Spring weather is here in Holland! (with temperatures up to 20 degrees!)

Spring weather is here in Holland! (with temperatures up to 20 degrees!)

19 apr All Day 21 Paaspop/Easter Doll Festival Event Details
Paaspop/Easter Doll, has been going since 1974 and has grown year on year. It went from a friendly regional festival to an internationally recognisable three-day event. Last year 83,000 people more Event Details
Paaspop/Easter Doll, has been going since 1974 and has grown year on year. It went from a friendly regional festival to an internationally recognisable three-day event. Last year 83,000 people attended Passpop to see 230 different acts, on 14 different stages. They also got to try 42 different food trucks, offering a variety of different cuisines from all over the world.
Paaspop has seen acts such as Iggy Pop, Bastille, Nothing But Thieves, The Prodigy, Underworld, Kaiser Chiefs, The Kooks, Fatboy Slim, The Wombats and many more. So, who is going to be there this year?
25 Years Charly Lownoise & Mental Theo • 2manydjs DJ Set • 4shobangers • 80’s Verantwoord • Aap uit de Mouw • Abba Fever • Alex Agnew • The All Star Gary Moore Tribute Band • All Them Witches • Amartey • Amyl And The Sniffers • Arie & Silvester • Atmozfears • Baby Blue • Bizzey • Black Water County • Blood Red Shoes • Brennan Heart • Camo & Krooked • Circus Brothers • Claw Boys Claw • Clean Bandit • Comeback Kid • D-Block & S-te-Fan • D-Sturb • Daddy Long Legs • DAISY • Daniel Caldèras & the Shrunken Big Band ft. Benjamin Herman • Davina Michelle • De Hofnar • De Jeugd van Tegenwoordig • De Lievelings DJ’s van je Zusje • De Staat • The Devil Makes Three • DeWolff • The Dirty Daddies • Donnie & Joost • Dopebwoy • Douwe Bob • Dr Phunk • Dropkick Murphys • Drunken Dolly • EAUXMAR • Ellen Ten Damme • Famke Louise • FATA BOOM • Fiesta Macumba Soundsystem • Flonti Stacks • For I Am King • Freddy Moreira • Frenna • The Gaslamp Killer • GENTA • Handrick • Hannah Williams & The Affirmations • Heavy Hoempa plays Iron Maiden • Hef • Heideroosjes • HENGE • Herrie met Gerrie • Ho99o9 • Idaly • IDLES • Ilse DeLange • Indian Askin • Jailhouse Jimmy • Jameszoo • Jarreau Vandal • Jeangu Macrooy • Jett Rebel • Jiri11 • JoeyAK • Johnny 500 • Jordymone9 • Kovacs • Kraantje Pappie • Kris Kross Amsterdam • La Fuente • LNY TNZ • Louder Than Love • Louder Than Love (Soundgarden tribute) • Lukas Graham • MADUK hosted by Ben Verse • Mash-Up Jack • Mate Power • Merol • Mia More • Michelle David & The Gospel Sessions • Mike Krol • Mike Williams • Mr. Belt & Wezol • Mula B • NAFTHALY RAMONA • Navarone • Nervana • Nicole Atkins • Nielson • Noisia DJ Set • NOMA$ • Nona • Novastar • Ooostblok • Oscar and the Wolf • Passenger • Pendulum DJ Set • Phuture Noize • Ploegendienst • Plunder • Poke • Prime • Puinhoop Kollektiv – The Final Weekend Tour • Puri • Que Pasa! • Ran-D • Rondé • Ronnie Flex & Deuxperience • Rowwen Hèze • Russkaja • S10 • Sam Feldt LIVE • Scooter • Sevn Alias • Singlefeestje • Sir Reg • Sjaak • Sjannies • SMP • Snelle • Son Mieux • Stahlzeit • The Stand-Up Club • The Stand-Up Club • Steel Panther • T & Sugah b2b NCT • Tabanka • TAPE TOY • Ten Times A Million • Terry Alderton • Thijs Boontjes Dans- en Showorkest • Tim Akkerman Sings The Boss • Tim Knol & The Blue Grass Boogiemen • Trobi • Tusky • The Vintage Caravan • Vinylfeestje • Waxfiend • The Wetnecks • White Lies • Winne • Within Temptation • Yonaka • Young Ellens • Yung Felix • Yungblud • Zer00’s Heroes Tickets

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Truck Full of Wine Tips on the A2 Freeway in Thick Fog

