The best Cotswolds restaurants with rooms

The best Cotswolds restaurants with rooms

The best Cotswolds restaurants with rooms
These cotswolds pubs offer pitch-perfect cuisine with chic rooms from which to explore the countryside Mark Ramshaw 10 Apr 2019
There’s no mystery to the Cotswolds’ popularity. England and Wales’ largest designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty boasts green hills and pleasant rolling lands to match those of Devon and Cornwall, but with easier access. Spanning five counties and 800 square miles this land teems with historic towns, honey-stone villages and clued-up tourist attractions. In fact, there’s so much going on that a day trip just doesn’t cut it. A wealth of possibilities exist for overnighters and weekenders of all budgets and tastes, but here we look beyond the usual stuffy hotels, manor houses and country inns to highlight some of the area’s best and most inviting restaurants with rooms. Wild Garlic & Wilder, Nailsworth
Nailsworth is now regarded as something of a foodie haven, in no small part due to the efforts of chef Matt Beardsall, a veteran of Ramsey, Wearing and Hartnett’s restaurants. Food at his Wild Garlic Bistro with Rooms is gloriously unfussy, while a stone’s throw away its sibling Wilder serves up blind tasting menus and matching wine flights for more inquisitive palates. End the night in one of the five Cotswold-chic accommodations, and don’t forget to stock up at the famous Hobbs House Bakery and Williams Food Hall & Fish Market before you head home. Eckington Manor, Eckington/Pershore
It would be easy for Eckington to shamelessly exploit the celebrity appeal of its husband-and-wife chef team, Great British Menu competitor Sue Stinchcombe and Masterchef Professionals winner Mark. Instead, it’s the intricate yet appealing food that takes centre stage in the dining rooms, while the 300-acre farm and 13th century farm buildings deliver an equally tempting feast for the senses. That Mark and Sue also run a much admired cookery school here is just one more reason to stay a night or two… The Wild Rabbit, Kingham
A hop skip and a Hunter welly-clad jump from the Daylesford Farmshop lies the Bamford family’s other labour of a love. The Wild Rabbit does its utmost to exude shabby Cotswold chic, but can’t help but come across like a multi-million dollar facsimile of the real thing. In truth that’s no bad thing, what with an airy conservatory dining space and a kitchen knocking out Instagram-worthy dishes based around ingredients culled from the Daylesford estate. This as very much an ultra-luxe affair, though curiously chef Nathan Eades’ tasting menu represents ridiculous value at £65 for 7 courses. The Rabbit’s 13 rooms are so Sunday Supplement beautiful you might never want to leave, while five cottages in the village offer equally recherché accommodation for more independently-minded groups. Thyme, Southrop
Thyme , aka Southrop Manor Estate, aka ‘that place where Kate Moss celebrated getting hitched’ doesn’t so much sit in its idyllic village home as drape itself all over it. The self-styled ‘country destination’ has evolved over the last decade to encompass a boutique hotel, Farrow & Ball-decked gastro pub (The Swan), cookery school, cocktail bar (named Baa, naturally), spa, and private events barn – all served by 150 acre estate’s own kitchen garden and farm. The Ox Barn is the latest add-on, delivering a slightly more refined version of the British-Italian fare favoured by head chef and owners’ son Charlie Hibbert. More accommodation is also imminent, though even now the choice of rooms and cottages dotted around the village is impressive. No 38: The Park, Cheltenham
Less a restaurant with rooms, more a townhouse into which a boutique restaurant has been sensitively airlifted, No 38 is the quirkiest property in the eclectic portfolio of Julian ‘Superdry’ Dunkerton’s Lucky Onion Group. Originally conceived as a wine, dine and recline hideaway better suited to group bookings, the focus of this 13-room ode to teal paintwork and high end fabrics has shifted since the arrival of Prithvi, an upmarket Indian restaurant that had already garnered its share of awards elsewhere in the city. Also in Cheltenham, the Lucky Onion’s No.131 hotel offers a more formal, though no less hipster-ish playground. The Painswick, Painswick
Pay no head to the painful puffery on The Painswick’s website, with its talk of ‘breaking the rules’ and ‘plating up a sort of contemporary contradiction’. Pretentiousness is thankful absent within the walls of this former vicarage, where both the decor and menu speak of comfort, care and indulgence. Feast on crowd-pleasing dishes gussied up with flourish and wit, or slowly unwind with a spot of afternoon tea. The 16 bedrooms – all muted colours and Victorian embellishments – span five different price brackets, with the most sumptuous – George Suite – sporting a balcony with unfettered South-facing views across the valley. Russell’s of Broadway A quintessential destination in a quintessentially picture postcard town, it’s almost worth eating at Russell’s just for an excuse to bed down for the night. Plump for one of the two top-tier rooms – they feature characterful exposed beams and the kind of bathrooms that cry out for a glasses of bubbly with every dip. Downstairs, the menu from chef George Santos puts just enough of a spin on familiar fish and meat-orientated dishes to keep the taste buds tingling, while the desserts spice things up with savoury notes such as juniper, saffron and parsnip. The Feathered Nest, Nether Westcote Looking to all intents and purposes like a well-polished rambler’s pub, The Feathered Nest is anything but. Head chef Kuba Winkowski has loftier aims and – judging by the artful plating arrangements and proliferation of purees – an eye on a Michelin prize or two. Such ambition inevitably results in a degree of formality, along with vertiginous pricing at odds with the ‘country inn’ tagline – expect to pay £70 for four courses or £90 for six. But approach this as a fine dining experience in sheep’s clothing and you’ll do just fine. Needless to say, the four available rooms are all as pretty as a picture. See also

