Taking a Broome to Classic French Cuisine We Speak with Chef, Bjoern Schorpp

Taking a Broome to Classic French Cuisine We Speak with Chef, Bjoern Schorpp

From eating guinea pigs in Peru to minced squirrel in Laos and fermented stinky tofu in Taiwan – there is not much on a plate that German-born Chef Bjoern Schorpp hasn’t tried.
Now on the pans as Head Chef at La Perle restaurant in Broome, it is quintessential French cuisine with a tropical twist that Bjoern brings to the table. Nestled in Kimberley Sands Resort and Spa , La Perle is named for the iconic pearl acclaimed the world over as a gem and food source – the meat of which is a menu highlight at the restaurant.
“I believe La Perle fits perfectly into the Broome dining scene, which is such a diverse mix of cultures and cuisines like no other place in Australia,” Bjoern says. “You will find German, Chinese, Vietnamese, Japanese, Indian, Italian and Egyptian food here – from quick eats, casual restaurants and food trucks to fine dining all in one place.
“What we want to achieve is to combine the best local ingredients with one of the classic cuisines of the world. With our beautiful open-air setting within the resort next to the blue light pool and bush on the other side, white tablecloths and attentive service, we aim to create a dining experience like no other in Broome.”
It was far from Western Australian shores that this Chef grew up, hailing originally from a small town called Grieth on the banks of the Rhine River in the German countryside, directly bordering the Netherlands and surrounded by farmland and forests.
In the local fields, farmers would grow all sorts of vegetables and fruit and during the Summer you would find Bjoern and his friends in the fruit orchids snatching cherries, apples and strawberries; or fishing for pike, perch and eel in the river.
“Growing up in such surrounds created a close bond between myself and the land, which gave me a good understanding of seasonal fruit and vegetables, as well as how to use them and the importance of freshness.
“I can really say that I had the best childhood a kid could ever have.”
His first cooking memories revolve around baking cakes from scratch without a recipe at age 13, as a surprise for his mother and that love of the sweeter side of cooking has never left him.
“I believe that as desserts are the last course guests will see, eat and remember, they must be special and achieved perfectly. And who doesn’t like sweets?”
Ambitious and only wanting to learn from the best, Bjoern sought out the best restaurant in his home area when looking for an apprenticeship, finding a small French establishment willing to take him on. He realised that 80% of the cooking techniques he was learning were French and once completing his apprenticeship he moved on to work for Michelin-starred restaurants in Europe.
For the next 18 years, he continued his journey at venues around the globe including Hong Kong, Japan, Cambodia, Canada, New Zealand and Australia – where he is now a permanent resident. During his travels, he has tasted many strange and outrageous dishes, that turned his stomach upside down.
“Top of the list has to be fermented stinky tofu in Taiwan. It took a few laundries to get rid of the smell on my clothes and my taste buds took weeks to recover. If it wasn’t for my profession, I would never have eaten it, as all your senses tell you to avoid it from the moment you smell it 150 metres down the road.”
In contrast, a bouillabaisse takes some time to cook but it’s well worth the effort, once you enjoy the first spoonful of this delicious classic fish soup. Invented by the poor fishermen of Marseille using leftover catch, the bouillabaisse has surely become one of the most timeless French dishes of all time and Bjoern’s version is no different.
“With all the amazing local seafood available in WA, it was clear to me that it must be on the menu – not cooked with the leftover catch of fishermen anymore, but rather with high-quality seafood. It has become our signature dish at the restaurant,” he says.
Another iconic French dish loved and known by all is crème brulee and Bjoern’s recipe pays homage to La Perle’s tropical location.
“I started experimenting and found that pandan, coconut and pineapple sounded very tropical to me. The nutty pandan flavour, coconut and fruitiness of the pineapple makes a great combination and fits right into Broome’s climate, or anywhere on a hot Summer’s day.”
While he only cooks French food at the restaurant, surprisingly Bjoern mainly dines on Cantonese food at home, as his wife is from Hong Kong and usually dishes up come meal time.
“As much as I cook with expensive and high-quality ingredients at work, I do like to eat a good meat pie from the butcher, from time to time.”
As for the future, Bjoern, unlike other Chefs, has no plans to open his own restaurant – rather he would seek an opportunity as an Executive Group Chef, or in the kitchen of a multi-outlet establishment. As long as he continues to grow, learn and stay healthy, he will be happy. Bon sante Bjoern!

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Hotel Review: Hyderabad Marriott Hotel & Convention Centre, Hyderabad in India

