Tastes of the world: Beckley celebrates world cuisine with fundraiser dinner

Tastes of the world: Beckley celebrates world cuisine with fundraiser dinner

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(Brad Davis/The Register-Herald) Shady Spring resident Nancy Walker, right, gets a spoonful of biryani (rice, chicken, vegetables) from Hina Amir, who serves up that and a number of other homemade, authentic Indian offerings during the 40th Annual YMCA International Dinner Sunday afternoon at the Beckley-Raleigh County Convention Center.
(Brad Davis/The Register-Herald) A mix of hungry, enthusiastic and possibly curious patrons fill their plates with authentic cuisine from countries and regions all around the world during the 40th Annual YMCA International Dinner Sunday afternoon at the Beckley-Raleigh County Convention Center.
(Brad Davis/The Register-Herald) The food went fast as hundreds again came out to the 40th Annual YMCA International Dinner Sunday afternoon at the Beckley-Raleigh County Convention Center. editor’s pick featured Tastes of the world: Beckley celebrates world cuisine with fundraiser dinner By Matt Combs The Register-Herald 5 hrs ago
(Brad Davis/The Register-Herald) Shady Spring resident Nancy Walker, right, gets a spoonful of biryani (rice, chicken, vegetables) from Hina Amir, who serves up that and a number of other homemade, authentic Indian offerings during the 40th Annual YMCA International Dinner Sunday afternoon at the Beckley-Raleigh County Convention Center.
(Brad Davis/The Register-Herald) A mix of hungry, enthusiastic and possibly curious patrons fill their plates with authentic cuisine from countries and regions all around the world during the 40th Annual YMCA International Dinner Sunday afternoon at the Beckley-Raleigh County Convention Center.
(Brad Davis/The Register-Herald) The food went fast as hundreds again came out to the 40th Annual YMCA International Dinner Sunday afternoon at the Beckley-Raleigh County Convention Center.
On Sunday afternoon, the Beckley-Raleigh County Convention Center was filled with excited, well-fed people and the smells of different cultures from around the world.
With an eye toward diversity, the YMCA of Southern West Virginia held its 40th annual International Food Festival.
The festival, sponsored by Raleigh General Hospital, featured foods from multicultural backgrounds which were prepared and served by community volunteers, local restaurants and YMCA staff and members.
Megan Clackler, the YMCA’s health and wellness director, was happy with the turnout.
“It’s an annual tradition that people come out for,” Clackler said, adding that folks from as far away as Boston came back to Beckley to participate. “It’s a celebration of diversity, so we have foods from all over the world.”
According to Clackler, Japanese dishes seemed to go the quickest at Sunday’s event with that table running out of food early, though she added that there were some interesting dishes from the Jamaican table along with foods from Poland, Mexico, the Middle East, India and Italy.
While the food may have been the central theme of the day, Clackler said the event was about community members coming together, enjoying themselves and experiencing new things.
While many see southern West Virginia as a monoculture, Clackler said that there is a surprising amount of diversity, albeit in small numbers, that goes unnoticed.
“We don’t actually realize how much diversity that we have in just a small little town,” Clackler said.
With several hundred people in attendance, the YMCA staff member said the event has become a great way to show off Beckley’s culture.
For Georgianna Richards, the dinner has become a tradition in sharing the culture of her home country.
“Each year we have been participating in this international dinner,” Richards said. “We bring in some of our more popular dishes, traditional Jamaican dishes.”
Richards said that while Jamaica is best known for other cultural attributes, the outside world’s view of Jamaican food is catching up.
“We’re a very small country but a lot of people will be familiar with the music, athletics and things like that that we tend to be more known for,” Richards said, adding that knowledge of Jamaican cuisine is spreading.
Richards said she has seen firsthand that knowledge spreading in southern West Virginia.
“I notice each year more and more people will be familiar with some of the dishes,” Richards said.
For Richards, the tradition of sharing her home nation’s food has become a cherished one.
“It’s something that I really like to do,” she said.
While the event is about diversity and community experience, it is also a fundraiser for the YMCA’s Health and Wellness programs and YMCA World Service, which helps provide support YMCAs throughout the world.
Founded nearly 175 years ago in England, YMCA activities have spread to 120 countries around the world.
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We Believe in Quality Food and Service in Fairfax