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Del Monte launches economical spout packs of its mayonnaise spreads!

Del Monte has launched convenient and economical spout packs of its much-loved range of mayonnaise spreads, which will now make it even more convenient, delightful and affordable to add taste to a wide range of food and snacks. With changing lifestyles and an urbanized way of living, Indians are adopting more innovative and novel food options in their diet. Consumers are looking for ready dressings to prepare restaurant quality food at home. Keeping the consumer preference and satisfaction as a primary aim, Del Monte’s much liked tasty and creamy – Eggless Mayo, Tandoori Mayo and Sandwich Spread – will now be available in smart spout packs of 80gms in the price range of Rs 30-35. To help consumers make delicious cuisines at home, these smart packs come with instructions on its usages, printed on their packaging.
The introduction of new smart and convenient packs is yet another offering from Del Monte, which always has kept family’s health and convenience as uppermost on its priority and due to which it has emerged as a top and favourite food brand in a wide range of categories.
“We have always given highest priority to consumer product quality and convenience while making new products. Del Monte has introduced small packings of its much-loved range of mayos to enable a wider set of families to buy its range.” said Mr. Yogesh Bellani, CEO, Del Monte.
Tags: Del Monte Foodies Previous Article MX Player Ups the Ante of Web Series Marketing with MX Original Aafat You Might also Like Light up your Diwali with Del Monte’s Diwali Gift packs MediaInfoline Oct 16

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Marico launches ‘Coco Soul’ India’s finest Vegan Gourmet Products made with superfood coconut

Hot News / LifeStyle | By Team Estrade Marico launches ‘Coco Soul’ India’s finest Vegan Gourmet Products made with superfood coconut
9 th April 2019 : Marico Limited, one of India’s leading FMCG majors has launched a range of Vegan Gourmet products under the brand name ‘Coco Soul’ . The range includes 100% Organic virgin coconut oil, 100% Natural virgin coconut oil and 100% Natural Infused variants of cold pressed virgin coconut oil, and Coco Soul Foods which include Coconut Spreads, Coconut Chips and 100% Organic Coconut Sugar; all made using the Superfood coconut. The organic variants marks Marico’s first foray into the organic products space.
Coco Soul Infused Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil is expertly extracted with a ‘No-Heat Process’ or ‘Cold-pressing process’ which helps preserve vital nutrients, rich aroma and flavor of real coconuts. Being a rich source of medium chain triglycerides (MCT’s), the oils are easy to digest, thus providing an instant boost of energy, aiding digestion and helping weight management and supporting cognition.
Chef Kunal Kapur has expertly curated three infused variants that bring natural flavor and aroma to many cuisines. The Coco Soul Infused Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil – Chilli Oregano is naturally infused with the extract of hot chilli and delectable oregano, which acts as a perfect partner to salads and pastas. The Cinnamon variant is similarly infused with the extract of cinnamon and can be used in baking or as a top-up on shakes and smoothies. Infused with the natural extract of curry leaves and coriander, the Curry Coriander variant is best used to cook Indian dishes for an earthy aroma and palatable taste.
Coco Soul Foods offer a range of products made with simple formulation and without any preservatives or artificial flavors. This includes 100% Organic low Glycemic Index (GI) Coconut Sugar, Coconut Spreads made of 100% natural ingredients without added sugar, high-protein Peanut Coconut Butter and Almond Coconut Butter made in an unsweetened form with 100% natural ingredients and high-fibre Coco Soul Coconut Chips made by only roasting without any frying.
The foods offer a range of flavors or variants to choose from. Coconut Spreads offer Original, Sea Salt and Cacao flavours while Peanut Coconut and Almond Coconut Butters offer crunchy and creamy variants. These can be enjoyed with breads, paranthas, crackers or smoothies.
The Coco Soul Coconut chips are made using 100% natural coconuts sourced from Thailand and are offered in four flavours- Thai Chilli Lime, Caramel, Original and Chocolate. These can be consumed directly as a snack as well as sprinkled on meals.
Speaking on the new launch, Sanjay Mishra, Chief Operating Officer (COO), India Sales & Bangladesh Business, Marico Ltd. said, “With Coco Soul, we have leveraged our heritage and experience with coconut as an ingredient to craft these truly inspiring products. We see an undercurrent of heavy demand for natural products that offer a focus on health. Coco Soul harnesses the benefits inherent in a coconut and brings it to a range of products that aid wellbeing in more ways than one. Given our expertise in the health and wellness domain, we believe coconut as a superfood offers numerous health benefits and is a smart choice of vegan gourmet products for our consumers.”
The Coco Soul Virgin Coconut Oil range is available in 250ml, 500ml, 1 litre bottles along with a 500ml jar. The range starts at Rs.230 and goes up to Rs.749. The range of infused oils is available in a bottle of 250ml and is priced at Rs. 349. Coco Soul Coconut Sugar will be available in the packaging of a 200g Carton priced at Rs. 249 and a 200g Jar priced at Rs. 399. Coco Soul Coconut Spreads are available in 265g Jars priced at Rs. 349, Coco Soul Coconut Chips will be introduced in 4 variants (Swiss Chocolate, Thai Chilli Lime, Caramel and Classic Salted) in 33g pouches at a price of Rs. 99 and the Coco soul Peanut Coconut butter and Coco soul Almond coconut butter spreads are priced at Rs 149 and Rs 549, for the 250g pack of the respectively
While the Coco Soul Food range will be gradually available in stores over the coming months, the Coco Soul Cold Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil and infused oils are available in modern trade stores such as D-Mart, Big Bazaar, Spencers, Godrej Nature’s Basket, Tesco and Foodhall across Mumbai, Pune, Delhi NCR, Bangalore, Hyderabad and Chennai and on major ecommerce platforms such as Amazon, Flipkart and Big Basket. Consumers can also purchase the product on www.cocosoul.in Read more on :

