Street food of Kerala : 10 dishes you must try when you’re exploring god’s own country!

Street food of Kerala : 10 dishes you must try when you’re exploring god’s own country!

/ Street food of Kerala : 10 dishes you must try when you’re exploring god’s own country! Street food of Kerala : 10 dishes you must try when you’re exploring god’s own country! Tripoto https://www.tripoto.com/ By Anila Kopparapu Kerala’s breathtaking natural beauty oftentimes plays a distraction to it’s delectable cuisine which probably doesn’t get as much attention as it deserves. While the backwaters, waterfalls, rivers all the natural beauty of Kerala is a treat to the eyes, the flavourful and diversified cuisine this land has to offer is in equal measures a treat to the taste buds. The street food of Kerala hasn’t been given the limelight that it deserves probably because the few stalls that were spread out in some of the major cities were kind of discreet. Another reason should be the fact that the number of street food joints and their popularity has gone up only in the recent times. Yet, Kerala’s street food has got a certain unique-ness to it when compared with the other states of the country and that’s because most of its local cuisine is a blend of many other cuisines such as – the south Indian, Kerala’s own flavours, the Malabari cuisine, a bit of an Arabian and some French influence too. And sampling these in many of the upcoming ‘thattu kada’ (which is another name for street food joints), is an experience of its own. A little slice of heaven in god’s own country is what these street foods of Kerala are and not sampling them would be a sin, so to speak. Here’s a list of nine most popular dishes you’ll find in the many cities and towns of Kerala. Idyappam Strands of Vermicelli cooked in the shape of Idlis – Idyappam is one of the most popular foods of Kerala that’s eaten both as breakfast, a snack as well as the main food at times. It is made of rice flour and is usually eaten with a curries, mostly with chana curry or with egg curry both of which are a favourite with the locals. Along with most of the restaurants, street food stalls in Kerala have Idyappam or Noolappam (as they are sometimes called) as a major food. Puttu (steamed rice rolls) Yet another breakfast favourite with the locals, Puttu is one food that is found everywhere in Kerala. It is basically a rice roll with coconut filling, usually eaten with Kadala curry which is made with chickpeas. While it’s usually had for breakfast, you can find them althrough the day especially on the many street stalls. Kerala Parotta / Malabar Parotta The Kerala version of the parotta – the Malabar Parotta is a thick and fluffy kind of flatbread that’s made of all-purpose flour. Most of the time, the Malabar Parotta has got egg stuffed within it. This soft and delectable version of the naan is one of more of Kerala’s street food that the locals relish and we find it in most of the street food stalls as well as in most other eateries of the state. Thattu dosa A small steamed dosa – which happens to be Kerala’s own creation is one of the most popular street foods here. In fact, the very name of the dosa means that it is found on the small street stalls. This one’s a healthy version of dosa being steamed and is usually had with coconut chutney or sometimes even one of the many curries of the land. Appam A kind of a rice-pancake which is thin and crispy, Appam is one food that every one visiting here must sample. Despite the simplicity of the Appam, it is quite delectable. It is usually had with stew and a host of curries most of which have a lot of coconuty flavor to them. Kumbilappam (steamed jackfruit dumplings) Did you know that you could make dumplings with Jackfruit? That is what Kumbilappam is for you and it has been one of the most popular dishes of Kerala which has made its way onto street food as well. While many households usually make it during the time of Onam, you can find it through-out the year on the many street stalls here. The dumplings are wrapped in the leaves of elamangalam – an aromatic plant with cinnamon like aroma. This is surely one authentic Kerala dish that you shouldn’t miss out on while you’re here. Pazhampori (Banana fritters) Right from their homes to the food stalls on the street, the banana fritters are an old-time favourite snack with the Keralaites and understandably so – they’re crispy, yummy and you can’t just eat one! Ripe bananas are dipped in flour and fried and that’s all it takes to make this snack. In most of the cities, hill stations and towns of Kerala, this snack is one that you’ll find everywhere. Fish fingers The many fish-based foods found in Kerala are quite popular and rule the streets too. Apart from all the curries made of fish and the fried fish, fish fingers are quite a hit with the locals these days in their stalls and food trucks. It is used as a snack most of the time and is made with fish, flour and flavours added to that. While fish fingers don’t solely belong to Kerala, there’s a special unique flavor to the ones we find here. Credits : Creative Commons Sundal Sundal is yet another popular snack that we find on the streets of not just Kerala but other states in South India such as Tamilnadu and Karnataka as well. Chickpeas stir fried with coconut and some other spices and wrapped in leaves or papers is what Sundal from the streets is for you. And while it tastes great, it makes for a highly proteinaceous snack too. Have you had the chance to sample the yummy street food of Kerala? You can share all about your experience here . Get travel inspiration from us daily! Save and send a message at 9599147110 on Whatsapp to start.

