The Best New London Restaurants, Picked by Top Chefs

The Best New London Restaurants, Picked by Top Chefs

(Bloomberg) — There are so many new restaurants in London, it’s hard to know where to go. The city is home to countless places to eat and dozens of cuisines. But which to choose? We asked leading chefs and restaurateurs, including Gordon Ramsay, Daniel Boulud, Danny Meyer and Yotam Ottolenghi, about their favorites that have opened over the past couple of years—and their favorite dishes, too.
Here are their picks.
Arros QD
Chef Quique Dacosta’s first London restaurant is a hit with fellow Spaniard, Nieves Barragan of Sabor. She loves the care and respect with which he prepares rice dishes, cooking over several different types of wood for just the right flavors. “It is new to London to have someone making paella in the proper way. I don’t even try in my restaurant because I don’t have the equipment. He is a very good chef.” Her favorite dish is the traditional Paella Valenciana, made with rabbit, chicken and garrafo beans.64 Eastcastle Street, Fitzrovia, W1W 8NQ; arrosqd.com
Bancone
This casual restaurant features long counters where you can sit and watch the chefs preparing pasta dishes from across the 21 regions of Italy. Bancone was an immediate hit and is popular with chefs, including Karam Sethi of Brigadiers. The head chef is Louis Korovilas, an alumnus of the smart Locanda Locatelli. “It’s the best pasta in the West End,” Sethi says. “It’s reasonably priced and it is just a knockout neighborhood Italian. The Locatelli pedigree of the chef is very much evident.” Favorite dish? Silk Handkerchiefs, walnut butter and confit egg yolk.39 William IV Street, Covent Garden, WC2N 4DD; bancone.co.uk
Berenjak
This casual Iranian restaurant in Soho is based on the cafes of Tehran. It’s owned by JKS Restaurants, the group behind Brigadiers, Gymkhana and some of the other most successful establishments in London. “It’s brilliant,” says Sat Bains of Restaurant Sat Bains. “I love the buzzy atmosphere and for me, sitting up at the bar and watching the rotating shawarma and fresh flatbreads being prepared is just heavenly. Make sure to order their Baklava Ice-Cream Sandwich and the Chenjeh Kabab.”27 Romilly Street, Soho, W1D 5AL; berenjaklondon.com
Bob Bob Cite
Bob Bob Cite is one of the most glamorous restaurants in the whole of London, occupying a floor of the Cheesegrater. Chef Eric Chavot uses the best ingredients to serve French comfort food that looks as good as it tastes. Italian chef Francesco Mazzei of Radici is a fan. “It’s a beautiful modern setting but the food is down to earth. Eric’s simplicity has a kind of sophistication. It is really difficult to make simple food, and he makes me happy.” Favorite dish? “The French Onion Soup. It is amazing. I would come back just for that.”The Leadenhall Building, 122 Leadenhall Street, City, EC3V 4AB; bobbobcite.com
Brat
Tomos Parry cooks over fire at this Michelin-starred Shoreditch restaurant with Basque influences. New York restaurateur Danny Meyer of Union Square Hospitality Group says: “I have raved and raved about Brat. Loved everything I ate. The wood-grilled cooking is brilliant in every way, and the dining room strikes just the right balance of going out and coming home.” Best dish: Whole Turbot.
Chef Daniel Humm, of New York’s Eleven Madison Park, is another fan. “I love the vibe of the restaurant,” he says. “The service and the wine list are great, too. I’ve pretty much made it a required visit for any one of our team when they are in London. I hope they don’t get sick of us.”2 Redchurch Street, Shoreditch, E1 6JL; bratrestaurant.com
Brigadiers
This Indian restaurant in the financial district focuses on different methods of Indian barbecue, while also offering a wide range of drinks in the bars. There are TV screens for sports, and there’s even a pool table. Chef Andrew Wong’s restaurant Kym’s is nearby and he is a regular at Brigadiers. “It’s lively there without being too boisterous and the food is really good,” he says. “It’s the kind of food I like to eat when I am drinking.” His favorite dishes include a snack of Lotus Root and Puff Chaat.1-5 Bloomberg Arcade, City, EC4N 8AR; brigadierslondon.com
Core by Clare Smyth
Clare Smyth spent 13 years with Gordon Ramsay, where she was the custodian of his three Michelin stars. She has two stars of her own for Core, which opened in Notting Hill in 2017. Ramsay and his wife Tana are both impressed. “I have to say my favorite new restaurant has to be Core by Clare Smyth,” he says. “All the dishes are exquisite but the Potato and Roe, in particular, was mine and Tana’s favourite.”
Other fans include Mark Birchall, whose Moor Hall, in northern England topped the U.K. Top 100 in June. “It’s so great to see a high-quality new restaurant doing something special in London,” Birchall says. “The service is top notch, too.” Other chef fans include London-based Ben Murphy of Launceston Place and Anna Haugh of Myrtle.92 Kensington Park Road, Notting Hill, W11 2PN; corebyclaresmyth.com
Darby’s
Dublin-born chef Robin Gill is popular with the London food crowd, which may explain (in part) the haul off to Vauxhall, near the new U.S. embassy, to visit his latest restaurant. Darby’s is an oyster bar, bakery and grill. Gill says his aim was to create a quintessential local restaurant. It works for Irish-born Anna Haugh of Myrtle. “With his old-school Guinness taps and super high ceilings creating such a relaxing and comfortable dining experience. I want to stay there all day.” She loves the Dooncastle oysters.No. 3 Viaduct Gardens, SW11 7AY; darbys-london.com
Gloria
