
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Thali (Gardens)
The tapas plate for two is the star of the show. Apart from oysters to start, it’s the only item on the menu, but as plate after plate arrives, you’ll be amazed at the generosity. There’s crispy spinach bhaji with mint-and-coriander dressing and a smoky, date and tamarind sauce. A dish showcasing three ways with cauliflower is a marvel of piquant flavours. The fish tacos are a highlight: deep-fried kingklip sprinkled with finely sliced green and red onion, and a curry aïoli. The tender duck in a sauce of coconut milk, cardamom and cloves is a revelation. Dessert includes kulfi ice cream and chai custard with almond praline and spiced banana bread.
A selection of tapas from Thali. Photo by Claire Gunn.
Italian-inspired 95 at Parks (Constantia) 🍽
A hybrid of Milanese chef Giorgio Nava’s 95 Keerom and its meatier sibling, Carne, 95 at Parks is the ‘burbs-friendly incarnation that includes all Nava’s preferred Italian classics: carpaccio, salmon tartare and meat – lots and lots of meat. On the bone, off the bone, lamb, veal, beef – carnivores will not go hungry here. The freshly made butternut and ricotta ravioli and the chocolate fondant live up to their reputation – you cannot go wrong with sage brown butter and liquid chocolate. Prime cuts on the meaty mains list are sourced from Nava’s own farms; expect seasonal preparations like osso buco and braised short rib.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
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95 Keerom (City Bowl) 🍽
Impeccably sourced ingredients handled with restraint is the key at 95 Keerom. The carpaccios are always worthy of praise and the beef tartare is reputed to be the best in town. Steamed asparagus with hollandaise, rocket and generous shavings of parmesan is a reviving dish. The pastas are wonderful: special mention must go to the gnocchi with gorgonzola and walnuts – light yet filling, rich but not cloying. On the meat side, there’s a La Fiorentina 1.2kg grilled T-bone for two, or try seared rib-eye scaloppine with white wine, parsley and lemon. And for dessert? A duet of chocolate fondants, one white and one dark, is a delicious option for two.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
A Tavola (Claremont)
You can’t go wrong with courgette fritters to start, or mixed bruschetta. Delight in home-made pasta tossed with wild mushrooms, fresh rocket and a touch of truffle oil. Or try calamari, prawns and mussels in a light creamy white wine sauce on artisanal pasta. A mouth-watering soul food dish is the osso buco: slow-cooked veal shin enjoyed with either soft polenta or fresh pasta. There are gluten-free and banting options, too. The dessert menu boasts traditional Italian gems such as tiramisu, or try the Dolce della Nonna, amaretti biscuits layered with coffee, zabaglione, cream, walnuts and chocolate flakes.
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Borruso’s (Kenilworth)
Borruso’s built its brand on pizza and pasta, and that’s where the focus of the menu still lies. The pizzas have a legion of fans: they’re thin-based, chewy and pretty good, with a classic selection of toppings. Think piquanté peppers, bacon and feta; or smoked chicken, sundried tomatoes and mushrooms. There are decent banting bases and gluten-free options, too. For dessert, the ice cream with hot chocolate sauce is a fail-safe sweet ending.
Burrata (Woodstock)
Kick off with antipasti of cheesy arancini, olives and burrata cheese. While the pastas are popular, don’t miss the crispy pork risotto with apple-currant vinaigrette. But pizzas are the stars, whether bianca – no tomato sauce, or rosso – with tomato sauce. Carnivores love the barbecue meat-topped options. Desserts are modern takes on the classics. Take friends who enjoy sharing because you won’t want to miss the tiramisu, the ginger-and-apricot semifreddo with chocolate ginger cremeso and pistachio sable biscuit, or the olive-oil panna cotta served with naartjie compote and hazelnut crumble – bellissima!
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Col’Cacchio (Foreshore) 🍽
Col’cacchio’s reputation is built on its pastas and pizzas, although the wraps and salads are great too. Bolognese and lasagne are tried and tested pasta options – or try the pollo with chicken, mushrooms, spring onions and sour cream in a pomodoro sauce. The pizza bases are all perfectly thin and crisp, with carb-conscious alternatives available. The cosi verde boasts spinach, broccoli, edamame, basil pesto and spring onions; while the zucca is topped with roasted butternut, beetroot, rocket, avocado and seeds. Desserts vary from traditional to innovative: think tiramisu or vegan amistoso with cashew cream, caramelised pineapple and coconut shavings.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
The Cousins (City Bowl)
Home-made pasta, authentic flavour and a true Italian experience have been created by three cousins from the Adriatic coast of Italy. Mains consist of pasta, meat, seafood and a specials board. The speciality pasta is the signature dish and not to be missed: hot mushroom and thyme-infused tagliolini is tossed in a half wheel of Grana Padano cheese at the table. The home-made gnocchi in a Bolognese ragu are mouthfuls of light, fluffy pillows. Finish with a home-made dessert such as panna cotta or the bignè filled with pistachio cream and covered in chocolate.
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Da Vinci’s on Kloof (Gardens) 🍽
Starters include deep-fried bites, boerewors bowls, nachos and spring rolls. For something indulgent, choose the mushrooms Romano – baked mushrooms with a feta, garlic and tomato sauce. Mains range from salad meals and burgers to pastas, pizzas and grills. There’s a burger bowl for those avoiding carbs. The beef patties are good and the garlic mayo tangy. Ribs are always a hit here and come with a special barbecue basting. The thin-based pizzas are named after famed artists. Choose your own toppings, or take a bite out of the Da Vinci with bacon, avo, mushroom and garlic, or the hearty Rembrandt with roasted butternut, spinach, Roquefort cheese and piquanté peppers. For pud, The Lindt chocolate brownies arrive warm and gooey with sweet vanilla ice cream.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Giulio’s (City Bowl) 🍽 – 2018 Best Italian-inspired Eatery
This vibrant eatery showcases the finest ingredients in wisely selected flavour combinations. For breakfast, choose between shakshuka of gently poached eggs in the spicy red pepper, cumin and pomodoro sauce, or crisp brioche French toast served with mixed berry cream cheese compote and maple syrup. Lunch sees pizzas from the wood-fired oven topped with the best-quality mozzarella, Parma, rocket and tomatoes. There are also pastas and burgers. The strawberry tart with a rich biscuit base is a must-have for dessert or a coffee break.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
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La Frasca (Oranjezicht)
If you’re a fan of wafer-thin bases and creative toppings, La Frasca should be your go-to pizza spot in the city centre. The pizza menu stretches to three pages, with more options scribbled on a chalkboard. Everything here is top quality, from the stoneground flour to home-cured wood-fired hams. The Pizza Saporita, with spicy pork sausage, ricotta and a touch of chilli is excellent. There’s also a compact menu of uncomplicated Italian plates: the home-made pasta is always popular, from papardelle with slow-cooked lamb to ever-dependable spinach-and-ricotta ravioli. Desserts are equally traditional; try the classic tiramisu or silky chocolate panna cotta.
Massimo’s (Hout Bay) 🍽
This is comforting Italian food with a variety from which to choose. Start with some spuntini (Italian tapas) – the deep-fried baby artichokes are absolutely moreish, served with a creamy pesto dip. For mains, choose from one of the many wood-fired pizzas or home-made pastas. All of the usual suspects feature, as well as some interesting options like spicy chilli con carne. The perfectly cheesy fior di latte margherita will please. On the pasta front, name the sauce and it’s there. There’s also a charity pizza and pasta offering where a donation will be given for each order. Order home-made Italian kisses to seal the deal.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Nonna Lina (Sea Point)
Sardinian owner Antonella Scamuzzi and his passionate team turn out some of the best pizza in town. Salads are interesting: think artichokes, parmesan, caramelised red onions and roasted pine nuts; or a Caprese with fresh fior di latte. From there, your best bet is a glorious wood-fired pizza. The calzone is spectacular, whether it’s stuffed with taleggio and coppa or loaded with porcini and rocket. The traditional beef lasagna is thoroughly indulgent. Vegetarian? Try the version made with carasau bread, grilled aubergines and tomatello sauce. There’s also a range of fish, veal and lamb dishes. Finish with seadas nostras – this Sardinian speciality is a golden pastry filled with fresh mozzarella, preserved figs and macadamia nuts.
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Osteria Tarantino (De Waterkant)
Try the Four P pasta: pappardelle with a rich tomato sauce, pecorino, prosciutto and porcini. If you’re not into tomato-based pasta sauces, the penne salsiccia is made with Italian fennel sausage, mushrooms, garlic, chilli and cream. And if that wasn’t enough to give the dish a decadent richness, the pasta is topped with a generous sprinkling of pecorino cheese. Order the tiramisu in advance before it sells out, or have some of the best cannoli around: a crunchy shell filled with sweet, citrussy and creamy ricotta.