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#target200tripstogether – A crazy dream

By Roshan & Ruchi Anniversary trip to Bali – #10of200trips #target200tripstogether The past one year has been crazy for us, having a packed schedule as we traveled to 10 different locations, since our marriage on 12 th March’ 18. The list includes two countries – Mauritius and Indonesia, seven Indian States and one Union Territory. We aim 200 trips together in 20 years of our marriage. People have been asking how and why did we plan for #target200tripstogether. So, here we go. How did we get the idea of #target200tripstogether? Well, we were still dating and had seen people going on and off in relationships. Few reasons to quote were trust, lack of spark, change in heart and mind with time. We wanted to keep our love and trust alive, to see each other growing and to love each other at every stage of our lives, as we were planning to get married. Those days, we used to read a lot about new and unique foods, restaurants and places in and around Mumbai and wanted to have new experiences. We had blocked our every weekend for this. Trust us, we not only experienced new cuisines, places and restaurants but also got to know and understand each other. Not only the lovey-dovey sides but also our insecurities, downfalls and inner most fears of each other. Our married friends used to suggest us to have as much fun as possible before getting married as things get boring afterwards. And that’s when the biggest question of the century started to eat us, ‘WHAT IF’. What if our life gets boring post marriage? What if we change with time? What if the love is lost in our daily routine? And the list went on. That’s when Roshan suggested, why not to have a dream for life. A dream which will not only keep us moving but also will keep the life alive within us – Let’s travel. Let’s travel for the rest of our life. Ruchi was so excited; perhaps she wanted to pack her bags ready for all the future travels, then and there. We were crazy to think and discuss of 500 trips at one point in time. We know 200 trips are still tough, but then for us, it’s a dream. We don’t know if we will be able to do it but we are enjoying the journey. We are so glad that we could make it for the first year. We have not only completed 10 trips for the year but have also grown in many ways. What inspires us to travel? YOU. Yes, you read it right. Our followers, friends and family, who have not only enjoyed our clicks and stories but have also appreciated and inspired us to travel more. There have been phases when we contemplated if we should actually be travelling as much as we are. We were always in planning mode for the next trip even before completing the one in hand and as we write this blog, the next two trips are already planned. The challenge for us has been that, as we end up landing to some new corner of the world on every weekend and holiday, we have not got much time to spend time with our friends and families. But, over the past year, we also realized that we have started inspiring many of our friends and family members to travel and we thought this is just so amazing, as Indians still don’t travel as much compared to non-Indians. We feel travel not just fills you with experiences of new places but also fills your soul. It teaches you patience, acceptance, determination and to become solution oriented. It gives you power to handle life. We thought if we could inspire some of our friends, we can definitely inspire other fellow Indians to travel more, to learn more and to live more. Truly, our goal of #target200tripstogether originated a new dream to #InspireIndiansToTravel. There is a lot to pen down, a lot to share, a lot to convey. As we go ahead, we will write about how we feel about travel and about our experiences as we keep travelling. You may also follow us on our Instagram page to witness our journey. This is our first blog and we would love to have your feedback.

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Small wonders leave a big impression

India Priyadarshini Chatterjee Apr 19, 2019 16:55:34 IST Firstpost print Edition
About half-a-dozen ice cream cones in candy colours that can fit in your palm, avocado toasts topped with eggs sunny-side-up that you can prop up on a nail, or a loaded cheese burger that you perch on your fingertip — the world of food miniatures is more than a small wonder. And, across the country, miniaturists — professionals and enthusiasts — are looking to sink their teeth into it. Their Instagram pages are stunning virtual galleries of intricate food miniatures in myriad colours — everything from elaborate banana-leaf meals and ramen bowls with all the works, vada pao and chicken biryani to glazed donuts and frosted cakes — inedible and incredibly tiny, but no less appetising, and steeped in aesthetics. An intricate food miniature
Take for instance Chennai-based miniaturist Shilpa Mitha, whose Insta handle @suenosouvenir has over 20K followers. Mitha has among her fans celebrity chefs, and has miniaturised Daniel Wilson’s signature Huxtaburger on request. The former sound engineer started out in the creative field as a paper-quilling hobbyist. “But I wanted to try more pliable mediums and turned to clay. That’s when something clicked,” says the 31-year-old. Kolkata-based Agnika Banerjee, an HR professional, quit her job to pursue her passion for miniaturing. These days she is most likely to be found in one corner of her room, bent over mounds of clay with a quirky assortment of tools. Her miniatures come in the form of everything from fridge magnets to food jewellery.
“I believe food miniatures are evocative of childhood memories of toy kitchen sets — they appeal to the child within,” says Mitha. Her inspiration came from the autumnal festival of Golu — a festive display of dolls and figurines. Rupashree Adam, another Chennaiite who shifted to New Zealand, was initiated to the world of food miniatures by a YouTube video. Adam’s Charming Miniatures is a delightful collection of incredibly tiny and delicious-looking delicacies from around the globe, crafted in polymer clay — a manufactured modelling compound made of polyvinyl chloride, plasticisers and pigments.
“The clay is soft and pliable until baked in an oven at a low temperature,” says Ahmedabad-based Shirali Patel who creates and sells her miniatures turned into everything from bag charms and keychains to earrings and pendants, under the label Small Ideas. Mitha, on the other hand, prefers to work with soft and light air-dry clay that doesn’t require an oven to cure. She uses acrylic and oil paints to paint her miniatures and finish them with a coat of varnish to give them a delicious sheen.
Texture is paramount in food aesthetics, fake or not — the nooks and crannies, streaks and granules, crumbs and pockmarks are vital to giving these miniatures a life-like finish. Detailing is crucial and these miniaturists use everything from sophisticated sculpting and dotting tools and even specialised lamps to simple everyday paraphernalia like needles and blades. “I use a ‘mold putty’ to make a mould that I use for many of my miniature utensils,” says Adam. Patel, on the other hand, picks a toothpick, toothbrush, aluminium foil and needles as her kit essentials, her vast collection of tools that even includes instruments typically used at a dentist’s notwithstanding. In the end, as Mitha points out, the art rides on the strength of the artist’s nifty fingers and exceptional skills. “Sometimes, a needle and a toothpick is all I need,” says Mitha whose work is known for its intricate detail and realistic finish.
“But, above all, the art calls for extreme concentration and lots of patience,” says Adam. A labour-intensive art, most of these artists spend anywhere between 8-12 hours at their workstation. “One time I spent 16-17 hours a day working on my miniatures,” says Mitha. The astonishingly long hours started taking a toll on her health. “Nowadays, I try to restrict myself to 8-10 hours,” she says.
But sculpting each of these miniatures require extensive research. “An understanding of the ingredients and the cooking procedure is crucial to ensure authenticity. There is a lot of reading involved. Recipe videos help too,” says Mitha, who more than makes up for her lack of culinary skills with her delightfully appetising miniatures. Patel, who receives numerous custom orders, says, “Often I am asked to create food I am not familiar with. So, it’s important to first learn about the food I am miniaturing. One of Patel’s personal favourites, interestingly, is a multiple course Bengali thali, a cuisine she had no idea about.
Regional Indian cuisine is a trending theme on the Indian food miniature scene. “When I started making miniatures I realised not much was being done with Indian food. So I started out with my idli-dosa platter,” says Mitha. She went onto create everything from paneer tikka and sweet pongal to elaborate sadhya meal and intricate biryanis where each grain of rice need to be sculpted one at a time.
Both Mitha and Patel want to illustrate the stunning regional diversity of Indian cuisine through their intricate miniatures. Banerjee’s latest is an exquisite collection comprising an assortment of typical Bengali dishes ranging from kathi rolls and crumb-coated fish fry to koraishutir kochuri, muri-tele bhaja and a khichuri platter complete with begun bhaja and fried Hilsa, that would be retailed from select Biswa Bangla showrooms, under her label Agnika’s creations.
Adam is driven purely by passion. It is her dream to see one of her miniatures at Madurodam, an extraordinary model city of miniatures, at The Hague in the Netherlands. “Besides, when I open my own restaurant, I will showcase my miniatures,” the Le Cordon Bleu graduate signs off.
(Priyadarshini Chatterjee is an independent food and travel writer based in Kolkata)
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16:55:34 IST Tags : ConnectTheDots , Food Miniaturists , Issue 13 , Miniature Artists , Miniaturists , Volume-1 Welcome 1. If you are in certain parts of Delhi NCR or Mumbai you can subscribe for doorstep delivery. Digital subscription comes free with it. 2. If you are outside this distribution zone you can access the full bouquet of Firstpost Print content online for a limited period. 3. You may sample up to five stories, following which you will need to sign up for continued access. Please choose one of the options…