Photo by Bonnie Hobbs Sapana Lama is about to serve vegetable soup and Chicken Momo dumplings at Tandoori Nights. A tandoori is a clay oven where naan bread is made. But in the City of Fairfax, it also stands for Tandoori Nights, a restaurant serving South Indian and Nepalese cuisine. Owners Raj Tamang and Shyam Lama are both from Nepal, bordering India, so they offer food from both countries. They also own restaurants elsewhere, but this one is in Courthouse Plaza shopping center at 10312 Willard Way. And in May, it’ll celebrate its one-year anniversary here. “We truly believe in quality food and service,” said Tamang. “Instead of being a business franchise looking at numbers of diners, we make sure that we take good care of our customers and our community.” The restaurant is open daily, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., and it also offers a popular buffet lunch from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. The price is $9.99, weekdays, and $10.99, Saturday and Sunday. Customers may dine in or call 703-865-8800 or order online at tandoorinightsfairfax.com for pick-up. Or delivery services Grub Hub and Uber Eats will deliver. “We don’t make the buffet food too spicy, so anyone can enjoy it,” said Tamang. “But we can make entrees to any spice level the customer likes.” THE MOST POPULAR dishes include Butter Chicken, chicken-breast chunks in butter sauce; Chicken Tikka Masala, chicken chunks in tomato-onion sauce with bell peppers; Honey Butter Chicken, baked with honey, mustard and Indian spices; and both Vegetable and Chicken Momo, marinated and spiced fillings in a steamed dumpling. “But Momo are completely different from Chinese dumplings because of the type of filling and spices,” said Tamang. “And ours are served with a tomato sauce.” Other customer favorites, he said, are Lamb Choila, lamb chunks marinated with fresh ginger, garlic and Nepalese spices; Tandoori Chicken, marinated in yogurt, lemon juice and spices; Chicken Tikka Kabob, marinated in ginger, garlic paste, lemon juice and yogurt; and Grilled Salmon, marinated with garam masala, garlic and ginger and served with raita and cucumber-yogurt sauce. Biryani dishes are also a hit; they’re made with either chicken, lamb, shrimp or vegetables and cooked with basmati rice, herbs and spices. A popular vegetarian meal is Palak Paneer, combining spinach, spices and herbs with homemade cheese. Additional menu highlights include a variety of Indian breads and desserts such as Gulab Jamun, which is cooked milk balls in rose-flavored syrup with a hint of cardamom. “I’ve been in the restaurant business for 25 years in the Washington Metropolitan area,” said Tamang. “I have a real-estate business, an engineering company and a construction company – Green Valley Custom Builders – and my office is in Fairfax City. So Tandoori Nights is convenient for me when I’m hungry.” But most of all, said business partner John Sargent, “The City of Fairfax is one of the best places in the country to do business. We recognize the friendly business climate and feel like the business professionals here match what we’re about. We live, work, eat and play with the City decision-makers, so that’s what’s attractive about starting, retaining and growing a business here.” And, added Tamang, “Since we’re a local, family-owned business, we want to focus on building our community relations here. We also do corporate and private events and parties, as well as catering. And we can set up for dancing and karaoke with our stage, lighting, sound system, professional deejay table and speakers.” “Besides the amazing food, what I like about Tandoori Nights are the people, Raj and Shyam,” said Sargent. “I like being with people who do business the right way. We’re like family here, and we work hard to provide the best-quality product and service possible. Any venture I’m involved with, I have to believe in the product – and this is something I believe in.” THE CUSTOMERS agree. During a recent lunchtime, Fairfax City resident Rikesh Rajak had a hearty meal of lamb chops with vegetables and a side of chickpeas. “I’m from Nepal and I like their Nepalese cuisine, so I come here once a week,” he said. “Today, I had lamb and I liked the spices and marinade they used; it was delicious. They have very good Nepalese food here; people should come and try it.” Meanwhile, Erin Brown of Burke was enjoying the buffet. When she first tasted the Chicken Momo, she said, “Ooh, this is delicious. I love dumplings, and this filling is flavored and seasoned really well. And the vegetable soup is light and fresh. It tastes like lemongrass, and you can taste the herbs.” “I’m a member of Northern Virginia Foodies, and I’m sure they’d like to come here,” she continued. “I’d recommend this restaurant to others. If you like Indian food, you should definitely check out Tandoori Nights.” More like this story

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A taste of home: The expat Singaporeans cooking up a storm to feed foreigners with authentic dishes