This French-owned Italian restaurant in East London is a riot of color, with exuberant designs and staff. Be prepared for a long wait to get a table. Chef Jason Atherton of Pollen Street Social is a fan: “I didn’t think I was cool enough for Shoreditch but Gloria is filled with all kinds of people, including families. The decor is absolutely stunning and the food is really good casual Italian. It feels like a special-occasion restaurant but it is affordable.” Favorite dish? La Gran Carbonara, served from inside a wheel of pecorino. Chef Paul Ainsworth of Paul Ainsworth at No. 6 is another fan. “I love it,” he says. “It’s totally bonkers but in the best possible way.”54-56 Great Eastern Street, Shoreditch, EC2A 3QR; bigmammagroup.com
Kyseri
Cypriot chef Selin Kiazim uses her classical training as a springboard in the creation of light and colorful Turkish dishes that are big on flavor at Kyseri. It’s the pick of British chef Pip Lacey of Hicce, who particularly enjoys a dish of Beef and Sour Cherry Manti, yoghurt sauce, tomato-chilli butter and pine nuts. “This dish seriously educated my palate,” she says. “I love new taste sensations. and this is a very clever restaurant, from the use of space through to the extraordinarily delicious flavor combinations on each plate.”64 Grafton Way, Fitzrovia, W1T 5DP; kyseri.co.uk
Margot
This Italian restaurant in Covent Garden is unusual in that it is owned by two maitre d’s—Paulo de Tarso and Nicolas Jaouën—rather than being being chef-led. It’s the pick of New York chef Daniel Boulud of Daniel. “Not only is the restaurant casual and elegant, but there is always the finest quintessential London host, Paulo De Tarso, there to greet you,” he says. His favorite dish is Ravioli al Granchio e Zafferano (crab ravioli with mascarpone, saffron sauce, cherry tomatoes and basil). “All the pastas are fantastic there,” he says.45 Great Queen Street, Covent Garden, WC2B 5AA; margotrestaurant.com
Master Wei
This low-key and simple Xi’an noodle restaurant is a destination for food lovers, including chef Yotam Ottolenghi, known for his several restaurants including Rovi and for cookbooks such as Jerusalem. The chef is a woman, Wei Guirong, whose first London restaurant was Xi’an Impression. “I love Master Wei,” Ottolenghi says. “It’s the intensity of the flavors with all that chili and chili oil and Sichuan peppers. It’s the most remarkable, vibrant cuisine and I didn’t even know it before.” Favorite dish: Boneless Chicken in Ginger Sauce.13 Cosmo Place, Bloomsbury, WC1N 3AP; masterwei.co.uk
Perilla
This low-key neighborhood restaurant on Newington Green is starting to gain attention from high-profile chefs for the quality of Ben Marks’s cooking. Phil Howard of Elystan Street, who held two Michelin stars at the Square, is among the fans. “Every now and then a chef comes along who really has something to say,” he says. “Ben manages to create consistently exciting food that is as stunning to look at as it is exceptional to eat.” He enjoys Organic Greens With Girolles, a herb sauce and goat’s curd. “He has a way with vegetables that is magical.”1-3 Green Lanes, Newington Green, N16 9BS; www.perilladining.co.uk
Sabor
Chef Nieves Barragan, who grew up in Bilbao, serves some of the best Spanish food in the U.K. “It’s one of my favorite places to eat in London,” says Tom Kerridge of the two-Michelin-stars Hand & Flowers. “It’s buzzy and full of incredibly enthusiastic great staff. The tortilla is the best in the whole of Europe.” Favorite dish: Chorizo Tortilla. “Sabor has got to be one of the best restaurants in the capital,” says chef Tom Brown of Cornerstone. “Nieves cooks from the heart, and that’s something I really admire.”35-37 Heddon Street, Mayfair, W1B 4BR; www.saborrestaurants.co.uk
St Leonards
Chefs Jackson Boxer and Andrew Clarke cook over fire at this Hackney restaurant, whose bare tables and walls reflect their focus on simplicity. Dishes come with a minimal number of ingredients and few adornments. It’s the pick of James Knappett of the two-Michelin-star Kitchen Table. “They have a log-burning hearth where they cook everything from whole ducks to monkfish to spider crabs, and their wine list is really special,” he says, picking Diver Scallop, Curry Butter, Pistachio, Lime as his favorite dish.70 Leonard Street, Hackney, EC2A 4QX; stleonards.london
The Sea, The Sea
This new Chelsea establishment is a fishmongers by day and a seafood and Champagne bar by night, led by Portuguese chef Leandro Carreira. It is a favorite of Brat’s Tomos Parry, himself one of the U.K.’s most respected young chefs. “I ate there the other night and I was blown away by the food,” he says. “It was the best meal I’ve had in a while. Everything was very fresh and exciting. It is very clever cooking. I particularly enjoyed the Aged Turbot Crudo With White Asparagus. It was delicious.”174 Pavilion Road, Chelsea, SW1X 0AW; theseathesea.net
Stockwell Continental
This south London establishment is an Italian-inspired cafe, bar, pizzeria restaurant from the folks behind the nearby Canton Arms gastropub. “We knew it was going to be good and it turned out even better then expected,” write Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich of Honey & Co. “It’s the kind of neighborhood restaurant you dream about: Simple food cooked with care and attention, using top ingredients, the kind of food you can eat every day.” Favorite dish: Basil Pesto Pizza.169 S Lambeth Road, Stockwell, SW8 1XW; stockwellcontinental.com
TaTa Eatery
This new venue from Chinese-Portuguese chef couple Zijun Meng and Ana Goncalves started out as a street-food concept and is difficult to classify, but the focus is on katsu sandwiches. “It’s the most interesting place to open in the last couple of years,” says James Lowe of Lyle’s. “I love how they’ve evolved, the addition of the kitchen counter menu and their sandwich place makes them such an interesting crew and something that London really needs.” Favorite dish? The Iberico Pork Katsu Sandwich.152 Old Street, Clerkenwell, EC1V 9BJ; tayer-elementary.com
Richard Vines is Chief Food Critic at Bloomberg. Follow him on Twitter @richardvines and Instagram @richard.vines.
Richard Vines in London at rvines@bloomberg.net
Timothy Coulter “Tim” at tcoulter@bloomberg.net