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Iconic Luxury Hotel Brand Brings Personalized Service And Iconic Environments To The Maldives With Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi

Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi
Hilton ‘s (NYSE: HLT) luxury brand, Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts , will soon welcome guests to the heart of the South Malé Atoll with the highly-anticipated opening of Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi . Set to debut on July 1 st , the all-villa resort spans across three private islands, providing secluded enclaves and a tranquil escape for discerning travelers complete with a plethora of activities for guests of all generations.
Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi will offer a sophisticated and serene retreat just 30-minutes from Malé International Airport via the resort’s private yacht. An escape or families and couples in search of space and exclusivity, the resort boasts 122 luxuriously appointed villas, each equipped with a pool and uninterrupted views of the Indian Ocean in its own private enclave. Each reef, beach and overwater villa will open onto an indoor and outdoor deck featuring a swinging daybed, dining gazebo, an infinity pool, in-water lounge and an outdoor shower.
In line with Waldorf Astoria’s legacy of culinary expertise, Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi will offer 11 exceptional, specialty-dining venues. Each venue will deliver distinctive, immersive dining experiences – the variety of which is a first in the Maldives. Guests can enjoy an elevated treetop-dining concept at Terra, featuring spectacular views of the ocean and horizon, as well as exquisite food and wine pairings in a tranquil setting seemingly chiselled out of the face of a boulder at The Rock. Yasmeen will boast authentic Middle Eastern flatbreads and mezzes, impeccably prepared crispy Peking duck fresh out of the first wood-fired oven in the Maldives, and embracing the garden-to-table concept, Glow will serve healthy and holistic cuisine made from the freshest ingredients harvested from the resort’s herb garden. To further elevate Waldorf Astoria Maldives Ithaafushi’s culinary offerings, the hotel will be announcing a partnership with a world-renowned chef and restaurant in the coming weeks.
For those seeking the ultimate in exclusivity, the Ithaafushi Private Island features a two-bedroom overwater villa as well as a three-bedroom beach villa. The 32,000 square foot island sanctuary – accessible by yacht – comes complete with a dedicated chef and personal concierge team, as well as its own spa, gym, five swimming pools, entertainment center and pristine beaches. Two Stella Maris Ocean Villas, inspired by a celestial charm – accessible only by boat – will also allow discerning guests to enjoy unrivalled privacy. Floor-to-ceiling windows, chef service, a jacuzzi and direct ocean access will make for an unforgettable and memorable escape.
For additional pampering, guests can visit the Waldorf Astoria Spa, comprised of ten idyllic overwater or garden treatment villas, which will offer an extensive menu of treatments and Asian-inspired therapies focusing on relaxation and rebalance. The Waldorf Astoria Young Discovery Park, a water park for young guests, and the Lagoon Pool, are ideal for families looking to enjoy a variety of activities with ease. Other facilities include the beachfront, 40-meter Mirror Pool; the Ocean Pavilion, which will host a range of wellness activities; a fully-equipped fitness center; and a combined water sport and PADI dive center.