SINGAPORE: For some Singaporeans living abroad, the thing they miss most isn’t family or friends.
It’s food. Advertisement
No matter how hard they look, they can’t find anywhere that serves chicken rice or char kway teow with the authentic, cooked-in-a-heartlands-coffee-shop Singapore taste.
For 52-year-old Jasni Zakaria, it started when he was frustrated with the food options available in Finland where he has been living for the last 23 years. He resides in Jyväskylä, about four hours away from Helsinki.
“In Finland, it’s very difficult to get Asian food and they sell Chinese and Indian food but it’s not original,” said Jasni.
According to him, fried rice would often be too oily and curries would come from pre-packaged jars. It is also not spicy enough for his Singaporean taste buds. Advertisement Advertisement
“I cannot get the real taste. … I don’t care about the price, I just want good food that I cannot get!” he added.
Jasni Zakaria taking part in Restaurant Day in Jyväskylä, Finland where anybody can set up a stall to sell their food to raise money. He told mee goreng, chicken curry, spring rolls and curry puffs. (Photo: Jasni Zakaria)
The self-professed foodie said that he has been searching all over Finland for authentic Asian food. There are only a handful of restaurants that have been able to give him what he is looking for in capital Helsinki and Oulu.
His desperation led him to cook for himself, and this eventually led him to start selling his offerings.
“I made curry puffs for my work friends to try. They liked it so I turned it into a business. I also made fried rice but it’s the Malay way; the fried rice that my father used to make,” said Jasni, whose full-time job is assembling hydraulic cylinders.
He sold them by standing outside hotels, pubs and outside football matches. Curry puffs usually go for between €1 (S$1.52) to €2.50 each, while a serving of his fried rice is priced at €3 to €5.
He has also sold his food at food festivals, and most of his customers are local Finns.
“One night, I can earn about €1,200 from selling fried rice. After paying for the ingredients and the place to cook, I still make about €1,000 a night,” Jasni said.
GERMANY
For Singaporean Angie Tan and German Fabian Böddecker, both 33, getting into the F&B industry was always a dream. Without culinary backgrounds, both of them would experiment with recipes and post them on their food blog called riceandbread.
After going to a supper club in Cuba in 2016, Angie and Fabian wanted to replicate the experience but with Southeast Asian food served communally. They started hosting private three-course dinners at their home in Düsseldorf last year.
“There also wasn’t any other place that offered Singaporean food. The closest we could find was Malaysian food but they were also under the disguise of a Chinese restaurant in Düsseldorf. We thought it would also be really interesting to see how people would react to Singaporean food as well,” Angie added.
Fabian Böddecker and Angie Tan runs riceandbread, and they sell Singaporean food at pop-up events all over Düsseldorf. (Photo: Angie Tan)
From there, the couple started tackling food festivals and pop-up restaurants.
For two weeks at a pop-up restaurant in November last year, they served curry puffs, ngor hiang and otak-otak as snacks, as well as nasi lemak, lor bak, curry chicken and laksa as main dishes. There was even kueh salat for dessert.
“We didn’t have family recipes so I was basically collecting them from the Internet, testing it out and coming up with our own recipes. These are recipes that we’ve used to cook for our friends and supper clubs,” Angie said.
The response from their customers was “overwhelmingly positive” but some dishes sold better than others.
“What was a bit difficult was to get people to order something else other than curry.”
“For Germans, chicken curry is something they can process and understand what it is. But having them to order something else like laksa or nasi lemak is actually not as easy as we thought but the people who tried it liked it,” Fabian said.
Laksa sold by riceandbread. (Photo: Angie Tan)
But even so, Fabian and Angie have not tried to localise the dishes to suit the German taste buds. Dishes like their chicken curry or laksa are served spicy in general but when customers tell them that it’s too spicy, they will add a little coconut milk to make the dish more palatable.
To make these dishes, they have had to do significant research on where to source their ingredients. For example, laksa is a challenging dish to replicate in Germany because of the lack of availability of dried shrimps and the correct noodles.
“Dried shrimps are very, very difficult to come by. If you make laksa paste, you need dried shrimps for it. A hundred grams over here costs €8. So that makes cooking with it very expensive. What we struggled with too at the beginning was laksa noodles because the laksa noodles that we know is a Singaporean brand and there is only one place that we know that we can buy from in the Netherlands,” Fabian said.
The other ingredients are easily available in Düsseldorf because of its large Asian community.
Another German resident, Tang Pin-Ji, 33, sells kaya from her home in Berlin. Owing to an abundance of Asian supermarkets in Berlin, she is able to get fresh pandan leaves for her kaya.
Pin-Ji started making kaya to bring them to house parties and office parties to share a piece of home with her friends and colleagues 1.5 years ago.
Homemade kaya made in Berlin by Tang Pin-Ji. (Photo: Tang Pin-Ji)
It was only late last year that she started getting her first paid orders, with those who have tried her kaya wanting to share it with their friends. Half of her customers are Singaporeans and Malaysians while the other half are Germans and other Europeans.
“They find it delicious and the feedback has been positive so far, although for very different reasons. For the Singaporeans and Malaysians, it’s a feeling of nostalgia. For the Germans and Europeans, it’s either a novelty or it’s because they’d tried it on holiday in Singapore or Malaysia,” Pin-Ji said.
“I generally feel that Singaporean food is severely underrepresented in a global city like Berlin and many locals can’t tell the differences between Asian cuisines. You could say that making kaya is my way of telling them this is where I’m from and this is what people back home love,” she added.
UNITED STATES
Faridah Zee Jusuf, 57, who goes by Zee, moved to the United States in 2002 and went into the food business in 2017 after retiring from the real estate industry. She started Zippy Zee Kitchen as she moved into semi-retirement and can be found at pop-up events or farmer’s markets all over Florida.
“Nasi Lemak sells because everybody here loves coconut. They like spicy food like buffalo wings. Coconut rice and chicken rendang always sells,” Zee said.
Faridah Zee Yusuf (in red) in front of her pop-up stall. (Photo: Faridah Zee Yusuf)
To make Singaporean food more accessible to Americans, she has even created her own version of a burrito – a rendang wrap – that is made with shredded beef rendang and roti prata as a wrap.
According to her, she is the only one selling Singaporean food in Florida. But wherever it is in the US, it is hard to find Singapore fare.
“Not even in Los Angeles. There are a lot of Malaysian places. It’s not so different from Singaporean food but I think our food is better than theirs,” Zee joked.
To make her food, she has to search high and low to find the right ingredients.
Zee returns to Singapore two times every year and on those trips, she packs over up to 70kg of ingredients to bring back to Florida. It includes kerisik, ikan bilis, and a frozen chilli paste that she makes in Singapore so that she can bring it through customs.
Zee’s pop-up stall Zippy Zee Kitchen moves all over Florida. (Photo: Faridah Zee Jusuf)
In the US, she also has her own garden where she grows herbs and spices like chilli, lemongrass, lime leaves and galangal used in her cooking.
For her food, Zee has been invited to participate in food events because they know her food is “different” and “unique”. “They didn’t know about Singaporean food and now they do,” she said.
When new customers visit, Zee takes the time to explain where Singapore is and shares her knowledge of Singapore’s history.
“I have changed a lot of my customers … Even those who have not travelled can appreciate Singapore food and know that it consists of Chinese, Indian, Malay, Eurasian cuisine and also flavours from the region.
“When I have time I will also tell them how it came to that, why it is multi-racial. Everybody contributes to the cuisine. Even Singaporean Chinese food has Malay influences and so on,” Zee said.