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Take the Perfect Indian Cafe in Melbourne

Like 3 views Australia has between the utmost diverse cultures in the world. Countless folks across the environment take pleasure in the one of a kind flavor of spicy Indian food. That is why oneself may see just about every and every single Indian restaurant is usually attracted through different nationalities. 1 of the biggest things powering the one of a kind style of Indian foods is the intake of exotic herbs and spices. Just about all the Indian recipes consist of a incorporate of various spices and these types of substances are in all probability toward mature a enormous fan base above them. At this time, taxi nice the Indian places to eat are turning out to be a norm throughout the entire world. Your self can come across at minimum 1 Indian takeaway cafe within just about every heavy town currently. It is legitimate that the Indian delicacies and places to eat are special were being not spread throughout the entire world. However, parallel toward the immediate globalization and the strengthening require for the Indian cuisine, Indian restaurants have turn out to be a every month sight concerning the every month cafes and eateries. With this widespread level of popularity of the Indian eating places, it can be a challenging process in direction of distinguish the easiest restaurant Melbourne between the chill out. No subject if your purpose is in the direction of go for a luxurious evening meal or a easy lunch, there are loads of Indian dining establishments toward provide your need to have. Within just real truth, a person of the most eye-catching attributes of Indian restaurants is that they supply supreme style for a amazingly affordable finances. Environment As the initial step of picking out the directly sort of restaurant, on your own should be clear around the encompassing. As for every the latest trends, choice Indian restaurants include substitute themes. If by yourself plan in direction of carry your children, it is much better towards avoid intimate restaurants. Inside contrary to that, don’t opt for a crowded Indian cafe for a cause together with proposing your fiancé. Thus, generate guaranteed taxi barcelona to cinque terre choose the appropriate setting and tradition. Numerous Indian dining places in Melbourne with their personal topic and embellish the restaurant with Indian society which feels your self Indian traditions. Consequently Atmosphere is always factors each time you are shifting in the direction of pay a visit to any cafe any place. Price tag wide variety It is generally better in direction of incorporate a Great thought around the rates in advance of you go to the place. Having said that, Indian food has a in general reputation to be exceptionally very affordable. Yourself will get best provide, magnificent support and delectable foodstuff inside return for the revenue you shell out. Having said that, be 100% very clear about your spending budget and the charges of the restaurant by yourself wish in the direction of stop by. It will permit yourself in the direction of love a stress-free dining. If on your own favor in the direction of seize a straightforward dinner, there are a good deal of Indian buffets offered throughout the Melbourne Place for even fewer cost. In just truth, such merchants are a exceptional course in the direction of get pleasure from a spicy evening meal for a little price. Design and style of products and services on your own can purchase towards well-known restaurants • Acceptable Costs

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Why Sweet Saunf Is So Much In Demand?

Fennel or sweet saunf is one of the most commonly exported spices in India. Fennel has a great indigenous market too, and it is one of the most common spices found in the kitchen of almost every Indian household. Fennel is not only used in cooking to add taste, but it also has nutritional and medicinal value. Sweet saunf is also consumed raw after meals to aid digestion or even as a mouth freshener. Fennel is an herb whose bulb, leaves, and seeds are all edible. It is a very common kitchen plant found in India, and it is used as a culinary spice in cuisines all around the world. Sweet saunf exporters provide a constant supply of fennel to the overseas market. What are the different qualities that make sweet saunf a much sought after spice? Let us look at the benefits of fennel in detail. Nutritional value Saunf has great nutritional value and is, for this reason, consumed daily by a lot of people. Fennel is a rich source of potassium. It has almost no fat and some protein and carbohydrate in it. The mineral richness of saunf can be paralleled by few. It is rich in sodium, iron, molybdenum, manganese, folate, copper, phosphorus, and calcium. Fennel seeds are also highly rich in pantothenic acid and niacin. Niacin or vitamin B3 is highly useful as it helps reduce cholesterol in the body, boosts the brain function, prevents heart diseases and can be used to successfully treat type-1diabetes. Saunf also has adequate amounts of vitamin C, a vitamin which helps prevent a situation of the gums known as scurvy. Health Benefits Now that we know the minerals and vitamins present in fennel let us look at the health benefits that keep sweet saunf suppliers busy all year round. 1. Prevention of Anaemia: Saunf is rich in iron, and it also contains the amino acid histidine. Together, they help in the production of haemoglobin within the body and thus helps reduce the chances of a person becoming anaemic. 2. Helps in Digestion and Reduces Flatulence: Components in fennel seeds stimulate the secretion of digestive juices that aid digestion. In other words, saunf helps digest food better and prevents gas from building up inside your stomach and, in turn, prevent flatulence. 3. Serves as an Antacid: This benefit is an extension of the role saunf plays in digestion. Saunf is basic. The alkaline nature of fennel neutralises any acid build up within the stomach and prevents acidity. Many people consume saunf after a meal to prevent acidity and for better digestion. 4. Helps in Body Functions of Women: Fennel plays a very useful role for women, especially those who face problems due to irregular menses. Fennel can induce menstrual flow in women. Saunf can also help lactating mothers to stimulate mil secretion. The manifold advantages of sweet saunf make it a highly useful consumable item. Spice exporters usually delivered raw as well as processed fennel to almost all parts of the world.

