Thali Tray might just be the best spot for a pint and some scran in Ouseburn

Thali Tray might just be the best spot for a pint and some scran in Ouseburn

What’s On opinion Thali Tray might just be the best spot for a pint and some scran in Ouseburn We review the new food offering at Arch 2 in Newcastle’s Ouseburn and find that pints, open fire pits and loaded trays of warming Indian food are everything needed on a Friday night Thali Tray Thali Tray in Arch 2, Ouseburn Get the biggest what’s on
With food, it’s so often a case of the simpler, the better, and you couldn’t get much simpler than the concept behind Thali Tray.
Recently opened in Arch 2, Newcastle Brewing’s bar in Ouseburn , it offers a small but perfectly formed selection of thalis: a traditional Indian selection of curries, breads and sides.
Its owners launched as a street food van in July last year, and their new permanent base has quickly gained a reputation (and associated TripAdvisor ranking) as one of the city’s best places for a quick, satisfying meal – so we decided to test it out. So, what’s it like?
There are some restaurants where the food does all the talking, and some where the atmosphere is key. For me, Thali Tray is one of the latter.
Arch 2’s sheltered yard looks beautiful lit up with fairy lights and the flames from the open fires you sit around to eat and drink. Benches and tables made from reclaimed palettes give the place a pleasantly informal feel. Inside, there’s an industrial vibe, with long wooden tables, exposed bulbs and, on the Saturday night when we visit, a very convivial atmsophere. It’s the sort of place I instantly want to spend a lot of time.
It all feels distinctly ‘cool’ – the sort of place that’s very at home on Instagram – while the food and drinks stay affordable enough that it doesn’t strike you as pretentious or annoying. The outdoor seating area at Thali Tray, featuring several open fire pits What are you drinking?
As you might well expect from a joint venture with a brewery, there’s a fine selection of beers on tap. Newcastle Brewing’s craft beers are made right there, a fair selection of IPAs, pale ales, and some slightly more unusual brews. Other breweries get a look-in too, and if what you want to drink comes in a pint or a half, there’s plenty to choose from. I enjoyed the eminently drinkable Newcastle IPA, and my companion’s pint of clean, refreshing Yellow Cab Lager washed down his curry perfectly.
There are, of course, wines, spirits and ciders to be had too: this is a fairly small place, but it’s stocked like a proper pub. You could absolutely just head down here for a drink, especially if you were planning an evening out in Ouseburn – though if you could resist ordering at least one of the taster dishes, you’re a stronger person than I. Thali Tray starters: Onion bhaji (left), Bombay potato wedges (back), chicken tikka skewer and pannner tikka skewer How is the food?
The menu here is pretty simple, and you’re unlikely to be overwhelmed by choice. Alongside a few lighter bites, you get the choice between three different thalis – metal trays loaded with everything you need for a varied Indian meal.
In this case, each tray comes with rice, pickles, onions, an interesting skewer of some kind of meat substitute (I couldn’t catch a waiter to check, but it tasted like seitan to me), your choice of bread and two curries, all at a cost of between £8 and £9.
Gluttons – I mean, dedicated and thorough reviewers – that we are, we opt to try all four of the ‘taster’ dishes before moving on to our main tray (£3.50-£4.50). These all come out pretty quickly, and pretty much at once, which I’m all in favour of (with informal dining like this, there’s really no need to hold on to food once it’s cooked to create an artificial first and second course.)
Of the tasters, chicken tikka skewer is the least remarkable: good, moist, flavourful chicken, but I feel like I could get something similar at almost any Indian restaurant in the UK. The panner skewer is a step up – the same gentle, smoky spice rub on the outside, but for me, that flavour went better with the soft, salty cheese, which had an absolutely perfect texture. Punjabi thali with puri
Bombay potato wedges were crisp, fluffy inside and coated in a generous measure of warming spice, but the true winner was the ‘blooming’ onion bhaji. Like no bhaji I’ve ever seen before, it looked like the best part of an entire onion, teased apart to create ‘petals’ that, yes, sort of looked like a flower. This was coated in the most wonderfully light, crisp batter I’ve ever tasted, managing to pack an impressive punch of flavour into the delicate, thin layer of coating. The onion itself was soft and sweet – the way you want the onions that smell so delicious frying in burger vans at fairs to taste (they never quite do taste as good as you think they will but this, this bhaji was it.)
The thalis themselves are a profoundly satisfying way to eat. Perched on your lap in a sort of metal version of those trays you got your primary school dinner on, you get a big, warming pile of comfort food – with plenty of carbs to soak up whatever you’re drinking, and a fun variety of dishes. I have neither the authority nor the inclination to judge the ‘authenticity’ of the food (as far as I’m concerned, if it tastes good that’s all that matters) but the chef says he trained in India, and the curry is much more like traditional Indian fare, from across the county, than the UK takeaway version of that cuisine.
The curries all tasted rich and complex, some with a solid hit of chili (in the words of one of my friends: “My mouth is on fire – but I can’t stop eating.”) Highlights included Kerala beef – wonderfully soft meat accessorised with a hint of coconut – and paneer karahi, the hottest dish we tasted, strong green chili marrying perfectly with rich tomato and soft cheese. Takka daal was a good example the lentil dish that’s long been a favourite of mine, with a pleasant bite to the lentils and suffused with an aromatic flavour of corriander. A special mention, too, for the gorgeous, sour hot lime pickle adorning the corner of each tray.
The skewer is the only bit I think might not be to everyone’s taste. I quite like that weird, slightly chewy texture of not-quite-meat, but I know not everyone is with me there. Keralan thali with onion seed naan
There’s plenty here for vegetarians, vegans and meat eaters alike to enjoy, which is always a bonus. So, should I pay Thali Tray a visit?
It’s a resounding ‘yes’ from me.
The meal was pretty good value – four of us ate gluttonously for £50.99 (we bought drinks separately). That even included 99p towards a carbon offsetting scheme, planting trees to make up for transporting ingredients from across the world. Somehow I don’t think this means I had a carbon neutral meal, but I applaud the effort.
And I think I’ve found my new favourite spot in Ouseburn for a pint and a bite to eat. I’m not saying this is the best food in the area. There’s plenty of competition for that label (special mentions for knock-out pub food in The Ship and a top-notch brunch at Ernest.)
What I am saying is that if you’re looking to sit around with a few mates, a few drinks and some enjoyable food I can’t think of many nicer places to do so. Key information