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The Food Ranger ‘What Makes Pakistan So AMAZING’

Location: Dubious said: ↑ I think you seriously need to either change your company of friends or broaden your circle…. Everyone I know has first asked me the difference between Pakistani and indian food…And even after taking them to an indian restaurant followed by feeding them home cooked Pakistani food…BELIEVE ME, they were less confused and NEVER made a mistake of confused labeling! Then again my circle of friends include people in university [working and students] …so maybe they needed to prove they are not ignorant and have high observation skills….but I have never faced what you claim… Sure, I myself sometimes call our food desi but they always called it Pakistani coz I took them to indian restaurant and they noticed the difference AND remember it/ kept it in mind… My American neighbours ALWAYS differentiated the 2 from the start coz they had experienced both types in California as they had friends from both groups…So, I guess it really depends on what kind of “people” you are surrounded with… Click to expand… Until and unless, they interact with overseas-Pakistanis or visit Pakistan, they do not get to know about the differences in Indian and Pakistani cuisines but once they have done it, they do not make this mistake. However, it depends on their Pakistani friends as well that how much they explain to them. Pakistani food contains a lot more meat though even Indians restaurants use meat as well for marketing but the taste and quantity of meat based recipes is much higher in Pakistani cuisine. Furthermore, our spices are different even the garam masala taste different… by Shaan, National, Laziza or any other Pakistani brand vs any Indian brand…the taste, texture and smell are different. And then simply there are a lot recipes which are exclusive like dam-pukht, chapali kebab, takatak, bakra mussalalam.. Lahore Naan, chikkar cholay, siri payeee in Pakistani cuisine while dhokla, dossa etc. And generally, Indians use stronger spices especially more chilli. Last edited: Apr 7, 2019 at 5:53 PM Thanks x 1

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Architect Nao Saito writes a travel diary about exploring recipes, homes and kitchens throughout South India

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“I am a Japanese woman from Tokyo, and an architect by profession. I like designing on a small scale, particularly furniture or interiors.” And so begins the book, Travels Through South Indian Kitchens by Nao Saito.
The author’s interest in the every-day life connection between people, their environment and culture morphed into a research project that resulted in a book. It began with an invitation from the publisher of Tara Books* offering a three-month residency at the publishing house in Chennai (formerly Madras), the capital of the state of Tamil Nadu in India. Saito’s architectural tenet and design philosophy, anchored by her belief that “a space is not just a fixed physical structure – it is also fluid, shaped by the way in which people use it” lead her to focus on a venture related to kitchens – the metaphoric “heart” within a home and a primary key to a broad and deep understanding of people and their cultures. TravelWireNews Chatroom for Readers (join us)
Through visits to diverse homes in various South Indian communities, interacting with the cooks in their kitchens, sharing food and friendly, intimate chats, writing and sketching her observations, Saito produced a travel diary enhanced with floor plans, photos, conversations with and recipes from the Indian women she met.
Her kitchen explorations result in a broadened understanding of not only the physical structure of kitchens, but its psychological significance. One of her first revelations was her realization that “the kitchen need not be a single room. It can expand to other spaces inside and even outside… beyond what I could have imagined.”
Saito’s illustrative sketches, simple and unadorned (charming, somewhat child-like – but a precocious one), mirror her writing style: accessible, conversational. A tête-à-tête between friends. She has an eye for detail which she shares as she examines the kitchens visited, the food eaten, the people met and the lifestyles lived.
Tamil cuisine, called Chettinad, is often cited as the most renowned cuisine of Tamil Nadu, recognized for its use of fresh ground masalas (spice mixes and blends), sun-dried meats and salted vegetables. The Chettiars were once traditionally vegetarians, but through trade influences, they have also adopted non-vegetarian habits. The recipes in Saito’s book, nearly two dozen in all, are family dishes from the women who cook in the kitchens she visited – wives, mothers, grandmothers, aunties. They include a varied range of vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes, such as Verkadalai Chutney (peanut chutney), Kathirikai Kootu (stew with eggplant and dal), Puttu (steamed rice and coconut rolls), Shrimp Curry (tamarind stew), and Kuzhi Paniyaram (fried dumplings).
The book, unique in its subject matter, universal in its recounting, is a pleasurable read. For those seeking a respite from the ordinary, a worthy diversion, or a thought-provoking work, Travels Through south Indian Kitchens fits the bill.
*Tara Books is an independent publishing house identified by its website as “a team informed by feminism and other movements for social justice”, and whose guiding principle is embodied in its opening quote:“Pushing the boundaries of the book form in an age that is busy writing its obituary.”