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Here is my interview with Rowena Rede

My name is Rowena Rede and I’m 34 years young.
Fiona: Where are you from?
I grew up in Kentucky (USA) and currently live in West Virginia (USA). I have family in both states so I split my time pretty equally between the two.
Fiona: A little about your self (ie, your education, family life, etc.).
Before becoming a full-time writer, I attended Marshall University majoring in History with the aim to become a teacher, while I loved studying, I realized pretty quickly that a career in education wasn’t right for me. I then transitioned to a nursing field and worked as a Surgical Technician and then as a Veterinary Technician.
I’m married to my high school sweetheart and have two little daughters. When I’m not writing, I’m chasing them and running our small farm.
Fiona: Tell us your latest news.
My first published story will be out in August! It’s a collaborative short story and I couldn’t be more excited. The character I created for that story will be getting his own series this autumn.
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I’ve always been interested in writing. As a child, I often locked myself in my room and filled notebooks front to back with stories. I was more obsessed with television writing then and even tried to write my own soap opera once! As a ten-year-old, I found that particular task to be a little out of my skill set at the time.
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
Actually, right now. I’m giving my first interview with you, Ms. Fiona, so now I feel like I’ve accomplished something.
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
I’ve started and stopped so many books, but this one came about because of my love of the tv show Supernatural and all things involving mystery and suspense. My husband is also the inspiration for the main character (Thatcher) in my latest book and the series that will be coming out in the future.
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Thatcher has a sense of humor and subsequently, when he forms his agency, he realizes if he uses the first initial of all his business partner’s last names it spells out TMI as in, “That’s really TMI, and inappropriate to tell someone.” It’s a lame joke, but he finds it amusing and so do I so my series is subtitled, TMI,Inc
I’m a pantster. I have tried outlining and I find when I do that, I lose interest in the story. Being a pantster keeps it exciting. I find that the downside to this method is that you get stuck frequently but I’m always amused at what I come up with.
My books are completely fiction, especially since they involve monsters, ghosts, and supernatural powers. My characters’ personalities’ are loosely based on people I know.
No, I don’t have to travel, but that doesn’t mean I don’t want to. I would love to be able to go on location and write my stories.
Fiona: Who designed the covers?
For The Michigan Dogman Files, Derek Borne, my co-author designed the cover. My TMI series is being designed by Molly Phipps at We Got You Covered.
Probably the idea of Chosen Family being just as valid as a biological family. My mother and grandmothers have always been a great example of loving your friends just as much as you would love your biological relatives. Family is what you make of it, or to quote the character Bobby Singer from Supernatural, “Family Don’t End In Blood.”
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest? Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?
Onley James is an m/m romance writer who really got me interested in reading romance novels again. I also really love Christine Pope, Stacey Rourke, and Kate Danley as writers of my genre (Urban Fantasy and Paranormal) They always have strong female characters who hold their own against the monsters in their worlds.
Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.
There are so many! Derek Borne, a fellow author, is responsible for my debut so he definitely gets kudos for that. My writing tribe as a whole is so supportive though. I love them all.
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Yes, it’s an unpredictable career, but I put just as much work into it as I did my regular 9-5 jobs.
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
I would have written it sooner!
Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?
Yes, I learned that I’m not the only writer out there that has self-doubt when it comes to their book babies.
Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?
I have three main characters so I would want Chris Evans to play Thatcher, Cheyanne Jackson to play Ison, and Demi Lovato to play Maya.
Fiona: Any advice for other writers?
Find your core support group to help you when through when you have self-doubts. People who will give you late night pep talks and send you random pictures of shady locations in their cities because you needed it for research, and those friends that absolutely don’t think your story ideas are banannas.
Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?
Thank you for EVERYTHING! You all have made my lifelong dream a reality.
Fiona: What book are you reading now?
For Lenova by Ruth Juliano
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder was the first one I remember but I probably read something before that, I was always reading something.
Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?
I love absurd comedy and pretty much any meme you throw at me. I cry at every Disney film.
Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?
Just one? Oh wow, it’s a toss between Daniel Levy or Misha Collins! I love them both onscreen and offscreen. They both seem like amazing and kind people. Misha is so philanthropic which I also admire.
Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?
I’m a pop culture junkie. I want to know what’s going on with everyone everywhere in all possible ways. I’m constantly watching tv, movies, reading magazines, and on twitter trying to keep up.
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I love action films, horror, paranormal, suspense, and absurdist comedies. Schitt’s Creek, Supernatural, Good Omens, Stranger Things, and anything Marvelrelated.
Fiona: Favorite foods, colors, music?
I absolutely love Indian and Asian cuisine. The spicier the better. Black and Purple are my favorite colors, and I love all types of music.
Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?
I would go back to the medical field but I hope I’m always writing.
Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?
With my closest friends and family somewhere special just reminiscing and enjoying each other’s company.
Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?
I’ve never thought about it. I hope I come up with something funny and clever by the time that day comes though.
Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?
I have a website: www.rowenarede.com and you can follow me on Amazon USA :