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Taste Of Chicago To Feature Dozens Of New Eateries

Taste Of Chicago To Feature Dozens Of New Eateries Marley Arechiga April 25, 2019 G-Jun Yam/Associated Press People fill Columbus Ave. while attending the Taste of Chicago to browse local food in Chicago’s Grant Park on July 6, 2017. The list of vendors for this year’s food festival was released Thursday.
Taste of Chicago will be in its 39th year this summer, but the city hopes to keep the food extravaganza fresh and tasty with 37 new vendors. More content below this sponsor message
Newcomers announced Thursday will include 90 Miles Cuban Café, Hakka Bakka Indian Kati Rolls, Luella’s Gospel Bird, Pink Taco and Whadda Jerk.
Eighty-two eateries will be serving their specialties at Taste from July 10-14 in Grant Park.
The vendors will include 24 pop-ups and 17 food trucks.
The cuisines will span barbecue, Brazilian, Chinese, Jamaican and Thai, among many others.
Admission to Taste is free, but tickets for food and beverages must be purchased in strips of 14 tickets for $10. Stay up-to-date with the latest news, stories and insider events. Please enter a valid email address Oops, something went wrong! Sign Up Try Again You’ve signed up to receive emails. Please check your email for a welcome confirmation.
The food fest also will continue its nightly concerts at the Petrillo Music Shell along with local artists at the Goose Island Stage. The music and entertainment lineup will be announced next month.
Marley Arechiga is a news intern for WBEZ. Follow her on Twitter at @marleyarechiga . Stay up-to-date with the latest news, stories and insider events. Please enter a valid email address Oops, something went wrong! Sign Up You’ve signed up to receive emails. Please check your email for a welcome confirmation. Related Stories

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Singapore Travel Guide: An Inside Look at the Surreal Garden City

Singapore Travel Guide: An Inside Look at the Surreal Garden City By – April 24, 2019
An eclectic blend of Chinese, Malaysian, Indian and English cultures and one of the wealthiest cities in Southeast Asia—there’s no place in the world quite like Singapore.
I was lucky enough to visit Singapore just a few months after the blockbuster movie “Crazy Rich Asians” was released and explore some of the locations where the film was shot! It was even better than I imagined it. Honestly, as breathtaking as the scenes in the movie are, they definitely do not do Singapore’s beauty enough justice.
While I was only in Singapore for four days, I was able to explore quite a bit during my time there.
With that said, here are all of my favorite spots in Singapore! 1. Supertree Grove at Gardens by the Bay
One of Singapore’s most iconic landmarks, it’s no surprise the Supertree Grove at Gardens by the Bay tops almost every Singapore guide. The surreal futuristic green oasis in the heart of the city will make you feel like you just stepped into an “Avatar” movie. The Supertree Grove consists of 18 “supertrees” that actually act like vertical gardens that supplement lush tropical greenery. Unlike anything you’ve ever seen before, the massive tree-like structures are so high-tech, they actually function like real trees that can absorb and store water, photosynthesize, and support other green life. I also highly recommend stopping by at night to see the supertrees lit up in stunning colors—you’ll honestly have SUCH a hard time remembering you aren’t actually in an “Avatar” movie. This is also where the larger-than-life reception scenes were shot in “Crazy Rich Asians.” I’m sure all of us South Asians dream of wedding settings like this one too, right? 2. Cloud Forest at Gardens by the Bay
The Cloud Forest boasts the world’s largest indoor waterfall and is home to some of the lush greenery found in the tropical mountain region. As you walk through the Cloud Forest, you’ll learn about our planet’s ecosystem, the environmental crises we face and how Singapore—true to its nickname as the “Garden City”—is actively working towards becoming the world’s greenest city. 3. Marina Bay Sands
Marina Bay Sands is Singapore’s most popular hotel. Most well-known for housing the world’s largest infinity pool, do not leave Singapore without visiting this spectacular place. While you can only visit the infinity pool if you are a hotel guest, there’s plenty more you can do here. As you can see, it has three towers and each one has its own rooftop bar that you can visit.
The rooftop bars in the Marina Bay Sands Hotel are Spago, Ce La Vi, and Lavo. I checked out all three and loved them all! Spago has an amazing breakfast buffet (but definitely on the pricier side), amazing cocktails and high-end bar food. I highly recommend having a 3-course lunch at Lavo if you’re in the area!
Marina Bay Sands also has a casino, shopping mall, and several incredible restaurants to check out. 4. Newton Hawker Center
Singapore’s hawkers are a MUST when you’re in the Garden City. Newton Hawker Center is Singapore’s most famous hawker center, and of course also of “Crazy Rich Asians” fame, but there are definitely cheaper hawker centers to visit if you’re looking to save some money!
So, what is a hawker center? Well, it’s basically street food paradise. It’s a bustling market filled with numerous food stalls and hawkers offering local cuisines. But, as I mentioned earlier, Singapore is a blend of Indian, Chinese, Malaysian and British cultures, so you’ll definitely be seeing influences from all four cultures at the hawker center. You can find spicy biryani, laksa, noodles, satay, and so much more!
Pro-tip : Go with a group, separate, let everyone buy 1-2 dishes, grab a table and enjoy your food family style so everyone can try a bit of all the delicious food the hawker center has to offer! 5. Merlion Park
The mythical Merlion—half fish, half lion—is the national mascot and icon of Singapore. You can find the Merlion statue at the waterfront Merlion Park, a very popular tourist attraction. 6. Little India
Naturally, I traveled across the world, just to end up back in Little India. Is anyone really surprised? No, not really. Any regrets? NONE AT ALL! Singapore’s Little India is a colorful little paradise with so much to do!
I highly recommend coming here for lunch, walking around the stalls and shops for a while and then embarking on the Little India Heritage walk. You’ll see markers set up across Little India to show you the main attractions. There are two vibrant Hindu temples, a stunning Buddhist temple, and much more.
I had just seen similar colorful temples in Malaysia, so I spent more time at the Buddhist temple—The Temple of Thousand Lights—which was by far my favorite. If you go behind the massive Buddhist statue pictured above, you can actually climb inside to see a beautiful reclining Buddha. The Buddhist temple was actually built by Indian workers so I was pleasantly surprised to find a Ganesh idol in the temple as well. The people in the temple were beyond friendly and took me around. Definitely one of my favorite memories in Singapore.

