The 100 Best Al Fresco Restaurants in America: OpenTable Releases Its 2019 List

The 100 Best Al Fresco Restaurants in America: OpenTable Releases Its 2019 List

As someone who grew up in Southeast Asia, I feel most at home during summer. It’s not just the steamy weather I love, it’s being able to enjoy activities not possible during the other nine months of the year. To me, that means I can run in Central Park without having to put on ten layers. I can wear shorts every day without people staring at me. And I can stop dining al desko and finally begin eating al fresco. And I’m sure I’m not the only one thrilled about the idea of eating outdoors. To help with that, OpenTable —the popular restaurant reservations system—just released its latest list: 100 Best Al Fresco Restaurants in America .
Lon’s at the Hermosa Inn in Paradise Valley, Arizona offers fresh fare cooked the old-fashioned way—with a twist.
Photo: Lon’s at the Hermosa Inn
And this one is no different from all of the platform’s 100-strong rosters: It’s generated by regular people for regular people. Folks like you and me, who live in the real world. You won’t find four-figure omakase dinners here. There’s an absence of enormous pretense in all these restaurants. There will be no servers pointing out each element of your vertically-plated dish with a pinkie finger. Zero gimmicks and bar tricks will be on offer—just straight up friendly service and good food in reasonable portions, which are really the most important things when dining out. There are also no rankings, no special awards, no titles, and no distinctive mentions. No singular chef, bartender, pastry chef, or restaurateur even gets a “prize.”
The Ivy in West Hollywood is one of Los Angeles’ best dining institutions. It just does everything right: The food, service, and decor. The restaurant even serves you with a glass of welcome Champagne when you check in.
Photo: The Ivy And thank God for that. In the world of food, it seems like fine dining (especially in the Alpha coastal cities) has gone overboard—forgetting that guests just want to feel good, eat well, and not spend an entire paycheck.
“Outdoor dining is synonymous with summer—there’s no better way to soak up a city’s scenery, be it urban vistas or waterfront views, than with an al fresco table at one of this year’s winning restaurants,” Caroline Potter, OpenTable’s chief dining officer, said in a statement. “Diners looking to snag a prime spot can use OpenTable’s Seating Options feature to find the perfect place to celebrate the season.”
La Mar by Gaston Acurio serves Peruvian–inspired cuisine. Think: novo-Andean fare, Asian-Peruvian fusion, and traditional seafood ceviche.
Photo: La Mar by Gaston Acurio This year’s annual Best Al Fresco Restaurants in America is particularly exciting: It features in 19 states and the District Columbia. New to the list are Colorado and Louisiana (with one honoree each) and Washington (with three). California is at the top of the list with 31 restaurants—including The Ivy in West Hollywood, Catch L.A., and Bistro Jeanty in Yountville. Florida and Hawaii come in second with 26 and 10 restaurants, respectively. Arizona is third with eight winning restaurants. New York has four and Ohio has three.
Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, North Carolina, South Carolina, and the District of Columbia also made the cut. It’s also nice that places like Brennan’s (New Orleans) , The Ivy (Los Angeles) , Mon Ami Gabi (Las Vegas) , Tavern on the Green (New York City) , and Parc (Philadelphia) are on the list.
To view the full list, scroll down or click here .
L’Abatros in Cleveland prides itself for its excellent traditional French dishes.
Photo: L’Albatros 100 Best Al Fresco Restaurants in America
Amara at Paraiso (Miami, Florida)
Avra Beverly Hills (Beverly Hills, California)
Beach House Restaurant (Kauai Koloa, Hawaii)
Beachcomber Café, Crystal Cove (Newport Coast)
Bistro Don Giovanni (Napa, California)