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The Serve: Burger Shurger, Elsternwick, Melbourne

297 GLEN HUNTLY ROAD, ELSTERNWICK, (03) 9532 8995 LICENSED AE MC V EFTPOS TUESDAY-THURSDAY 5PM-9.30PM, FRIDAY-SATURDAY 3PM-10PM, SUNDAY 3PM-9PM SNACKS: $5-$12; BURGERS: $12.50-$16.50; DESSERTS: $11
While you’re sticking your face into Burger Shurger’s awesome Mighty Butter Chicken Burger, say a silent thank you to owner Payal Bisht’s in-laws. It’s in large part due to them that this fun Indian fusion burger and craft beer joint got off the ground. Payal and her husband moved from New Delhi to Melbourne in 2008 to study their Masters in IT. When the in-laws came to visit from India they weren’t too keen on the local cuisine. “Don’t try to feed us burgers or sushi or pasta,” they pleaded. But Payal, a keen cook and multicultural eater, couldn’t help herself.
Burger Shurger in Elsternwick is bright and friendly. Credit: Eddie Jim
“I would make Indianised versions of things for them to try,” she recalls. “I’d do vegetarian paella, pasta, maybe paneer burger or falafel, all spiced up with an Indian twist so they would find it more flavourful.” As the in-laws became more adventurous, the burger concept rose to the top – Payal found herself mashing up Indian and American food all the time. Burger Shurger, open a year, is the happy result. Advertisement
The shopfront restaurant is bright and friendly, somewhere between saloon and diner, with neon signage playing off a stylised mural of Indian gods sitting down to burgers – vegetarian, one presumes. The menu is an array of “sometimes” food: burgers, loaded fries, roti rolls and bao, with plenty for vegans and vegetarians.
The Mighty Butter Chicken burger. Credit: Eddie Jim
Payal lived in New Delhi, home of butter chicken, and she’s rightly proud of her sauce, which is creamy and spicy but not cloying; the sweetness comes from cashews, not sugar. The sauce is smoked to round out the flavour. So far, so traditional but then comes the fusion and fun. The sauce is reduced so it sits nicely on the buttermilk-marinated, crumbed and fried chicken Maryland, which is sandwiched between charcoal buns with house-made chutneys. If you want the sauce and not the whole burger situation, you can also have vegetarian loaded fries with chickenless butter chicken sauce.
Other Indian cuisines are honoured on the menu. The chilli crab burger riffs on the Indian-Chinese food of the east with a characteristic soy-spiked Manchurian sauce lavished on soft-shelled crab. The Gobi 65 is a reworking of Chicken 65, a famous hotel dish from Chennai in south India, supposedly invented in 1965. Instead of the classic chicken 65, which is fried and smothered in a red chilli sauce, Burger Shurger takes the idea and wrangles it into a blended sauce of sriracha, curry leaves, ginger and garlic, then tumbles it with fried cauliflower (gobi). In a town full of great cauliflower, this dish rockets onto the must-try list.
Vegetarian burgers include the vada pav, a traditional curried potato dish that’s served on a soft roll in India but turned into a burger here, and the pav bhaji, a Mumbai-style vegetable curry that’s turned into a burger-friendly patty and slathered with tamarind sauce. Even desserts get the spicy mash-up treatment, with a creme brulee jazzed up with chai spices.
Everything is tasty, filling and served with pride, usually by the chatty and charismatic Payal herself. This young entrepreneur is not only part of an Elsternwick renaissance; she’s also collaborating on the great Melbourne story of immigrant cuisines given new life and energy in this big, hungry town.
The Chilli Crab Burger.

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3 Ingredient Chickpea Flour Treats for Dogs [Recipe] | The Dog People by Rover.com

Can dogs eat chickpeas? Absolutely yes! You can use chickpeas (or garbanzo beans) in your dog treat recipes to add a healthy boost of protein and fiber to their diet. Why should my dog eat chickpeas?
If your dog is on a limited ingredient diet due to allergies— especially protein allergies, the humble chickpea’s protein boost won’t upset her digestion while boosting her protein intake. Advertising
For the dog on a diet, the high fiber content of chickpeas will help her feel full while eating less.
For this recipe, we’ll be using chickpea in the form of flour, and we will use that to replace the regular wheat flour most people use for baking.
Chickpeas are legumes, so chickpea flour is perfect for making grain-free dog treats .
You can substitute chickpea flour for regular flour in any dog treat recipe. Just like with coconut flour, you will typically need a little less chickpea flour so replace it at 3/4 cup for each 1 cup of regular flour and add more as necessary. Where can I find chickpea flour?
You might find chickpea flour in a few different places in your local grocery store. Look for chickpea flour in the baking section, the gluten-free section, the natural food section, or the international section of your favorite grocery store. Chickpea flour is used in human cooking to make falafel, garden burgers, breads and fritters, and is a popular ingredient in Indian cuisine. If you can’t find chickpea flour in your area, Amazon has you covered . How to make your own chickpea flour
You can make your own chickpea flour by grinding dried chickpeas in your food processor. Dried chickpeas are pretty hard, so you may need to sift the resulting powder, and re-grind any larger particles using a coffee grinder or spice grinder.
Grain Free Chickpea Dog Treats Prep

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A world of flavours awaits at Taste of India Letterkenny – Win a voucher!