Home / Travel / Hotel Reviews / Hotel Review: Hyderabad Marriott Hotel & Convention Centre, Hyderabad in India Hotel Review: Hyderabad Marriott Hotel & Convention Centre, Hyderabad in India By Jyoti Balani on 6th July 2019
I recently visited the Hyderabad Marriott Hotel & Convention Centre on invite by General Manager Sudeep Sharma. Overlooking the famous Hussain Sagar Lake and centrally located, cultural attractions, shopping arcades and the IT hub are in close proximity from the hotel.
The hotel comprises of 295 luxuriously appointed rooms including 11 suites with amenities that ensure a comfortable stay. The lake view room offers a panoramic view of the idyllic lake. Besides carpet flooring, elegant silk upholstery, each room comes with a Revive bed that spells indulgence, luxury and comfort with it’s designer duvet covers, linen furnishings and super soft sink-in mattresses.
The hotel is equipped with high speed internet to cater to its business travellers. As I entered my spacious and comfortable suite, I was delighted to be welcomed by personalised amenities in the living room and a basket full of luscious local mangoes. Guests are assured a high level of service from check-in to check-out
Sudeep Sharma is the new General Manager of the Hyderabad Marriott Hotel & Convention Centre. With a consistently ascending career graph for over 18 years, Sudeep is a seasoned hospitality professional who has held various leadership positions with brands such as The Taj, Le Meridien and Claridges across multiple cities like Mumbai, Jaipur, Pune, Delhi, Lucknow and Ahmedabad.
His previous assignment was with Fairfield by Marriott, Lucknow where he served as the Hotel Manager and orchestrated the growth of the property. Sudeep’s Marriott journey began in 2011 in Food & Beverage at the JW Marriott Mumbai, Juhu. Sudeep is versatile and an achievement-oriented professional with a keen inclination to deliver operational excellence that reflects year-on-year success in achieving business objectives and accolades such as Restauranteur and F&B Leader for the APAC region in the year 2013-14. The hotel is located in the centre of the city of Hyderabad
Throughout his journey with Marriott International Sudeep has been the recipient of many accolades and was awarded the General Manager of the Year by FHRAI for 2018 and Global Diamond General Manager of the Year in 2019 for Fairfield by Marriott for his contributions towards hotel’s operational success.
He is a fitness enthusiast and loves travelling with his family. Under his able leadership the hotel will continue to provide guests with creative and inspiring moments, while striving to further enhance service quality with innovation and making every guest travel brilliant. Sudeep said, “The Hyderabad Marriott Hotel & Convention Centre features a blend of old world grace and authenticity. We offer specialised dining experiences with carefully crafted food, served with genuine and warm hospitality.”
Hyderabad Marriott Hotel & Convention Centre is a popular MICE destination and houses one of the biggest Convention Centres in the City. Connected to the Courtyard by Marriott, Hyderabad by a sky bridge the hotel offers over 50,000 sq.ft of meeting space area with a the state of art Convention Centre and 17 meeting rooms of various sizes to accommodate 5-1500 people, just ideal for breakaway sessions. Guests can find a relaxing spot by the outdoor pool
An extension to the Marriott Convention Centre is the well-manicured “Pearl Gardens”– the outdoor lawn with the capacity to host 2000 people. The Pearl Gardens is a newly built space with lush green lawns and dramatic architectural designs spread across 13,000 sq ft. to meet the world class standards in the heart of the city. Pearl Gardens rejuvenates the entire concept of an open-air space and can cater right from a corporate party, wedding, stage performances and almost anything for an outdoor extravaganza.
While in Hyderabad Marriott Hotel & Convention Centre it is a great idea to spend time in the Hyderabad Baking Company which offers delightful desserts, ice creams, teas, coffees, sandwiches, pastries, salads, healthy and refreshing drinks and local mangoes to relish. I also enjoyed a couple of fantastic dinners in Bidri, the hotel’s elegant and romantic Indian restaurant. Bidri is the hotel’s elegant and romantic Indian restaurant.
Bidri is a great place to enjoy the authentic flavours of royal cuisine in tastefully decorated interiors with live ghazal singers which take you back in time. Chef Pawan Manhas dished up his award winning Hyderabadi biryani for me while I was a guest in this hotel.
Okra the multi-cuisine restaurant works up a treat for the eyes as well as the palate. It boasts of a show kitchen with several live counters serving Indian and Oriental delicacies. Altitude Lounge Bar, on the 8th floor of the hotel offers exotic cocktails in exciting varieties; lip smacking short eats and also undoubtedly gives a spectacular view of the sunset by the Lake Side. Executive Sous chef MV Naidu came up a local thaali for me which comprised of a delicious seafood curry served with neer dosas and tamarind rice. Altitude Lounge Bar has spectacular views over the lake
While in the hotel I visited the Tattva Spa and Salon several times and felt very relaxed and rejuvenated. The therapists in the spa and salon were extremely efficient and friendly and ensured that I had a super time. I started by experiencing the signature spa treatment followed by trying a scrub and wrap. The salon is a great place to get a haircut or unwind with a pedicure as I did during my stay.
Hyderabad Marriott Hotel & Convention Centre is a perfect destination for relaxation, rejuvenation when one is visiting Hyderabad for pleasure and also an ideal hotel for business travellers. The Convention Centre makes it a great venue for those who are in the city to plan weddings or grand events. Definitely worth several visits when in Hyderabad ! The Tattva Spa and Salon offers a wide range of rejuvenating treatments and therapies
Address: Tank Bund Rd, Opposite, Hussain Sagar, Lake, Hyderabad, Telangana 500080, India Phone: +91 40 6652 2999

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X Jeddah Festival Offers Unique Experience

The official Saudi Press Agency X Jeddah Festival Offers Unique Experience Saturday 1440/11/3 – 2019/07/06 Riyadh, Jul 6, 2019, SPA — The General Entertainment Authority (GEA) continues to host ‘X Jeddah’ festival on the Waterfront within the ‘Jeddah Season’ until July 18. The festival spans across seven central locations in different areas of the seaside and includes fun activities for all visitors, families and individuals alike. X Jed comprises a variety of free multicultural activities and events vibrant with musical performances, performing arts, comedy segments and virtual reality games, in addition to shopping areas, cafes and exceptional dining experiences. The offerings are held throughout the day, and guests can especially enjoy worldwide touring shows, all along the Waterfront from 5 pm till midnight. For theater lovers, X Jed is offering a variety of exciting plays starring a host of Saudi and Gulf artists. The theater also offers stand-up comedy shows by a group of Saudi youth, as well as ‘Love Factory’ shows, and magic shows by the ‘Laughter Factory.’ The Marina Area will host multicultural musical, and dance performances, including Colombian and African bands, and drums and percussion shows accompanied by lighting and laser displays, and other shows garnered from different places around the world. Interactive entertainment is also offered in X Jed with the Spanish Fun Carnival, inspired by the Carnival held in the Spanish city of Valencia every year to celebrate spring. Visitors will watch a fireworks show, giant puppets, and exquisite art that will dazzle the audience by its cultural depth and portrayal of the Saudi heritage. The Carnival also offers several different cultural shows weekly, including Spanish, African, Chinese, American and Indian. Moreover, the Carnival includes a variety of fun activities and games, where a tent is designated for video game enthusiasts. Also, an area is dedicated to exciting activities including flying in the air tunnel, the thrilling bungee jumping experience, a strongman competition, and a monster-slaying ride in the House of Terror with its Saudi-made designs. The Carnival also includes a zoo with many species of exotic animals and birds including toucan birds, parrots, flamingo, and giant tortoises. Among X Jed’s numerous features is the fully-prepared venue specially designed to cater to the visitors’ needs through accommodating several shops, booths, and cafes in the ‘X-Mall,’ a closed and air-conditioned lounge designed in huge cargo containers to go with the fun surrounding. Additionally, X Jed takes into account diverse food tastes and is, therefore, hosting several fine dining restaurants serving international and varied cuisine, as well as many food carts that allow young Saudis to exhibit their skills at preparing a variety of food and beverages. –SPA 18:11 LOCAL TIME 15:11 GMT 0005