19 apr All Day 21 Paaspop/Easter Doll Festival Event Details
Paaspop/Easter Doll, has been going since 1974 and has grown year on year. It went from a friendly regional festival to an internationally recognisable three-day event. Last year 83,000 people more Event Details
Paaspop/Easter Doll, has been going since 1974 and has grown year on year. It went from a friendly regional festival to an internationally recognisable three-day event. Last year 83,000 people attended Passpop to see 230 different acts, on 14 different stages. They also got to try 42 different food trucks, offering a variety of different cuisines from all over the world.
Paaspop has seen acts such as Iggy Pop, Bastille, Nothing But Thieves, The Prodigy, Underworld, Kaiser Chiefs, The Kooks, Fatboy Slim, The Wombats and many more. So, who is going to be there this year?
25 Years Charly Lownoise & Mental Theo • 2manydjs DJ Set • 4shobangers • 80’s Verantwoord • Aap uit de Mouw • Abba Fever • Alex Agnew • The All Star Gary Moore Tribute Band • All Them Witches • Amartey • Amyl And The Sniffers • Arie & Silvester • Atmozfears • Baby Blue • Bizzey • Black Water County • Blood Red Shoes • Brennan Heart • Camo & Krooked • Circus Brothers • Claw Boys Claw • Clean Bandit • Comeback Kid • D-Block & S-te-Fan • D-Sturb • Daddy Long Legs • DAISY • Daniel Caldèras & the Shrunken Big Band ft. Benjamin Herman • Davina Michelle • De Hofnar • De Jeugd van Tegenwoordig • De Lievelings DJ’s van je Zusje • De Staat • The Devil Makes Three • DeWolff • The Dirty Daddies • Donnie & Joost • Dopebwoy • Douwe Bob • Dr Phunk • Dropkick Murphys • Drunken Dolly • EAUXMAR • Ellen Ten Damme • Famke Louise • FATA BOOM • Fiesta Macumba Soundsystem • Flonti Stacks • For I Am King • Freddy Moreira • Frenna • The Gaslamp Killer • GENTA • Handrick • Hannah Williams & The Affirmations • Heavy Hoempa plays Iron Maiden • Hef • Heideroosjes • HENGE • Herrie met Gerrie • Ho99o9 • Idaly • IDLES • Ilse DeLange • Indian Askin • Jailhouse Jimmy • Jameszoo • Jarreau Vandal • Jeangu Macrooy • Jett Rebel • Jiri11 • JoeyAK • Johnny 500 • Jordymone9 • Kovacs • Kraantje Pappie • Kris Kross Amsterdam • La Fuente • LNY TNZ • Louder Than Love • Louder Than Love (Soundgarden tribute) • Lukas Graham • MADUK hosted by Ben Verse • Mash-Up Jack • Mate Power • Merol • Mia More • Michelle David & The Gospel Sessions • Mike Krol • Mike Williams • Mr. Belt & Wezol • Mula B • NAFTHALY RAMONA • Navarone • Nervana • Nicole Atkins • Nielson • Noisia DJ Set • NOMA$ • Nona • Novastar • Ooostblok • Oscar and the Wolf • Passenger • Pendulum DJ Set • Phuture Noize • Ploegendienst • Plunder • Poke • Prime • Puinhoop Kollektiv – The Final Weekend Tour • Puri • Que Pasa! • Ran-D • Rondé • Ronnie Flex & Deuxperience • Rowwen Hèze • Russkaja • S10 • Sam Feldt LIVE • Scooter • Sevn Alias • Singlefeestje • Sir Reg • Sjaak • Sjannies • SMP • Snelle • Son Mieux • Stahlzeit • The Stand-Up Club • The Stand-Up Club • Steel Panther • T & Sugah b2b NCT • Tabanka • TAPE TOY • Ten Times A Million • Terry Alderton • Thijs Boontjes Dans- en Showorkest • Tim Akkerman Sings The Boss • Tim Knol & The Blue Grass Boogiemen • Trobi • Tusky • The Vintage Caravan • Vinylfeestje • Waxfiend • The Wetnecks • White Lies • Winne • Within Temptation • Yonaka • Young Ellens • Yung Felix • Yungblud • Zer00’s Heroes Tickets

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Tips for choosing the right frozen foods