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Food-delivery apps score big in IPL

26/04/2019
Indian food-tech players, including Zomato and Swiggy, are currently batting on a good wicket on the back of the ongoing Indian Premier League (IPL).
The average number of daily orders on food-tech platforms has jumped by 18.2% till now from pre-IPL days due to numerous consumption occasions created by the league, revealed data from RedSeer Consulting. The 50-day league hosts at least one match everyday.
With final rounds of IPL and the ICC Cricket World Cup to follow, the momentum gained by the food-tech majors is expected to pick up pace, helped by none other than thousands of restaurant partners on their platforms that have menus curated especially for the IPL.
“During IPL 2018, snackable items like pizza, french fries, and ice-creams witnessed a 50% increase in orders compared to the previous year. This year too, the trend has been similar. While local cuisine has been quite popular during the matches, snackable items have witnessed a considerable increase in orders from last year during both snack and dinner hours. Some of the top 10 dishes ordered during the season this year are chicken biryani, paneer butter masala, pav bhaji and samosa,” said Srivats T S, VP (marketing) at Swiggy, which is the associate sponsor of India’s biggest cricketing league.
Bangalore has taken the lead in the total number of orders placed during the first fortnight of the IPL, followed by Mumbai, Hyderabad, Chennai and Delhi, according to the Swiggy. Even for Swiggy’s arch rival Zomato, the order frequency, as well as early dinners and evening snacks, have shot up significantly. “This IPL season we have witnessed some relatively newer food delivery trends. Dinner (7-11pm) hours are usually busiest but with the IPL matches starting at 8 pm every day (and at 4pm on the weekends) our order frequency for early dinners and evening snacks has increased,” said Sandeep Anand, CMO, food delivery at Zomato.
services/food-delivery-apps-score-big-in-ipl/69051078 ITC

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Watch: Here’s How You Can Prepare Dhokla In A Mug That Too In Just 2 Minutes

Watch: Here’s How You Can Prepare Dhokla In A Mug That Too In Just 2 Minutes Watch: Here’s How You Can Prepare Dhokla In A Mug That Too In Just 2 Minutes Sushmita Sengupta | Updated: April 26, 2019 13:17 IST Tweeter
Gujarati cuisine is one of the oldest cuisines of India. Like all ancient cuisines, Gujarati cuisine too has evolved and developed along the way to be one of the richest cuisines in India. One of the most popular Gujarati food marvels that has garnered a global following is dhokla. Light, soft and fluffy, this sweet-tasting snack is prepared lavishly across Gujarati households. You can have it for breakfast, or with your evening cup of tea. This peculiar pillowy snack is a delight any time of the day. One of the other reasons why this snack is so popular is because of its high nutritive value. Yes, you heard us. Dhokla is one of the healthiest snacks we know.
(Also Read: When It Comes to Dhokla, It Does Matter If It’s Yellow or White )
Unlike many popular Indian snacks, it is not deep-fried or laden in ghee, or makes use of heavy spices. Since it is not fried, it saves you a whole lot of calories. Traditionally, dhoklas are steamed. They are also made from the fermented batter of besan. It is said that foods made of fermented foods are good for the gut. Fermentation increases the bioavailability of nutrients. This recipe of two-minute dhokla posted by Mumbai-based YouTuber Alpa Modi on her YouTube Channel ‘Something’s Cooking With Alpa’, is made in microwave and we are pretty sure you are going to love it as it is instant, rich and yummy!
Have a look.

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From Punjabi Tadka Sushi to Onion Kheer: Five places in Delhi where you can try out these unusual dishes

Khana Bajana food festival to satiate food lovers with dose of music Onion Kheer or Punjabi Tadka Sushi: What’s your pick?
If wacky, innovative flavours are all you yearn for and your weekends revolve around trying out new eateries in town, then you are in for luck. Delhi being the food capital, we have a few places that we think you can definitely try this summer. From Punjabi Tadka Sushi to Onion Kheer and Old Monk & Dark Chocolate Ladoos, you will have a range to select from. Palak Patta Mille Feuille at Gravity Space Bar, Gurugram Advertising
Mille Feuille is basically a rich cake consisting of thin layers of puffs filled with jam. At Gravity Space Bar, Palak Patta Mille Feuille – a cake with thin layers of palak (spinach) – is filled with Greek yogurt and is served with mint sauce and imly chutney with dollops of aloo bhurji on the top.
Where: Gravity Space Bar, Plot 6 & 7, Sector 29, Gurugram Timing: 12 noon – 12 am Cost: Rs 225 (plus taxes) Onion Kheer at Dum Maro Dum Studio
The reason behind this eatery offering a new menu on each day of the week revolves around the idea that foodies will never have to worry about the dearth of choices. Other than Onion Kheer, they have buffets that serve dishes like Mutton Rogan Ghosh, Chicken Biryani, and Soya Rice Pop Corn. Advertising
Where: Dum Maro Dum Studio, C-8, Vishal Enclave, Rajouri Garden Timing: 12 noon – 6pm Cost: Unlimited veg and non-veg multi-cuisine buffet for Rs 600 (all inclusive) Unlimited veg and non-veg multi-cuisine buffet with IMFL liquor for Rs 1000 (all inclusive) Valid till: May 30, 2019 Punjabi Tadka Sushi at Gastronomica Kitchen & Bar
If fusion is more your style then you might enjoy the food here. Serving a variety of sushi with Indian tadka, Gastronomica will surely tease your tastebuds. From Butter Chicken Sushi, Amritsari Fried Fish Sushi, Butter Paneer Sushi, and spicy Bikaner Aloo Poppadam Sushi, choices are many. Latest Videos