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The influx of technology and its impact on education in Indian society

education in Indian society , educational institution , eLearning platforms , encyclopaedias , good libraries , great museum , technology
New Delhi, July 12, 2019: If we need an appointment, we use an app on our mobile phones. If we need any house repairs, we book an electrician, a carpenter, a plumber, online. If we are hungry, we call for food using an app-based food delivery service.
Technology has truly transformed the way we live our lives. Unsurprisingly then, the impact of technology then is immense in the sphere of education too, where, be it at home, or at school and educational institution, the integration of digital and other technologies has diametrically changed the learning experience according to the reports published in indiatoday.in .
THE INTERNET At the most basic level, technology has permeated education through the presence and patronage of the internet. The world wide web seems to have ALL the answers to students’ quests for knowledge and information. Gone are the stacks of encyclopaedias that our generation used to covet, and store and refer to with much care and regularity; now, have a question, simply search for the answer, online! Be it teachers at schools or parents at home, anyone who is interacting with students is now readily asking the students to “look it up”, meaning, get online, and search for things on the internet, be it on a phone, a laptop, or on a computer.
SMART CLASS The proliferation of smart-class technologies, where a classroom becomes a ‘connected’ entity, has also dramatically altered the learning experience. Not only does this connected classroom, with access to the internet, a projector and sound capability, allow learners to learn through more immersive and entertaining ways; it has been particularly potent when used in relatively remote/underdeveloped regions where, for instance, students wouldn’t have access to say, a great museum, or good libraries. The smart class and the internet have virtually torn down boundary-limitations by giving access to scores of students, who can now watch videos on their subjects, of their favourite speakers, take virtual tours of places-of-interest, watch lessons & demonstrations on key academic concepts. Until some years back, this would have seemed like fiction, and it is today, in regular practice, increasing the footprint at an alarmingly rapid rate.f we need an appointment, we use an app on our mobile phones. If we need any house repairs, we book an electrician, a carpenter, a plumber, online. If we are hungry, we call for food using an app-based food delivery service.
Technology has truly transformed the way we live our lives. Unsurprisingly then, the impact of technology then is immense in the sphere of education too, where, be it at home, or at school and educational institution, the integration of digital and other technologies has diametrically changed the learning experience.
THE INTERNET At the most basic level, technology has permeated education through the presence and patronage of the internet. The world wide web seems to have ALL the answers to students’ quests for knowledge and information. Gone are the stacks of encyclopaedias that our generation used to covet, and store and refer to with much care and regularity; now, have a question, simply search for the answer, online! Be it teachers at schools or parents at home, anyone who is interacting with students is now readily asking the students to “look it up”, meaning, get online, and search for things on the internet, be it on a phone, a laptop, or on a computer.
LEARNING APPS
The other big development through tech in education is currently underway. A number of app-based learning platforms have come into being. These apps use high quality, curated, academic curriculum-based modules that students can use for self-learning through animation-heavy tutorials. The best part is that these apps are mostly free, at least their basic versions are. They offer a host of learning solutions and modules for learners across the entire school-spectrum. And once a learner has used what they have to offer, most apps can be upgraded to their ‘paid’ premium versions which then even call on renowned educators to hold group, or even one-on-one web-video-call lessons, webinars, where students and educators are united across their platforms for an even more enhanced learning experience and greater exposure. Once again, this works for both the learners, who benefit from access to experts who would have otherwise eluded them; for the educators, it exponentially increases their reach!
APTITUDE TESTING & GUIDANCE
With the mass proliferation of various eLearning services, aptitude testing is thorough, scientific, well-researched, and exhaustive. Today, there are companies that have developed detailed algorithms and software based on which they test learners, identifying not only their core scholastic strengths and weaknesses, but also providing accurate insights and suggestions into categoric career choices, based on their academic as well as co-curricular, and personality parameters.
Matching a holistic assessment of their overall aptitude with real world job options is the precise addition that eLearning platforms have brought to aptitude-testing, which has made it possible for onward generations to make infinitely more informed and robust decisions regarding subject and career choices going forward. This will only increase further in the years to come.
ALTERNATIVE COURSES
Indiatoday.in further added that another huge contribution of technology in education has been giving learners access to courses that aren’t necessarily considered mainstream or one would potentially find hard to get instruction for, from a skill such as a Calligraphy to a Korean cuisine cooking course. While one might have had to be in a cosmopolitan, big urban centre to find instruction on these arguably esoteric fields of learning, thereby denying many learners an education in them; with eLearning now optioning an unimaginable array of online courses, learners can gain an education in pretty much anything they desire. However rare the skill they wish to develop, no matter how niche the program or the subject, chances are that there is an eLearning program for it. This has democratised learning and brought hitherto unapproachable subjects to the doorstep of any learner. In the years to come, this roster of ‘alternative’ courses available online will only increase.
The influx of technology in education is simply undeniable. While there are some who might contend that so much technology has diluted the ‘human’ aspect of learning; I’d tend to think that for all its many advantages, society is better for the presence and increase of technology in education. Of course, as with most anything in life, one has to tread cautiously, and not overuse. The huge strides that have been made in education because of technology though, is simply remarkable.