Bistro Jeanty (Yountville, California)
Blue Moon Fish Co. (Fort Lauderdale, Florida)
Boat House Waterfront Dining (Tiverton, Rhode Island)
The Boathouse (Lake Buena Vista, Florida)
Boatyard (Fort Lauderdale, Florida)|
Bon Appetit (Dunedin, Florida)
Brennan’s (New Orleans, Louisiana)
Café Monarch (Scottsdale, Arizona)
Campfire (Carlsbad, California)
Campiello, Naples (Naples, Florida)
Carmelo’s Italian Ristorante (Punta Gorda, Florida)
Carrol’s Creek Cafe (Annapolis, Maryland)
Catch L.A (West Hollywood, California)
Cecconi’s Dumbo (Brooklyn, New York)
Chicago Cut Steakhouse (Chicago, Illinois)
Coasterra (San Diego, California)
Columbia Restaurant (Multiple Locations)
Continental Naples (Naples, Florida)
Copley’s on Palm Canyon (Palm Springs, California)
Dry Dock Waterfront Grill (Longboat Key, Florida)
Duke’s Beach House Maui (Lahaina, Hawaii)
Duke’s La Jolla (San Diego, California)
El Chorro (Paradise Valley, Arizona)
El Five (Denver, Colorado)
Farm & Table (Albuquerque, New Mexico)
Farmer’s Table (Boca Raton, Florida)
Farmers Fishers Bakers (Washington, D.C.)
Farmhouse at Rogers Gardens (Corona Del Mar, California)
Fleet Landing Restaurant & Bar (Charleston, South Carolina)
Fleetwood’s On Front St. (Lahaina, Hawaii)
Foreign Cinema (San Francisco, California)
The Front Yard (North Hollywood, California)
Geoffrey’s Restaurant (Malibu, California)
The Girl & The Fig (Sonoma, California)
The Grand Marlin of Pensacola Beach (Pensacola, Florida)
HEXX Kitchen + Bar (Las Vegas, Nevada)
House Without a Key (Honolulu, Hawaii)
Hula Grill Kaanapali (Lahaina, Hawaii)
The Ivy (West Hollywood, California)
Jake’s (Palm Springs, California)
JB’s On The Beach (Deerfield Beach, Florida)
The Keg Steakhouse + Bar (Gilbert, Arizona)
Keoki’s Paradise (Koloa, Hawaii)
Kimo’s Restaurant Maui (Lahaina, Hawaii)
Kyle G’s Prime Seafood (Jensen Beach, Florida)
L’Albatros (Cleveland, Ohio)
La Mar by Gastón Acurio (Miami, Florida)
La Quinta Cliffhouse (La Quinta, California)
Latitudes on Sunset Key (Key West, Florida)
Lavender Bistro (La Quinta, California)
Le Diplomate (Washington D.C.)
Le Vallauris (Palm Springs, California)
Legal Harborside, Floor 1 Restaurant and Market (Boston, Massachusetts)
Lindey’s (Columbus, Ohio)
Lon’s at The Hermosa Inn (Paradise Valley, Arizona)
Louie Bossi Ristorante (Fort Lauderdale, Florida)
Mama’s Fish House (Paia, Hawaii)
Mariposa (Sedona, Arizona)
Mediterrano (Naples, Florida)
The Mill House (Waikapu, Hawaii)
MiraMare (Naples, Florida)
Mon Ami Gabi (Las Vegas, Nevada)
Monkeypod Kitchen (Multiple Locations)
The Mooring Restaurant (Newport, Rhode Island)
Ocean Prime (Tampa, Florida)
Ocean Terrace, George’s at the Cove (San Diego, California)
Olive & Ivy Restaurant & Marketplace (Scottsdale, Arizona)
Ophelia’s on the Bay (Sarasota, Florida)
Pacific Coast Grill (Cardiff-By-The-Sea, California)
Pacifica Seafood Restaurant (Palm Desert, California)
Parc (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Perch L.A (Los Angeles, California)
Piatti (La Jolla, California)
The Pink Door (Seattle, Washington)
Poseidon (Del Mar, California)
The Prado at Balboa Park (San Diego, California)
Preserved Restaurant (St. Augustine, Florida)
Prime: An American Kitchen & Bar (Huntington, New York)
Rats Restaurant, Grounds for Sculpture (Hamilton, New Jersey)
Salt Rock Grill (Indian Shores, Florida)
Sam’s Chowder House (Half Moon Bay, California)
Shooters Waterfront (Fort Lauderdale, Florida)
The Smith, Lincoln Square (New York, New York)
Smith & Wollensky Steakhouse (Miami Beach, Florida)
Spencer’s Restaurant (Palm Springs, California)
Sunset Terrace at Omni Grove Park Inn (Asheville, North Carolina)
Talula’s Garden (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Tavern on the Green (New York, New York)
Tom Hams Lighthouse (San Diego, California)
The Tropicale (Palm Springs, California)
True Food Kitchen (Pasadena, California)
The Twisted Olive (Green, Ohio)
Ulele (Tampa, Florida)
Virtu Honest Craft (Scottsdale, Arizona)
Wildflower (Tucson, Arizona)