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July 4th 2019: How a tax on playing cards and a thwarted tea shipment led to American

July 4 1776 was a prominent day in American history, as the 13 colonies successfully claimed their independence from the British Empire. In what is now known as Independence Day, the US’ most beloved national holiday is celebrated annually on the Fourth of July, with millions of Americans coming together to celebrate the anniversary of the birth of their nation. From the history behind America’s independence to the modern celebrations, here is everything you need to know. What is Independence Day? Independence Day commemorates the day the Declaration of Independence was adopted in 1776. Introduced by the Second Continental Congress, the statement outlined that the 13 American colonies were united, independent states, who were no longer subject to British monarch. Recognised annually by Americans, fireworks, parades and other patriotic celebrations are held every year on the Fourth of July to celebrate the colonies breaking free from British control. Why did the Americans want independence? The relationship between the settlers and British had been amicable, however tensions started to escalate over the imposition of British laws and taxes. To help control settlements in the western territories, King George III introduced the Royal Proclamation of 1763, preventing the colonists settling along the Appalachian Mountains. After the French and Indian War came to a close, the Quartering Act was passed in 1765, ordering the American colonies to help house the British soldiers. Also in 1765, Britain then introduced the Stamp Act to help handle war debts; this required colonists to pay a tax on printed paper including newspapers, licenses and playing cards. Colonial governor Thomas Hutchinson (1711 – 1780) escaping from local rioters after demanding Stamp Tax from them Credit: Getty Images/Hulton Archive Unsurprisingly, the colonists were not pleased. ‘No taxation without representation’ became the cry around 1765 after a rise in Britain’s national debt forced the colonists to raise import tariffs and crack down on smuggling to raise funds. There was also a growing sense of nationalism in these largely agricultural colonies and acts of American colonial defiance began in the form of rebellions, fighting and protests. Social unrest escalated further in 1773, when patriots in Boston famously destroyed a shipment of tea by boarding three ships in Boston harbour and throwing 342 chests overboard in protest over the Tea Act. This became known as the ‘Boston Tea Party’. These rebellions over taxes led to full-scale revolutionary war. What happened in the Revolutionary War? Determined to fight for their independence, Great Britain’s 13 North American Colonies fought for control over colonial affairs. They included: New Hampshire Massachusetts Connecticut Rhode Island New York New Jersey Pennsylvania Delaware Maryland Virginia North Carolina South Carolina Georgia George Washington led the American forces to victory and, thanks to the diplomatic efforts of Thomas Jefferson, France and Spain acted as allies, providing arms for the war. Independence was formally declared on July 2 1776; on July 4 1776, the final version of the Declaration was approved by Congress, announcing that the 13 colonies were free from British rule. While the Fourth of July marks the adoption of the Declaration of the Independence, most of the Congress members actually signed the document on August 2, 1776. Following the Declaration of Independence, they went on to become the United States of America – however conflict continued up until 1783. How is the day celebrated in the US? In what was a simple but powerful mark of respect to each of the colonies, 13 gunshots were fired as part of the first celebration of independence on July 4 1777, a year after the Declaration of Independence was approved. George Washington commemorated the Fourth of July the following year in 1778 by ordering a double ration of rum for his soldiers at Ross Hall, near New Jersey. Meanwhile outside the US, Benjamin Franklin and John Adams organised a celebratory dinner for Americans in Paris. The Fourth of July was officially acknowledged as a state celebration by the Massachusetts General Court in 1781, and Moravians in North Carolina, observed the day with The Psalm of Joy music programme in 1783. Nearly 100 years on from the Declaration’s approval, Independence Day was made an unpaid holiday for federal employees in 1870, and it was later established as a paid holiday by US Congress in 1938. Nowadays it’s typically marked by patriotic activities – usually outside. Think parades, camping, barbecues, beers and fireworks, with as much red, white and blue as possible – all punctuated with a backing track of “Star spangled banner”, “Yankee Doodle” and “God Bless America”. Politicians also like to make a point of appearing at Independence Day celebrations and praising the nation’s heritage, history and people. Who celebrates it apart from Americans? The Philippines and Rwanda also observe Fourth of July anniversaries for their own reasons. The US gave the Philippines independence on that day in 1946 and the Rwandan genocide ended with US help on July 4 1994. Rather more bizarrely, Denmark also celebrates the US version – it started with European expats in 1911, but now is just an “excuse for a nice day out”. When is Britain’s Independence Day? Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage made a case for the 23rd June to be Britain’s Independence Day in 2016, because that was the date of the 2016 Brexit vote in which he said the nation “took back control” from the European Union. However, he was criticised by some who pointed out that liberation from colonial ownership was not really equivalent to Brexit. And the point that most independence anniversaries around the world celebrate breaking from the British Empire has also been well made. Best American recipes for Independence Day From sweet treats to traditional dishes, the US is famous for its cuisine, with Americans tucking into an array of classic foods every year on Independence Day. If you’re celebrating the Fourth of July in the UK, here are some of our favourite American recipes to try and taste with your family and friends. Perfect homemade beef burgers Juicy beefburgers, served with roughly torn lettuce, ripe tomatoes and thinly sliced mile cheese in a bun of your choice, are perfect for any Independence Day barbecue. Mississippi mud pie Mouth-melting dark chocolate combined with delicious praline, biscuits and cream. This Mississippi mud pie makes a great, indulgent Independence Day treat. Credit: Andrew Crowley Cheat’s mac and cheese Diana Henry’s simple recipe for mac and cheese requires no sauce-cooking or pasta-boiling, helping you to serve the American favourite in minimal time. The best cornbread This tasty cornbread, coated in melted butter and honey, is another perfect dish for your Independence Day feast. Classic shrimp and grits Get a real taste of American cuisine with this classic Shrimp and grits recipe. This traditional Southern dish is creamy, versatile and packed with coastal flavour. The best American pancakes with banana, blueberries and maple syrup Credit: Barry Taylor Whip up a stack of these banana and blueberry pancakes, best served with a drizzle of maple syrup, to satisfy your sweet-tooth craving. Salt beef New York-style salt beef is delicious with pickles, horseradish, English mustard or piccalilli and can be enjoyed both hot and cold. Prepare it yourself in the comfort of your own kitchen, following this simple and affordable recipe.
https://news.yahoo.com/july-4th-2019…072440857.html