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Masala Wok

As you must have guessed from the name, this restaurant serves Indian as well as Indo-Chinese cuisine. I was invited to try out their food.
The interiors are colourful and have a desi feel to it. We started with a nice welcome drink which was refreshing and had a berry flavour to it.
We started with some really nice soups. I liked the talumein chicken soup which we had with some noodles on top, as well as the lemon coriander soup .
The dragon chicken looked really good and tasted nice too. Though it was just a starter, it was a little saucy which I liked.
Chinese bhel had a good taste to it, but nothing extra-ordinary. I felt they could have done more with it.
The chicken wontons looked appealing and were really crunchy, and the filling was good too.
I like prawns in general and I was looking forward to the tandoori prawns when they got us some. These tasted average, and were a bit dry for my liking.
The chef’s special kebab was perhaps the most interesting one. The way it is served as well as the flavours. These are an assortment of kebabs which had a nice flavour and were soft too.
The masala wok special chicken kebab was also yummy. It has minced chicken inside chicken tikka, and has a smokey flavour to it.
Another starter which I liked was the chicken lollipop tossed with schezwan sauce . It is a nice twist to the lollipop. Also, the chicken was really soft, and this was saucy too.
For our drinks, we had the shikanji which felt really refreshing. It wasn’t too sweet or too tangy but just right.
The lemon mint juice was also really good and refreshing. I liked the minty taste that it had to it.
If you’re a fan of raw mango then you should try the aam panna . Though they use syrup, it did taste pretty good and it isn’t something that too many places have.
If you’re more of a sweet tooth person, then the Oreo shake will appeal to you. It wasn’t overly sweet, but had a good consistency to it.
For the mains, we had the masala wok special fried rice which has rice topped with keema gravy. This was a really good combination.
The desi kukkad gravy is also something that you should try. It was served with the sizzle and the smoke coming out of it, and tasted fantastic.
For the vegetarians, the paneer do-pyaza gravy is really a nice option. The paneer was soft and the gravy was delicious.
The chicken chowmein was loaded and had some egg in it too. The noodles felt a bit thicker than usual though.
If you like something with a more strong flavour then the hot garlic chicken gravy will definitely suit your palate. It was on the spicier side and a tad bit tangy too, along with the garlic flavour.
For fans of sea-food, do try the pomfret rava masala . It didn’t have too many bones in it and was flavourful.
We had the gravies along with a selection of fresh Indian breads.
For the dessert, I totally enjoyed the sizzling brownie . The brownie was gooey and more chocolaty than usual.
Another one which I really liked was the moong dal halwa . I definitely recommend trying this one.
The royal falooda was not too bad either. It has ice-cream, vermicelli, and lots more in it.
A Chinese dessert was the honey fried noodles with ice-cream . The noodles were crispy, and tasted nice along with the vanilla ice-cream drizzled with some rose syrup.
Overall, I really liked this place. The Chinese was a bit better than the Indian food, though everything was really good overall.
Click here to salivate.

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The Little-Known Danish Coastal Getaway Locals Love and Travelers Overlook