Riva (De Waterkant) 🍽
Kick off with a carpaccio (the fish changes daily), sliced and served with coconut flakes, olive oil and kiwi fruit. Another option is the tender Saldanha Bay mussels. Pasta is made in-house and the bronze-drawn spaghetti – served with cherry tomatoes and clams – is perfectly al dente. Squid ink gnocchi with prawns comes laced with vibrant threads of saffron. If you have space for secondi, there’s the option of a vast platter; a smaller platter of fried hake, calamari and bait fish; or the Abalobi catch of the day. For dessert, there’s a creamy lemon sorbet and very good tiramisu.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
True Italic (City Bowl) 🍽
Owner-chef Luca Di Pasquale takes his Italian heritage and cuisine seriously at this rustic osteria at the foot of Bree Street. Food is carefully prepared and simply served. The compact menu of homely Italian dishes changes daily. There are generous boards of affettati (sliced Italian cured meats) to start, and no shortage of intriguing antipasti: bruschetta with octopus, capers and cherry tomatoes; silky burrata with Parma ham. Luca’s home-made pasta is sure to catch your eye. No run-of-the-mill combinations here: spaghetti could be served with swordfish, pistachio pesto and fennel bulb, or delicate gnocchi with pork fillet and saffron sauce.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
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Mediterranean The Fat Greek (Tableview) 🍽
All the Greek favourites are here, immaculately prepared and packed with flavour. The mezze platters are good value: garlicky tzatziki, creamy hummus, home-made dolmades, tiny meat balls, fried halloumi, and crisp calamari tops and tails make up a feast. Go on to excellent moussaka with the creamiest béchamel topping in town, or try the gyros (beef or chicken) – pita pockets packed with succulent pieces of meat bathed in tzatziki, with cucumber, tomato and red onion to give it crunch. If you want something more substantial, there are prawn, kingklip, and sardine dishes, grills and a great lamb shank. End with home-made baklava.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Maria’s Greek Restaurant (Gardens)
This relaxed eatery’s mezze is a game-changer: the hake is flaky and enrobed in a crisp Striped Horse beer batter and served with a fantastic home-made mayo. The komesko comes with beer-battered aubergine and zucchini and skordalia (garlic and potato dip). The vegan platter for one bursts with flavour: dolmades, garlicky olives, aubergine, hummus, komesko and garlic pita. The rest of the menu covers the Greek gamut: from souvlaki and moussaka to lamb chops with tzatziki and spanakopita. For dessert, choose between the likes of kataifi, semolina cake and kourabiethes (Greek butter cookies).
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Sotano (City Bowl)
The signature breakfast dish of eggs Benedict is the way to go. Served on a croissant with a choice of bacon, salmon or ham, the eggs are perfectly poached, with a gloriously oozy yolk, and the hollandaise is well balanced. Or have the shakshuka made with sautéed red peppers and tomatoes. The vast lunch and dinner menu has tapas, salads and soups.
Seafood dishes feature prominently, with mussels and prawns as well as classic fish and chips. The Sotano lamb burger with hummus and avo is the most popular dish. The dessert section is small but interesting: try pistachio mille-feuille or white chocolate crème brûlée.
Middle Eastern Anatoli Turkish Restaurant (Green Point) 🍽
More than three decades on, Anatoli is still in its original location; the waiter still does the rounds carrying a mighty wooden tray with hot and cold mezze; and the slow-cooked lamb shank is still enormous. The garlic bread, sliced at your table with a flourish, is memorably good. The signature Anatolian lamb (cubed and cooked with rosemary, oregano, red peppers and tomatoes) is a family-sized helping of richly flavoured, tender lamb served with rice. The borani (spinach with yoghurt, caramelised onions, sultanas and turmeric) is deliciously zesty. You’ll have no room for dessert, which is a shame, because the cheesecake is made with Turkish delight.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
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Modern & tapas Bistro Sixteen82 (Tokai)
Chef Kerry Kilpin has a flair for showcasing fresh seasonal produce in exquisite compositions that pop with flavour. The breakfasts are fabulous; signature eggs Benedict are served with a rich hollandaise. An Asian twist threads through the lunch menu, from tempura prawns with pineapple salsa to beef tataki with truffled corn, chilli and sesame. Carnivores will love the slow-cooked signature dishes like pork belly and braised lamb neck. A vegetarian menu offers warm quinoa salad, risotto, and mushroom-and-gorgonzola gnocchi. Leave room for the bread-and-butter pudding.
A trio of tapas dishes at Bistro Sixteen82. Photo supplied.
Black Sheep (Tamboerskloof)
Serving hearty bistro-style food from a menu that changes daily, Black Sheep has firmly entrenched itself as a neighbourhood favourite. The starters are seemingly light, but the portions are sizeable. The West Coast mussels in a creamy white wine sauce is a well-rounded dish. The trout gravadlax is light and fresh with dill mustard dressing, pickled beetroot dressing and rye bread adding tang. Mains options range from roast aubergine-and-tomato ragout, kingklip and rabbit leg to impala loin. The kudu, braised in red wine and served with bacon and root vegetables, is wonderfully rich. For dessert, try the flourless chocolate tart or the artisanal cheeseboard.
Bouchon Bistro (City Bowl)
The menu at this sophisticated urban hangout is delicious to read. It’s hard to choose between options such as pea-and-artichoke risotto, kudu carpaccio with beetroot and date salad, and grilled tiger prawns with saffron and garlic. The lamb ribs are succulent and tender. The pan-fried squid is good and the chorizo imparts a lovely smoky flavour.
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Cape to Cuba (Kalk Bay)
Kick off with tapas-style starters from the wide-ranging menu inspired by Spanish and Cuban cuisine. Delicious peri-peri chicken livers and sticky pork ribs are as popular as the grilled sardines with salsa verde. Mains highlights are meaty: spicy lamb curry, mojito chicken marinated in rum and lime, or the hunger-busting diablo rum burger. If there’s a signature dish, it’s the paella piled high with fish, calamari, prawns and chorizo – ideal for sharing. The chocolate cigars are a quirky end to the meal.
Chefs (Gardens) 🍽
A contemporary reimagining of the lunch canteen serves up a treat for tech-savvy food lovers. Despite only three dishes (meat, fish and plant-based) on the menu, it’s hard to choose. The menu changes daily, but keep an eye out for the the aubergine terrine served with a mustardy salad of rocket, almonds and shaved parmesan. The tartare is excellent – hand-diced cubes of beef with capers, gherkins, parsley and chilli oil, with a soft egg nestling on well-dressed leafy greens. Keep room for the buttermilk panna cotta.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Chefs Warehouse & Canteen (City Bowl) – NOMINEE
Liam Tomlin’s set menu of tapas-for-two changes regularly, but the result is always a fusion of cuisines, using some of the best local ingredients. It could include Japanese, French, Mediterranean and South African influences. Highlights are miso charred salmon with soba noodles and mentsuyu dressing; deep-fried squid with fragrant Cape Malay pickle and a curry emulsion; as well as the fresh tomato gastrique with home-made ricotta, semi-dried tomatoes and olives. There’s always a risotto, and the celeriac version with truffle cream is dreamy. Dessert isn’t included in the set menu, but the lemon posset is legendary.
A dish at Chefs Warehouse and Canteen. Photo by Claire Gunn.
Chefs Warehouse at Beau Constantia (Constantia) – Top 10
Ivor Jones creates punchy flavours, each dish better than the next, and the best of them are inspired by Asian cuisine. There’s a Thai sour curry with fermented lime that you’ll want to bottle, and incredible Korean chilli chicken tacos. The umami-laced risotto’s secret lies in the coal-fired oyster mushrooms that lie beneath a thyme-infused milk froth. Line fish gets a lift from caraway and burnt butter dressing, and a simple tartare is finished with a barbecue garlic aïoli. End with wild honey and lavender crème, served with honeycomb and smoked cassia bark ice cream.
Coco Safar (Sea Point)
Start your evening at the rooibos bar for a delicate amuse bouche before going to the main dining area. The two- or three-course meal is paired with innovative drinks. The boule feta is a house favourite starter: a chilled sphere of creamed feta cheese filled with a chunky mushroom caponata. Main course options include pumpkin risotto, ostrich lasagne, sea bass curry, brisket and mutton casserole. The brisket is slightly smoked and served thinly sliced with caper mash and braised cabbage. The tropical coconut rice pudding with mango and granadilla purée, lime sorbet and dark chocolate is well balanced. The after-dinner surprise is a fabulous ending.
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The Foodbarn Deli & Tapas (Noordhoek)
Lunch options reflect the refined farm stall space. There are freshly made pies filled with the likes of braised pork in red wine or classic chicken and mushroom. Flatbreads are topped with interesting options such as butter chicken or smoked salmon, dill cream and watercress. The calamari salad is a particular standout, with lightly-spiced calamari tossed generously through leaves, green beans, tomatoes and avo, topped with an aïoli-style dressing. For the sweet tooth-inclined, you’re spoiled for choice with a rotation of home-made cakes and pastries. Dinnertime sees enticing tapas: mini bunny chows, sautéed potatoes with truffle oil and tuna tataki with peanut sauce.