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Tips for using Tripadvisor restaurant reviews

Home Food and drink Tips for using Tripadvisor restaurant reviews Tips for using Tripadvisor restaurant reviews
Whatever anyone thinks about the travel advisory giant, Tripadvisor is the best place for finding information about restaurants in any given location.
However, there’s a right way to use it and lots of wrong ways.
Here’s how Tripadvisor restaurant reviews shouldn’t be used: You search for restaurants in the destination you’re interested in, and automatically decide to eat in one or more of the top ones listed because, well, they’re the top ones listed.
Why is this method a potential recipe for an unsatisfactory dining experience? The answer to that is the first tip. Cafes and ice cream parlours regularly rate highly on Tripadviser ‘best restaurants in…” lists.
Don’t automatically pick the top rated restaurants For a start, the first entry that comes up on lists when you search for ‘best restaurants in…’ is sponsored rather than being the number 1 choice of TA reviewers. Secondly, volume of reviews rather than quality often dictates position. Restaurants near hotel districts can be bumped up tables just because many visitors don’t wander far from where they’re staying. Subsequently, excellent restaurants in back streets don’t always reach the giddy heights they deserve. There are various other influences. At the time of writing, the 3rd best restaurant in Porto was a cafe. Cafes rank highly in numerous other locations just because of the sheer volume of reviewers – quantity over quality. For the full picture of restaurants in any location browse, browse and then browse some more. We’ve eaten in fab places which were hidden way down the list just because A) they were new and not on the mainstream radar yet, or B) they were frequented more by locals (less likely to leave reviews) than visitors. Creative cuisine isn’t for everyone, but not everyone checks what food is served in a top rated restaurant.
Think about your own eating preferences Don’t dine in a top rated restaurant just because others rave about it. I’ve read plenty of negative reviews where reviewers were disappointed with a restaurant simply because the food it served wasn’t to their taste. I might find the cuisine top notch in a restaurant because it’s creative, but inventive cuisine rings my bell. Anyone who prefers more simply prepared and presented food could be seriously disappointed. A huge factor regarding choosing somewhere to eat is in picking somewhere the food it serves appeals to our own dining preferences. I wouldn’t wander off the street into a restaurant without having a look at its menu first. I do exactly the same when choosing online. Photos often include shots of menus.
Look at photos What if there’s no menu? I always flick through the photos which accompany Tripadvisor restaurant listings. Sometimes there are photos of menus, often there are photos of itemised bills. The latter gives an idea of what dishes cost. But the important information you find from looking at images of the food is whether they match what’s in the reviews. I’ve seen dishes described as Michelin star or gourmet standard yet photos reveal the cuisine to be basic, traditional fare. The bottom line is if you like the look of what you see in the photo gallery, there’s a good chance you’ll like the restaurant. Photos on reviews don’t lie. Some might be blurred and of shocking quality, but they show you what to expect.
The Devil is in the detail Only pay any attention to reviews which include useful details – ambience, prices, service, specific dishes etc. Vague reviews tell you absolutely nothing. Paying attention to details in a review reveals whether it can be trusted or not, especially when cross referenced with other information about the restaurant on the Tripadvisor listing. A headline review for a highly rated restaurant in Tenerife’s Costa Adeje included this statement “authentic Spanish seafood, best meal of the holiday.” The restaurant description (and photos) revealed it was actually an Italian restaurant. Knowing opening hours is helpful, but sometimes these can be more flexible than notices suggest.
Check out restaurant listing information The additional information on TA reviews can be incredibly useful – showing location, type of cuisine, and opening hours. Knowing opening hours obviously prevents you from turning up to find somewhere closed (not always foolproof as there are plenty of destinations where a casual culture can mean restaurateurs view opening hours more as guidelines than set in concrete). There’s also one huge giveaway with restaurant hours – they tell you whether the restaurant is geared towards tourists or locals. For example, if a restaurant in a Spanish town closes at 7pm it definitely isn’t aimed at Spanish diners. Restaurants with hours aimed at visitors rather than a local population are found in purpose built and locations which attract hordes of day-trippers. It doesn’t necessarily mean the food is bad in them, but in our experience quality generally does tend to veer toward the mediocre in restaurants which open only for a market that spends the briefest of time in a destination. TA information can tell you whether a restaurant is authentic long before you set foot in it.
Review statistics Another simple little tip for showing the authenticity of a restaurant is to look at the breakdown of the nationalities of reviewers. The ‘authentic Spanish’ restaurant I mentioned previously had 79 Spanish reviewers, and 1306 English speaking ones. By contrast, a restaurant we ate at in the north of Portugal recently had 264 Portuguese reviews and 18 English ones. Authentic restaurants in any location have more local reviewers than visitors. Another factor to consider in volume of reviews is overall low numbers of reviews might be because restaurants aren’t in touristy areas, so don’t discard these. If you like what you see in photos, the chances are you’ll like the restaurant.
Don’t ignore the negatives Whenever I see glowing review after glowing review I’m suspicious, especially when photos don’t back up the accolades. So I seek out negative reviews as well and cross reference what their beef is with all the other information to hand. The masses don’t always know best, as we found out the hard way with our first ventures into the world of TA restaurant reviews many years ago. This pizza restaurant tried to pass off garlic bread as four cheese pizza, I gave it a one star review.
Beware of fake reviews I’m not convinced there are as many fake reviews as some people claim, but there’s no denying they do exist. I check out the reviewer’s profile in there are any alarm bells going off in my head. If the reviewer has only ever posted one or two reviews, then I treat it with extreme caution. Tripadvisor still lets people set up profiles with false names, which leaves plenty of scope for unscrupulous behaviour. However, I don’t believe it’s difficult to spot authentic reviews, often details don’t add up, so I simply ignore any where’s there’s even the slightest hint of something fishy. In Portugal sometimes you get asked whether you want the couvert, at other times it just appears on the table and you have to send it back if you don’t want any of it.
Consider cultural differences This is connected with the Devil is in the detail. Analyse exactly what reviewers write, especially in relation to specific destinations. I often see negative comments about service being slow. In parts of southern Europe long, leisurely meals are the norm – it’s a good thing. I don’t want to be in and out of a restaurant in under an hour. Some reviewers moan about a lack of atmosphere in a restaurant… when dining at 7pm somewhere locals don’t eat dinner till much later. Others complain about fish being not fresh when they’ve ordered salt cod; or are annoyed about unexpectedly being charged for bread, olives, cheese they didn’t order in Portugal (being offered ‘ couverts ‘ which you accept or don’t is standard). People can’t be expected to know a destination’s dining habits in depth, but it’s something to think about when perusing reviews. The best food in purpose built resort areas might be in hotel restaurants, and they don’t always rate highly on Tripadvisor lists.
Finally, restaurant reviews for purpose-built holiday resorts I’ll keep this short but not sweet. Don’t pay any attention to any, they’re invariably a minefield of misinformation and mediocre choices. That might seem harsh, but I’ve seen variations of the next example many, many times. In the top five restaurants for Portugal’s Portimao area (Algarve) are three Indian restaurants and a cafe. Portimao boasts a Michelin star restaurant; it comes in at 94th best restaurant on TA reviewers’ list. I rest my case.
The bottom line is there are no shortcuts to sorting the wheat from the chaff when it comes to browsing Tripadvisor restaurant reviews. But knowing how to sift and analyse them rewards with meals in off the beaten track restaurants and a travel catalogue of outstanding dining experiences. The truth is out there. About Jack 654 Articles Jack is co-editor, writer and photographer for BuzzTrips and the as well as a Slow Travel consultant and a contributor to online travel sites and travel magazines. Follow Jack on Google+