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Apr 6, We Recommend These 75 Florida Restaurants

Corn Pones at a Florida Cracker Restaurant FLORIDA CRACKER RESTAURANTS
Okay, maybe there’s really no such thing as a Florida Cracker Restaurant.
But there is good old genuine Southern cooking, and long before there was a Cracker Barrel at almost every interstate exit, there were Florida restaurants where southern fare was common.
In the years since World War Two, and continuing to today, millions of new people have moved to the state. They come from just about everywhere in the world.
The good news is they have brought with them all kinds of new food choices to Florida: Italian, German, Thai, Korean, Turkish, Lebanese, Indian, Brazilian, Colombian, and on and on and on.
And we can’t forget New York or Chicago style pizza, Philly Cheesteak, or Reuben Sandwiches. I’m getting hungry just thinking about the many choices.
The bad news is that it’s getting harder to find the old Florida restaurants that used to specialize in Southern cooking.
Southern cooking enjoyed by the early Florida Crackers was influenced by African, English, Scottish, Irish, French, Spanish, and Native American cuisines.
Some of the foods used in Southern cooking are squash, corn (including grits), black eyed peas, okra, rice, eggplant, sesame, sorghum, and melons.
The Florida Cracker’s love of a full breakfast comes from the English culture. Bacon and sausage, grits, biscuits, and fried eggs are just right.
A good Cracker meal could include pan-fried chicken, peas, greens (collard, mustard, turnip, or poke salad), mashed potatoes, cornbread, corn pone, and country ham.
Don’t forget hushpuppies, fried catfish, pit cooked barbecue. fried green tomatoes, okra, and sweet potatoes.
There are still some restaurants in Florida that serve some or all of the above.
These restaurants are what this page is all about, and you are invited to submit one you know about or comment on one that’s already listed.
ANNIE’S CAFE, Cedar Key. She specializes in good old fashioned cooking that takes you back to the simpler times in Old Florida. They have grits and greens, biscuits and gravy, and whatever the fresh fish of the day might be. It goes without saying that they have great hushpuppies. A favorite is their grouper sandwich, and they often have soft shell crab and if you’re lucky, they are one of the few places around that still serves mullet when they are available.
AUNT CATFISH’S, Port Orange . This charming southern style restaurant is at the mainland foot of the bridge that crosses the Halifax River to the South Daytona Beach area. It has wonderful river views from both inside and outside seating area. I have only eaten there during their famous Sunday buffets, and have never been disappointed in anything I’ve eaten at Aunt Catfish’s.
APALACHEE RESTAURANT, Bristol. Although you can order from the menu, the buffet is usually a treat too. North Florida is Southern in culture, and the food in this small restaurant confirms it. Among the offerings are Southern Fried Chicken, Barbecue Beef Brisket, catfish, turnip greens (just called greens down here), corn bread and corn bread dressing, white acre peas, biscuits, and other Southern staples.
BLACKWATER INN, Astor . Blackwater Inn has an Old Florida Menu that includes full entrees as well as soups and sandwiches. Fried oysters are a specialty, along with fish sandwiches, clam chowder, shrimp, catfish and scallops along with other fish specials of the day. You can even get frog legs, chicken wings and crab legs. One of the house specialties is grilled quail. My favorite is the Florida Cracker Platter for $17.99 with 3 oz. of gator tail, 3 oz. of frog legs, 6 oz. of fingerling catfish, all breaded and deep-fried.
DIXIE CROSSROADS, Titusville. Dixie Crossroads is a very large restaurant that features an equally large menu with something for everyone. Its primary focus is on shrimp and seafood from nearby Port Canaveral. It also has an extensive selection of steaks, barbecue ribs, chicken, and gator bites. Southern fried cooking is used here, and they also have a large selection of favorite vegetables.
GOODRICH’S, Oak Hill. I love mullet and wanted to have it as my main meal. The waitress told me they usually have it but for some reason they were out right now. There were plenty of other things on the menu, so I didn’t whine. Entrees include fried seafood baskets, crab cakes, clam strips, shrimp, fish, and oysters. Lots of oysters. I don’t like oysters but would like to attend one of their oyster roasts anyway. That’s how they got to be famous locally. They have oyster roast parties on the deck for groups of twenty or more.
O’NEALS COUNTRY BUFFET, Madison. The restaurant features a country buffet with many favorite Southern favorites. They serve smoked chicken, for example, smoked on their own property. It’s an “all you can eat” venture, so it’s best to come in hungry and leave well filled. Fried chicken, fried catfish, green beans. butterbeans, are among the daily vegetables, always fresh. On some nights they have seafood offerings like large shrimp prepared various ways. The menu changes daily.
ROBIN’S COUNTRY KITCHEN, Floral City. I went here with breakfast on my mind, but saw various other items on the small menu and daily special board: chicken salad sandwich, hamburger, french fries, Italian sausage soup, house salad, bacon and cheese omelet, coleslaw, grilled ham and cheese, corn beef hash, grits and various desserts including coconut cream pie. I had three eggs over easy, sausage patties, tater tots and silver dollar pancakes with plenty of butter and syrup, washed down with good coffee.
SOUTHERN FRESH, Safety Harbor. This small place has inside and outside dining and is the place to go for seafood and southern cooking. They have meatloaf, mashed potatoes, green beans, fried chicken, roast pork, collard green, and various other grilled vegetables. Their southern fried chicken is not made in advance. It’s made to order while you wait for it. They also have a fantastic dessert selection.
STEPH’S SOUTHERN SOUL, Dade City. Steph’s is a buffet style restaurant that features several options. If you are really hungry, you can order Herold’s Plate that consists of 1 1/2 meats, 2 side dishes, and bread. That plate is $9.99 and the sizes and prices step down from there. The meat selections typically include fried fish, meat loaf, baked chicken, fried chicken, smoked BBQ ribs, liver & onions, pork chops and the meat of the day. Side orders usually available are collard greens, green beans, mac & cheese, mashed potatoes, okra & tomatoes, cabbage, rice, sweet potato souffle, rutabaga, beans, and squash.
THE CATFISH PLACE, St. Cloud . I’ve been visiting The Catfish Place since it opened in 1973. You won’t be surprised to learn that this restaurant features seafood, and especially catfish. Their catfish is reportedly delivered fresh daily from Lake Okeechobee to the south. It certainly tastes fresh, and I’ve never been disappointed in the quality or quantity of their meals. You will find plenty of Southern favorites such as hushpuppies and country vegetables. There “all you can eat” catfish dinners bring in people from miles around. The interior decor is Florida country.
YEARLING, Cross Creek. The Yearling has been a Florida dining legend since 1952. Just don’t be expecting a fancy literary boutique style cafe; this is a southern restaurant, and it’s in the middle of rural cracker country. The weathered old restaurant building is not impressive from the outside, but don’t let that stop you from going inside. And once inside, don’t be expecting gourmet food with fancy trappings and trimmings. This is the place for good ole Florida vittles. DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE FLORIDA RESTAURANT?
IF IT’S NOT ALREADY ON THIS PAGE, TELL US ABOUT IT! For your contribution to be accepted, give the restaurant’sname, street address, town, and phone number. Enter Name of Restaurant, Street Address, Town, and Phone Number Tell Us About It!