Foxcroft (Constantia) – NOMINEE
The lunch menu by chef Glen Foxcroft Williams is set up for diners to enjoy any two small yet flavour-packed courses, followed by a more substantial dish and dessert. It provides a clever incentive to return for the longer evening menu. Roasted tandoori cauliflower mousse with lemon pickle, sultanas and naan bread is deceptively complex. Fragrant poached line fish with charred corn, seaweed and Thai broth is a delight, while glazed free-range duck with nectarine, garlic, green olives and mushroom boasts a balance of richness and sweet acidity. Desserts are shimmy-inducingly good. Sample rhubarb financier with Dulcey, yoghurt, celery leaf and lime, or buttermilk panna cotta with grapefruit, oats and Thai basil.
A colourful dish at Foxcroft. Photo supplied.
Hemelhuijs (City Bowl)
The menu is beautifully designed and, like the décor, changes with the seasons. Breakfast is served all day. Try the seasonal poached fruit and mealie meal porridge served with butter and honey, and the potato rösti with poached eggs and hollandaise is perfection. The lunch menu is divided into sections of botanical plates – which are different interpretations of carpaccio using fish, meat, veggies and even fruit. The signature dish is slow-cooked frikkadels wrapped in cabbage leaves. End with a classic sweet tart.
Homage 1862 (City Bowl) 🍽
The wood-fired grill is put to very good use here, in what is interestingly a vegetable-forward establishment. Peppers, eggplant, sweet potato and even broccoli all receive a baptism by fire, to delicious effect. They’re served small-plate style: grilled sweet potato with thyme and honey butter; wood-fired broccoli with toasted almonds, lemon and chilli, and the happiest mielie that ever did live – roasted corn on the cob with warm spices, mayo and fresh lime. There is fish as well (the spiced salmon is on point), and a selection of meats such as rib eye, lamb chops, lemon herbed chicken breast, and heavenly vegan dishes like green veg curry.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
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Janse & Co (City Bowl)
What sets chef Arno Janse van Rensburg’s (previously of The Kitchen at Maison) restaurant apart is the use of indigenous ingredients. Expect the likes of num num, custard apple and soutslaai. Choose from an extensive list of menu options to make up three- to seven-course menus. Start with the home-made charcuterie – while the chokka with klipkombers and nasturtium aïoli is a highlight, the balance of sweet and salty is extraordinary. The trout is excellent, too: it’s served with num num, which adds a lovely tartness and a pop of colour. End with milk chocolate coulant, a rich end to an outstanding meal.
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Mulberry & Prince (City Bowl)
A short paper menu lists the options of small plates intended for sharing. Options might include a generous serving of market fish carpaccio laid out on a bed of sour hot sauce; whipped hake roe; smoked lamb tartare; oysters; or stracciatella. The famed cacio e pepe (a highlight) and a dish of meaty and fragrant foraged mushrooms might appeal. Beef with café de Paris butter and the catch of the day are at the top end of the menu. The dessert could be a Dutch baby pancake with lemon and fromage blanc.
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The Pot Luck Club (Woodstock) – NOMINEE
The tapas-style dishes are made to share. Pencil down your choices and quantity desired and the kitchen will decide the order in which you’ll experience the flavours. Lighter fish dishes usually start things off, such as the fish taco or the fish sliders. Go for options such as the beautifully unctuous prawn and king-crab stuffed chicken wings with lime green crème fraîche and sriracha. Leave space for a sweet serenade to end off the eating extravaganza, such as the hazelnut-and-apple tart with salted caramel and smoked cinnamon ice cream.
A peri peri prawn dish from The Pot Luck Club. Photo by Andy Lund.
The Shortmarket Club (City Bowl) – NOMINEE
Chef Wesley Randles shows his brave approach in dishes such as crispy pig cheek on red endive with honey, smoked nuts and gorgonzola – an unapologetic combination of sweet and salty, crispy fat and bitter notes. A main dish of springbok is complemented with a genius Caperitif quince jus, Jerusalem artichokes, smoked bone marrow and fresh porcini. The stand-out main course is aged rib-eye on the bone for two – as much for the theatrics of having it set alight in front of you as for the flavour. Desserts keep the pace with chocolate fondant with a peanut-butter cookie, malt foam and popcorn ice cream or oak-smoked crème brûlée with lavender and mozzarella.
Chardonnay-steamed West Coast mussels with celeriac and ham hock veloute poached oysters and fresh seaweed dish. Photo supplied.
The Willaston Bar at The Silo Hotel (V&A Waterfront)
Open throughout the day, The Willaston Bar boasts an extensive menu that runs the gamut from breakfast, salads, sandwiches and platters to desserts. The popular choice is a salad or classic club sandwich stacked with bacon, smoked chicken, steak and served with French fries.
For a shareable choice, the tempura platter is worth a sample, while the dense apple treacle sponge with tonka-bean caramel and vanilla ice cream is a sweet way to end off. The high tea spread is sensational.
Seafood Café Orca (Melkbosstrand)
The starter menu offers grilled squid with lemon butter, garlic, parsley oil and red pesto. If you’re a prawn fan, try the Cajun prawns with Asian noodles. A platter is a great way to sample a bit of everything, with many options to choose from: baby sole, prawns, calamari, hake – you name it. Vegetarians can try the Caprese salad, Greek salad or blue cheese salad. End with the house dessert of a sponge base, custard and peppermint mousse.
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Hokey Poke (City Bowl) 🍽
The food is fresh and bursting with flavour. A tofu salad or edamame beans with lime and furikake are great choices on the starter menu. Poké bowl favourites include the Lucky 7, which comes with prawns, seasonal fruit, avocado, radish, edamame beans, pistachio, mint and coriander. Over summer there are lots of fresh bowls to choose from. Warm winter bowls see Korean-style brisket slow-cooked to perfection and served with a base of your choice. Swap brisket for grilled tofu and mushrooms for a vegetarian option. Dessert of the day could be a moreish coconut flan.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
SeaBreeze Fish & Shell (City Bowl)
Start with fresh oysters, naked or dressed – order a Saldanha and Knysna oyster side by side and compare. (Half-price oyster happy hour happens twice daily: 12pm to 1pm and 5pm to 6pm). The starter menu also offers hake ceviche, an oyster po’boy and a tangy anglefish taco. Mains range from hake and chips and a couple of seafood curries to a Seabreeze Caesar salad and exotic dishes like whole grilled bream and grilled swordfish. Dessert offerings include an apple crumble cheesecake, a chocolate ganache tart and a piña colada panna cotta.
Willoughby & Co. (V&A Waterfront)
The fold-out menu is vast and varied and features a wide range of Japanese-inspired dishes and sushi, as well as a number of continental classic seafood items and good old fish and chips. The new-style sashimi, where raw, thinly sliced fish is doused with a punchy yuzu-soy dressing and aromatics such as ginger, garlic and sesame seeds, steals the scene.
The desserts on offer are pretty standard, including malva pudding with custard and crème brûlée, but hit the sweet-tooth spot nonetheless.
Steakhouses & meaty fare Brad’s Grill (Claremont)
Brad’s Grill was established over three decades ago, and is now housed in an intimate neighbourhood in the heart of the southern suburbs. Only open at night, it feels like a village secret, but its founder, Brad Steele, isn’t shy to let you in on it. To start, Brad’s buffalo chicken wings are deliciously spicy. The 200g skinny steak with a side salad is a tempting order, but the reasonably priced 300g rump or sirloin is a carnivore’s dream. Bread-and-butter pudding, apple crumble, cheesecake and pecan nut pie are but some of the decadent desserts.
The Butcher Shop & Grill (Mouille Point)
You might suffer from order envy if you don’t order the creamiest chicken liver starters. The game carpaccio starter is stylishly presented and also delicious. For a lighter lunch, the fragrant lamb pita showcases the freshness and quality of the meat. The pièce de résistance, however, is the dish of pork chops in black pepper – perfectly grilled and unimaginably succulent. For dessert, malva pudding goes toe-to-toe with halva ice cream.
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Carne on Kloof (Gardens) 🍽
Vegetarians, look away – this Italian-style steakhouse offers an outstanding experience for hardcore meat-lovers. Rare cuts are the Carne signature. The picanha rump, beloved by Brazilians for its sturdy layer of fat that hits the grill first, gets the nod and, with salsa verde and a side of thin-cut fries, is everything you’d expect from a supper of steak and chips. A trio of tartare delivers three spheres of hand-cut beef lightly dressed with anchovies, salsa verde and lemon by a chef with complete confidence in the quality of his product. The pan-fried sweetbreads with white wine, butter and sage are both crisp and juicy, and come served with potato mash.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Carne SA (City Bowl) 🍽
There are few places in Cape Town that serve meat of the variety and quality that Italian chef Giorgio Nava provides at his various Carne restaurants. The trio of beef tartare, served with briny anchovies and a sparkling salsa verde, is a tasty gateway to what’s coming. Another standout favourite is the ravioli of Karoo lamb shoulder, served with burnt sage butter. Better-known cuts like fillet, rump and sirloin are impeccably hung and prepared, but pricy. You get the same flavour and juicy tenderness from less well-known and less expensive cuts like spider and hangar steaks. If there’s room after the last meaty mouthful, the chocolate fondant oozes decadent richness.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Cattle Baron Steak Ranch (Constantia)
For starters, try the likes of stuffed mushrooms, garlic snails or peri-peri chicken livers. Substantial salads such as seared sirloin with fig and roquefort are worth it. For mains, lighter grills include burgers and chicken schnitzel. There’s a wide selection of meaty mains including the usual beef cuts, while the meat on the bone section includes lamb chops, beef or pork ribs, prime rib and T-bone. There are also signature dishes such as chateaubriand for something different. A selection of seafood including sole, prawns and calamari is available. Add to your dish from a selection of sides, sauces and flavoured butters. Dessert is also a classic hit list, including chocolate mousse, malva pudding and ice cream with Bar One sauce.