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The way to a tourist’s heart is thru the stomach

Summary: Al Ain, UAE: what better way to get to know a foreign land than having a taste of its array of cuisine.
In my first two weeks in Al Ain, all my father and I did was to go out and eat. I enjoyed it simply because food is cheap. I get to eat my favorite shawarma at 5 AED. My father warns me not to convert.
Clearly, UAE is a country of so much diversity.
Volcano
Eat and Drink
Across the block. My father sotoodtood up to get something by the cashier. When he returned, he had
“What’s that?”
“I don’t know what it’s called but it’s something the locals eat after meal. They say it aids their digestion.”
Before leaving, I asked the cashier what the food was. I hardly caught what he said, but I managed to get some wrods that could help me research about it
When I we got home, I searched on Google what it was. I found out it goes by the name of mukhwas , a colorful Indian snack. My father is right, mukhwas helps in digestion and also a mouth freshener that can be made of various seeds and nuts, but often F ound with fennel seeds, anise seeds, coconut, and sesame seeds.
Al Mallah Restaurant
This is the bomb we had a meal for three for less than 50 AED.
Al Yafar Restaurant
In my few days in Al Ain, my long-time gi friend Cejs mentioned the local dish biryani . She says it fits my appetite, tipong pangkargador.
My father took me to Al Yafar Restaurant in what street, it was way more than how I imagined it!
The waitress came to the table with a large plate full of beryani rice topped with a whole grilled chicken. There were spinach and slices of cucumbers, too, and chili tomato paste where we dip the chicken.

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COOK UP TO 1.5K USD++ FOR A ROYAL FAMILY IN ERBIL IRAQ

COOK UP TO 1.5K USD++ FOR A ROYAL FAMILY IN ERBIL IRAQ Confidential Company
SALARY: up to 1,500 USD basic salary + accommodation, transportation and foodHIRING COMPANY: Royal FamilyAVAILABILITY: Can join immediately or maximum 1-monthEMPLOYMENT TYPE: PermanentOpen to ANY nationals, preferably Turkish and IndianMale/Female, 25-45 years oldOverseas candidates are welcome to apply EDUCATION/EXPERIENCE REQUIRED:Diploma holder of any related courseAt least 3 years of cooking experience of international cuisines such as Italian, French, American, Indian, Baking and etc.With experience working with royal family JOB DESCRIPTION:Setting up menus and preparing high-quality dishesAble to delegate tasks to kitchen staff to ensure meals are prepared in a timely mannerEnsure appealing plate presentationCheck freshness of food and discard out-of-date itemsExperiment with recipes and suggest new ingredients

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New CEO of Georgia’s Flag Carrier