Photo by Lyndsey Matthews Beyond the dunes on southwest Jutland’s coastline is the Wadden Sea National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site. The southwest corner of Denmark’s Jutland peninsula offers the country’s only two-Michelin-star restaurant outside of Copenhagen and a UNESCO-listed national park. But most travelers would struggle to find it on a map.
A s Nordic cuisine and hygge continue to gain popularity outside of Denmark , the small Scandinavian country of less than 6 million residents welcomed a record number of travelers in 2018. But most U.S. visitors fly into Copenhagen and stay put. While there’s plenty to do in the capital city to keep you well fed and entertained for days, take a note from the locals and head about 200 miles west to the southwestern coast of Jutland, the main peninsula of Denmark.
The sleepy beach town of Henne, along with the island of Fano, and medieval town of Ribe, have long been a popular summer getaway for Danes and Germans. But after gaining a two-Michelin-star restaurant—the only one outside of Copenhagen—and a UNESCO-listed national park all in the past five years, southwest Jutland is ready for its closeup.
Getting there SAS makes the 50-minute flight from Copenhagen to the town of Billund at least once a day throughout the year and up to four times a day in the summer. From Billund, located in the center of the Jutland peninsula, it’s another hour’s drive to the coast. If you’d rather make a full road trip out of it, the drive to the southwest coast of Jutland from Copenhagen takes under three hours. Either way, you’ll want to rent a car to move between the various towns in the region. To reach the island of Fano, car ferries depart from Esbjerg several times per hour during the day and take 12 minutes to make the crossing. Photo by Lyndsey Matthews Henne Kirkeby Kro is the only two-Michelin-star restaurant in Denmark outside of Copenhagen. Eating and drinking there Of the four restaurants in Denmark that hold two Michelin stars, Copenhagen is home to three of them, including Noma . The other one— Henne Kirkeby Kro —is located 200 miles away in the village of Henne. Although the thatched roof and red brick exterior of the 1790 inn ( kro means inn in Danish) may lead you to assume the food served inside will be traditional Danish fare, British chef Paul Cunningham draws inspiration from his travels for the menu. A recent dinner included one course inspired by Indian papadums , with local squid in a Hong Kong–style sauce served next. In true Nordic style, Cunningham sources a majority of his ingredients from the vegetable garden behind the inn, as well as using locally procured fish and meat. Guests who don’t want to drive after partaking in the wine pairings can check into any of the inn’s 12 rooms, which have modern amenities like Hastens beds and include breakfast in a renovated stable overlooking the garden. Oyster lovers should not miss the ferry over to Fano, an island off the coast located within the UNESCO-listed Wadden Sea National Park. Each fall, Fano hosts the largest oyster festival in Denmark in part of a local effort to rid the Wadden Sea of an invasive Pacific oyster population . Even if your travels take you to this part of Denmark outside of oyster season, Sonderho Kro on the island’s southern tip is worth a detour. There, you can enjoy a five-course Danish meal made with locally sourced and foraged ingredients in the inn’s 300-year-old dining room, considered one of the oldest in Denmark. Located within a charming village of thatched roof houses, the inn serves both lunch and dinner, as well as full breakfast spread for guests who choose to stay overnight in any of the 13 tidy rooms. Photo by Lyndsey Matthews It’s easy to happen upon hygge scenes like this on Fano. While you’re on Fano, book a table at Kellers Badehotel , another inn serving outstanding Nordic cuisine in an understated cozy setting. Before heading back to the ferry, stop for a pint of locally brewed beer at the Fano Bryghus , which creates limited edition offerings for well-known Danish breweries like Mikkeller and Evil Twin Brewing. Back on the mainland, stock up on edible souvenirs to bring home at the Hr. Skov gourmet market in the village of Blavand. Together with his wife, the owner (whose last name Skov is the Danish word for forest) sells a wide variety of wine, charcuterie, and sweets from Danish brands like Lakrids by Bulow and Summerbird. But the thing to stock up on here are their handmade line of jams, mustards, and snaps (try the locally foraged sea buckthorn variety). Anyone with a sweet tooth will delight in the inventive treats made at Temper Chocolate , located in the medieval center of Ribe, Denmark’s oldest town. Made with Valrhona chocolate and butter from a local dairy, the handmade chocolates are also filled with ingredients like rhubarb sourced from the shop’s garden or local honey from Fano. At Copenhagen’s Buzziest New Bakery, Former Tartine Head Baker Is on the Rise
Playing there The blustery beaches on the Wadden Sea in southwest Jutland make it a popular place for kite flying , kite surfing, and riding blokarts , a small go-kart with a sail attached to it that you can race along the sand. But the coast also has plenty to do for those interested in nature and history, as well. In 2014, the Danish Wadden Sea area was added to the UNESCO World Heritage site that extends more than 300 miles down through Germany and into the Netherlands. While the dunes and mudflats may not be as visually striking as other national parks you’ve visited, a visit to the Vadehavescentret (Wadden Sea Center) near Ribe will give you a greater appreciation for the biodiversity the area supports. A major stopover point on the East Atlantic Flyway, more than 10 million migratory birds—including Eurasian spoonbills and great cormorants—pass through the region each spring and autumn as they move between wintering grounds in Africa and breeding areas in the Arctic tundra. Courtesy of Vadehavscentret/Adam Mork The recently redesigned Vadehavescentret in Ribe is the gateway to the Wadden Sea National Park. Even if you’re not a birder, the museum’s unique design will impress architecture fans. A nod to the region’s traditional thatched roof homes, Danish architect Dorte Mandrup created the building’s 2017 extension to feature reed thatching on the roof—and the sides of the building. After you explore the museum, a naturalist from the center can take you out into the Wadden Sea during low tide for a bird-watching tour during the migration or to the invasive oyster beds about 2.5 miles off the coast for an all-you-can-eat Oyster Safari in autumn and winter. Photo by Lyndsey Matthews Southwest Jutland is a summer beach getaway for many, but oyster lovers can enjoy an abundance of the invasive Pacific species starting in the fall. Another architectural highlight is the Tirpitz Museum , a Nazi bunker that was reborn in 2017 as a Bjarke Ingels–designed museum dedicated to the region’s history. Located in the town of Blavand, the museum is built directly into the dunes, making it invisible from the surrounding area. Inside, you’ll learn about what life was like for both civilians and soldiers during World War II through an exhibit that tells the real stories of the individuals who lived and worked near the bunker.
Before you fly back to Copenhagen, be sure to schedule a few hours in Billund to explore the town where Lego was founded in 1932. Even if you haven’t touched the building bricks since you were a child, Lego House is worth a stop. Opened in 2017, Bjarke Ingels designed the building to look as if it were made from gigantic Lego bricks. Inside, you’ll find four different zones designed for both children and adults to play in, as well as an area to create your own stop-motion Lego movies. If you’d rather admire others’ masterpieces, there are plenty of original works displayed throughout, including three massive T. Rex sculptures made entirely from Lego bricks. In the basement, an official Lego history museum will make you feel nostalgic for the sets you played with as a kid.
Staying there For the full experience at any of southwest Jutland’s gourmet inns, it’s best to stay the night. But if you can’t secure a reservation for a room at Henne Kirkeby Kro, Henne Molle A Badehotel is a short drive down the road toward the beach. Designed by Poul Henningsen in 1935 to blend into the dunes surrounding it, the rooms are fairly small but feature the lighting fixtures that made Henningsen famous in Denmark.
>> Next: Plan Your Trip With AFAR’s Guide to Denmark

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Palatable Inc.