Cattle Baron Steak Ranch (Durbanville)
It’s steak all the way, with a small choice of chicken, seafood and vegetarian options. The menu begins with starters and salads like deep-fried stuffed mushrooms and a fresh rocket salad topped with cherry tomatoes, red onion, avocado and buffalo mozzarella. There’s a good selection in the section ‘Steaks that made us famous’ , like the sirloin Nevada, a 300g sirloin topped with bacon, avocado, camembert and onions. Meat on the bone includes ribs while traditional rump, sirloin and fillet are cooked to your liking. Desserts are classic steakhouse: ice cream with Bar One sauce, malva pudding, baked cheesecake, don pedros and Irish coffees.
Don Armando (Green Point)
This restaurant specialises in steak and prides itself in having the best cuts of aged meat, cooked to perfection. Starters include a steak tartare and succulent sautéed prawns with tomato and a hint of chili. For mains, share the signature picanha steak: an 800g hunk of beef served with hand-cut potato chips, chimichurri sauce and a crisp house salad with balsamic dressing. For those who don’t want steak, choose lamb or chicken. End with churros, caramel flan or heavenly pancakes drizzled with caramel sauce and served with dulce de leche ice cream.
Hoghouse Brewing Company (Ndabeni)
The focus here is authentic barbecue. Start off your meal with the crispy pig’s tails, coated in a maple glaze. The ‘low and slow’ style of cooking means you can look forward to tender cuts of meat such as sticky pork ribs, which are quite exceptional, as well as a decent offering of fried chicken. If you’re veggie, great options are the baked aubergine topped with a zingy tomato sauce and mozzarella, as well as the coal-roasted cos lettuce tossed in a punchy citrus dressing. Keep space for dessert, the famous pasteis de nata in particular.
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The Hussar Grill (Camps Bay)
For starters, expect to find familiar steakhouse specialities, such as chicken livers with sherry and garlic cream, crumbed and fried camembert served with sweet cranberry jelly, and calamari and tartar sauce. Steaks are the focus here: choose your own portion size and cut of meat, on or off the bone. Matured and grilled to perfection, steaks are served with classic sauces such as creamy mustard or green peppercorn. The popular carpetbagger steak with smoked mussels and cheese filling, as well as chateaubriand, are also on the menu. The pork belly ribs deliver smoky, sticky pleasure. End with the chocolate fondant or crème brûlée.
The Hussar Grill (Mouille Point)
If you’re not in a meaty mood, go for the delicious mussel pot: plump mussels finished in a herb, wine and cream sauce. If you feel like some theatrics, the chateaubriand is a good choice: well-aged fillet is served with a classically prepared Béarnaise sauce on the side and flambéed in brandy tableside. The meal includes a starch, but the onion rings, creamed spinach and cinnamon-infused butternut are sides to consider. End with the signature ice-cream dessert that comes with peanut brittle, marshmallow, nougat, honeycomb, sprinkled nuts and is finished with chocolate sauce
The Hussar Grill (Willowbridge)
Obviously the thing to eat here is meat, for which they are famous, but they also have some delicious fish and even veggie offerings, like superb tomato soup and a large grilled black mushroom with caramelised onion and feta. The grilled calamari with chilli and garlic is delicious. Perfectly aged rump, sirloin and fillet are on offer, as well as ostrich served with a wild berry and apple schnapps sauce. Their sauces are legendary, ranging from Béarnaise to classic café de Paris. The salads are fresh and crunchy, with the caramelised pear, walnut and blue cheese one being a knockout. The baked cheesecake has been gathering fans for years.
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Patina (Newlands) 🍽
With most steaks (all Chalmar beef ) above the R200 mark, this is not a cheap neighbourhood restaurant. The steak tartare is the second clue that this is no ordinary suburban steakhouse. Patina’s version is beautifully plated with wafer-thin pink radishes, mustard seeds resting in a boat of pickled onion, and a covering of grated cured egg yolk. Try the fillet champignon topped with creamy thyme, roasted garlic and wild mushroom sauce. There’s also fillet on the bone, lamb rib-eye and a Wagyu burger to be had. For pud, there’s a chocolate fondant with hazelnut crumb, mascarpone and sour cherry ice cream, or try the affogato.
🍽 Available for online bookings on the Eat Out app .
Saucy steak from Patina. Photo by Katharine Pope.
Rare Grill (Kenilworth)
Winner of the steakhouse category in the Western Cape at the 2018 Best Everyday Eateries. You could be won over by the bone marrow on toast or chicken livers for starters, but just keep in mind that you’re here for the steak. The selection is small (aged rump, sirloin and fillet) but steaks are expertly grilled, fat rendered, but still rare and with enough flavour to dispense with a sauce. The desserts are the usual favourites (brownies and malva pudding), but a good reason to hang around.
A juicy steak from Rare Grill. Photo supplied.
Brought to you by Stella Artois
This selection comprises all the Cape Town restaurants that made the cut for the 2019 Eat Out 500, the list of best restaurants in the country as rated and reviewed by our panel of critics for the 2019 edition of Eat Out magazine ( on sale now ). But we know the city is crammed with loads more more gems and mainstays that didn’t crack the nod. Please tell us about your favourites in the comments section below.

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News: Forte Village to welcome the Cinnamon Club this summer

News: Forte Village to welcome the Cinnamon Club this summer April 17, 2019 by PressEditor
Forte Village has announced an upcoming collaboration with award-winning chef, restaurateur and author Vivek Singh.
Singh has attained a reputation as a pioneer of modern Indian cuisine through his London based restaurants.
The Sardinian opening at Forte Village will be his first venture abroad and will open under the flagship name, the Cinnamon Club.
“The restaurant will serve fine Indian food that showcases the philosophies of pushing boundaries and combining really good quality Sardinian produce, which will be given the spice treatment from different parts of India,” said Singh.
“Forte Village is a phenomenal location and I’m really looking forward to it.”
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Forte Village Resort, Sardinia is the ultimate foodie escape with 21 permanent restaurants and bars set in 47 hectares of beautiful gardens along a white sandy beach in southern Sardinia.
Every summer, the resort hosts a spectacular array of Michelin-starred chefs who cook up their famed dishes for guests for a select number of nights.
Chefs so far have included Enrico Cerea from Da Vittorio, Frank Reynaud and Aimo e Nadia.
More Information
Forte Village is considered the World’s Leading Resort by voters at the World Travel Awards. Older Cartagena joins Caribbean Hotel & Tourism Association Newer Canopy by Hilton Venice City Centre pencilled in for 2021 opening Related Article

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Celebrate The Best of Cantonese Cuisine with Yauatcha’s Signature Six Course Supreme Taste of Yauatcha Experience

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Start off your meal with the light and wholesome Hot and sour soup with mushroom or shredded chicken, followed by Yauatcha’s signature crunchy Mixed salad with lotus root. At Yauatcha a meal is incomplete without the famous dim sum, guests can choose two baskets from a myriad of vegetarian, meat and sea-food options such as the Vegetarian poached Peking dumpling, Shiitake mushroom dumpling, Pork char sui bun or the signature Har gau that are intricately wrapped and freshly prepared by Yauatcha’s skilled dim sum chefs every day. Choose from mains like Mabo tofu, Stir-fry lotus root, asparagus and water chestnut, Kung pao chicken or Steamed Indian seabass in spicy black bean sauce accompanied with Egg fried rice with long beans or the Ho fan noodles with chicken.
Enjoy all this with Yauatcha’s special Golden Ging cocktail. The team behind Yauatcha India paired up with the folks at Ballantines Whisky and embarked on a journey to the Ging Tea House, to conjure a new blend of tea. This tea blend found its way into the Golden Ging cocktail, which is light and refreshing drink that combines Ballantines finest with the tea. This long drink with fruity undertones coming from the passion fruit and orange bitters, can be sipped throughout the meal and pairs well with all the courses.
End your meal with Yauatcha’s instagramable desserts like the Chocolate pebble and the Red fruit fromage.
When: Monday through Thursday
Timings: 5 pm to 11 pm
Where: Yauatcha, Level 5, 1 MG Road Mall
Price: INR 1388/- for vegetarian and INR 1488/- for regular
For Reservations: Call – 092222 22800

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Cultural appropriation: Why is food such a sensitive subject?