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Get a taste of the Caribbean in Britain

Get a taste of the Caribbean in Britain Get a taste of the Caribbean in Britain
A multi-cultural melting pot of traditions, cuisines and customs, Britain’s rich cultural diversity is what makes it the place we know and love. Home to people from all over the world, few cultures have had the impact of the country’s Caribbean community, many of whom sailed to Britain more than 70 years ago on HMT Empire Windrush.
If you’re in Britain in June, you can celebrate the ship’s landing and the amazing contribution that the Caribbean community has made to Britain on Windrush Day (June 22), an annual celebration of Caribbean culture and traditions. But with restaurants, carnivals and events on offer all-year round, it’s easy to get a taste of the Caribbean all-year-round in Britain.
Caribbean Food
Roti, curries, patties, ackee and saltfish, Caribbean food is always a good idea! Full of flavour and spice, there are lots of restaurants dedicated to Caribbean cuisine up-and-down the country, ensuring you can always get a taste of the spicier side of island life. London
Fish, Wings & Tings, Brixton
If you’re in the mood for some Caribbean cuisine, head on over to Fish, Wings & Tings in Brixton Village. Known for its bright colours, warm welcome and Caribbean food served by a professional chef from Trinidad, its split menu serves fresh and flavoursome ‘small tings’ and ‘big tings’, while their fritters and roti have both been given rave reviews.
Café Caribbean, Covent Garden
Starting out as a small outlet in Covent Garden, Café Caribbean now brings authentic Jamaican food to Spitalfields market. With curried mutton, oxtail with butter beans and jerk chicken on the menu, this place will fill your belly and put a smile on your face.
Three Little Birds, Clapham and Brixton
Three Little Birds is an ever-popular Jamaica-inspired restaurant and rum bar with spots in both Brixton and Clapham. Fill up on Jamaican-inspired dishes such as honey-jerk chicken wings and callaloo croquettes or get into the Caribbean spirit during happy hour (5-8pm), when classic cocktails are just £5! The north of England
M&M’s Caribbean Spice, Manchester
With 30 years in the business, Chef Mike has cooked for celebrity clientele including the Manchester United team, the Queen and Pavarotti. So if you fancy dining out on top-quality Caribbean food while in Manchester, his restaurant – M&M’s Caribbean Spice – is the place to be. Get stuck into vegetarian dishes including callaloo rice and peas or classic dishes such as ackee and saltfish, for a true taste of the Caribbean in the heart of the city.
Raggas, Liverpool
Family-run restaurant Raggas in Liverpool started on a ‘shoestring budget’ back in 2006, and now offers some of the finest Caribbean food in the north-west! Satisfy your foodie cravings with dishes including jerk king prawns, West Indian-style chicken curry and boneless tilapia fish, plus thirst-quenching pineapple punch.
Maureen’s, Leeds
For traditional Caribbean home-cooked meals and cakes in Leeds, look no further than Maureen’s – a cosy little restaurant with space for just 20 people. Offering both dine in or takeaway, whichever you choose you’ll enjoy some of the most authentic Caribbean food in Britain. Start the day the right way with a traditional Jamaican breakfast of ackee, saltfish, dumplings and hardo bread, savour classic dishes such as jerk wings, fried fish and curried goat, and spice things up with fiery homemade ginger punch.
Caribbean Experiences
Numerous events take place across Britain throughout the year to celebrate Caribbean culture, including one of the world’s largest street festivals – the Notting Hill Carnival. You’ll enjoy revelry, dance and music, plus some of London’s best Caribbean food and drink to boot!
Notting Hill Carnival, London
One of the world’s largest street festivals, the Notting Hill Carnival celebrates Caribbean culture in Britain every August Bank Holiday. Since the first event in 1959, the carnival has continued to grow, with steel bands, street food and dancing at the buzzing J’ouvert street parade all highlights of the three-day festival. A feast of cultural diversity, creativity and the arts, soak up the vibe on Saturday with friends, or enjoy the traditional carnival parade taking place early on Sunday morning (25 August). If you’re travelling with family, the Sunday also includes a Children’s Parade and a host of other family-friendly entertainment. The Notting Hill Grand Finale Parade, and the main event, is on the Bank Holiday Monday, with an array of dancing, street performances, steel bands and music groups all taking part, for the biggest and best carnival experience this side of the Caribbean!
When? 24-26 August
Jerk Jam, Hampshire
Having evolved from a small gathering to a fully-fledged celebration of the Caribbean community, Jerk Jam sees food vendors, artists, DJs and dancers all flocking to Houndhill Farm in Hampshire. Alongside four stages of live music, you can take part in workshops for children, fairground rides and plenty of circus and enjoy arts and magic performers. The centrepiece of the festival is the Jerk-Off BBQ Battle, when chefs from all over the country go head-to-head in a boxing ring, battling it out with authentic jerk pans.
When? 20 July
Caribbean Carnival of Manchester
Since starting in 1972, the Caribbean Carnival of Manchester has celebrated everything about Caribbean culture in the heart of Alexandra Park. Expect to see Caribbean music and dance, as well as theatre, steel bands and an abundance of bright and extravagant costumes. Proceedings start with an early morning J’ouvert street parade before the main carnival procession weaves its way through the crowds, complete with floats, DJs, dance troupes and a host of carnival queens and princesses in the early afternoon. You can also enjoy three stages of music accompanied by a host of food vendors and Soca bands!
When? 10-11 August
Caribbean Music Festival, Liverpool
Dubbed the ‘ultimate Caribbean festival’, why not join in with Liverpool’s celebration of Caribbean culture this summer? With an array of DJs and other artists coming together on Brick Street to showcase their talents, this year you can catch headline acts including Scrappy Sinon, DJ Rockshun, Big Band Tropical Storm, Firebiggz, DJ Rory and Iyah Sample.
When? 17 August

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Opinion: Food is a fluid concept