Description: Palatable Inc. APK Who are we?For any dish you crave and anywhere you wish to have it, we’re here at your beck and call, literally! Palatable Inc is your go-to food app for takeouts, home deliveries, and dine ins.Unique features on the appChoose what you seeYou select your food preferences based on lifestyle diets, allergies, and cuisines while signing up with Palatable Inc. So, go ahead and customize your preferences and see more of what you like.Know what you eatFor every dish you wish to eat, you can keep an eye out for healthy ingredients, allergy-free contents, and other dietary requirements if you have any.Tend to your allergiesWe know it stinks when you want to order a dish but are allergic to its ingredients, but we’ve got that covered for you. You can now look for dishes that do not contain allergens such as gluten, dairy, peanuts, seafood, sesame, soy, sulfite, and tree nuts.Stay true to your lifestyle dietsYou deserve to eat delectable even if you adhere to a certain lifestyle diet. We value you because you value your values! Whether it be vegetarian, lacto vegetarian, ovo vegetarian, paleo, pescatarian, and vegan, you’re sorted.Pick a cuisine from places you’ve never beenYou can’t travel the world in a day, but we bring the cuisines of the world to you from the best restaurants near you under one roof. Order any dish online native to cuisines such as Indian, Greek, Chinese, Japanese, Italian, French, Thai, Mexican, and Spanish among others.A 3-Way Street For Placing OrdersYou’re out?… Order takeout!You’re in?… Order in!Going for a spin?… Choose to dine in!Takeout-All restaurants on the app offer takeouts. So, if you’re the person who’s always on the go, then takeouts are for you!Dine in-A few restaurants provide dine ins. If you’re the one who’s all about exquisite meals in exquisite places, then you’ll love this added feature to dine in. Simply find a Palatable restaurant, get a table, send a message containing the table code to the phone number placed there, and then simply follow the restaurant link and type in the required details to book a table and further proceed to ordering on the app.Delivery-If you’re too lazy to step out, ill, or need to run some errands, simply order in. It’s a delight to eat food in the comfort of your home. Not all restaurants provide food delivery but for those that do, extra charges may apply.A Deal-icious AppPalatable restaurants are all for giving! So, get ready to have your taste buds pampered with exciting deals at lower prices, every once in a while.Pay SmartIn this digital age, we strive for a greater cause – saving paper. Simply make your payments via card or Apple/Google Pay and help us go cashless!

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Kibber Village, Spiti Valley – A Detailed Travel Guide