Cultural appropriation: Why is food such a sensitive subject? Earlier this week, a restaurant in New York made headlines for rather unfortunate reasons. Lucky Lee’s, a new Chinese restaurant run by a Jewish-American couple, advertised itself as providing “clean” Chinese food with healthy ingredients that wouldn’t make people feel “bloated and icky the next day”. It told Eater website: “There are very few American-Chinese places as mindful about the quality of ingredients as we are.” It prompted a fierce backlash on social media from people who accused the restaurant of racist language, cultural appropriation, and a lack of understanding of Chinese food. The restaurant’s Instagram account was besieged with thousands of angry comments, including some which questioned the credentials of a white couple running a Chinese restaurant – as well as comments from defenders who accused the “online slacktivists” of being easily offended, and targeting the restaurateurs simply because of their race. The whole debate became so polarised that ratings site Yelp placed an “unusual activity” alert on the restaurant’s page after it was flooded with both positive and negative reviews, many seemingly from people who hadn’t actually been to the restaurant. Lucky Lee’s has since issued a statement saying that it was not “commenting negatively on all Chinese food… Chinese cuisine is incredibly diverse and comes in many different flavours (usually delicious in our opinion) and health benefits”. It added that it would “always listen and reflect accordingly” to take “cultural sensitivities” into account. The owner, Arielle Haspel, told the New York Times: “We are so sorry. We were never trying to do something against the Chinese community. We thought we were complementing an incredibly important cuisine, in a way that would cater to people that had certain dietary requirements.” The uproar is the latest in a series of rows over food and cultural appropriation. US celebrity chef Andrew Zimmern came under fire for saying that his restaurant Lucky Cricket would save people from the low-standard “restaurants masquerading as Chinese food that are in the Midwest”. Critics accused him of being patronising towards smaller restaurants run by immigrant families, and he later issued an apology. Meanwhile, in the UK, supermarket chain Marks and Spencer was accused of cultural appropriation after it produced a new vegan biriyani wrap, despite the Indian dish normally being served with rice and meat. And Gordon Ramsay’s new London restaurant, Lucky Cat, was criticised for selling itself as an “authentic Asian Eating House” – despite not having an Asian chef. When did food become such a sensitive topic – and why does it provoke such strong reactions from both sides of the debate? Food can be closely linked to identity For many people – particularly those from ethnic minority backgrounds – food can be both personal, and political. Second and third generation immigrants often have “a sense of loss of their own culture – their attire is western, their language is western, and food is almost the last of the cultural domain that they retain a vivid memory of”, Krishnendu Ray, a sociologist and professor of food studies at New York University, tells the BBC. Many Chinese Americans have talked about their experiences growing up – for example when classmates would make fun of the food in their lunch boxes. Luke Tsai, a food writer in the San Francisco Bay Area, says: “We grew up in the US with a sort of in-between status of our identity. Were we American? Were we Chinese? It was hard to find acceptance in a lot of mainstream culture. He remembers being “slightly ashamed” of Chinese food when he was younger – “I didn’t want to bring Chinese food for my lunch at school – I wanted a sandwich or pizza to fit in.” “People would say: ‘Why are you eating that smelly thing? That’s gross!'” “But for many of us as we got older, we remembered the food our parents cooked us, and it became a great source of nostalgia for us – in a way, embracing that was embracing the Asian, immigrant side of our identity.” Many Chinese restaurants deliberately adapted their menus to serve more fried foods or thickened sauces because those were items a “mainstream white audience” were more familiar with, he adds. “The reason that they opened those restaurants was not because they couldn’t cook their ‘true’ Chinese food, it was because that was what they did to survive and cater to their audience. “So to see that flipped around nowadays, and have a white restaurateur open a restaurant and say ‘we’re not like those Chinese American restaurants you know about, we’re serving clean Chinese food… is particularly hurtful and offensive for a lot of people.” There’s also a historical context to this. In the 1880s, the US passed legislation barring Chinese workers from immigrating to the US. Only a few categories were exempt – including restaurateurs – and historians say this contributed to a boom in Chinese restaurants in the US. Yet “American exposure to Chinese food has mostly been cheap Chinese food”, and the cuisine has been associated with “a kind of disdain” due to the presumption that it is associated with “cheap ingredients and mostly untrained labour”, says Prof Ray. “Very few Americans realise or know that China probably had the most sophisticated food culture in the world at least 500 years before the French did.” Whose food is it anyway? Some of the sharpest criticism on both sides has been around ownership. Some negative social media comments about Lucky Lee’s have focused on the fact that the owners are white – while critics have responded that it would be ridiculous to suggest that only Chinese people are allowed to cook Chinese food. Francis Lam, host of The Splendid Table radio programme, believes that a lot of the furore around cultural appropriation and food is due to a “disconnect in the conversation”. “I think if you’re a chef or restaurant owner, it’s fair to say you probably put a lot of yourself into your business, and don’t want to hear it when you think people are saying ‘you’re not allowed to do that’.” However, he thinks that for those opposed to cultural appropriation, the issue is “not about who’s allowed or not allowed to do things”, but rather about the manner in which things are done. “If you are going to promote yourself as someone who cooks or sells food from a culture you didn’t grow up in, I would say it’s also your responsibility to make sure you’re doing it in a way that truly respects the people who grew up in the culture – and the people who frankly invented some of the things you’re doing.” Andy Ricker says chefs need to be respectful – but also need a thick skin Andy Ricker, an award-winning chef and bestselling cookbook author, spent 13 years learning about Thai cuisine, familiarising himself with ingredients and the language, before starting the restaurant chain Pok Pok. He is recognised as an expert in northern Thai cuisine – and his approach has been praised by Asian chefs and food critics. However, others have also questioned why a white chef is being seen as the authority on Thai food, rather than a Thai one. He suggests chefs should “be aware that language is important”, and try “to be as accurate and faithful as you can”. “I can’t say that I’m making authentic food because I don’t have any claim to that.” The most important thing for chefs like him, he says, is to “be respectful and not claim anything is yours. Don’t apply labels to food – don’t just add chillies, basil and peanuts to something and call it Thai, or put something in a sandwich and call it Banh Mi… you’re playing to clichés which is not a good look”. He also says it’s crucial for chefs to “grow a thick skin – it doesn’t matter what’s in your heart or how careful you are about what you say, there’s going to be people who just aren’t having it.” Meanwhile, Chris Shepherd cooks a range of cuisines at UB Preserv in Houston, Texas, but says highlighting and cherishing the cultures that inspired him is important to him. Chris’s dishes include “boudin siu mai” – a take on a type of Chinese dumpling His restaurant’s bills come with a listing of his favourite local restaurants, and the message “we’d love to have you back at UB Preserv, but we politely request that you visit at least one of these folks first”. He acknowledges that his restaurant attracts more funding and publicity than many small businesses, but says his goal is to “get people who wouldn’t normally go” to those places, or try different cuisines, to “visit these restaurants and become part of this community”. Why is it hard to separate food and politics? These days, there seems to be constant debate about identity politics, and an endless stream of incidents provoking outrage. It can certainly feel tempting to keep politics out of food. But commentators argue that the food business, like any other business, is linked to power structures and privilege – and it’s not a level playing field for everyone. “If you’re opening a business you’re already engaging with the public, making decisions about who you’re going to hire, who can afford to eat at your restaurant, what your staff is going to look like – there’s hundreds of decisions you’re making that will have an impact on society,” Mr Tsai says. Meanwhile, Prof Ray says that his research suggests some ethnic minority chefs may face specific barriers. “There is a tendency to ‘ghettoise’ Chinese, Mexican and Indian American chefs into cooking ‘their own food’, whereas white chefs tend to find it easier to cross boundaries”, and are seen as “artistic” when they do. Kwame Onwuachi, 29, has been nominated for awards for his cooking Kwame Onwuachi says in his memoir that, during a casting session, a television producer told him that US audiences would not be prepared to see a black chef like him doing fine dining. Similarly, chef Edourdo Jordan has previously told GQ that some people found it hard to believe he was the owner of a restaurant serving French and Italian food. Mr Ricker agrees that white chefs face some advantages when cooking in the West. “Of course in white dominant culture, white people always get away with more than other people. But I would say this too – if you’re a westerner trying to cook in Thailand you’re faced with a massive amount of scepticism and sometimes downright derision…. I think it’s human nature for the dominant culture to pigeon hole people who’re not of their culture.” It all comes down to money These perceptions also have financial implications that affect restaurants’ bottom lines. In one study, Prof Ray found that dishes from certain cuisines were seen as more prestigious, enabling restaurants to charge more. For example, an average meal at a Zagat-listed French or Japanese restaurant cost about $30 more than an average meal at a Zagat-listed Chinese or Southern restaurant in 2015, his research found. Chef Jonathan Wu encountered this when he opened a high-end Chinese restaurant, Fung Tu, in New York. The restaurant received excellent reviews, with Bloomberg calling the food “genius”, and the New York Times giving it a two-star, “very good” review. One of the dishes at Fung Tu – egg whites poached in a broth with Toona sinesis leaves But Mr Wu says he received a lot of “blowback” for its prices, with complaints that the restaurant was “too expensive for what it is”. Fung Tu closed down in 2017, and was reopened as Nom Wah Tu, a dim sum restaurant with lower prices. Mr Wu says there is still an “expectation that Chinese food is cheap”. He compares how hand-made Chinese dumplings are sometimes sold for “five for a dollar”, whereas a high-end plate of ravioli can sell for “$45 a plate”. “If you tried that for a plate of dumplings, people would freak out.” Which would you pay more for? Are things changing? In a way, the whole cultural appropriation debate is also “a symptom of a very visible, assertive, middle and professional class” of people from ethnic minorities in the US, says Prof Ray. And US perceptions of Chinese food could be radically different in 20 years’ time, due to China’s economic rise, and a growing Chinese middle class presence in US cities. Prof Ray says a similar process happened from the 1980s with Japanese food, as the culture became associated with affluent immigrant groups or businessmen. In the meantime, the cultural appropriation debate is likely to continue – but not everyone thinks that’s a bad thing. “We’re experiencing growing pains in this whole conversation, but the bigger picture is that it’s amazing to see how the American palate has widened, and there is a greater market acceptance of different stories and backgrounds,” says Mr Lam. “These conversations can seem frustrating and tiresome, but you have to have them.” Mr Ricker agrees. “There’s a lot of angst, anger and defensiveness out there, [but] it’s important that people understand the sensitivity around food and culture, because they’re very powerful things. I don’t think it’s comfortable for anybody, but it’s certainly necessary.”