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Nuchas Empanadas on Shark Tank: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know – Buzz Unites

Nuchas Empanadas on Shark Tank: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
NBC
Ariel Barbouth
Nuchas Empanadas is a food stand company owned by Ariel Barbouth. He will be appearing on tonight’s episode of Shark Tank in the hopes that investors will help him sell to retailers and supermarket chains.
Nuchas Empanadas was established in 2011 and has several different locations throughout New York. Read on to learn more about how Barbouth started the company, and how he hopes to expand it moving forward.
Here’s what you need to know: 1. Nuchas Specializes In Empanadas Made from Traditional Argentinian Recipes
Nuchas specializes in empanadas, which are baked or fried pastries that hold any number of fillings. According to the Shark Tank Blog, they bake their empanadas and fills them with beef, pork, chicken and various dessert fillings. They also provide vegetarian and vegan offerings. Each location prepares their empanadas by hand, and uses fresh ingredients without added hormones or antibiotics. The average cost for a Nuchas empanada is between $4-6.
Nuchas offers several dough options; including rosemary, basil, spinach, paprika, Parmesan and turmeric. The most common empanada they sell adheres to the traditional Argentinian recipe: beef, onions, hot pepper powder, oregano, hard-boiled egg and olives. It was this recipe that first inspired Barbouth to go into business. Nuchas also sells empanadas that represent cultures from around the world. You can check out the different menu choices below: Vegetarian portobello mushroom and spinach with berbere, an Ethiopian spice mix Vegan Indian shiitake curry with eggplant, zucchini, potatoes and coconut milk Chicken tikka popular in Bangladesh and Pakistan with yogurt, red chili and ginger paste Creole-style shrimp jambalaya with andouille sausage Mexican-inspired chicken with chipotle sauce, olives and smoky Spanish paprika Nutella, apples and cranberries for dessert 2. Ariel Barbouth Studied Tech at Boston University Before Starting the Company
Barbouth was born in Argentina but has spent most of his life in the United States. He graduated from Boston University with an M.S. in Innovation and Technology, and briefly worked in the field of venture capitalism. According to All Shark Tank Products, however, Barbouth has always had a passion for cuisine, and invested in several start-up food companies before starting his own.
During a visit to Argentina, Barbouth rediscovered empanadas, and decided to make them the focus of his business. He moved to New York with his wife Leni in 2009, and by 2011, they had invested $9,000 of their own money into the company. The first Nuchas stand opened at a small kiosk in Times Square, and was followed by a pair of food trucks and pushcarts.
“I’m from Argentina, and in Argentina we eat a lot of empanadas. But this is New York, this is not Argentina,” Barbouth told CBS Local. “So trying to come to New York to just do what they do in my country wasn’t really what I wanted, because I moved here because I love food from everywhere. We’re in the hand-held food business. We happen to make great empanadas.” 3. Nuchas Has Won Several Critics Honors Including the 2014 People’s Taste Award
Nuchas Empanadas has won several critics honors since its inception. It won the Rookie of the Year Vendy and the People’s Choice Vendy in 2013, which are annual awards presented by the Street Vendor Project. It also won the 2014 People’s Taste Award and the Best New York Food Truck in the New York vs. Boston food truck competition, which is an annual competition held in Boston. Nuchas’ Jambalaya empanada also took the award for Best Seafood.
Barbouth spoke to Business Interview about his success and the great risks that his family took. “My other passion has been helping small businesses get started and seeing ideas and dreams become reality,” he said. “As a venture capitalist, I was able to do that across a wide range of industries, food being one of them.”
“I’ve registered the Nuchas.com domain name in December 2006, so it has been over 5 years in the making,” he continued. “My one motto in life has always been, ‘It’s all about timing’, and only in 2009 we decided to give it a go. The hardest part was really how and when to get it started in a place like NY, without much capital. Rents can easily crash you in no time so you really have to be cautious on when to take each step.” 4. Barbouth Believes That Empanadas Are Becoming a ‘Mainstream’ Food
Barbouth is confident that empanadas are growing in popularity throughout the United States. “Most gourmet stores and supermarkets as well as many high-end restaurants have been featuring a version of an empanada in their offerings for quite some time now,” he observed. “They are on the verge of becoming mainstream. Over the past two months, we have had people from all over the world not only eating Nuchas, but also taking pictures of our kiosk and writing about it on their blogs and newspapers.”
Barbouth said that his initial gut feeling was pivotal in moving forward with the company. “It all started with a very strong gut feeling, which has proved correct over the past few years and specially since we opened in the heart of Times Square,” he recalled. “It is common knowledge that if you can offer a truly great product, made fresh (baked on premises throughout the day in our case), with the best ingredients at a reasonable price in a convenient package, people will buy it.”
“Although I am from Argentina, it seems that I needed to live in the US and then move back to Argentina to really understand that there is a world of difference between an empanada and a truly AMAZING empanada,” he added. “This is how Nuchas was created. It so happens that what you call Argentine Street foods could have all those attributes and more in one simple package.” 5. Barbouth Wants ‘Shark Tank’ Investors to Help Crossover Into Supermarket Chains
Acco rding to the Shark Tank Blog , Barbouth will be seeking to expand his retail presence and his ties to supermarket chains. He will no doubt want one of the Shark Tank investors to offer him a bid, so that he can make that transition as easily as possible.
“The feedback been incredible on every level, both from happy customers as well as offers to bring our brand elsewhere, in the US and overseas,” he told Business Interview. When asked what his plans were for the future, Barbouth said, “We are on schedule to open a second location in March or April and a third one a few months after that, both in NY. After that, our plan calls for expansion throughout the Northeast as part of our brand building.” Share this:

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Wonderful friendly old charm hotel

This hotel was my favourite on the golden triangle tour as it had a much friendlier and personal approach, all the others felt very corporate. The service was superb and the food very tasty for both Indian and European cuisine. Conveniently placed for visiting the national park.

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Bisi Bengaluru: Run A-MOC with authentic Chinese

A jewel from Bengaluru’s past, Memories of China (MOC), started when Chinese cuisine first began to gain favour, back in the 1980s. Three decades later, it’s still a favourite. Akin to a learned and all-knowing dowager, she has been a lantern of warmth over the Cantonment for over 30 years. This wise old Chinese maiden, Memories of China, has witnessed the city’s landscape change, mature, evolve, watched her peers disappear into oblivion. Today, she till “woks” the talk beautifully. Now, as Taj MG Road gets a wand of new spangled magic in a brand new avatar, it’s also ready with open arms to welcome all. The refurbished Taj MG Road celebrates its new look with contemporary interiors, wooded exteriors, larger gold and beige-toned sensor controlled rooms, a brand new coffee shop and al fresco by a quaint poolside with Taj’s iconic warmth. The change comes after 19 months of dedicated refurbishing as the hotel was turned around.
What was an after-party hangout in the 80s, the place for a sumptuous midnight meal for some, a languorous dinner or business hotel for others, comes revamped courtesy David of the Singapore-based firm DBTA. Swanky, earthy textures, the hotel revisits its glory days with this new look, as General Manager Manoj Mathew V.M. scurries around, an eagle-eye running over every detail. A jewel from Bengaluru’s past, Memories of China (MOC), started when Chinese cuisine first began to gain favour, back in the 1980s. Three decades later, it’s still a favourite.
New in town
Taj’s brand new coffee shop augurs a new era. Taking lessons from history, it’s called The Trinity Square, and has clean wooded lines, an English countryside feel in a space that has incorporated the previous Mosaic and Graze, and also houses cake shop, Sugar and Spice. Chef Saikat has added biryani, kathi rolls, lamb shanks, and coastal delights to the menu. A woodfire pizza oven, and a two-pronged buffet with a gentle joie de vivre, it reminds one of an era when Taj Residency’s coffee shop was the go-to. Seems like it’s that time once again.
If food and emotions are intertwined into the fabric of a desi foodie, so is MOC – That steadfast place to tuck into authentic Chinese, where the food, ambience and service is stellar. Executive chef Saikat Nag, who was earlier with Taj Lands End, Mumbai, and in London with Taj Bombay Brasserie St James Court, brings his signature cuisine, Indian and coastal to the new Taj’s coffee shop too. Chef Nag sat with Master Chef Jinhong Luo to add flavour to the sumptuous MOC menu which retains its old soul, quite like the wise dowager.
Chef Luo’s signatures crystal prawn dumpling with ginseng flower, wok-fried shredded pork with Szechuan vegetables, add flavours to the exhaustive menu as do the master chef’s finesse in dim sums and dumplings. “Memories of China has been a statement since the very beginning. Our challenge has been to evolve by acknowledging trends with authenticity and consistency,” says the chef who is originally from Hunan, a mountainous province. For those who love the Chinese Steam Hot Pot, Chef Luo has a worthy offering. “We source exclusive ingredients from China – wild asparagus, enoki mushrooms, honey beans, ginseng, pack choy, longan, grouper fish and ma po tofu. Our menu features a careful selection of Hunan, Cantonese and Szechuan dishes,” says the chef.
A flavourful green tea started our forage into this old hand at Chinese cuisine. The popular steamed Coriander Chung Fung (rice roll) had a wholesome and caramel-ly soya stock, with wild mushroom – beautiful with spring onion nibbles. Then came a simple pork dim sum with a thick broth on a soup spoon, to be slurped whole, we took it bite by bite (given its size!). With a layer of burnt chilli paste and tangy spicy sauce, it was delicious. The parcel could be thinner, though.