Twitter Ethel Hoon
“Fusion cuisine” is generally an ugly term in the culinary world. The sense of cultural appropriation behind it opposes the authenticity that chefs strive for. But “fusion” is happening everywhere. Chefs have their stockpile of references gathered from other places that influence how we think and cook, consciously or not.
We forget that food is a fluid concept. Borrowing ingredients and cooking techniques from other cultures is a long-established and universal part of cooking. The iconic German currywurst is in fact made of ingredients derived from other places. Japanese tempura did not originate from the Japanese, but from Portuguese missionaries who came to Japan in the 16th century. And pizza culture in Sweden bears influences from Turkish, Balkan and Afghan immigrants.
1949: The year currywurst was invented in Germany, using ingredients from British soldiers
Singaporean food is also fusion in nature and is an excellent representation of our country with its riotous blend of Chinese, Malay, Indian, Peranakan and Eurasian cultures. Our cuisine definitely deserves more attention on the world stage. Rempah is a great example of how deceptively complex Singaporean cuisine can be. Raw and pungent ingredients such as onion, chilli, garlic and other aromatics and spices are pounded into a paste with a specific texture, then dried in a wok over a flame until the colour of the paste deepens from its bright hue to burgundy brown. This paste develops further as the onion and garlic caramelise, and the sharper pungent flavours mellow and meld together for a product that is rich in depth and ready to be used as a base for curries, braises and sauces. All humble ingredients, but more than the sum of their parts. The trick is in the layering of flavours into one holistic dish that stands on its own.
I have worked in Sweden (at soon-to-be-closed Michelin- starred restaurant Fäviken), Hong Kong, Tokyo and Berlin, and never realised how much technique there was in Chinese food until I started looking at it from a professional standpoint through Hoon’s Chinese . While I cringe a little to say it, Hoon’s Chinese is very much a fusion concept. We serve dishes that mainly focus on Singaporean Chinese cuisine, but reference the locale of where we are cooking. For example, we may use salted trout for salt fish fried rice, or emulsify a salted-egg sauce in the style of a béarnaise, simply because we lack the same kitchen set-up here.
“Chefs have their stockpile of references gathered from other places”
My husband, who is from northern Italy and a chef himself, runs Hoon’s Chinese with me, and we see it as a way to share our love for Singaporean cuisine with people around the world. It is a pop-up kitchen for the city and the world, as well as for us, in equal measure. Illustrations by Kouzou Sakai
issue of SilverKris

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Eating (with a) Local

Lessons in history at El Paragua Lifelong New Mexican Paul Rainbird says Española’s El Paragua is as good as it gets. | Zibby Wilder | 15 hours ago When it comes to some of the most authentic New Mexican food around these parts, you’ll find few who disagree El Parasol is among the best. With six locations in Santa Fe, Los Alamos, Española and Pojoaque, it’s frequently found in SFR’s annual Best of Santa Fe issue, voted so by none other than you. The mothership of the enterprise, El Paragua (603 Santa Cruz Road, Española, 753-3211) , which opened in its current location in 1966, is also considered among the best in the whole of the Southwest. It’s kind of a no-brainer when it comes to traditional New Mexican cuisine. So, when I got an email from a guy named Rainbird telling me I needed to review El Paragua, I was lukewarm on the idea. I mean, everyone already loves it. What more can I say about it that hasn’t already been said? Thankfully, though, he piqued my interest: “At El Paragua you will find a menu that is filled with authentic Southwestern food from 400 years ago. … As a Native American, I appreciate the food they have that is strictly from the pueblos.” I’ve always wondered, beyond the three sisters of corn, beans and squash, what specific New Mexican dishes carry the heaviest pueblo influence. So I trekked up to Española to get some schooling. On a Wednesday afternoon, El Paragua’s front door is opening more with people coming in than leaving, and lines are already forming at El Parasol outside. You can’t help but smile at the design history of the place—a mashup of vintage New Mexico meets alpine ski lodge meets turn-of-the-century mining shack meets old-school pizzeria. “Before we get started, I just have to say, this is the best Southwest food in all of New Mexico,” Rainbird says as we shake hands. “I have travelled the whole state, and it is hands-down the best, from Las Cruces to Chama, Clayton to Gallup.” Paul Rainbird, who hails from San IIdefonso Pueblo, is former director of the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts and former president and CEO of the Southwestern Association for American Indian Arts. Obviously, he knows a lot about a lot, and he’s also a self-proclaimed foodie with fond memories of the smells and tastes from his family’s kitchens. His maternal grandmother was originally from Trinidad (the island, not the Colorado town) and lived in New York, where she learned to cook from all cultures. “Everything from plantains, corn fritters and pizza to curry, pot roast, and a gravy that was so amazing we put it on everything,” Rainbird explains. His paternal grandmother, Rose Gonzales, in addition to being one of New Mexico’s most celebrated potters, was also a star chef in Rainbird’s eyes. “She knew everything about every food in the Southwest,” he says. “My quest in life has always been to find people who cooked as well as she did. And they do that here. … El Paragua doesn’t dumb down their food. It’s truly authentic.” He also relates some of her methods. “Grandma would grind chiles from ristras we had made—on a metate with garlic from the garden—and for breakfast she would toast deer meat in a cast-iron pan on a wood stove, with a little lard, then add the chile pods and we’d put it on eggs,” he tells me. I can almost smell the rich aromas filling their kitchen. These days, Rainbird’s favorite homestyle dishes at El Paragua include chicos, posole, chicharrones and, oh yes, carne adovada. Chicos are an “ancient pueblo process for preserving corn,” Rainbird points out. Dried for storage by slow-roasting, the kernels are rehydrated and slow-cooked, then added to dishes for flavor. Their intensely sweet and smoky flavor turns El Paragua’s pinto beans into something else entirely, and are definitely my favorite pintos on the planet ($11.95 a bowl). Posole, sometimes an overlooked side at many New Mexican restaurants, is light but rich at El Paragua, made so by the addition of chicken. “Posole is like the sister to chicos,” Rainbird says. “We would have it with deer, rabbit or wild birds, and the corn absorbed the flavor of the meat. We also added dried red chile pods for flavor.” Chicharrones, slow-fried cubes of pork fat, specifically fat from between the skin and meat, were a constant source of excitement, or sometimes even great disappointment. “They’re so easy to burn if you’re not paying attention,” Rainbird says with a laugh. “So much work goes into getting the fat off the pig correctly, so if you burn it, everyone’s going to be mad at you.” El Paragua gets this classic dish right. Their chicharrones ($5.25 per side) are airy, crispy, and dissolve in your mouth like porky astronaut ice cream. And the moment you’ve been waiting for: the carne adovada. Traditionally a method of preserving pork, essentially fermenting it in red chile, this dish has become perhaps one of New Mexican cuisine’s best-known. El Paragua’s tender cubes of pork come coated with an intense, smoky sauce of red chile ($5 per side). When I can’t find a word for how refined its flavor is, Rainbird suggests “pure.” It’s an apt descriptor for a flavor, and also for this legendary spot up north.