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Chug’s Makes Its Coconut Grove Debut More New Restaurant Openings

Chug’s Makes Its Coconut Grove Debut and More New Restaurant Openings Tracking the latest restaurant and bar openings in South Florida Flipboard Chug’s/Official Press Photo Below is a weekly round up of the latest openings around South Florida. Track all the openings here and find the hottest new openings here . April 17 COCONUT GROVE — Ariete’s Michael Beltran has officially opened the doors to his Cuban-diner style eatery, Chug’s (3444 Main Highway). It serves up Cuban-inspired breakfast, lunch, dinner and to-go bites daily from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.. In true Beltran fashion it has a array of fritas and other sandwiches like Medianoche and Minuta, alongside lighter dishes like sweet potato salad, and inventive pastelitos courtesy of Pastelito Papi. MIDTOWN MIAMI — Counter service, Indian style cuisine has finally arrived to Miami courtesy of CHO:TU (3252 NE First Avenue). Considered neighboring Maska’s more casual counterpart, it features a menu of Indian street food like lamb bhuna, vegan pani puri, and lentil curry, with seating for 42 people both indoor and outdoor. LITTLE HAVANA — Cafe La Trova’s 80s themed backbar is now open for business. Open on the Fridays and Saturday evenings, the cocktail menu at 80s 305 Bar (971 SW 8th Street) features 12 cocktails — think Cosmos, Hurricanes, Mint Juleps — all priced at $12. Each drink bears the name of the bartender or mixologist that made the drink famous. Local beers, wines and champagnes can also be found on the menu. DOWNTOWN MIAMI — Downtown Miami has a new breakfast focused restaurant. A spin off of The Butcher Shop Beer Garden and Grill, The Egg Spot (228 SE 1st Street) counter service dining while serving The Butcher Shop’s most popular brunch dishes, as well as a range of new breakfast options like breakfast sandwiches, power bowls, even bratwurst and burgers, plus Illy coffee bar, squeezed and cold pressed juices in addition to a selection of wine and beer options. March 15 LITTLE HAVANA — While Calle Ocho isn’t exactly lacking in the taqueria department, it seems always welcome to newcomers. The latest to come to the area is El Santo (1620 SW 8th Street), a self-described “kitschy” Mexican restaurant dedicated to one of lucha libre’s most famous luchadores and folk heroes named Santo. The straightforward menu features items like carne asada and al pastor tacos along with guac and quesadillas. A bar is slated to open in the back in the following months. SOUTH BEACH — The Italian-inspired market Mercato (1701 Purdy Avenue) has expended to Sunset Harbour. The restaurant, which got its start in the Design District in 2013, will offer a similar menu to its mainland counterpart but will offer outdoor seating and the inside communal table will serve as a “bread and breakfast vibe” where visitors and locals alike can interact. BRICKELL — El Tucan (1111 SW 1st Avenue) is back in Brickell starting tonight. The “reimagined” restaurant will still feature elements of its cabaret past with “surprise” entertainment, including aerialists, singers and dancers performing during dinner. The menu got a revamp as well and now features a variety of Asian-influenced dishes like spicy hamachi tacos, Wagyu sliders, pork belly bao buns, chicken wing lollipops and Chilean sea bass satay. BRICKELL — Ever dream to drink in a fancy watch shop? Well now those dreams can come to life thanks to new watering hole Bar Journe , located inside of F.P.Journe (270 Biscayne Blvd Way). At the bar guests can sip on a selection of rare and vintage spirits like Suntory Japanese Whiskey from the 1980s, Bacardi Rum from the 1940s, and Moskovskaya Vodka from the 1970s, all while nibbling on jamón Ibérico and Petrossian caviar, of course. For those who want to take their libations up another level, individual and corporate memberships are also available, offering additional benefits and selections with the option to acquire a locker where one can store and access their bottles. Eater Miami Sign up for our newsletter. Enter your email address Subscribe By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy. More From Eater Miami

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Fay Maschler's week in food, from perky edamame at Robata to 'ironed chicken' at Coal Office

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From a “nibble” of perky edamame in sweet soy with gochugaru flakes, the meal at Robata in Soho rolls gently downhill.
At La Ferme aux Grives, part of Les Prés d’Eugénie in south-west France, ingredients spit-roasted over an open fire include suckling pig stuffed “comme en Castille”. Succulence.
Not every business in Eugénie-les-Bains is run by Maison Guérard. Le Bistrot d’Eugénie , the village café, boldly provides us with classic jambon-beurre (baguette).
The first dinner according to the precepts of Michel Guérard’s Cuisine Minceur (three courses at 635 calories) kicks off with Le Clafoutis de Legumes de Saison.