Travel Responsibly About Kibber
Kyiber, commonly known as Kibber or Kibber Khas village is a high altitude village in Spiti valley and acclaimed as the second highest motorable village in the world. Landscape of the village is captivating, it is surrounded by limestone rock mountains. Beautiful fields and a backdrop of brown mountains adds to the charm of Spiti’s villages
With a population of under 400 people, Kibber is home to the magnificent snow leopards. The Himalayan Snow Leopard Research Center at Kibber has been instrumental in conservation of the animal. People at Kibber do farming and livestock rearing for their livelihood. Not many areas in Spiti are fertile, Kibber is one of the high-yielding lands in the region.
The village is well structured with stone houses, a school, a post office, a primary healthcare center, a PWD rest house and is headed by a sarpanch (elected head of the village). The wind-carved mountains and whitewashed houses which look exactly similar with their red windows and blue doors are salient features of almost all Spiti villages. However, at Kibber the houses are unique in one feature. They are made of stone, instead of mud. The School at Kibber Historical Significance
In commune with the Spiti valley, residents of Kibber also practice Tibetan Buddhism. In fact, the village holds a special significance for Buddhists because Serkong Rinpoche, the teacher of current Dalai Lama died here in late 80s. His Holiness the Dalai Lama also expressed his wish once to retire at Kibber.
An ancient trade route between Spiti valley and Ladakh across the Parang La pass, initiates at Kibber. Nomadic tribes of Changthang region in Ladakh and people of Spiti used to trade by barter system, for horses, yaks and food at the famous La Darcha festival. You can enjoy the festival at Kaza during the month of August every year.
Though Langza village is most famous in Spiti valley for fossil hunting, the entire region of Spiti valley is fossiliferous, including Kibber. Don’t be surprised if you stumble upon an ammonite or marine fossil here, as the whole Himalayan belt rose from the ancient Tethys sea only. The fossiliferous land of Kibber Location
At an elevation of 4270 meters, Kibber is situated in a narrow valley. The village is 20 kilometers (40 mins drive) away from the town of Kaza. Weather & Best Time to Visit
Summer is a good time for a hassle free trip to Kibber. Winter snow enhances the wilderness and beauty of Spiti valley but poses many challenges too. However, best time to visit Kibber or Spiti valley depends on the route ( Manali to Kaza or Shimla to Kaza ) you take and the kind of experience you are seeking.
Spiti’s weather is cold and dry. Winter months are extremely harsh with temperature dropping as low as -20 degrees. Several feet of snow blankets the entire valley, which makes reaching Kibber a challenging task in this season. Rohtang pass shuts due to heavy snow, so Manali to Kaza route is not an option in winters.
Summer witnesses very bright sun, altitude increases the intensity of sunshine. Though nights are still cold enough to use woolens. Monsoon months don’t see much rain or no rain at all. But the roads leading to Spiti from Manali or Shimla witness rainfall and landslides, leading to blockages and closures including Rohtang pass.
For a detailed and month-by-month guide on when to travel to Spiti, please refer to our article ‘ Best Time to Visit Spiti Valley – A Month by Month Guide ’ What to Experience
Kibber’s beautiful vistas are a sight to behold, surrounded by green fields and limestone mountains. Few beautiful treks such as Parang La, Dangcham peak, Gette, Chicham and Tashigang villages originate from Kibber. Buddhist heritage can be explored through the neighboring Ki Monastery and the Kibber village temple. However, the most exciting part about this village is the Kibber WIldlife sanctuary, which is home to the elusive snow leopard, Ibex and Tibetan wolf. Beautiful flora engulfs you at Kibber Kibber Wildlife Sanctuary
With an elevation range of 3600-6600 meters and spread across 1400 square kilometers, this is the only sanctuary in India which is situated in a cold desert. This Himalayan forest harbors some rare species of flora and fauna.
The superstar of this sanctuary is obviously the magnificent snow leopard, which is difficult to spot. However, their sightings have increased significantly in the past decade and at present there are around 25-30 snow leopards in Kibber sanctuary. Besides this sanctuary, it can be spotted at Pin Valley National park also in Himachal.
Also know as the ‘grey ghosts’, snow leopards are easier to spot during winter season. During winter, their prey ‘Himalayan goats’ and other animals come down from higher altitudes to the valley for food. Snow leopards come down the trail following their prey and hence become visible.
These discreet cats camouflage so perfectly among their surroundings, especially snow, that you could be looking right at it from a distance and might not able to spot it till it moves! So, you need specially trained local guides to take you on a trail for snow leopard spotting. The cats inhabit steep cliffs and rugged terrains to ambush their prey, which makes it imperative that you are accompanied by someone who knows the landscape.
Few young residents from Kibber, and neighboring villages have been trained by HP government in spotting snow leopards which has become a reliable source of livelihood for them.
In addition to snow leopards, the sanctuary inhabits Tibetan wolf, Ibex, Bharal (Himalayan blue sheep), Tibetan woolly hare, pale weasel, Tibetan wild ass and red fox. Himalayan birds, such as, Griffons, Bearded Eagle and Snow Cock also adorn the sanctuary.
The region is rich in many endangered species of plants, which are used in production of traditional medicines, cosmetics and also as food for livestock. Some of these plants play an important part in Traditional Tibetan Medicinal Healing System.
Local operators from Kaza town organise treks and safaris to Kibber Sanctuary. Almost all home-stays at Kibber also organise excursions to the sanctuary and provide trained guides. Parang La Trek
Kibber village is one of the starting points of the ancient Parang La trek. You can also start the trek from Chicham village in Kibber’s neighborhood. Parang La is a mighty pass with a maximum altitude of 18,400 feet connecting the Spiti valley with Ladakh. During olden times, it served as a traditional trade route between the people of Spiti, Changthang in Ladakh and Tibet.
It is a long and difficult trek, which offers splendid views of Tso Moriri lake. Starting from the meadows of Spiti’s villages, the trail descends down the Kibber gorge and then climbs over Parang La. The trek then follows the Pare Chu river which originates from Datung near Parang La in Leh. It is the only river of its kind which originates in India, flows into Tibet near Chumar, then again enters India in Spiti, and finally reaches Tso Moriri Lake.
Words fail to describe the beauty and splendor of this trek’s landscape. Imagine crossing two regions of the cold desert, a high altitude pass, a unique river and ultimately reaching one of the highest and pristine lakes in the world. In fact, the trek includes walking along the length of Tso Moriri for almost two days! Load More… Follow on Instagram
This is an intense trek which passes through challenging landscapes, so make sure you have some prior experience of trekking at high altitudes before you attempt this. Sufficient acclimatization and physical fitness will help too. Home-stays at Kibber and local trek organisers at Kaza can help you with the trek and all kinds of gear. It is advisable to go along with a group, preferably with local guides on this trek. You would need almost 8-9 extra days if you go on this one. Hike/ Drive to Nearby Villages
There is no better way to explore a place, especially mountains, than walking around the locale. Kibber is a part of the larger puzzle called Spiti, which surprises you with a new spectacle at every turn. From gorges to valleys, snow capped peaks to green meadows, brown deserted mountains to hidden ponds, lush fields to rocky hills. You can hike or drive (upto a certain point) to the three neighboring villages of Kibber – Chicham, Gette and Tashigang Sinuous Roads to Spiti’s villages Chicham
Chicham is approximately 6 kms away from Kibber. This village has Asia’s highest (13,596 feet) suspension steel truss bridge, which stares down at the 1000 feet deep gorge and connects Kibber to Chicham. Task of constructing the bridge on such formidable terrain was undoubtedly difficult and took 14 years to get completed.
But now, the bridge has reduced the distance from Chicham to Losar by 40 kms and provided the much required direct connectivity to Chicham. Chicham lies across the Parilungbo canyon, and until this bridge was constructed (which is only a couple of years back), a ropeway was the only means of transport between Chicham and rest of the civilization. Gette