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5 Best Places for Fine Dining on the Space Coast

5 Best Places for Fine Dining on the Space Coast by SpaceCoast Living – Current Issue , Eat & Drink , SpaceCoast’s Endless Summer
My significant other and I love our staple date night restaurant, but eating at it time and again is making it stale. If you and your partner are in this rut, consider trying the fantastic food and elegant atmosphere of one of the following fine dining options. These 5 restaurants will certainly get you out of your rut and feeling romantic again. Built in 1905, The Mansion was originally known as “The Queen Anne” and served as a home to Nannie McBride Lee and John B. Lee. This historic home served as a hurricane shelter when the storms blew in and garnered fame as the site of Nannie’s famous ice-cream socials. Now, over 100 years later, The Queen Anne has been restored and turned into The Mansion, one of Melbourne’s most beloved restaurants. Located right along the Indian River, The Mansion has a wealth of seating and freshly made meals just for you. You have the option to sit in one of six different locations including the garden or the tavern bar. Along with their plentiful seating and menu options, The Mansion is home to its very own expansive wine cellar and gin closet. The Mansion has any type of alcohol that you could dream up, from chilled wines and champagnes to microbrews and whiskeys. If you are looking for a historic place to have your date night, The Mansion is the perfect spot for you. Visit The Mansion This is the fine dining experience you’ve been waiting for. Djon’s Steak and Lobster House is located right on the ocean in the heart of Melbourne Beach, so you’ll enjoy a picturesque view along with your food. Djon’s has a romantic feel, with beautiful chandeliers and several different sections to sit, including a lovely outside seating area. If you come at nighttime, a pianist accompanies your meal with music. Best known for their melt-in-your-mouth steak and lobster, the food is made fresh daily. Along with the restaurant’s ability to cater to date nights and small celebrations, Djon’s can host up to 200 people. So, you can host a wedding or work event here, too. Visit Djon’s Steak & Lobster House For an upscale experience with a casual feel, The Fat Snook is the place to go. This scratch kitchen specializes in seafood with a Caribbean twist, with offerings such as Caribbean Corn Bread and Pumpkin Grits. While you can partake in a delicious, fresh meal any night, head over on Sunday from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. to try their Sunday Brunch. This fun, local-themed brunch is delightfully boozy, with cocktail names such as “Beach, Please!” and “I Dream of Sangria.” And speaking of local, they partner with local vendors such as Wahoo Coffee Co., Intracoastal Brewing Co., Springer Farms, and others, so you can feel comfortable knowing that the money you spend is going directly back into the community. Visit The Fat Snook Café Margaux is home to quality steak and European cuisine. Located in Cocoa Village, this upscale restaurant is the perfect place to end a long day at the office, celebrate an anniversary or enjoy a first date. The outdoor seating has a bubbling fountain and the feel of a Parisian café, and the indoor section is refined and elegant. Apart from their daily menus, Cafe Margaux also offers a 7-course dinner and wine tasting on the first Friday and Thursday of every month. Each experience features a different vineyard, with wines available for retail purchase following the dinner. With the selection constantly changing, this dinner is worth enjoying more than once. It is also important to note that Cafe Margaux’s dress code is business casual, so keep the restaurant in mind for any special occasion. Visit Café Margaux Though Malabar might be a far drive for most, Yellow Dog Cafe is well worth it. Whether you’re there for lunch or dinner, the food is made from scratch with fresh ingredients. That in mind, Yellow Dog Cafe is perfect for those with food allergies and restrictions. Because their food is made to order, the chefs at Yellow Dog Cafe can adapt your entrée to your particular needs. Like The Mansion, Yellow Dog Cafe has a variety of seating available to guests. You can choose to reserve a table for you and your date in the open kitchen (where you can watch the chefs prepare your meal), on the patio, in the library or in one of the restaurant’s other unique dining rooms. And rest assured, each dining room has a view of the river, ensuring your evening is picture perfect. Visit Yellow Dog Cafe 97

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These Are The 16 Best New Restaurants In America

FlipBoard iStockphoto
“There is no sincerer love than the love of food.” -George Bernard Shaw, Me after ripping a weed pen
You know how you know when you’re really growing up? When an outlandish bar tab makes you feel more shame than an outlandish dinner tab. I’m straddling that line, and every now and then like to treat my lady to a nice feed (as long as she sticks to water and the kid’s menu).
The folks over at EATER have scoured the country to determine a list of the 16 Best New Restaurants in America . The winning eateries consist of all different cuisines, at varying budgets, from all corners of these fine United States. Check them out below!
ADDA Long Island City, New York
What: A Queens restaurant that’s helping to abolish the long-running joke that the best Indian food in New York City is actually in New Jersey.

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