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Fenugreek Powder Market: Growing Consciousness Regarding Health & Healthy Practices to Drive Growth

Fenugreek Powder Market: Growing Consciousness Regarding Health & Healthy Practices to Drive Fenugreek Powder 2026Growing consumer consciousness regarding health and healthy practices have raised the demand for Fenugreek Powder globally. Fenugreek Powder is essentially fenugreek seeds in grinded form. Fenugreek is very common in the Indian subcontinent, where it is known as “methi.” Methi is an herb, scientifically referred to as Trigonella foenum-graecum. Fenugreek Powder contains many nutrients. For instance, one tablespoon of Fenugreek Powder contains 6 grams of carbs, 3 grams of of protein, 3 grams of fiber and 7% of daily required magnesium. Fenugreek Powder is used as a spice in India as well as in other regions of Asia Pacific. Since Fenugreek Powder is derived from a natural source and offers various health benefits, consumers show more interest towards it. Fenugreek Powder is known to increase production of milk in breastfeeding mothers and it controls cholesterol, diabetes and blood sugar levels. Due to its various benefits, Fenugreek Powder is highly utilized in nutraceuticals. Fenugreek Powder supplements are found to be advantageous for boosting testosterones level and libido in men. Due to the presence of lutein, zeaxanthin and lycopene, Fenugreek Powders is also used for treating common cold, flu, gallstones, diarrhea, constipation, high blood pressure, etc. Get PDF //www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=B&rep_id=56877 Huge demand for Fenugreek Powder has been experienced in recent years as consumers, these days, prefer natural health care products. Fenugreek Powder is not only used as a food ingredient and spice but also finds a number of applications in the healthcare industry. Fenugreek Powder is used to increase the production of milk in breastfeeding mothers as Fenugreek Powder is used in numerous dishes to provide aroma and flavor. Along with food, Fenugreek Powder is also used as a natural remedy for hair treatment and is known to control baldness. Fenugreek Powder has been witnessing high demand from cosmetics and personal care products and people use it as a natural remedy to reduce wrinkles. Some of the top most manufacturers and suppliers of Fenugreek Powder are Garlico Industries Limited., P.C. Kannan & Co., Amazon Spices Private Limited, Xi’an Mekeem Cosmetics Co., Ltd., Shaanxi Joryherb Bio-Technology Co., Ltd., Xi’an Lyphar Biotech Co., Ltd. Al Africky Herbs, Avikara foodstuff trading LLC, etc. More and more manufacturers and organic products developers have been showing escalating interest in Fenugreek Powder and thus, its demand from the food and health sector is escalating every year globally. Fenugreek Powder has been used as a condiment since years in the Indian subcontinent as it gives excellent flavor to food. It has also been used in Middle Eastern Cuisine for years now. Increasing food varieties and flavors globally will also give a boost to Fenugreek Powder market globally. Growing health consciousness is increasing the demand for healthcare products across the world. However, many health care products have terrible side-effects. Hence, people are opting herbal or natural products for personal care, i.e. hair treatment. This factor is expected to boost the demand for Fenugreek Powder across the world. # # #