Gette is barely a village, it rather be called as a cluster of few homes scattered across the brown mountains, green fields and many ponds full of blue waters. A short drive of about 8 kms will take you till Gette village. However, from here dirt road starts and you would have to trek to get inside the village. The landscape and serenity is of course, unmatched. Tashigang
Further from Gette, the same dirt road goes towards another gem of a village named Tashigang. A village in the clouds, yeah! that’s what locals call it. This again is a cluster of 4-5 houses a beautiful lake and lots of fields around it. Ki Monastery
Key or Ki is the grandest and oldest monastery of Spiti valley which is supremely famous with travelers. Built on a hill, like a fort, it gives the appearance of an ancient castle more than a place of worship.
From Kaza, Ki monastery is about 14 kms away. However, if you want to cover it during your stay at Kibber or return journey from Kibber then it is around 8 kms away from Kibber and can be clubbed in your return journey from Kibber. Please refer to our article on Key monastery for more details on it. Kibber Village Monastery
The local monastery of Kibber village holds huge significance for the followers of Buddhism as it was founded by the eminent Serkong Rinpoche who was the current Dalai Lama’s master of debate. He passed his last days at this monastery and died in 1983 at this very place. Sky Gazing
Spending a night at Kibber will reward you with astounding views of the sky. Kibber is one of the best places for astro-photography and star gazing. The altitude and remoteness of Spiti valley makes for many magical spots to look at the milky way with naked eyes or millions of stars, even some planets. The experience is out of the world and leaves you speechless. The crystal clear sky has made it a favorite destination for night-photographers and sky gazers. How to Reach
Kibber does not have rail or air connectivity. It is connected to the nearest town, Kaza, by road. By Road
Kibber is almost 40 minutes of drive away (20 kms) from Kaza. A local bus plies from Kaza to Kibber every evening at 4pm and returns Kaza the same day.
Kaza is connected to Manali, Shimla and Chandigarh by a network of buses. Shimla and Chandigarh buses reach Reckong Peo and from here you have to board another bus to Kaza.
Alternate option is to drive all the way to Kaza from any of these towns. For details on public transport around Spiti valley, refer to our article How to make a budget trip to Spiti Valley by public transport .
If you are self-driving, you will need to acquire permit to cross Rohtang pass (if choosing to follow Manali-Kaza route). For details on getting Rohtang pass permit, please read our article How to get Rohtang Pass Permit Online or using Mobile App in 2019? By Train
The nearest train station is Joginder nagar (364 kms from Kaza), which is a narrow gauge station and receives train from Pathankot railway station (broad gauge). Major nearest railway station is Chandigarh (500 kms from Kaza). By Air
Chandigarh is the nearest international airport and Bhuntar (Kullu) is the nearest domestic airport with limited flight connectivity.
The onward journey in case of rail and air travel can be made by taxi/ self-drive or bus. Driving alongside the Spiti river Where to Stay
When in Spiti, stay like a Spitian! As Kibber is one of the most famous villages of Spiti Valley, it has a number of home-stays to choose from. There aren’t any fancy hotels, given the remoteness of the place. Here are a few recommended stay options: Norling Home-Stay
The homestay has 12 rooms with attached bathrooms, with 24 hrs hot water and basic amenities, no TV. Meals are Spitian (Tibetan, Indian and Himalayan cuisine), made from locally procured and organically produced ingredients. A night’s stay here costs between 1200-1500 INR along with meals. The hosts are warm and welcoming, you can contact them at 0-9418556107 Deshek Home-Stay
Located right opposite the Kibber school, this is a small and comfortable place where you would experience good hospitality, basic amenities and delicious home-cooked food prepared by the local host family. Spread on three floors, the hotel has a terrace on each one with beautiful views. You can contact the host, Indra at 0-7650074070 What to Eat
Food made fresh from locally grown ingredients is the best kind of food, be it any cuisine. And that is exactly what you get in Spiti valley, including Kibber. Peas, potatoes and barley are the local crops and taste best here.
Tashi Zom guest house at the entry of village is a good place to start exploring the food of Kibber. When we visited, they served a dish of potatoes and peas along with fresh bread. As they make everything from scratch after you place the order, you will have enough time to chill at the terrace of the guest house, while your food is being prepared. I had the most delicious peas curry at this place
For more details on Spitian food, please refer to my last article on Langza A terrace with terrific views, Tashi Zom Guest House Suggested Itinerary
I always recommend staying at a place for at least a night to experience it to the fullest. However, if time doesn’t permit then Kibber can be included in your Spiti itinerary as a short trip from Kaza, while visiting Langza, Hikkim, Komic villages or Ki Monastery. Day 1 | Kaza to Kibber Reach Langza from Kaza via rented taxi or car in the morning, or by the daily bus in the afternoon. If you leave from Kaza in the morning, you can visit Ki monastery en route to Kibber. Visit the village monastery, stroll through the fields and meet with Kibber school kids (if possible) Hike or drive to Chicham, Gette and Tashigang You my return to Kaza in the evening Or spend the night at a home-stay and enjoy their hospitality.Try astro-photography, if it interests you. Or simply enjoy the night-sky Return to Kaza next day
Below is the added itinerary for exploring Kibber Wildlife Sanctuary Day 2 – 4 | Kibber Wildlife Sanctuary If you would like to go on a snow leopard trail, you would need to go to the interiors of the sanctuary and search for the famous animal. Take a local guide along for the trek. Important Tips Always carry a sunblock , sunglasses, water bottle and if possible a hat whenever you are out on sightseeing in Spiti valley. Sun at such altitude is harsh enough to burn your skin. Spiti’s weather and terrain is fragile. Go prepared with a basic list of things to carry on a Spiti trip . Usually BSNL signals work throughout Spiti valley, but in Kibber they can get a bit patchy. However, when you hit the road to Kaza you should get connectivity. You get good signals at Ki monastery. For details on mobile phone connectivity in Spiti valley, refer to our article on 11 Tips on Mobile Phone Connectivity in Spiti Valley Conclusion
Kibber is a moerately developed village of Spiti valley and popular among tourists. It has motorable road connectivity, home-stays, hospitable people, and much to explore. Like traversing through high altitude forest and see its inhabitants? or want a dose of ancient Buddhist treasures? Then, Kibber should be on your Spiti itinerary. Enchanting vistas of Kibber Travel Responsibly We can not stress enough on the need to save the Himalayan ecology and communities from negative impact of increasing travel in the region. Spiti’s water supply is highly dependent on snowfall in the region. Lesser snowfall during winter means, lack of water during summer for farming (which is the major occupation here) and utilities. By following simple practices we can do our bit to conserve this eco-sensitive zone: Carry a refillable water- bottle Use and encourage building of dry toilets Do not litter, especially not around water resources Do not pollute water resources in any way If you can, bring your trash back to cities
Read our article on responsible travel for more such tips
I hope, this detailed guide to Kibber will help you to plan your journey better and make it a memorable one.
Do you still have any questions or suggestions or need any help in planning your trip to Kibber? If yes, please feel free to post them either in the comments section of this article below or direct message on Instagram. You can also take guidance from many travel experts in our DoW Community Forums and discuss your upcoming travel plans.
If you like the article, please feel free to share it with any of your family or friends who are planning a trip to Kibber or Spiti Valley. Happy traveling to you!!! Do follow @soulful_worldview on Instagram for updates on my next adventure. A post shared by Anchal (@soulful_worldview) on Sep 25, 2018 at 10:51pm PDT Are you looking for the CUSTOMIZED TOURS ?? Get in touch with our our handpicked & trusted Destination Specialists from the Himalayas who offer SPECIAL DISCOUNTED RATES to all the readers/followers of the Devil On Wheels website.

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