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A multi-cuisine takeaway is heating up the Letterkenny food scene with an exciting menu and app.
Taste of India Express, on Lower Main Street, has become a hotspot for hungry customers who want a varied menu to satisfy every craving.
From authentic curries to fast food favourites and pizzas – everyone wants a slice of the action!
A Taste of India has a packed menu of exceptional Indian dishes and delicious vegetarian options.
But their fresh kebabs, hoggies and munch boxes really tickle the taste buds late into the night.
As a top Tuesday treat, the takeaway offers buy one get one free pizzas. So you pay for one and get two!
All special offers and meal deals are just a tap away, as Taste of India have a handy app for all collections and deliveries. Get 15% discount on online orders over €20.
Download the app now for all the latest offers: https://tasteofindia-italianpizza.com and discover all the tasty deals for yourself.
You can order through the app or call 074 91 25753 COMPETITION:
Want to win a €30 voucher to spend at Taste of India Letterkenny? Check out our Facebook giveaway here: https://www.facebook.com/donegaldaily/ A world of flavours awaits at Taste of India Letterkenny – Win a voucher! was last modified: April 17th, 2019 by Staff Writer Share this:

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2 Bedroom Apartment / Flat for sale in Mulund West, Mumbai

PropertyWala.com 2 Bedroom Apartment / Flat for sale in Mulund West, Mumbai 2 – 2.5 crores 2BHK 2Baths Residential Apartment for Sale in Vikas Paradise, Mulund West LBS Rd, Vardhman Nagar, Mulund West, Mulund West, Mumbai – 400080 (Maharashtra) Area: 1020 SqFeet Total Floors: More than 20 Facing: West Rate: 23,529 per SqFeet +20% Age Of Construction: 19 Years Possession: Immediate/Ready to move Build Up Area: 1020 sqft Price: 2.40 Cr The society has dedicated security guards for every tower.No power backup is available.Daily needs shopping could be done within the society premises to make the stay convinent.The apartment has borings water supply.Piped gas facility is available in the property.
When you call, don’t forget to mention that you saw this ad on PropertyWala.com. Features Explore The World Travel Academy Kausa (<11km), Hiranandani Powai Helipad (<11km), Reliance Corporate Park Helipad No. 1 (<12km), Reliance Corporate Park Helipad No.2 (<12km), Reliance Corporate Park Helipad No.3 (<12km), Hawre Helipad (<13km), Reliance Corporate Park – Helipad (<12km), Hiranandani Helipad (<12km) PVR Growel / Kandivali East (<13km), Cinemax (<3km), PVR Cinemas Nirmal Lifestyle Mall (<2km), Davakhar Infrastructure Pvt. Ltd. (<5km), Cinema star (<8km), Reliance Media Works 2 (<9km), Movie Time Cinema (<14km), Inox Movie Vishnu Shivam Mall (<12km), PVR Oberoi (<13km) Swatantryaveer Vinayak Damodar Savarkar Sabhagruh (<13km), Vanita Mahila Mandal Hall (<14km), Sambhaji Mitra Mandal (<14km) Dr Sankpals Dental Centre (<10km), goodhealthclinic (<3km), Smile Speak Dental Clinic and Implant Centre (<8km), Vyughadhanth (Dr.Rajesh Iyer, Shaligram Ajit – Dr Shaligram Avinash (<5km), Dental Concepts™ Thane (<4km), Smile Centre Dental Clinic Bhandup (<5km), SoftTouch Dental Clinic (<3km) 9 Nine Convenience Store (<1km), Shraddha Services (<4km), Life Style Family Shop (<5km), Shreeji Supermarket (<5km), Chenna Ram General Stores (<9km), Yadav Communications / Y-MART (<10km), Powai Pan Beedi Shop (<11km), The Hungry Birds (<11km), Mamta Provision & General Stores (<14km) Education Smt. Sulochanadevi Singhania School (<6km), Transcendental Meditation Center (<5km), Vidya Prasarak Mandal School (<3km), DAV Public School (<8km), Little Flower High School (<7km), DAV International School (<1km), Kendriya Vidyalaya IIT Powai (<9km), New Horizon Scholars School and Neo kids (<7km), St Xavier, Maharani Saibai Vidya Mandir (<11km), Gundecha Education Academy (<12km), Sri Sri Ravishankar Vidya Mandir Mulund, Sheth Karamshi Kanji English School (<1km), Kidzee (<5km) Chandu Halwai Airoli c/o DMart (<8km), Monginis Cake Shop (<8km), Love and Cheesecake Hiranandani Gardens, Chandu Halwai Mulund (<2km), Standard Chartered Thane Branch (<9km), IDBI Bank (<13km), Union Bank of India ATM (<10km), IDBI Bank ATM Mulund West (<1km), Standard Chartered (<10km), The Saraswat Co-operative Bank Limited ATM (<5km), Axis Bank ATM (<5km), Bank of Baroda ATM (<2km), HDFC Bank ATM (<3km), Oriental Bank of Commerce (<8km), Axis Bank ATM (<9km), Kotak Mahindra Bank ATM (<4km), State Bank Of India ATM (<7km), IDBI Bank (<3km) Renaissance Mumbai Convention Centre Hotel (<9km), Hotel Satkar Residency (<5km), The Residence Hotel & Apartments (<10km), Keys Select Hotel Nestor (<13km), The Caliph Hotel (<11km), Ramada by Wyndham Powai Hotel & Convention Centre (<9km), Sapphire Asta Mumbai (<11km), Rodas An Ecotel Hotel (<10km), Hotel Cosmo (<13km), Hotel Tip Top Plaza (<2km), OYO Rooms Thane West (<3km), Hotel Ratna Palace Residency (<5km), Ginger Hotel Mumbai (Mahakali) (<14km), OYO Apartment Chandivali Powai (<12km), Royal Park Residency (<7km), Country Inn & Suites by Radisson Navi Mumbai (<14km), Hotel Vinyasa (<5km), The Church