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Looking For Indian Food Catering for Your Party in Melbourne? Boroondara Area – Camberwell | 1215257444

Let Camberwell Curry House cater your wedding, birthday party or any other event! We serve traditional and modern Indian food catering service in Melbourne. If you want to impress your guests with authentic Indian cuisine, look no further than us. Whatever your event may be, we will turn it into a grand experience! Learn more:https://www.camberwellcurryhouse.com.au/catering-services-melbourne/
or call us on (03)

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8 Easy Asian-Style Beef Recipes That Will Impress The Family – The Singapore

If you and your family are beef lovers, here are some ideas to serve up the delicious meat – they are cooked Asian-style so you can surprise and wow everyone at the dining table!
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1. Slow-Cooked Beef Rendang This succulent, slow-cooked beef rendang develops deep, complex spice flavours as it simmers away. It is best served with fragrant basmati rice, or you can accompany it with naan or roti to soak up all the sauce.
Get The Recipe
2. Ginger Beef Hokkien Mee This version of fried Hokkien Mee comes with delicious ginger beef and crunchy snake beans – so yummy! Add lots of chilli if you like to spice up the dish.
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3. Satay Beef Tataki With Crispy Rice Salad Surprise everyone at the table with this creative dish – every spoonful of satay beef tataki with crispy rice salad is a burst of flavour with an added crunch.
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4. Spiced Garlic Beef Stir-Fry Ready in minutes, whipping up this delicious spiced garlic beef stir-fry is really easy with this simple recipe.
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5. Serangoon Garden Roti John The Serangoon Garden Roti John was made famous in 1976 by food seller Mr Shukor, who used to sell it at the now-demolished Taman Serasi Food Centre. The business then moved to Serangoon Gardens and closed down in 2010. This recipe will show you how to make roti john inspired by the original.
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6. Chickpea Mince Curry When you’re craving a hearty homemade Indian dish, cook up this easy but gorgeous chickpea and mince curry.
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7. Green Beef Curry The Green Beef Curry is a staple in Thai cuisine and for good reason. Spicy, coconut-y and with a fish sauce umami, this makes a comforting meal with rice.
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8. Thai BBQ Beef Salad If you are bored of the usual western salads, how about about one with Asian spices? This one has beef steaks marinated with Thai red curry paste for a moreish dish.
Get The Recipe