The Peking duck, a favourite, was made with a flourish, carved by a sous chef, in an interactive table, as we chomped on fresh, crackling and glazed slivers of duck meat with cucumber and chilli sticks with a lip-smacking hearty sweet bean sauce to imbue it with flavour. The duck was dry… the meat is such… we added more scallions, green onions and sauce.
The main course came next, a large menu to choose from. A delicious, smoky burnt garlic fried rice that one can chopstick away as is. The hakka noodles were okay, and the kung pao chicken with cashews was subtle in flavour. We loved the freshness of the dishes. A black bean chilli fish with an unmistakeable peppery hint with a flaky steamed grouper complimented the grainy spicy of the bean. Wow. And the stir fried Chinese greens were sautéed perfectly. “The vegetables are sourced specially to give the dishes authenticity. The old menu is popular, and weekends are packed, so we have stayed true to MOC’s essence,” adds Chef Saikat.
“MOC has over 30 years of knowing a city’s palate. That’s a rarity today. It is also the only place where the interiors are untouched,” explains Praful Narchal, director, sales and marketing.
The spicy golden fried garlic prawns were pink, crispy and delicious, we loved the sprinkling of chilli and crunch though a nice honey chilli dip would have enhanced the bite. The chef also stir-fried the remaining duck – it was scrumptious. We had date pancakes, glazed with honey, crunchy with a creamy litchi ice cream to end the meal. Satiated, and rightly so. The simplicity of an old hand serving delights over decades is what keeps Memories of China pertinent, and with emotions as the Indian calling card… suffice to say there are many more decades under MOC’s belt!
Memories of China: Taj MG Road, 41/3 MG Road
Call 66604444
Meal for two: Rs 3,000
Must haves: Dim sums and dumplings, hot pot, steamed grouper in black bean, stir fried veggies and date pancakes with ice-cream

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NEEDS staff for four different cafes and restaurants Melton Area – Truganina | 1215007480

Needs urgently new staff for four different cafes
1. Bannocburn 3331
2. Drysdale 3222
3. Trugnina 3029( two cafes opening soon)
4. Ararat 3377
[ ] Bannockurn 3331/Drysdale 3222
Both Kitchen and cafe management opportunities exist for the right individual who:
• Have at least 12 months experienced working in commercial kitchen
• Ability to work unsupervised
• Skills to Supervising other staff
• Experience with ordering and managing stock
• Be able to work as a team as well as independently.
• Reliable, responsible and fast learner
• Looking for long term commitment.
• Ability to work under pressure and efficiently.
• Ability to work under pressure and efficiently
[ ] Trugnina 3029 ( two cafes; kebab shop &Indian food)
(Needs kitchen helpers and Indian cook )
Looking For cooks with experience in Indian Cuisines and work with us in our Indian Restaurant in Trugnina . Must be hard working be able to work without supervision.
To be successful you must have:
• at least one year Experience
• Experience creating exciting menus including main dishes, specials and desserts
• Ability to work under pressure with efficiency.
• Ability to work unsupervised . Self motivated.
• Skills to communicate other staff .
• Be able to work in a team work as well as independently.
• Reliable, responsible and fast learner.
• Looking for long term commitment.
[ ] Ararat 3377
Join a well known, and busy , established restaurant . Great work environment, We are looking for committed kitchen cooks that have commercial kitchen experience , our restaurant follow home-made food style such as Pasta , wrapes , sandwiches , cooking meals etc, it is full restaurant menu. We are looking for someone who can demonstrate fresh food preparation.
We require a full time experienced Cooks with strong food preparation skills. Please apply if you can demonstrate that you can meet the following requirements:
– At least 2 years food prep and cooking experience
– Have Certificates or a Diploma in Commercial Cookery (not a requirment but will be seen as a positive);
– Has a management skills , food hygiene, temperature records …etc
– The ability to communicate clearly .
– Assist in food orders .
– Excellent chopping/cutting/slicing skills;
– Welling to relocate to Ararat.
We offer excellent working conditions and look forward to building a team work ¹. If you have above skills then please forward your resume by replying to this ad. and clarify which site you interested to work in.
sar @*

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