at Powai (<11km), Our Lady Of Mercy Church (<7km), Our Lady of Fatima Church (<8km), New Life Fellowship Church (<9km), Methodist Tamil Church Thane (<9km), Covenant Blessings Church Thane (<10km), St. Pius X Church (<2km), St. Stephen’s Orthodox Syrian Church (<9km), STECI (Bhandup Parish) (<4km), Living Way A.G. Church (<4km), St.Mary, St. Thomas Malankara Catholic Church Thane (<6km), St. Thomas’ Church (<6km), Airoli Assembly of God Church (<8km) * All distances are approximate Price Trends Mulund West, Mumbai Apartments / Flats for sale in Mulund West, Mumbai This property is priced approximately 20% over the average for an Apartments / Flats for sale in Mulund West, Mumbai (Rs.19530/SqFeet) * Disclaimer: Data may be approximate. Locality Reviews Mulund West, Mumbai Mulund is green belt of Mumbai main population of Mulund west is Gujrati then sindhi & PunjabiIn Mulund east mostly Marathi, Mulund is full of all brand of restaurantYou get more variety of Gujrati food in Mulund temperature of mulund is also low then Mumbai Pros: Mar 2 by Arjun Khanchandani Mulund West is planned layout with each plot faces well maintained roads . There is no water shortage. Thousands of trees across roads make Mulund West a free city. Well mannered and cultured residents has contributed a lot in development of present Mulund West. Residents are peace loving people and hence preferred area in central suburbs. It is queen of central suburbs. Pros: Well planned and well maintained roads Cons: Jan 14 by Arvind kumar Mulund West is a well planned city which has a lot of free neet and patal kel road. It's highly impossible for a person to get lost. Well connected to western, south, north, and Navi Mumbai . One can call it a center point. Pros: All points above are good Posted: Apr 28, 2017 by Nitin Deshpande Very well developed place of mumbai , less crowded, luxurious places and very good locality . The best friendly locality of mumbai . Many good construction works sre csrried out here with spacious rooms ans good view. Pros: Mar 21, 2017 by Kamal Narwani Good location, near Mumbai , has very good facilities. School, collages and offices are located very near, Pros: Good location in living as well as investment Posted: Jul 15, 2014 by Anil Mulund west is very popular Residential locality of central Mumbai suburbs, surrounded by posh residential developments such as Nirmal lifestyle, City of joy, Runwal tower and many more.It is a prime locality from where all places of Mumbai can be reached easily, and enjoys excellent connectivity with EE Highway, WE Highway, Powai , Vikhroli, Kanjurmarg etc. Pros: Mumbai 's best suburb, located on foothills with lots of greenery & serene surroundings, blend in vicinity of commercial, industrial & residential surroundings. Friendly people & everything available easily nearby. Clean & healthy environ. Pros: No water or electricity problems Good road network, well connected with entire Mumbai Serenity, nature & brisk activity perfectly blended Cons: by Ashok Gangwani (Property King Dehradun) Mulund is the earliest planned suburb of Mumbai city, which extends from present day Mulund station to Paanch Rasta junction in Mulund (West). Mulund comes under the Central line of railway. If you go through any Central line Mulund has the hottest property to live in. Mulund was a home to a cosmopolitan mix of large number of educated middle class residents and several industrial factories along present day L.B.S. road.Mulund today has become more densely populated than what it used to be, it still remains one of the greenest and safest places to live in Mumbai. The pleasant living conditions and easy access to different parts of the city and its outskirts, have attracted many new residents.Also Mulund is a well connected suburb in all directions. Mulund has several educational institutes in both English and Regional language mediums. Mulund has two large shopping malls on LBS Marg , Nirmal Lifestyles and R-Mall. and really one of the few suburbs of Mumbai to boast of a vibrant night life. The center of it all lies within Nirmal Lifestyles mall, near Nahur . Several western cuisine restaurants, along with some Indian restaurants are located within the mall, and it also has two nightclubs. Overall, the night life in Mulund has a sober and peaceful feel to it, except for some people who have too much to drink.Real Estate prices are hiked day by day in Mulund according to the demand. Safe for residential purpose all the time as compared to other suburbs.Panchrasta, Tambe Nagar, Sarvodaya Nagar , Aasha Nagar, Yogi Hill, Vardhaman Nagar, Veena Nagar , Vaishali Nagar , Model Towen, Swapna Nagari, Kalpa Nagari, Yogi Hill, Mulund Colony are few important places. Mulund is one of the posh built-up areas in North-East part of Mumbai. There is an easy access to Eastern Express Highway and Navi Mumbai through Mulund-Airoli Bridge. Pros: Mulund is perfect location for Residential purpose as compared to other suburbs. The biggest shopping mall in India, that is Nirmal LifeStyle, is located in Mulund. As people over there worship God, Allah, Bhagwan, so there are many Temples, Churches and Mosques. Posted:

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The 9 best Indian restaurants in London according to TripAdvisor

The 9 best Indian restaurants in London according to TripAdvisor The number one curry house is ranked the best restaurant in the capital too Share A chef prepares a curry dish in an Indian restaurant kitchen (Image: CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
Bhuna, Korma, Jalfrezzi, Vindaloo, Massala and Balti.
Just some of the Indian dishes that the British public have taken to their hearts and consumed in vast quantities.
Everyone has their opinion on which restaurant does the tastiest curry.
Some people take it a step further and even spend their free time arguing over which city does the best ones. Read More Paedophile abused girl for years
MyLondon is of the opinion the capital certainly holds its own when it comes to one of the nation’s favourite cuisines.
TripAdvisor website users can rate and review restaurants and say whether their food was good, excellent, very good, average, poor or terrible.
So it is a great gauge to how eateries are performing based on food, service and value.
We’ve plucked out the top nine Indian restaurants in London according to TripAdvisor for you to mull over and debate. 9. Olde Goa, Norbury Instagram
Authentic Goan home style cooking in abundance at Olde Goa in Norbury .
The restaurant has plenty of character and it is clear the owners are passionate about the food they are creating.
One visitor wrote: “Warm welcome, joyful atmosphere, freshly made, authentic cuisine. If you’re familiar with Goan food, you’ll love it, if you’re not, you’ll love it even more!”
Address: 1336 London Rd, Norbury, London SW16 4DG
Tel: 020 8765 9998 Instagram
There is a strong emphasis on south Indian food, particularly on Kerala coastal cuisines with some tandoori dishes too.
A reviewer on TripAdvisor was full of praise, they said: “I have been craving authentic south Indian food and I am glad that I was able to get what I was looking for.
“The food, service and the music was on point and reminded me of home!
“Definitely gonna visit more often and I highly recommend everyone to try this place out.”
Address: 57-59, Willesden Lane, Kilburn, London, NW6 7RL
Tel: 020 7624 1713
A jazz curry house!
This is why we love London.
The Sitara is brave enough to shake up the norm and do something bold in Archway .
The restaurant was established in 1991 and produces “quality Punjabi cuisine” accompanied by jazz.
Once a month jazz is played live, but the restaurant is decorated with jazz art and pictures all year round.
One customer wrote: “This was our first visit to The Sitara, and we really had a fantastic evening there: a friendly atmosphere, great food and jazz to die for!”
Address: 784 Holloway Road, Archway, Holloway, London
Tel: 020 7281 0649
This Ealing restaurant is very unassuming in its approach and has no explanation of their thinking behind the food.
However the reviews speak for themselves and they are a 5 out of 5 Indian restaurant.
One customer wrote: “Absolutely amazing. Indian food made to a fantastic standard. You can really taste the flavours and spices. The menu caters for all your usual favourites and all reasonably priced to.”
Address: 185 South Ealing Road, Ealing, W5 4RH
Tel: 020 8560 5878 5. Shahi Pakwaan, Finchley
Shahi Pakwaan means Royal Cooking in Hindi so expectations are high when hungry eaters walk into this restaurant in Finchley .
Browsing over the menu you will genuinely be surprised what good value the food on offer is. Like the MyLondon Facebook page
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A visitor to the restaurant wrote on TripAdvisor: “Fantastic tasting food and the cheapest meal I’ve ever had in London. It was such good value for money that I had to check the bill twice. We’ll definitely be back.”
Address: 25 Aylmer Parade, Aylmer Road, East Finchley, N2 0PE
Tel: 020 834

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Bay Tree / Laurus nobilis by GeaAusten