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India – Food

Mysore Bananas
Indian cuisine is almost ridiculously diverse. Dishes and flavourings are intensely regional, sometimes aligning with state borders, but at other times following geographical similarities & boundaries. There is a wealth of information available on Indian food, ranging from the generic to the forensically foodie focused. This post is intended to give a bit of a broad sweep overview, and point out some particularly interesting dishes & variations I’ve come across. Note I have a particular soft spot for South Indian food in all it’s forms, a set of different cuisines that is much harder to come across outside of India, though more influential on other Asian & S.E. Asian, even African cuisines, than North Indian or Mughal cooking. Regional diversity and names.
Some Indian dishes have spread across India and are on the menu or readily available no matter where you are. Tandoor dishes, dosais, various saag preparations, particularly saag paneer, puris, and dahl makhani, are examples that are found from North to South. However some dishes have the same name but markedly change their character from place to place. A simple example is the paratha (or parrotta). In Bengal it may be a relatively small thick disc of bread, usually stuffed. From Delhi to Rajahstan it is a layered, broad, relatively thin bread, either plain or stuffed. Round Kumbakonam in Tamil Nadu, it appears as a rich flaky bread, clearly the ancestor of the Malaysian roti, usually plain, but sometimes with egg to create something akin to an egg murtabak. Ice Cream Cart, Pondicherry Meals & timings
Outside of some middle class or hotel restaurants it is common for the menu & food choices to change over the course of the day. Breakfast is traditionally relatively small. In the South a choice of dosai, uttapam, idli, vadai, with sambar and a coconut chutney, or pongal, a rice dish (or variants of this). In the North, flat breads – chappatti, paratha, with a simple veg dish, pickle & dhal are the norm. Egg dishes are also popular for breakfast in the North, and nowadays many Indians can’t resist adding some ‘toast butter jam’ to their morning meal. Though I’ve often seen people rounding off such a Westernised breakfast with their familiar Indian choices.
These dishes tend to disappear from menus for lunch, replaced by more substantial options, only to reappear from 4.00 pm on-wards as light evening meals or snacks. There are exceptions to this, but searching for a lunchtime dosai can be a fruitless task. Instead, at lunchtime, thalis or ‘meals’ take centre stage.
Big cities will offer snacking options all day, but it is really from mid afternoon till late that the Indian love of snacks, and street food snacks comes into play. From the nationwide spread of pani puri, samosa, and bhaji, to more substantial & locally specific chaat dishes, and various lightweight crunchy nibbles, street vendors, coffee & tea shops, and local restaurants offer a plethora of these. So it’s no surprise that many Indians don’t eat a large evening meal. This option is the province of fancy restaurant meals, special occasions, or, conversely, the main family meal for poorer households.
Note – Not all Indian food in India is hot, or even spicy. There are plenty of Indians who don’t like to set their mouths afire with chilli – that’s best left for young, drunk and competitive Westerners. Flaky Parathas being made. Egg or Onion additions available. Kumbakonam. Thalis &‘Meals”
A thali is a classic lunch option, and describes the manner of serving food rather than a specific dish. A very common menu listing or signage for a thali restaurant is ‘meals’. I’ve seen more than 30 distinctly regional thalis described, and this is without taking into account just which variations of vegetable dishes may appear on your plate or banana leaf. So, when travelling round India, don’t expect that eating a thali for lunch every day will be monotonous or a chore. More traditional and locally focused thali restaurants will continually top up your thali with more of the dishes you’ve eaten, so by all means play favourites from the various options on your plate knowing you’ll get even more of these. About half the time a thali or a meal is ‘pay up front’ at the cashier when you arrive, collect a docket, take a seat, and it’ll arrive.
Given that a thali is essentially rice, with at least half a dozen side dishes ranging from savoury to sweet, the key decisions are; in the North – to veg or non-veg thali, and in the South – how elaborate a ‘special’ thali do you wish to order. In this case the quantity of each side dish doesn’t change – more & varied options appear, both savoury & sweet.
In the North of India, thalis are available, but just as common are meals, with a core component of a bread variety, dahl, and a flexible number of curries. Rice may or may not appear. Pickles take over from sambar.
As I mentioned I have a soft spot for South Indian thalis, which are invariably veg thalis. One particular favourite variety are Andhra style thalis. Andhra cuisine, originating from the south of Andhra Pradesh (& Teleganna) is renowned as particularly fiery, with a love of chillis. Interestingly a traditional Andhra thali, served on a banana leaf, is eaten, dishes wise, from left to right, finishing with the sweet components. I particularly like the textural component of Andhra thalis – nuts, or fresh crunchy sprouts can feature as an option. Another delicous option are Andhra chillies as a side dish – chillies marinated in curd, sundried, then flash fried. Fiery, smoky & fruity at the same time. Andrha thali restaurants pop up all over India – Mysore has the RRR restaurant, Bangalore has several, etc etc.
Another fascinating thali option is the Odisha thali. Available as veg or non-veg, often with fish, this is both delicious, and a very different array of tastes. A mix of Southern coconut, the Bengali love of slightly bitter flavours, and interesting dahl & grain combos, it’s well worth seeking out if you’re in Odisha. The fancy Odishan restaurant at the Mayfair Lagoon Hotel in Bhubaneswar does a marvellous version. Typical Small Town Hotel. The Espresso Coffee ad is the giveaway they expect Western tourists as well. Bus Station Snacks Some random notes on food