After seeing Wild Rose with brilliant Jessie Buckley in the title part at Everyman King’s Cross, “Ironed chicken” with polenta, bulgur and dried yogurt sauce at jolly, jumping Coal Office . Fay Maschler’s favourite restaurants of 2018 16 show all Fay Maschler’s favourite restaurants of 2018 1/16 Hām In West Hampstead, where almost every shopfront is a café or restaurant, independently owned Hām — apparently the old English word for home — with its Australian chef with past experience at The Ledbury, the Terroirs group and Salon in Brixton, and its estimable manager Alexandra Caciuc, stands out. Turquoise leather banquettes and a kitchen overlooking the dining room are two striking design features. Topical virtues — thoughtful buying, ingenuity with grains and vegetables — are all saluted. Weekend brunch is a big deal. Mind that pushchair. Daniel Hambury 2/16 Coal Office Coal Office was the first restaurant to open in the King’s Cross Coal Drops Yard development. Chef/entrepreneur Assaf Granit from Jerusalem, who with the Paskin siblings opened Palomar and The Barbary, is instigator of the food and mood, the latter benefiting significantly from the presence of general manager Thasanee Robinson. Adrian Lourie 3/16 Medlar Sometimes it’s salient to go back and see how places you initially admired are faring. Opened in 2011 by chef Joe Mercer Nairne and manager David O’Connor, who both previously worked at Chez Bruce, this dignified Chelsea stalwart powers on introducing sage new ideas to the set-price menus while wisely hanging on to established favourites such as crab ravioli with samphire, brown shrimps, fondue of leeks and bisque sauce and rump of Belted Galloway with Café de Paris snails, stuffed Portobello, shallot purée and béarnaise. Consideration for customers includes a very reasonable £10 corkage at lunchtime for BYO. Adrian Lourie 4/16 Kym’s This Chinese restaurant in Bloomberg Arcade is from chef Andrew Wong, celebrated for his delectable, astonishing, occasionally subversive dim sum at A Wong in Victoria. The new venture, backed by White Rabbit Fund, focuses on Cantonese roast meats, a sophisticated tradition dating back thousands of years. Three Treasure is a plate of crispy pork belly, lacquered soy chicken (amazing) and Iberico pork char sui. The crackling on the belly is a thing of wonder. Order also wild mushroom steamed buns; silken tofu with 100-year old egg; Sichuanese spiced aubergine; Xian City lamb burger; shrimp bao bao — and anything else that takes your fancy. Daniel Hambury/Stella Pictures 5/16 Two Lights I am using Chase Levecky’s Shoreditch restaurant, close to The Clove Club, where he was head chef and backed by that enterprise, to corral a certain type of intuitive, modern, rollicking, woke establishment that has proliferated this year. Bright, Leroy, Cornerstone and St Leonards, all new for 2018, spring to mind. The vibe is young, the wine often natural, the noise lethal. Even young people I know complain that they can’t hear their mobile phones. “Modern American” means dishes like crab on beef fat chips; a katsu sandwich (sine qua non), this one filled with sardine; grouse sausage with coco beans and figs. Some of the sweetest front-of-house in town. Adrian Lourie 6/16 Sabor/Asador Nieves Barragán Mohacho made her mark first at the Hart Brothers’ Fino and then Barrafina. A Basque upbringing informs her cooking in a scintillating manner. In what is now her own show — backed by the redoubtable Sethi siblings — and supported by manager José Etura, she struts her stuff in the bar and tapas bar on the ground floor while upstairs, from a wood-fired oven, pulls dramatically crisp suckling pig and fragrant lamb cutlets. Pulpo á feira, octopus simmered with potatoes in Galician copper pots, is a great way into a meal at those shared tables, as is an empanada gallega, the pastry turnover oozing braised cuttlefish Chris Terry 7/16 Next Door A restaurant attached to a fishmonger’s — the sweetest way of utilising perishable stock — is an obviously prudent idea. Robin Moxon has seized on it for his East Dulwich branch and installed Paul Holmes as chef. The larger fish, ethically sourced in Devon and Cornwall, are served simply prepared to share. It is in the smaller plates that Holmes’s talent and invention shine out. Cod tongues in batter atop a pile of mushy peas in a moat of curry sauce make sly reference to a chippie. Sliced, spiced, roasted celeriac layered with buffalo mozzarella, watercress, pickled shallots, honey and hazelnuts rewards the unimpeachable who even spurn fish. Adrian Lourie 8/16 Rovi The energy of Yotam Ottolenghi must be fuelled by his multicoloured swap shop diet, and in this Fitzrovia restaurant manifestation he is fortunate in the presence of Neil Campbell, previously head chef at Bruno Loubet’s Grain Store, behind the coals. Loubet’s ability to penetrate the soul of vegetables and grains lives on leading to temptation and redemption. A good example is celeriac shawarma — incidentally, also available at Noma — which banishes post-pub associations and is just blithely delicious. Ferments and chili add their kick to many assemblies. Low waste leads to customers paying for vegetable trimmings deep-fried in tempura batter. You can buy the napkins too. 9/16 Parsons Ian Campbell and Will Palmer, owners of the wine bar and restaurant 10 Cases in Covent Garden and the life-saving wine delivery service The Drop — now with its own retail outlet in Drury Lane — run this seafood restaurant, with benefits such as steak tartare and the garlicky steak sandwich famously served to round off fish dinners at Cervejaria in Lisbon. This knowingness applies cunningly throughout the menu, with propositions such as brown crab pissaladière, potted shrimp croquettes and lobster mash. The white-tiled room is small and usually crowded. Love thy neighbour. Good-value wines, plenty served by glass and carafe, are predictably another high point. Daniel Hambury 10/16 Indian Accent Pictures of a small ceramic mug of pumpkin and coconut chorba (soup) served with a diminutive blue cheese-filled naan hurtled around social media when chef Manish Mehrotra came back to London in January to open a branch of Indian Accent in Albemarle Street. The New Delhi original was followed by one in New York and now a sleek, revamped Chor Bizarre (same ownership) showcases his uncannily sure touch in transfiguring Indian culinary traditions into a blossoming from recognisable roots. Breads are superb and the take on Peking duck using ghee-roast lamb, roomali “handkerchief” roti and four chutneys is cheeky and cheering. Black pudding kulcha got a lot of snaps too. 11/16 Sorella Dublin-born chef Robin Gill, who wowed Clapham and the rest of London by opening The Dairy in 2013, has moved sideways to what was previously The Manor and soon upwards to Darby’s at Embassy Gardens tower in Nine Elms. On Gill’s CV is time spent at Don Alfonso 1890 on the Amalfi coast. It underpins the transformation of The Manor into Sorella (sister), which this year earned a Michelin Bib Gourmand. Gill aims to encapsulate “all we love about the Italian attitude to eating and drinking”, which now meet an in-house emphasis on curing, fermenting, bottling, pickling and potatoes. Skillful head chef Dean Parker ensures unerring product sourcing. Adrian Lourie 12/16 Brat Tomos Parry’s Shoreditch restaurant launched this spring on the first floor of a pub that once hosted strippers, above nu-Thai Smoking Goat, has already won various iterations of Restaurant of the Year. On reflection, it is mine too. Softly-spoken Parry, who came to prominence as chef at Kitty Fisher’s, where he cooked over wood, is fuelled by the same power here, notably softly to grill and gild turbot — brat is a colloquial name for that flatfish. Other produce including steak, duck and vegetables benefit from the process. Even toast becomes a minor work of art, especially when carrying smoked cod’s roe on its fingers. Matt Writtle 13/16 Masala Zone Soho After more than four decades in this job I have unsurprisingly made friends in the biz. It is on the whole a friendly industry with more than its fair share of characters. Camellia and Namita Panjabi share the same star signs as Beth and myself so we were destined to be sisters under the skin, obvs. Creators of Chutney Mary, renewers of historic Veeraswamy, their diffusion line is the Masala Zone group. The aim to create and convey the sort of food Indians in India eat at home or in the street is particularly profoundly realised at this first venue in Soho. New dishes are added all the time. Grass doesn’t grow under the feet of these sisters. 14/16 Caractère Formerly Bumpkin, the new inhabitants are anything but. Emily Roux is daughter of Michel Roux Jr, nowadays chef-patron of Le Gavroche. Her husband Diego Ferrari was for three years head chef there. Their combined talents in hospitality have come to Notting Hill, to alight not far from The Ledbury. The menu is divided by traits (their word) namely Curious, Subtle, Delicate, Robust, Strong and Greedy. Overthinking — also apparent in the table furniture — can be forgiven when dishes like celeriac “cacio e pepe” and Acquarello risotto flavoured with almond praline and scribbled with reduced port black crumble are delivered. Spendy. Adrian Lourie 15/16 The French House A snug dining room above a traditional unspoiled pub is a lovesome thing. Here Neil Borthwick follows in the honorable footsteps of Margot and Fergus Henderson and later on Florence Knight. Neil’s passion is for French bourgeois cooking brushed up and beautified by his experience working for Michel Bras in Laguiole. Adrian Lourie 16/16 Oslo Court A favourite of my late husband Reg Gadney, this venerable restaurant on the ground floor of an apartment block in St John’s Wood is where I went with Reg’s daughter Amy after we had collected his ashes. Amy chose duck Montmorency with cherry sauce that Reg claimed was only also ever done at The Connaught. Classic dishes mercifully not meddled with are the backbone of this establishment owned by the Sanchez family currently in charge since 1982. New Yorker staffer Adam Gopnik once correctly observed that “a lot of what tastes like good food is actually good service”. That is right. It is a joy. Daniel Hambury/Stella Pictures 1/16 Hām In West Hampstead, where almost every shopfront is a café or restaurant, independently owned Hām — apparently the old English word for home — with its Australian chef with past experience at The Ledbury, the Terroirs group and Salon in Brixton, and its estimable manager Alexandra Caciuc, stands out. Turquoise leather banquettes and a kitchen overlooking the dining room are two striking design features. Topical virtues — thoughtful buying, ingenuity with grains and vegetables — are all saluted. Weekend brunch is a big deal. Mind that pushchair. Daniel Hambury 2/16 Coal Office Coal Office was the first restaurant to open in the King’s Cross Coal Drops Yard development. Chef/entrepreneur Assaf Granit from Jerusalem, who with the Paskin siblings opened Palomar and The Barbary, is instigator of the food and mood, the latter benefiting significantly from the presence of general manager Thasanee Robinson. Adrian Lourie 3/16 Medlar Sometimes it’s