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Roman Bokeria worked in various positions in the private sector as well as public institutions in the United States. He graduated from St. Petersburg State University of the Faculty of World Economics and Banking (1992-1996). He continued his studies at the Tbilisi State University in Business Law (1997-2003).
In 2008-2010 he attained higher education at the University of Tampa in Florida, John H. Cisco Business College. He was awarded Master of Business Administration, MBA Finance and Investments. At the same University in parallel he was a graduate assistant of the Information Technology and Financial Department. After relocating to his home country, Georgian Airways, flag carrier of Georgia recently appointed Roman Bokeria their CEO.After relocating to his home country, Georgian Airways recently appointed Roman Bokeria their CEO. Glossy reached out to him, interviewing him on his vision for the company and much more.
Q. What does it feel like to be leading one of the major airline companies in Georgia?
A. Leading the national air travel company “Georgian Airways” as CEO is an honour and a privilege. The company stands as part of our national identity. As tourism has become the leading income source of the economy, Georgian Airways has been established as a Georgian air travel embassy. The introduction to the country’s culture begins from the very first step aboard our aircrafts.
Q. How can we compare Georgian air travel standards to those of the rest of the world?
A. Georgian Airways has 25 years of experience and has always been achieving the highest standards the global industry had to offer. Currently, holding 12% percent of the Georgian market share and successful competition against the very best the world has to offer highlights the company’s power. Last year our team achieved 34% annual growth. Unfortunately, the beginning of my leadership has coincided with Vladimir Putin’s restriction against air communication as of 8 July, however, the survival instincts of Georgian Airways have not dulled yet! The management has a number of options for diversifying flights to European cities and some new destinations. In close cooperation with the Georgian Government and Georgian businesses, we will use the challenge as an opportunity to explore distinct destinations. Born in Sukhumi, Abkhazia, following my graduation from secondary school, we left our home as refugees. The occupation and the political environment left us permanently scarred, but I have always believed that whatever does not kill us makes us stronger.
Q. As the new CEO, can you elaborate on your vision for the company?
A. I feel that we have a tremendous opportunity for growth and development. Simultaneously, the increasing popularity of Georgia significantly empowers the role of Georgian Airways. I feel a huge responsibility to fulfil my personal expectations and make the company the regional leader of the airline industry.
Q. How would you estimate the strategic location of Georgia in terms of air travel? A. Our nation has been blessed with a strategic geopolitical location in the Caucasus region. We are the gates between Asia, Europe, Russia and the Middle East. We share the Silk Road that has been developed as a Silk Air Way trade belt. China is considering Georgia a strategic partner for cargo shipments from China to Georgia and from Georgia to Europe, Russia, Africa and the Middle East. In this regard, we are negotiating on creating a cargo shipment hub in Georgia. I would like to thank David Saganelidze, the CEO of the Partnership Fund, for granting opportunities to collaborate with Chinese partners. The activities again highlight the natural geopolitical advantage that creates phenomenal opportunities on an international scale.
Q. Are there any Georgian-specific consumer trends that you have picked up on?
A. Our blessed nation has several unique trends like its winery culture, healing mineral waters, amazing cuisine, breathtaking nature, fabulous culture and phenomenal history. Georgian Airways thrives to become an ambassador of Georgian trends. I’m trying to convince the Georgian Government to advertise tourism through Georgian Airways. The national budget and government funds have hundreds of millions of dollars being invested in the popularization of Georgian trends and attracting tourists as well as foreign investors to Georgia. In that regard, our national air company naturally has a unique position to deliver that magical first-time experience of Georgian wine, mineral water, food, nature, culture and history from the first step onboard Georgian Airways. We need to remember the American saying – “You never get a second chance to make a first impression”. Thus, the first impression is our national air company that bears the Georgian flag and delivers guests to Georgia. Therefore, the Government needs to contribute to Georgian Airways’ brand awareness and quality of services as a first impression for foreign tourists and business partners. We need strong, mutually beneficial collaboration with the Ministry of Economy, Ministry of Finance as well as with the Georgian business sector too.
Q. What are the main traits that Georgian consumers seek in a decent flight, and how does Georgian Airways adopt those?
A. Georgian Airways’ priority is first of all the top-level safety of its flights and the professionalism of its pilots & crew. Also, better prices, better food, better plane, better service, etc. However, I would like to use that opportunity and address Georgian consumers, similar to how my favourite U.S. president J.F. Kennedy addressed the American nation. “My fellow Georgians, just once, ask not what Georgian Airways can do for you, ask what you can do for your country’s national air company that is the face of your nation and delivers the first impression to each and every foreign tourist, partner, guest and investor. How can each of you contribute to the creation of national brand Georgian Airways as the pride and symbol of the great Georgia?” We Georgians need to fully comprehend that our country, our air company, all nationally branded companies, all of our economy, nature, culture and history belongs to each of us and we need to participate in its creation and development as we want to see it and as we would like others to experience our beautiful Georgia.
Q. Tell us about your family and the decision you made to relocate to Georgia.
A. Honestly, I was not planning to relocate to Georgia. I was Deputy Auditor General of Georgia from 2000 to 2007 and moved to the United States because of disagreements with the previous government. For the last 12 years I lived in America, working for different U.S. Government audit institutions. Afterwards, I graduated from the University of Tampa, Sykes Business School and earned an MBA academic degree in Finance and Investments. Moving to Miami I became a successful businessman in the Mortgage, Real Estate, Development and Business Brokerage industries. I am also an active member of the United States Republican party and contributed to the election of Mr. Trump as President of the United States. Unfortunately, my father passed away and as a result I came back to Georgia in February 2019. After 12 years absent, something clicked in my soul and I start to feel the desire to stay in my home country and contribute to the growth and development of my magical & blessed nation of Georgia. My wife, Victoria Bokeria, moved with me to Tbilisi and is now President of “Georgian Business Brokerage”. She is a “Shark” Business Broker; buying & selling actual, active Georgian businesses for most foreign buyers and inventors. Also, she is advertising actual working American businesses for sale for Georgian and regional buyers who wish to buy a working business in America and get full family immigration through E2 Visa.
Q. Are there any things about the United States that you miss in particular?
A. I’m currently residing between the U.S and Georgia. Ownership of businesses always enables me to return, however I strongly believe I have reached my full potential in the U.S. Now it’s time to contribute to making Georgia great again. In the modern world, economy, finance and international business projects are deciding the fate of our nation. The modern Didgori is the battle to overcome Georgian economic obstacles. International corporations have often taken advantage of the lack of professionalism and experience from the Georgian side. I believe currently, in some Georgian industries we have international agreements with foreign companies that have betrayed Georgia’s national strategic interests and unjustly enrich the foreign partners. Such cases remind me of the ‘white man’ arriving in native American Indians’ land and trading European junk for American Indians’ gold. That’s why I feel that my country needs me to unite highly-educated professional patriots of Georgia in order to protect our national strategic economic & business interests, and to make Georgia great again. I graduated from Saint Petersburg State University and was awarded an academic degree in International Economics. I was working as Stock Exchange Broker at Saint Petersburg Stock Exchange. After I moved to Tbilisi I graduated from Law School, earning a degree in law. In Georgia, I was working as Deputy Auditor General of Georgia and was conducting reforms in the financial & auditing sector of Georgia’s incorporation with the U.S. Government Accounting Office as well as with the Court of Auditors of the European Union. In 2007 I relocated to America and was working for the U.S. Government; graduating from Business School with an MBA academic degree; I worked for ten years in the business sector of the United State economy. Finally, after 12 years, I’m back to serve my country with all my education, work experience, connections and unconditional love for my nation and blessed country, Georgia!
Q. You have also contributed to the presidential campaign of Donald Trump. How was it like?
My political views have always been leaning towards the Republican party, as in fact, I have been a member of it for quite some time. I was actively contributing into the 2016 presidential campaign and transformed my Miami office into the campaign office in order to spread the word around the state of Florida, which has greatly contributed onto the success in the state. I have been receiving the annual gratitude letter from Mr President. Mr Trump has very positive feelings towards Georgian Airways, and there are many tangible and intangible benefits with having such a powerful ally. Hits: 1793