Biryani. A dish with many regional variants, particularly where Islamic kingdoms or the Mughals held sway. The Hyderabadi biryani is a different creature to that of Delhi, much less the Kolkata biryani, with it’s potatoes & egg. That said, one of the most memorable biyanis I’ve had was a chicken biryani at a lunch biryani joint in Alleppey in Kerala. In Mysore, the Royal Orchid Metropole Hotel specialises in delectable rich biryanis, including the rarer vegetarian options for dinner.
Chaat & street snacks . Whether from a mobile street stall, for things like pani puri – puffed fried balls filled with tamarind water & potato or chickpeas; that come in sets of five, to the more substantial offerings of vada pav & pav bhaji – buns with gravy & shed loads of butter – popular in Mumbai & Kolkata, but less so elsewhere, that are served from a fixed stall or small restaurant, there’s a world of snack food. The names often are changed or localised, but the principle’s the same – fast, tasty, usually a riot of flavours – to keep you going. The more substantial chaats, like papdi or papri chaat, a combination of crunchy fried wafers, boiled potato, chickpeas, yoghurt, tamarind chutney & fresh coriander are now appearing on upmarket restaurant menus. I had a delicious modernised version of this papri chaat, snap frozen in liquid nitrogen, at Gabbars Restaurant in Kolkata. Some personal favourites to look out for, apart from the usual dosai, biryani, and curry dishes. Chole Bathura – a football sized puri with a spicy chickpea & tomato sauce. Uttapams – a cousin of idlis & vadai, when you see a menu offering a range of specialised uttapams go for it. Variations can include cashew nut, crispy onion, fenugreek (or methi). Seasonal & local fruit is something else to keep an eye out for. Mangoes are various across the season, and some of the best don’t transport well. Similarly, Mysore is home to a delicious small banana, that grows nowhere else and has PGI status. Christmas Carols outside an Irish Theme Bar in a Bangalore Hotel
Global Indian food . India has always adapted foods from other cultures or places. There are tomatoes, chillies, and thepotato, for starters. Kolkata has a whole branch of Chinese-Indian food, of which the most common example is Chicken Manchurian, found on menus across the country. The globalised world is obvious in contemporary Indian food. There is some great modern Indian contemporary food to be had, particularly in the major cities, and globally aware smaller centres like Pondicherry, Mysore & Pune. Equally, in cities, eating out for many Indians means going to a Lebanese, Italian, health food salad & baguette store, or some other trending cuisine. Indians have taken to their version of pizza like ducks to water, (so long as it has plenty of cheese on it) – even small towns will have a pizza joint. Some trends are inexplicable – for example, the Kolkatans love for Maggi 2 Minute Noodles, even in trendy bars, is something I just don’t get. This doesn’t mean that a generic restaurant, even in hotels, will do a Western style dish well though, even if it’s offered on the menu. In other words, if the menu has Indian options they’ll always be solid to very good. You can’t say the same about their attempts at pasta. Pizza is everywhere, unfortunately A Tea / Coffee Stall at it’s most rudimentary Drinks & Alcohol
Tea & Coffee. India is split roughly north to south re these beverages. Northern India sees chai as the drink of choice at local tea stalls, whereas coffee takes over in Karnataka, Tamil Nadu & Kerala. On the other hand modern coffee shop chains, such as Cafe Coffee Day, are widespread in cities & large towns. Although much more expensive than street-side offerings, these local chains do offer both air conditioning and free wifi which can be useful.
Fruit juices are popular, if often with added sugar. If you’re looking for an alternative to endless waters. then almost everywhere can produce a lfresh lime soda. These come as ‘sweet’ or ‘salt’– the salt version is particularly good for rehydration, and you can often add sugar or salt to taste. An interesting local alternative are the many varieties of Jeera drinks. Jeera (Cummin) drinks come as ready bottled teas & soft drinks, or sometimes made fresh as jeera water.
Alcohol. Alcohol in the form of beer, usually local, of which there are an increasing number of brands, and spirits, again usually local versions & labels, is a tricky subject in India. It depends very much which State you’re in – Gujurat being famously ‘dry’, & recently Bihar has joined the prohibitionist ranks. West Bengal has the most liberal licensing laws, and the fewest ‘dry’ days. Though nationwide there are ‘dry’ days when alcohol cannot be sold or served, each State has their own additional ‘dry’ days. This may apply even in luxury hotels. Watch out for election & vote counting days – sudden bans on alcohol can catch you out with these. It’s frustrating to look at a closed designer bar in a five-star hotel, and think ‘Well, at least it’s stopping me having a beer & rioting about the local election results’. Local beers brands often come in ‘heavy’ forms – these have a much higher alcohol content – for example Haywards 5000 is between 7% to 8% alcohol.
Venues. In general venues serving alcohol correlate to the size of the city. Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore & Kolkata have bars as comfortable, idiosyncratic, stylish, and pleasant as any other country, and in many cases better. Outside the cities your best bet is in the larger hotels. Many have at least two bars – if so, one will almost certainly become a nightclub at some stage of the evening, so drinking there depends on your tolerance for extremely loud music & possibly a cover charge. It’s worth remembering that most State run Tourism hotels have liquor licences, even when nowhere else does, though the quality & service can be hugely variable to say the least. Local drinking dens do exist – the best are good value, with reasonable food and a curious crowd who’ll happily accept the presence of Western couples. The worst are best avoided – you’ll pick this up pretty quickly, and there’s no shame in beating a retreat. If a restaurant has a ‘family’ section, it’s unlikely alcohol will be served there – try the other section.