salient to go back and see how places you initially admired are faring. Opened in 2011 by chef Joe Mercer Nairne and manager David O’Connor, who both previously worked at Chez Bruce, this dignified Chelsea stalwart powers on introducing sage new ideas to the set-price menus while wisely hanging on to established favourites such as crab ravioli with samphire, brown shrimps, fondue of leeks and bisque sauce and rump of Belted Galloway with Café de Paris snails, stuffed Portobello, shallot purée and béarnaise. Consideration for customers includes a very reasonable £10 corkage at lunchtime for BYO. Adrian Lourie 4/16 Kym’s This Chinese restaurant in Bloomberg Arcade is from chef Andrew Wong, celebrated for his delectable, astonishing, occasionally subversive dim sum at A Wong in Victoria. The new venture, backed by White Rabbit Fund, focuses on Cantonese roast meats, a sophisticated tradition dating back thousands of years. Three Treasure is a plate of crispy pork belly, lacquered soy chicken (amazing) and Iberico pork char sui. The crackling on the belly is a thing of wonder. Order also wild mushroom steamed buns; silken tofu with 100-year old egg; Sichuanese spiced aubergine; Xian City lamb burger; shrimp bao bao — and anything else that takes your fancy. Daniel Hambury/Stella Pictures 5/16 Two Lights I am using Chase Levecky’s Shoreditch restaurant, close to The Clove Club, where he was head chef and backed by that enterprise, to corral a certain type of intuitive, modern, rollicking, woke establishment that has proliferated this year. Bright, Leroy, Cornerstone and St Leonards, all new for 2018, spring to mind. The vibe is young, the wine often natural, the noise lethal. Even young people I know complain that they can’t hear their mobile phones. “Modern American” means dishes like crab on beef fat chips; a katsu sandwich (sine qua non), this one filled with sardine; grouse sausage with coco beans and figs. Some of the sweetest front-of-house in town. Adrian Lourie 6/16 Sabor/Asador Nieves Barragán Mohacho made her mark first at the Hart Brothers’ Fino and then Barrafina. A Basque upbringing informs her cooking in a scintillating manner. In what is now her own show — backed by the redoubtable Sethi siblings — and supported by manager José Etura, she struts her stuff in the bar and tapas bar on the ground floor while upstairs, from a wood-fired oven, pulls dramatically crisp suckling pig and fragrant lamb cutlets. Pulpo á feira, octopus simmered with potatoes in Galician copper pots, is a great way into a meal at those shared tables, as is an empanada gallega, the pastry turnover oozing braised cuttlefish Chris Terry 7/16 Next Door A restaurant attached to a fishmonger’s — the sweetest way of utilising perishable stock — is an obviously prudent idea. Robin Moxon has seized on it for his East Dulwich branch and installed Paul Holmes as chef. The larger fish, ethically sourced in Devon and Cornwall, are served simply prepared to share. It is in the smaller plates that Holmes’s talent and invention shine out. Cod tongues in batter atop a pile of mushy peas in a moat of curry sauce make sly reference to a chippie. Sliced, spiced, roasted celeriac layered with buffalo mozzarella, watercress, pickled shallots, honey and hazelnuts rewards the unimpeachable who even spurn fish. Adrian Lourie 8/16 Rovi The energy of Yotam Ottolenghi must be fuelled by his multicoloured swap shop diet, and in this Fitzrovia restaurant manifestation he is fortunate in the presence of Neil Campbell, previously head chef at Bruno Loubet’s Grain Store, behind the coals. Loubet’s ability to penetrate the soul of vegetables and grains lives on leading to temptation and redemption. A good example is celeriac shawarma — incidentally, also available at Noma — which banishes post-pub associations and is just blithely delicious. Ferments and chili add their kick to many assemblies. Low waste leads to customers paying for vegetable trimmings deep-fried in tempura batter. You can buy the napkins too. 9/16 Parsons Ian Campbell and Will Palmer, owners of the wine bar and restaurant 10 Cases in Covent Garden and the life-saving wine delivery service The Drop — now with its own retail outlet in Drury Lane — run this seafood restaurant, with benefits such as steak tartare and the garlicky steak sandwich famously served to round off fish dinners at Cervejaria in Lisbon. This knowingness applies cunningly throughout the menu, with propositions such as brown crab pissaladière, potted shrimp croquettes and lobster mash. The white-tiled room is small and usually crowded. Love thy neighbour. Good-value wines, plenty served by glass and carafe, are predictably another high point. Daniel Hambury 10/16 Indian Accent Pictures of a small ceramic mug of pumpkin and coconut chorba (soup) served with a diminutive blue cheese-filled naan hurtled around social media when chef Manish Mehrotra came back to London in January to open a branch of Indian Accent in Albemarle Street. The New Delhi original was followed by one in New York and now a sleek, revamped Chor Bizarre (same ownership) showcases his uncannily sure touch in transfiguring Indian culinary traditions into a blossoming from recognisable roots. Breads are superb and the take on Peking duck using ghee-roast lamb, roomali “handkerchief” roti and four chutneys is cheeky and cheering. Black pudding kulcha got a lot of snaps too. 11/16 Sorella Dublin-born chef Robin Gill, who wowed Clapham and the rest of London by opening The Dairy in 2013, has moved sideways to what was previously The Manor and soon upwards to Darby’s at Embassy Gardens tower in Nine Elms. On Gill’s CV is time spent at Don Alfonso 1890 on the Amalfi coast. It underpins the transformation of The Manor into Sorella (sister), which this year earned a Michelin Bib Gourmand. Gill aims to encapsulate “all we love about the Italian attitude to eating and drinking”, which now meet an in-house emphasis on curing, fermenting, bottling, pickling and potatoes. Skillful head chef Dean Parker ensures unerring product sourcing. Adrian Lourie 12/16 Brat Tomos Parry’s Shoreditch restaurant launched this spring on the first floor of a pub that once hosted strippers, above nu-Thai Smoking Goat, has already won various iterations of Restaurant of the Year. On reflection, it is mine too. Softly-spoken Parry, who came to prominence as chef at Kitty Fisher’s, where he cooked over wood, is fuelled by the same power here, notably softly to grill and gild turbot — brat is a colloquial name for that flatfish. Other produce including steak, duck and vegetables benefit from the process. Even toast becomes a minor work of art, especially when carrying smoked cod’s roe on its fingers. Matt Writtle 13/16 Masala Zone Soho After more than four decades in this job I have unsurprisingly made friends in the biz. It is on the whole a friendly industry with more than its fair share of characters. Camellia and Namita Panjabi share the same star signs as Beth and myself so we were destined to be sisters under the skin, obvs. Creators of Chutney Mary, renewers of historic Veeraswamy, their diffusion line is the Masala Zone group. The aim to create and convey the sort of food Indians in India eat at home or in the street is particularly profoundly realised at this first venue in Soho. New dishes are added all the time. Grass doesn’t grow under the feet of these sisters. 14/16 Caractère Formerly Bumpkin, the new inhabitants are anything but. Emily Roux is daughter of Michel Roux Jr, nowadays chef-patron of Le Gavroche. Her husband Diego Ferrari was for three years head chef there. Their combined talents in hospitality have come to Notting Hill, to alight not far from The Ledbury. The menu is divided by traits (their word) namely Curious, Subtle, Delicate, Robust, Strong and Greedy. Overthinking — also apparent in the table furniture — can be forgiven when dishes like celeriac “cacio e pepe” and Acquarello risotto flavoured with almond praline and scribbled with reduced port black crumble are delivered. Spendy. Adrian Lourie 15/16 The French House A snug dining room above a traditional unspoiled pub is a lovesome thing. Here Neil Borthwick follows in the honorable footsteps of Margot and Fergus Henderson and later on Florence Knight. Neil’s passion is for French bourgeois cooking brushed up and beautified by his experience working for Michel Bras in Laguiole. Adrian Lourie 16/16 Oslo Court A favourite of my late husband Reg Gadney, this venerable restaurant on the ground floor of an apartment block in St John’s Wood is where I went with Reg’s daughter Amy after we had collected his ashes. Amy chose duck Montmorency with cherry sauce that Reg claimed was only also ever done at The Connaught. Classic dishes mercifully not meddled with are the backbone of this establishment owned by the Sanchez family currently in charge since 1982. New Yorker staffer Adam Gopnik once correctly observed that “a lot of what tastes like good food is actually good service”. That is right. It is a joy. Daniel Hambury/Stella Pictures

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Quote: : How often do British people cook food in their homes ??
I can see that Takeaways (fast food, Indian, chinese) and dining at pubs is popular in UK.
Readymade meals from super market, like what we call TV dinners – microwaveable is also popular.
Going to restaurants is also popular.
How many times in a week will average British person / family avoid the stuff I mentioned above and cook food at home from the scratch ?? The last survey I saw suggested that the British do actually enjoy cooking, which is perhaps the reason there are so many succesful British cookery programmes on television and so many celebrity British chefs. Whilst a quarter of UK dinners are now either vegetarian or vegan.
Vegetarian and vegan: A quarter of UK dinners have no meat or fish – BBC News
Quote: : Guardian
As the French television station TF1 put it: “They trounced us at Trafalgar. They whipped us at Waterloo. Now the English have scored their ultimate victory: they are better at cooking than us … we, the self-proclaimed kings of nosh.”
The survey, carried out by the French magazine Madame Le Figaro and the BBC’s food magazine Olive, has produced an agony of French soul-searching – and a certain amount of disbelief – over the apparent erosion of the country’s most celebrated heritage.
More than 2,000 French people and nearly 1,350 Britons were asked about their eating and cooking habits. Their answers revealed that 72% of the British cook at home daily, compared with 59% of the French. One British cook in two spends more than 30 minutes preparing a meal while only a quarter of the French spend that long.
Four per cent of the French polled admitted they never cook, four times as many as Britons questioned. While French and British cooks are just as likely to bake a cake or fillet a fish, nearly twice as many British people as French make their own bread.
Official: British are better at cooking than the French | Food | The Guardian
Le crunch: is British cuisine really better than French? – The Telegraph
Top (French) chef Raymond Blanc admits British are best at food – London Evening Standard

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