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New York Times Crossword Puzzle Answers on June 12th 2019

Welcome to Crossword Puzzle Answers . Our website is dedicated to Crossword Answers. We solve all the clues from publishers such as New York Times, LA Times, USA Today etc. Since you arrived at this particular page you are looking for the answer to New York Times June 12th 2019 Crossword Clues so without wasting your time here are all the solutions.
June 12th 2019 Answers Clue Solution Getting close WARM Having obligations INDEBT Antiquated OLD Making a crossing, maybe ASEA Not so savvy about the ways of the world NAIVER Top of an outfit, for short? CEO 1938 Alfred Hitchcock mystery THELADYVANISHES Air TELEVISE Well-padded coat PARKA Fictional Charles NORA Assert openly PROFESS 1999 Garry Marshall comedy RUNAWAYBRIDE They can be dangerous when split ATOMS Cabin-building items LOGS Bussing on a bus, e.g., for short PDA Scandalous suffix GATE Conveyances on and off base JEEPS Silent type CLAM “___ sells seashells …” SHE List for the forward-thinking AIMS Like some oil and remarks CRUDE 1933 James Whale sci-fi horror film, with “The” INVISIBLEMAN Dutch master who painted “Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window” VERMEER Czech or Pole SLAV Self-evident truth AXIOM Appealing to lascivious desires PRURIENT Amorality … as suggested by 17-, 25- and 41-Across? LACKOFCHARACTER “Rocks” ICE Mathematician John who discovered logarithms NAPIER Stationery shade ECRU The shakes, for short DTS Former friend EXALLY Clog or pump SHOE Light amount? WATT Eponym of the world’s largest tennis stadium ASHE Part of a film archive REEL August, e.g., but not May or June MALENAME One of the Gandhis INDIRA Contradict NAYSAY Cruddy joint DIVE Adán’s mate in la Biblia EVA Jerry’s partner in the frozen food aisle BEN Camera stabilizers TRIPODS Shade in a desert landscape OCHRE Relatives of shallots LEEKS Crepes in Indian cuisine DOSAS Asserts openly AVOWS On base SAFE Top hat, to a magician PROP Fixes wrongly? RIGS Uses for worn-out T-shirts RAGS Geographical entity with six straight sides UTAH Reminder to oneself, perhaps NOTE Grace word BLESS Coveted, as a position PLUM “Anti-art” art movement DADA “Preach!” AMEN Don’t you believe it! JIVE Title meaning “commander” EMIR Cracks CREVICES Sea creature resembling a flower ANEMONE Santa ___, Calif. CLARA “Don’t worry, everything’s fine” IMOK Country that, according to its tourist bureau, has the highest number of museums per capita ISRAEL Not sharp BLURRY Not yet expired, say VALID Spot-on EXACT Chops finely RICES Dr. ___ PHIL Make a lasting impression ETCH Builder of the Domus Aurea NERO Faithful TRUE Copier option FAX Help in filing, maybe CPA Need more help? Visit Crossword Puzzle Solver