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Muse Brasserie to open in Cheltenham

Muse Brasserie to open in Cheltenham 9th April 2019 Pictured: Chef Director, Franck-Jean-Pierre Grillet
MUSE BRASSERIE , a new and exciting Modern European Restaurant, will officially open its doors to the public in Cheltenham on May 2nd 2019.
Located at 60 St George’s Place, Muse Brasserie brings together a world of innovative flavours to classic and modern European dishes under the careful eye of award-winning chef director, Franck-Jean-Pierre Grillet.
Muse, which means “inspiration”, is a reflection of Franck’s culinary journey and leads with a classic French theme but also offering so much more. Spices from the Indian subcontinent and Far East will play a big part in adding a subtle twist to those well-known European and Local British favourites.
Carefully selected ingredients from some of the best local producers and farmers, a typical dish on Muse Brasserie’s menu may be a Blood Orange Glazed Duck Breast, with Baby Vegetables and Sweet Potato Mash or a Cod Loin with Bombay Purple Potatoes in a mildly spiced Moilee Sauce.
Business partner to Franck, Limon Rahman, a restaurateur with 15 years’ experience, who has had stints in television programmes such as, Channel 4’s “Tips of the Restaurant Trade” and ITV’s Britain’s Best Dish, said: “Cheltenham is a striking town with beautiful people and surrounded by amazing eateries. Muse Brasserie intends to uphold and exceed expectations to deliver tasty food at very moderate prices. Experimenting, innovating and re-inventing, means cuisines have never been as exciting as they are now.”
Chef Franck has always been an advocate of the Bistronomy revolution and firmly believes that food should be cooked with order, discipline and technique but simultaneously prices should be affordable so as not to be elitist or exclusive. Inspired throughout his illustrious career working in all types of restaurants including a Parisian 2 Michelin starred establishment, it was actually his longstanding friendship with, business partner and continental chef, Pramod Tirungari that inspired him to open his own eatery. The duo have worked together for over a decade, opening up Frank’s eyes to the combination of spices and unique ingredients to classical cooking techniques.
With the belief that perfection is never achieved but ambition and inspiration help to edge just that little closer to the goal, Franck enthused: “Having worked in so many restaurants in France and England, the most satisfying thing for me was to see the contentment in the customers face after a meal. For me, there is nothing more exciting and fulfilling than doing a job that I love. Muse Brasserie will be my first platform to showcase what I have been learning for the past three decades.”
A modern restaurant, Muse Brasserie is ideal for intimate occasions as well as large family or corporate events. So, whether it’s a leisurely lunch, a sophisticated evening dinner, or a flight through the tasting menu, Muse Brasserie is the perfect place to enjoy great food and wine in a wonderful setting.
Follow Muse Brasserie on Facebook @musebrasserie, Instagram musebrasserie and Twitter @musebrasserie for offers, competitions and prizes plus details of how you can secure an invite to their exclusive launch party. For more information or to reserve a table go to www.musebrasserie.com . Post navigation

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Ten Things To Do In Peckham London