I grew this from a cutting.. I learnt from my Grandmother how to do it.. you take a side shoot off a main branch when its growing,, and quickly put it in the ground.. its very easy,, its a matter of doing it quickly,,
it sort of tricks the plant into thinking its still growing..
Laurus nobilis is an aromatic evergreen tree or large shrub with green, glabrous (smooth and hairless) leaves , in the flowering plant family Lauraceae . It is native to the Mediterranean region and is used as bay leaf for seasoning in cooking. Its common names include bay tree
The Bay leaf is an aromatic leaf commonly used in cooking. It can be used whole, or as dried and ground.
Contents 1 Sources 2 Chemical constituents 3 Taste and aroma 4 Uses 5 Safety 5.1 Canadian food and drug regulations 6 References Sources [ edit ] It comes from several plants such as:
Bay laurel ( Laurus nobilis , Lauraceae ). Fresh or dried bay leaves are used in cooking for their distinctive flavour and fragrance. The leaves should be removed from the cooked food before eating (see Safety section below). The leaves are often used to flavour soups, stews, braises and pâtés in Mediterranean and Latin American cuisine. The fresh leaves are very mild and do not develop their full flavour until several weeks after picking and drying. [1] California bay leaf – the leaf of the California bay tree ( Umbellularia californica , Lauraceae), also known as California laurel, Oregon myrtle, and pepperwood, is similar to the Mediterranean bay laurel, but has a stronger flavour. Indian bay leaf or malabathrum ( Cinnamomum tamala , Lauraceae) differs in that bay laurel leaves are shorter and light to medium green in colour, with one large vein down the length of the leaf, while tejpat ( Cinnamonum tamala ) leaves are about twice as long and wider, usually olive green in colour, and with three veins down the length of the leaf and is culinarily quite different, having a fragrance and taste similar to cinnamon (cassia) bark, but milder. Indonesian bay leaf or Indonesian laurel ( salam leaf, Syzygium polyanthum , Myrtaceae) is not commonly found outside Indonesia; this herb is applied to meat and, less often, to vegetables. [2] West Indian bay leaf, the leaf of the West Indian bay tree ( Pimenta racemosa , Myrtaceae), used culinarily and to produce the cologne called bay rum . Mexican bay leaf ( Litsea glaucescens , Lauraceae). Chemical constituents [ edit ] The leaves contain about 1.3% essential oils (ol. lauri folii), consisting of 45% eucalyptol , 12% other terpenes , 8-12% terpinyl acetate, 3–4% sesquiterpenes , 3% methyleugenol , and other α- and β- pinenes , phellandrene , linalool , geraniol , terpineol , and contain lauric acid also.
Taste and aroma [ edit ] If eaten whole, bay leaves ( Laurus nobilis ) are pungent and have a sharp, bitter taste. As with many spices and flavourings, the fragrance of the bay leaf is more noticeable than its taste. When dried, the fragrance is herbal, slightly floral, and somewhat similar to oregano and thyme . Myrcene , which is a component of many essential oils used in perfumery, can be extracted from the bay leaf. They also contain eugenol . [3]
Uses [ edit ] In Indian and Pakistani cuisine, bay laurel leaves are sometimes used in place of Indian bay leaf , although they have a different flavour. They are most often used in rice dishes like biryani and as an ingredient in garam masala . Bay (laurel) leaves are frequently packaged as tejpatta (the Hindi term for Indian bay leaf), creating confusion between the two herbs.
In the Philippines, dried bay laurel leaves are used in several Filipino dishes such as menudo , beef pares , and adobo .
Bay leaves were used for flavouring by the ancient Greeks. [4] They are a fixture in the cooking of many European cuisines (particularly those of the Mediterranean), as well as in the Americas. They are used in soups, stews, meat, seafood, vegetable dishes, and sauces. The leaves also flavour many classic French dishes. The leaves are most often used whole (sometimes in a bouquet garni ) and removed before serving (they can be abrasive in the digestive tract). Thai and Laotian cuisine employs bay leaf (Thai name bai kra wan ) in a few Arab-influenced dishes, notably massaman curry . [5]
Bay leaves can also be crushed or ground before cooking. Crushed bay leaves impart more fragrance than whole leaves, but are more difficult to remove, and thus they are often used in a muslin bag or tea infuser. Ground bay laurel may be substituted for whole leaves, and does not need to be removed, but it is much stronger.
Bay leaves are also used in the making of jerk chicken in the Caribbean Islands. The bay leaves are soaked and placed on the cool side of the grill. Pimento sticks are placed on top of the leaves and the chicken is placed on top and smoked.
Bay leaves can also be used scattered in a pantry to repel meal moths , [6] flies, [7] cockroaches, [8] mice, [ citation needed ] and silverfish . [ citation needed ]
Bay leaves have been used in entomology as the active ingredient in killing jars . The crushed, fresh, young leaves are put into the jar under a layer of paper. The vapors they release kill insects slowly but effectively, and keep the specimens relaxed and easy to mount. The leaves discourage the growth of molds. They are not effective for killing large beetles and similar specimens, but insects that have been killed in a cyanide killing jar can be transferred to a laurel jar to await mounting. [9] There is confusion in the literature about whether Laurus nobilis is a source of cyanide to any practical extent, but there is no evidence that cyanide is relevant to its value in killing jars. It certainly is rich in various essential oil components that could incapacitate insects in high concentrations; such compounds include 1,8-cineole , alpha-terpinyl acetate, and methyl eugenol . [10] It also is unclear to what extent the alleged effect of cyanide released by the crushed leaves has been mis-attributed to Laurus nobilis in confusion with the unrelated Prunus laurocerasus , the so-called cherry laurel, which certainly does contain dangerous concentrations of cyanogenic glycocides [11] together with the enzymes to generate the hydrogen cyanide from the glycocides if the leaf is physically damaged. [12]
Safety [ edit ] Some members of the laurel family, as well as the unrelated but visually similar mountain laurel and cherry laurel , have leaves that are poisonous to humans and livestock. [11] While these plants are not sold anywhere for culinary use, their visual similarity to bay leaves has led to the oft-repeated belief that bay leaves should be removed from food after cooking because they are poisonous. This is not true; bay leaves may be eaten without toxic effect. However, they remain unpleasantly stiff even after thorough cooking, and if swallowed whole or in large pieces, they may pose a risk of harming the digestive tract or causing choking. [13] Thus, most recipes that use bay leaves will recommend their removal after the cooking process has finished. [14]
Canadian food and drug regulations [ edit ] The Canadian government requires that the bay leaves contain no more than 4.5% total ash material with a maximum of 0.5% of which is insoluble in hydrochloric acid. To be considered dried it has to contain 7% moisture or less. The oil content cannot be less than 1 milliliter per 100 grams of the spice. [15]
References

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