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Howdy! You’ve had a lot of responses already, but I will chime in 🙂
Indian: Indian Cuisine, as others have suggested. It’s a low-key location (strip mall), next to an Indian market, and always full of Indians whenever I go. That checks all the boxes for indications of a good ethnic restaurant, and it doesn’t disappoint!
Sushi: There are a lot of sushi restaurants in town and many of them are pretty good but not great. I think the best sushi is at If It Is, but you will pay for it. Dragonfly is probably the most fun venue, but is not good value for money either. For your dollar, Sushi Matsuri is the best value IMO, with Ichiban next. A knock on Ichiban is that for some reason the quality is a lower when ordering takeout than when eating there… not sure why that would be. Finally, for an inexpensive meal, I have to recommend Pokebowl Station on University, which is pretty new… it’s not really sushi or poke, but those bowls are amazing and a good deal. I used to recommend Bento in this spot but Pokebowl Station is A+.
Korean: I LOVE Korean, and I’ll be honest, the Korean in Gainesville is disappointing. Beque Holic is good, and Garlic and Ginger has a great bibimbap, but they are both very overpriced. 2 bibimbap + 1 large beer should not be over $50! If you told me that the Korean restaurants in town were price fixing, I wouldn’t be astonished. On the plus side, this has just pushed me to learn to make bulgogi at home and buy a tabletop grill… totally worth it!
Upscale: Embers is probably the best steakhouse but I like to go to Mark’s Prime because I enjoy downtown and being able to walk nearby for a cocktail before or after dinner. Manuel’s is probably my favorite but someone just told me they’re closing (??). So let me also recommend Afternoon, which is an outstanding brunch place but does dinner service one weekend a month (although perhaps more frequently now?) with a different menu every time. I’ve gone for dinner once and it was the best meal I’ve had in town. Just outstanding chefs.
Chinese: Gator Suyaki. Gator Suyaki!!!
Thai: There’s not an amazing Thai restaurant, but Bangkok Square is pretty darn good. They have two locations now, although I haven’t been to the southern one, so quality might vary. Massaman Curry is the litmus test and theirs was delicious!
Seafood: I really like Wahoo Seafood for the Florida vibe and the broil, but my wife got sick there once so we don’t go anymore. I think Northwest Grill has really great seafood, so check it out. I’ve also had a killer swordfish steak at Emiliano’s, which is a Latin fusion place downtown.
Others: Civilization has my favorite brunch, get the Swamp Eggs. Cilantro Tacos are the best tacos in town; they were a food truck for a long time but opened a physical location in Tioga, with another one coming downtown I believe. One Love Cafe is the best place to eat outside and listen to live music. Karma Cream has great ice cream. It’s a chain but my favorite pizza is at V pizza downtown; however my favorite place to eat pizza is Satchel’s.
Edit: How did I forget Fehrenbacher’s??? Go for lunch on a weekend.

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Poland’s two-faced immigration strategy – POLITICO