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India’s water policy is leaking: Water crisis is slowing growth and increasing disparity

India’s water policy is leaking: Water crisis is slowing growth and increasing disparity In this photo taken on June 20, 2019, Indian residents queue with plastic pots to get drinking water from a distribution point on the outskirts of Chennai after reservoirs for the city ran dry. The drought is the worst in living memory for the bustling capital of Tamil Nadu state, India’s sixth largest city, that is getting less than two thirds of the 830 million litres of water it normally uses each day. ARUN SANKAR / AFP 3Jul 2019 THE world’s water crisis is quickly worsening – and at an extremely worrying pace. Worldwide, around four billion people live in water-scarce areas with about 844 million people without access to clean water. India has been worst hit and is experiencing the most severe case of water scarcity in its history. Some one billion people live in areas with extremely limited access for at least part of the year, and around another 600 million live in areas suffering from high to extreme water stress . More than 40 percent of the country is in drought. And things will only be going downhill from here with a steady increase in the country’s groundwater depletion rate, which has increased by 23 percent between 2000 and 2010. With a population of over 1.3 billion, the country is the world’s biggest consumer of groundwater, accounting for almost one-fourth of global demand – more than that of China and the US combined. Its usage of groundwater accounts for 24 percent of the global total. SEE ALSO: How fetching water is holding back millions of women in India Globally, water consumption has increased six-fold in the last 100 years. The surge in demand has been driven largely by population growth, a change in diets, and consumer habits. Moreover, agricultural intensification, urbanisation, mega-city projects, and climate change have boosted competition over water resources as well. Rice and wheat are staple foods in Indian cuisine, but are also a prominent water-guzzling crop in the agricultural sector. There is, therefore, an urgent need for society to shift to eating more sustainable and water-based crops. Water scarcity also occurs in urban areas . With globalisation has come a massive increase in infrastructure and construction projects that have greatened the demand for water. Internal migration to cities amongst those in search of jobs and an improved quality of life has also contributed to strained resources in urban areas.
Estimates have shown that 21 cities in India are likely to run out of groundwater by 2020. Signs of a water crisis are already apparent in New Delhi and India’s Silicon Valley. This, however, may occur even before 2020. In New Delhi, bathtubs, sprinklers, and washing machines in homes are already things of the distant past. Residents are restricted to a few buckets of water during summer. The situation is much worse in India’s Silicon Valley. Apartment complexes in the area no longer have direct access to water. All year round, residents are now dependent on water tankers that source water from lakes and wells, all lined up next to each other in residential areas. These tankers are quite costly as well, and prices go up as temperatures rise. Some people are having to move out of their hometowns as a result. SEE ALSO: India suffering worst water crisis ‘in its history’ Should current trends continue, the Institute for Social and Economic change predicts that India might incur a 6 percent loss in its GDP by 2020 – with the agricultural sector expected to be the most affected. The government, however, continues to fail to implement stringent laws against the use of groundwater. This has resulted in a severe exploitation of resources in commercial, domestic, and industrial use. The water crisis is also linked to biodiversity, food security, and health matters. Rapid water depletion will lead to major food shortages. The country’s most disadvantaged communities will face disease and death. Moreover, the sociocultural implications of the crisis are far less noticed. India’s patriarchal society puts the burden of household chores on girls and women. To complete their daily tasks, they are made to travel miles each day to collect water. In rural areas of India, households have designated days on which they make the trip for water, which is then used for cleaning, cooking, taking care of animals – the list continues.
To understand how this might affect India, one must only look to Africa . A similar shortage in water has caused a great change in the lives of girls and women across the continent. In the face of health and hygiene issues – mainly to do with menstruation, pregnancy, and childbirth – a lack of clean water can make them vulnerable to disease, malnutrition, and even death. But the implications of a lack of water go beyond immediate health issues. The crisis has also resulted in higher rates of school dropouts in Africa, with girls having to spend their days travelling to collect water. The situation has also widened the inequality gap in India, with the poorest and most marginalised people bearing the brunt of the shortage with no access to clean water. To tackle this issue, a serious policy framework needs to be put in place to encourage partnerships between all government bodies, as well as private and public participation. Managing groundwater resources and wastewater management is vital. Sewage treatment plants that recycle water must be made compulsory, while rainwater harvesting should be made mandatory at every stage too. Issues have no doubt snowballed into a concoction of social and economic challenges. Groundwater has been exploited beyond imagination, also presenting problems for both the waste management and aviation industries. Until stringent water policy is actually put in place, India’s future is not set to change. This piece was first published at Policy Forum , Asia and the Pacific’s platform for public policy analysis and opinion. Posted by Thavam

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Olbia – Pak Kebab – Farewell to Corsica, the Curry Desert; Hello to Sardinia, the Oasis