Ten Things To Do In Peckham London April 10, 2019 Visits London Guide: Ten Things To Do In Peckham . We’ve moved closer to Peckham, London SE15 , so we’ve been exploring this part of London more. My Ten Things To Do In Peckham List includes Copeland Park , Bussey Building , Peckham Levels , Peckham Rye Park and more. Peckham Salvage Yard Ten Things To Do In Peckham List
10 Things To Do In Peckham
1. Explore Peckham’s cultural quarter at Copeland Park and Bussey Building 2. Meet the creative community in the car park at Peckham Levels 3. Watch an arthouse movie at the Peckhamplex 4. Enjoy the amenities at Peckham Rye Park and Common 5. Stroll along the Surrey Canal Walk 6. Eat, drink and shop along Bellenden Road 7. Dine at one of Peckham’s renowned restaurants 8. Get your caffeine fix at one of Peckham’s cafes 9. Buy bargains at Holdrons Arcade, Rye Lane Market and Sky Shopping City 10. Borrow a book, CD or DVD from Peckham Library Ten Things To Do In Peckham Details 1. Copeland Park and Bussey Building : This former industrial Victorian warehouse, owned by George Gibson Bussey to manufacture sporting goods, is now a place for creativity. You will find a beer garden, rooftop bar, the CLF Art Café, Copeland Gallery and a couple of restaurants here. T he Peckham Salvage Yard by Hackney Flea Market is hosted here a few times throughout the year. Located at 133 Rye Lane SE15 4ST. Copeland Park and Bussey Building 2. Peckham Levels: This disused carpark was transformed to house creative businesses and help the community. You eat street food, watch a gig, play crazy golf, get your hair done or take a yoga class. Try the Wildflower vegan café inside. Located at 95A Rye Lane SE15 4ST. Peckham Levels 3. Peckhamplex : This is a licensed cinema showing a great choice of films from arthouse movies to more high-profile movies. Located at 95a Rye Lane SE15 4ST. Peckhamplex 4. Peckham Rye Park and Common : This park is stunning, it has so many wonderful amenities including the Community Wild Life Garden, Japanese Garden, Bowling Green, Skatepark, Outdoor Gym, Play Area and Café. The Common is a piece of flat land which is perfect for walking your dog or sitting down on the grass to relax. Peckham Rye Park 5. Surrey Canal Walk: This filled in canal runs from behind Peckham library to the entrance of Burgess Park. It covers approximately 1.1km with a walking and cycling path where you can escape urban life and enjoy nature. Surrey Canal Walk 6. Bellenden Road: This is a lovely street with a village vibe going on. Shop for groceries at the General Store. Treat yourself to something adorable at the lifestyle boutique Form SE15. Browse the D.A.Y and Otherwise fashion shops. Buy mid-century modern furniture from Frost. Eat Thai Food at The Begging Bowl. Tuck into contemporary Italian at Artusi. Savour South Indian cuisine at Ganapati. Enjoy a light lunch at Anderson & Co. Check out the specially commissioned street lights while you are there. Bellenden Road 7. Peckham Restaurants: There are many fantastic restaurants located in the area. Try the ones I mentioned above and these … Coal Rooms for charcoal cooked food, head upstairs for the Gosnells Mead Tasting Room which is London’s only Meadery! Levan is great for contemporary European seasonal dishes with natural wines. Pedler dishes up seasonal European food. Kudu features South African inspired food. Peckham Bazaar serves Pan-Balkan Mezze and Grilled meals. For lighter bites try Taco Queen or Mr Bao. For traditional Pie and Mash, it has to be Manze. The Coal Rooms 8. Peckham Cafes: Here are a few to check out – 2 Girls’ Café for vegan and vegetarian food, Petitou Café for cuteness and Brick House Bakery for sourdough bread. 2 Girls’ Cafe 9. Holdrons Arcade, Rye Lane Market and Sky Shopping City: There are plenty of bargain and discount shops in the area plus independents stores selling veg, cooking utensils and afro hair products. Check out Holdrons Arcade, 135A Rye Lane which houses 20 small businesses. Rye Lane Market is at 48 Rye Lane SE15 5BY. Sky Shopping City is at 137-139 Rye Lane SE15 4ST. Peckham Rye Market 10. Peckham Library : I’ve decided to give the library a mention because there aren’t that many left. This one has some great collections including the largest selection of African music CDs in the borough and graphic novels. The building won a Stirling Prize for Architecture in 2000. Located at 122 Peckham Hill Street SE15 5JR. Peckham Library Ten Things To Do In Peckham Information Travel to Peckham via Queens Road Peckham (Overground and Southern Trains) or Peckham Rye (Overground or Southern, Southeastern and Thameslink Trains). This area has many contrasts. Bellenden Road has a village feel while Rye Lane is more urban. It’s certainly an interesting area of London to explore, particularly for the restaurants which are very good. There are also quite a few bars if you want a night out. Try Bar Story or Peckham Springs near Peckham Rye Station, The Social or Rooftop Bar at the Bussey Building. Enjoy your exploration! Author: Homegirl London. Photographs: Homegirl London Ten Things To Do In Peckham London was last modified: April 4th, 2019 by Homegirl London

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Gordon Ramsay’s Great Escape. Reportage Photograpghy, Jonathan Gregson

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Three-star chef Gordon Ramsay’s favourite food is one that he shares with many – curry. But, until now, he’s never been to India see how the real thing is cooked. Accompanied by a film crew, Gordon takes the culinary trip of a lifetime to discover real Indian cuisine and share this collection of more than 100 of his favourite Indian dishes.As you’d expect from a Michelin-starred chef, Gordon brings his eye for perfection and ability to judge flavours perfectly to his exploration of Indian food and shows us how to cook authentic, mouth-watering dishes from all over this huge and varied country. He visits Kerala deep in the South of India to bring us spicy, coconut-based curries and travels to colourful Rajasthan to learn about the creamy, flavourful dishes of the North. Along the way Gordon experiences the hugely different flavours and spices from the different regions and absorbs local cooking styles and traditions.Throughout his culinary journey, Gordon selects the best of the vast array of Indian spices, now readily available in most supermarkets. He shows us how to use these authentically to produce a beautifully flavoured Indian dish. Gordon Ramsay’s Great Escape includes over 100 recipes in the following sections: Everyday, Entertaining, Quick Lunches and Healthy Dishes.Once Gordon shows you how easy it is to put together authentic Indian dishes, you’ll never look back. About the Author
Gordon Ramsay’s radical career change at 17 years old led him to London and to huge success as chef, restaurant-empire-builder and celebrity.Gordon has published nine bestselling recipe books and has starred in the hugely successful television series’ Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares, Hell’s Kitchen and The F Word.In 2006 he was appointed OBE and saw the launch of his New York restaurant.

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