Jan Cienski
Vasyl said he first worked as a cook after arriving in 2013 in a dreary bistro in Warsaw’s Old Town. Anna, a trained nurse, found work as a nanny because Poland did not recognize her certification, she said.
Poland’s massive migration numbers, and the warm welcome Ukrainians have received, stands in marked opposition to the anti-migrant electoral campaign that helped bring PiS to power four years ago. The party crushed a coalition of opposition parties with 46 percent of the vote in last month’s European Parliament election, its strongest ever result. Stumping in 2015, PiS head and Poland’s de facto leader, Jarosław Kaczyński, said that “refugees” would “bring in all kinds of parasites, which are not dangerous in their own countries, but which could prove dangerous for the local populations.” Jarosław Kaczyński, leader of Poland’s ruling Law and Justice party | Jakub Kaminski/EPA
Many Polish media outlets, some connected to PiS, also took a harsh anti-migrant line. In 2016, even as Ukrainian migration was roaring, right-wing magazine wSieci featured an infamous story headlined “The Islamic Rape of Europe,” with a cover image showing brown hands gripping a white woman dressed in an EU flag.
Hardly any Muslim refugees, including those fleeing wars in Syria and Yemen, have been resettled in Poland. The Ukrainians migrating to Poland are white Christians. ‘Migrants’ in Warsaw, ‘refugees’ in Brussels
PiS has at times drawn attention to Poland’s surprisingly high migration tally. In 2016, with European governments scrambling for responses to the then-mounting refugee crisis in Greece and Italy, then PiS Prime Minister Beata Szydło claimed Poland could not do more to help, having already done its part by welcoming 1 million Ukrainians.
At the time, Ukraine’s Ambassador to Poland Andriy Deshchytsia rejected the claim , arguing that Ukrainians living in Poland are primarily jobseekers who had not applied for refugee status and did not qualify for refugee-related assistance programs.
“What they’re saying by omission is that ‘We want to admit Ukrainians rather than take people from the Middle East, who the EU is trying to force us to take,’” said Ben Stanley, an associate professor at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Warsaw (SWPS).
Though identified as jobseekers, not refugees, Ukraine’s own political difficulties played an undeniable role in the surge of newcomers. Statistical spikes in Ukrainian migration to Poland appear in parallel with the Euromaidan protests, the 2014 revolution and the war in the eastern region of Donbas. Ukraine’s GDP fell by half between 2013 and 2015, and inflation hovered near 48 percent. Meanwhile, Poland was booming . The ongoing war in Ukraine has driven many people toward Poland | Anatolii Boiko/AFP via Getty Images
“After the Russian invasion, the Ukrainian currency fell,” said Ihor Babenko, a construction worker in Warsaw who came to Poland from the city of Pervomaisk, Ukraine, where he’d worked in his family’s shop. “People stopped coming to buy stuff. Everything became more and more expensive.”
Fewer than 400 Ukrainians were granted asylum status in Poland between 2015 and 2017, according to Eurostat, instead opting for work visas, which were easier to get. Joblessness has fallen in Poland every year since 2014, leaving unskilled jobs vacant as Poles climb the employment ladder. Since 2015, hundreds of thousands of Poles have left to work in other EU countries, especially the U.K. Unsurprisingly, the pace of Ukrainian migration to Poland tracks closely with Poland’s economy catching fire.
According to Stanley of SWPS University, the PiS-led government knows Poland’s economy needs immigrant labor, even if it won’t readily admit it. “They know they will need to bring in immigrants if Poland is to maintain the economic growth it’s been achieving over the last few years,” he said.
The Polish Union of Entrepreneurs and Employers has estimated the country will need 5 million new workers by 2050 if it’s to maintain a recent, torrid pace of economic expansion, which has averaged between 4 percent and 5 percent year-on-year. A poorly kept secret
Even with elections on the horizon this fall, some Polish politicians have started to signal quiet support for immigration. Jerzy Kwieciński, the Polish minister for investment and development, told reporters last year that Poland “already needs foreign workers and in the future we’ll need more and more.”
“If there is a demand on the labor market which Poles are unable or unwilling to meet, we need to take up the challenge so that we maintain our economic growth,” Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said in a 2018 interview with wSieci, the right-wing publication.
A glance around any Polish city suggests that process has already started — and 2019’s newcomers aren’t just Ukranians. It’s become common to see South Asian Uber Eats couriers cycling around Polish cities delivering food. Games of cricket have sprung up in city parks. “The last time I was in Warsaw, I took three Ubers and the drivers were Tunisian, Ukrainian, and Georgian. It’s a huge change, even three years ago this would be unimaginable,” said Tilles, of the Pedagogical University of Kraków.
“There aren’t many jobs for technical people. The service sector is No. 1 in Warsaw” — Ketan Patel, Indian student in Warsaw
Ketan Patel, an Indian student in health care at Vistula University in Warsaw, said he’s had no problems in Poland, despite the country’s anti-immigrant reputation: “People here are very friendly.” Unlike in other European countries, Poland’s sharp rise in immigration has produced little social friction. Anti-migrant protests are rare and when they do occur, crowds are thin.
But Patel, who delivers food as a college job, doubts that he will be able to find work in his field once he’s done with school. “There aren’t many jobs for technical people. The service sector is No. 1 in Warsaw.” He said he’ll likely go back to India after school, but might try to get working papers in Germany.
Ukrainians Vasyl and Anna Setrin, by comparison, are planning to stay. Having left his entry-level job at the bistro, Vasyl is now a chef at a Warsaw restaurant specializing in Mediterranean cuisine. Anna stays at home with their two-year-old son Daniel, born in a Warsaw hospital. Nearly seven years since their arrival, the Setrins both speak Polish and have a community of local friends. They plan to stay, and to raise Daniel in Poland, they say.
Makana Eyre is a freelance journalist based in Paris, France. Martin Goillandeau is a reporter at CNN International in London. Related stories on these topics:

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For me it’s just laziness. If meat became really hard to come by, I wouldn’t mind much I think. So long as we still have lab grown meat and tofu I’d be happy. In general the bar for American/European style vegetarian/vegan cuisine would get so much higher and there would be way more Indian food options which would make my heart sing.

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Barber’s Wire: More dairy beef unlikely to flood the market

Home Barber’s Wire Barber’s Wire: More dairy beef unlikely to flood the market Barber’s Wire: More dairy beef unlikely to flood the market June 12, 2019 Editor Barber’s Wire , In The Office , Meat Export NZ , New Zealand , On Farm , Processing
Meat processors have tried for years to encourage dairy farmers to up their numbers of beef cross calves and either keep them or on-sell to rearers at three months old, notes Allan Barber.
Rearing white face dairy beef calves has long been an option for dairy farmers to generate more income, with rearers looking to buy bull calves to put weight on and sell to bull farmers targeting the US lean beef market. But the lure of higher profits from maximising milk production has until recently made it a relatively unattractive option.
Until recently numbers have remained relatively static, varying only from one year to the next in response to the forecast payout. However, since 2016 Livestock Improvement Corporation (LIC) reports a sharp increase in beef semen sales, as dairy farmers look to reduce bobby calf numbers and increase the rate of genetic gain. Increasingly, as pressure comes on to minimise their environmental footprint, they find diversification into beef a profitable option, because it enables them to focus on the peak producing cows. Greg Hamill, LIC’s genetics business manager, says herd testing information has shown a difference of 160 kg of milk solids per annum from the engine room of the herd, those cows between four and eight years of age, compared with the bottom performing 10-20 percent.
There is an increasing trend to use beef semen over this tail end of the herd as the best option for improving overall milk production, while at the same time contributing to better profit and environmental performance. Beef semen sales contributed six percent of LIC’s total sales in 2016, rising by 17 percent and 13 percent in each of the next two years, and is currently running at nine percent of sales for the 2019 season which, if sustained, will equate to a 50 percent increase in three years. Beef sales are expected to top 400,000 straws this year out of total sales of 4.6 million, with Hereford making up 69 percent, followed by Wagyu (11 percent), Angus and Speckle Park (five percent each).
Apart from a potentially larger cow cull, these statistics suggest at least 100,000 additional beef cattle to sell somewhere around the world which could produce a degree of nervousness, considering all the factors which appear to be against red meat consumption. However, the latest Rabobank Beef Quarterly Review paints a more positive outlook. It suggests greater demand from China, both for traditional cuisine and for the fast increasing number of McDonald’s and other fast food outlets, will ensure continued growth of China’s imports of manufacturing and prime beef. This positive trend is keeping the beef price firm, ensuring strong competition for product.
For instance Chinese importers are currently paying about three percent or four percent more than US buyers, but without China one estimate reckons the price could be anything up to 15% lower than it is. China offers a major advantage for exporters of prime beef, because of its readiness to use a far greater percentage of the carcase, particularly for hotpot chain restaurants and other slow cooking food outlets. The high value steak cuts normally only make up 14 percent of the animal’s value, but the China market provides far greater opportunity to optimise returns across the whole carcase.
China currently takes about 60 percent of New Zealand beef exports which is a far cry from the days when over 50 percent went to the US. I asked AFFCO’s sales and marketing manager, Mark de Lautour who has just returned from China for his assessment whether Chinese demand was a bubble about to burst or sustainable for the foreseeable future. He agrees the unprecedented level of demand has all the hallmarks of a bubble, but doesn’t see it bursting for several years, his reasoning for this confidence being based on three specific factors: population growth, African Swine Flu (ASF), and trade related factors.
The decision to remove the one child policy was brought about by the problem of an ageing population. Although young Chinese in the largest and most expensive cities, such as Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, are reluctant to have more children, the population is forecast to grow exponentially in the smaller cities. As people migrate from the countryside into these second tier centres, where house prices are significantly lower, demand will increase. The major concern of central government in Beijing is to ensure the supply of food and water to satisfy the growing level of consumption.
The impact of ASF is huge; 60 percent of all meat in China is pork and some 400 million pigs have had to be culled, at least 20 percent of the pig population equivalent to a 12 percent reduction in domestic meat supply. The consensus is it will take between three and five years for the number of pigs to recover.
The third factor is a combination of trade issues. China has gone to great lengths to close off the grey channels, primarily Vietnam and Hong Kong, through which large quantities of American beef and Indian buffalo found their way into China. Having successfully closed these channels, central government is highly unlikely to allow them to open up again. On the subject of the US/China trade war, de Lautour says local opinion doesn’t see China making any concessions which could last five more years, if Donald Trump is re-elected.
Forecasts indicate the American market won’t lose its passion for real beef hamburgers any time soon, so there will still be competitive tension (as well as trade war tension) between New Zealand’s two largest markets for beef. This will help to keep prices firm which will enable exporters to continue paying a satisfactory price for livestock. This in turn will encourage dairy farmers, rearers and finishers to maintain the flow of dairy beef.
Allan Barber is a meat industry commentator. He has his own blog Barber’s Meaty Issues and can be contacted by emailing him at . Share this:

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Brit Selling Jhalmuri Outside The Oval Surprises Indian Cricket Fans

Brit Selling Jhalmuri Outside The Oval Surprises Indian Cricket Fans A video of Angus Denoon serving jhalmuri outside the Oval has gone viral online Offbeat | Sanya Jain | Updated: June 12, 2019 10:31 IST Share COMMENTS Angus Denoon served jhalmuri outside the Oval on Sunday.
Indian cricket fans attending the World Cup match on Sunday were surprised to find a British vendor selling jhalmuri outside the Oval in London. During the India vs Australia match, Indian fans in London found the man deftly chopping vegetables and making paper cones to serve the classic Kolkata street food. Of course, in no time at all, he had gone viral on social media, with thousands applauding his love for Indian cuisine. And among the many that gave him a shout-out on Twitter was none other than superstar Amitabh Bachchan.
Jhalmuri is a popular snack that, like its cousin bhelpuri , is made of puffed rice, spices and veggies.
The man was identified by many as Angus Denoon, a British chef who runs the Jhalmuri Express stall in London. Mr Denoon discovered a love for Bengali cuisine during a trip to Kolkata years ago, according to London Street Foodie .
Watch him in action outside the Oval: At Oval yesterday during India v/s Australia Cricket Match.भेल ले लो भाई… — Jasmine Jani ❤️EF (@JaniJasmine) June 11, 2019
Mr Denoon’s jhalmuri stall received a lot of love from Indians on social media. Superstar Amitabh Bachchan praised him with a punny tweet: bhery bhel done ???? https://t.co/xMNpRT8ZCe — Amitabh Bachchan (@SrBachchan) June 11, 2019
Others also joined in to give him a shout-out Woh Plastic ke mugs Pure IndianVillage style — Raje Shivraje (@RSThakkar) June 11, 2019 Smart man, availed the opportunity well! https://t.co/FeWOTjQEHD — Sawera Pasha (@sawerapasha) June 11, 2019
In fact, tweets on him were even curated into a Twitter Moment .
Mr Denoon has been treating Londoners to jhalmuri for about a decade now. Click for more trending news NDTV Beeps – your daily newsletter