Posted on July 6, 2019 by Hector Hector and Marg have just spent six days in Corsica ( France ) where there are no Curry Houses, not one . The – Yellow Sauce – with – Extra Big Onions – may have been available at – other places. Hector likes to think there are some standards left in this World, if not, in Curry-Heute . There was no Donner Kebap either. It was known in advance that the chances of finding Indian Cuisine were next to nil, the Kebap Shop invasion has not reached Corsica either. We saw one – KFC – presumably there are more, and no outlets for the big burger chains. Corsicans are expected to survive on overpriced Pizza and Burgers, or spend even more on Haute Cuisine . Ironically, at A Vista , our first chosen dining spot in Ajaccio ( Corsica ), Marg found – Samosa – on the Menu. Goat’s Cheese Samosa , something different. I do have to blog A Vista ( 4 Quai Napoléon, 20000 Ajaccio, Corsica, France) as we went there on consecutive days, for Hector, the same meal both times. The Linguine with Mussels was truly outstanding. A mountain of Pasta, a very simple and minimal – Garlic-based Sauce – with the juices from the Mussels adding that certain – j e ne sais quoi. I have eaten a lot of Pasta in the last week, in France . Today was a very long day, seven hours of actual travelling, with enforced two hours plus waits either side of the ferry from Bonifacio ( Corsica , France ) to Santa Teresa Gallura (Sardinia, Italia ). Having had a substantial – Dejeuner – at Bonifacio , we were only looking for a snack as we wandered the busy streets of Olbia for the first time this evening. Marg declared that a – Green Salad – would be enough for her. Knowing of one Curry source in Olbia, Pak Kashmir Donner Kebab, this would be held back until lunchtime tomorrow. On spotting a Kebab Shop, Hector was straight in, alas all the seats outside were taken, we were not going to sit on the steps of the square as Marg suggested. The days of eating a late night Vegetable Pakora in a Shawlands close have long since gone. We moved on. Moments later I spotted the magical words – Indian Food . There was no holding back the Hector. A dozy female who could have been a customer, but turned out to be a Waitress, was bypassed. Camera counter, there on display was Chicken Biryani, Chicken Curry on-the-bone and a Meat Curry . I had to ask, Beef Curry was confirmed. I ordered this on Basmati, the Green Salad (€3.00) for Marg, and two tins of Soft Drinks. (I had already drank two litres of Sparkling Water today.) We were in a Kebab Shop in Olbia , Sardegna, what was it called? I went outside to look for a name. Kebab Novo Gusto was one Menu poster. Gusto – appeared to be the name of either the building complex, or the square opposite. The Drinks came, tiny plastic cups. Italian Fanta , not as Sweet as served in the UK, closer to Belgium, which has a markedly paler colour. Marg’s Salad arrived, a big plateful for €3.00, but lacking the Black Olives which were illustrated. Marg, in her best French , attracted the attention of a Chap who also appeared to be a Waiter. The Black Olives were asked for, they never came. Maybe employing – Italian – would have been a better ploy. Olives aside, this Salad had everything Marg likes in a Green Salad. Beef (Veal) Curry Quite a plateful. Thankfully the abundant Oily Shorva had been withheld to some extent. The massive amount of Rice had already absorbed whatever Masala had been included. The Toppings of shredded Onion and Lettuce, a slice of Tomato and some Sweetcorn made the Curry look as if it had simply not been chucked on a plate. Expectations were low. They sank even lower after the first mouthful. Curry Powder – was my first pronouncement – that’s the dominant Flavour . Still, it was an attempt at a – Curry. The Spice Level was at the bottom end of the scale, as in next to non-existent. The Seasoning, ah, the Seasoning. This saved the day, this Curry suddenly had potential. I counted the Meat, at least a dozen pieces. The Meat was very Tender, having been sat in the Masala, there was hope. Why do I have – levels of expectation? I spotted some dark Seeds which could not identify, then some Tomato Seeds. There was no sign of Onion in the Shorva and so I concluded a Tomato-base. I then found a piece of Cinnamon Bark. This Curry was improving by the minute. I had to switch my attention to the Rice and Toppings else they would have been left. Everything here was – Fresh . Eventually I had parity with Meat and Rice, a Curry. I am not going to suggest that this Curry was in any way outstanding. It was very enjoyable, especially given the withdrawal symptoms. The Curry was decidedly better than a Beef Stew , it did need a bigger – Spice Kick . This was – Curry for the masses. The Lady, who was clearly Mein Hostess, came over to ask the customary question. We expressed our pleasure, here was the Opperchancity to identify the premises. It took a few attempts to register – Pak Kebab. The aforementioned Waiter assured me proudly that they are not on Google . They are now – Pak Kebab (Via Acquedotto 2b, 07026 Olbia OT Sardegna Italia), and on another Social Medium. Why let one venue in Olbia get all the publicity? I went up to pay, Calling Card and the Huawei at the ready. Mein Host was happy to chat, though as we talked across each other, I probably missed a lot. I had to tell him there was a – Business Opperchancity – in Corsica . He mentioned something about paperwork and passports. What happened to Schengen then? The Lady was very enthusiastic about the Calling Card. They have been in operation for seven years. A delightful couple, I wish them every success. Perhaps they could refine what is on offer in terms of Curry , a bigger Spice option, a written Menu? The Bill € 11.20 (£10.00) This is a quarter of what we have been paying for meals in Corsica . Corsica need Curry Cafes, I suspect they are going to be abundant in Sardegna. The Aftermath A couple of doors down was yet another Kebab Shop selling Curry – Pak Kashmir . The concept was pretty much what I had just experienced, Kebap rules . They too had a Chicken Curry and a Meat Curry. Veal – a helpful Waitress told me. I’ll be back. Tomorrow’s lunchtime Curry should hopefully be here then, Pak Kashmir Donner Kebab as located by Google have had it all their own way for too long. However, I suspect both venues are the same business. Then there was the first of two wind ups today. Namaste , a wine restaurant, no Curry. Later, Marg ordered – a large milky coffee- in Italian !

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