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Lol. Ok jokes aside, that was kind of my point. Gator Suyaki is very different from Yummy House. And my assumption is because they’re regionally different. I know Chinese people who only eat at Gator Suyaki and never at Yummy House. I’m going to assume u/MrPizzaMan123 is actually Chinese, and that they don’t like Gator Suyaki. Which kind of proves my point; a lot of Chinese people love GS and feel it’s the only authentic Chinese food. Apparently at least one doesn’t. China is a very large place, and the food varies by region. Sounds like u/MrPizzaMan123 is the one being racist by assuming that there’s one kind of Chinese food, and that he can speak for all Chinese people as far as what Chinese regions have good food. Is u/MrPizzaMan123 Chinese American or are they currently living in China? If the latter, what region? (I don’t actually care, I’m just being rhetorical). Maybe people from your region grew up eating food that is very different from the food in the region in which the owners and chefs of GS grew up, and that’s why you think it isn’t very good.
And yea, they could be Vietnamese or Thai, but based on shear numbers and probability, the likelihood that a lot of them are Chinese is pretty high (and like I said, I know a number of actual (gasp!) Chinese people who love GS, and either eat there or at home.
I can basically say everything I just said about GS about Indian Cuisine. I know plenty of Indians who eat there or at home. I know one Indian who hates it, and she served me food from her region of India. It was nothing like what they serve at IC, and I personally didn’t love it. All about region.
And on a final note: as far as the whole “how do yo know they weren’t Vietnamese or Thai” thing…give me a break. If you’re actually Chinese, you should be able to tell the difference, cause I’m a fucking gringo and I can tell. Thai people look different from Koreans, loot different from Vietnamese, who all look different from Japanese, Chinese, etc. Maybe you’re being racist by pretending they all look the same, or by assuming a white person can’t tell the difference. Can you tell the difference between a Southern Italian and a Northern Italian? An Italian and a Swede? Cause I can, and I’m white, and that’s fine. If all we white people look the same, who’s the racist?

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I’d avoid eating at the Farmer’s Market (which is separate from the Grove ). I worked at the Grove (definitely AVOID all the restaurants at the Grove) and found the food to be subpar and a tourist trap at both the Farmer’s Market and the Grove itself. The only decent place to eat was Pampas Grill and Blue Ribbon Sushi is good but (I ate there a lot…business meals). Since you are looking for a bakery, you might want to swing by the Ansel bakery for some pastries.
If you are like me (which you should be :P), you like to eat food that you can’t get back in your home town. I’ve never been to Toronto but know there’s a gang of Asians (Chinese) and Indians. So I’d avoid recommending any Chinese or Indian restaurants.
LA excels at Asian food and Latin food (especially Mexican).
I work in DTLA now and eat out quite often. If you are staying in DTLA with no car , walking distance from Fig, I’d hit up Sonoratown and the soon to be opened Tacos 1986 (which is THE best taqueria in LA hands down but a bit more pricey). Guerilla Tacos is a modern take on tacos and probably are tacos you can’t get back in Toronto.
Grand Central Market is OK. Nothing you must have, but cool to walk around even though it’s a cluster at lunch time.
Two cuisines that LA excels at is Korean and Thai (and sushi). I’d hit up some spots in K-town like Sun Nong Dan for galbi jiim and Soot Bol Jip for charcoal korean bbq. Hollywood Thai town has a big enclave of Thai restaurants that less white-washed and close to or better than what you can get in Bangkok. I’d hit up Saap Coffee Shop for Boat Noodles (made with blood soup) because you probably don’t have too many places in Toronto where you can get authentic boat noodles and it is one of the best bowls of noodles in LA.
And YUP you are right. Trip Advisor is NOT a good resource if you are going by ratings. Simply because it’s all tourists who are posting and what’s good to them is probably terrible to a true foodie. They don’t know any better.

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Andaz and Indian Cuisine for Indian food

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