Tips for choosing the right frozen foods Sun 24 Mar 2019
When it comes to having a proper meal, most of us prefer eating something made with fresh ingredients. But in today’s fast-paced world, lots of people quickly opt for the easiest, most convenient options for eating. And the moment we think about quick and easy ways of eating a whole meal, the first thing that comes to mind is the freezer.
Whether it’s time constraints, calorie-counting, or budget considerations, you may resort to some of the frozen foods that are readily available at grocery stores. Frozen foods come in many varieties and cuisines, including Chinese, Indian, Mexican, organic, vegetarian, and low-calorie meals. Most can be prepared in about 10 to 15 minutes.
Although frozen foods are super-convenient, there’s often a downside to them, not least of which is their nutritional value. Hence, you must pay attention to what exactly you’re buying before filling your care with frozen meals. Here we’ve highlighted a few useful tips, which will help you choose some healthy (and tasty!) frozen foods.
Always read the labels . Before buying frozen foods, read the labels carefully. One of the main things to look for is the amount of fat content in that particular item. The recommended value of fat content per serving for any of these frozen foods should not exceed 10-15 grams. If the label includes some scientific terms that you’re not familiar with, it’s better to avoid the item until you’re sure of the ingredients.
Avoid added ingredients . Frozen foods with added ingredients like rice, sugar or cheese may not be a good option. These extra ingredients often increase the fat and/or sodium content in the frozen meals.
Pick frozen foods with high protein and fibre content . While shopping for frozen foods, make sure you look for items with all the essential minerals and nutrients that are required for staying healthy. Try to select foods that contain about 5-10 grams of fibre per serving. Eating foods rich in fibre has numerous health benefits, including aiding digestion, lowering cholesterol levels, controlling blood sugar and maintaining a healthy weight. Apart from high fibre content, opt for items that are high in protein. Make sure they have atleast 15grams of protein per serving, if possible. Foods that are rich in protein aid in proper functioning of muscles and bones, increase body strength, and boost the metabolism.
Looking for healthy, organic options. One of the key things to remember when selecting the right frozen foods is that organic and gluten-free are usually healthier than the rest, since they are grown and processed without adding any preservatives. Eating organic foods has been associated with several health benefits, like improving heart health, strengthening your immune system, and reducing the chances of being affected by food-borne diseases. Be careful, though: just because something is organic doesn’t always mean it’s healthy. Watch out for high-salt or high-fat content, as you should when shopping for any frozen food.
Buy meals in re-sealable packaging. Frozen foods packed in re-sealable bags save the product from being damaged by oxidation and dehydration. Foods packed in this type of bag also prevents the formation of ice crystals.
Keep it balanced. To gettget the maximum benefit of frozen foods, select those that balance lean proteins, whole grains, vegetables and fruits. This way, you’re not only satisfying your taste buds, but you’ll ensure that your body gets a healthy combination of the most important food groups. -Akhila Kakarala

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Best Indian Restaurants in Singapore for Spice-Lovers

Best Indian Restaurants in Singapore for Spice-Lovers by Nicola Watson & Joy Fang FOOD | 24 March 2019 Love spicy curries? Head for some delicious fare at these Indian restaurants in Singapore. Photo: Shutterstock
For those who love their spices , you can’t go wrong with Indian cuisine. Rich, piquant and with a range of flavour profiles that deliver a satisfying kick, a hearty Indian meal always hits the spot, especially on a cold rainy day.
Whether you are craving for tandoori chicken tikka, butter chicken, palak paneer or fish head curry accompanied with piping hot naan, we’ve got the solution for you.
Whilst there are many many places to choose from islandwide, here are just a few of our firm favourites that always deliver on both taste and heat. Thevar A post shared by Thevar (@thevar.sg) on Feb 6, 2019 at 5:31am PST
This new-ish modern grill restaurant has taken Indian food to a whole new level with a Mod-Indian fusion menu that showcases creative interpretations of Indian flavours from the Malay Peninsula. Spearheaded by Chef Mano Thevar (who worked at Waku Ghin and Pure C in The Netherlands), the menu is reflective of his heritage growing up in the port town of Penang and is designed specifically to be shared with your family or friends.
Expect delights that are inspired by his grandmother, including oysters topped with punchy spicy-salty rasam granita, pork cheek cooked in sambar spices and wrapped in a betel leaf, and homemade dosai stuffed with spiced mackerel fillet. Basically, everything is jam-packed with traditional spices. It’s all delicious and well worth the cost of each dish.
Where: 9 Keong Saik Road For more info: Visit www.thevar.sg or call 6904-0838. A post shared by THE BANANA LEAF APOLO (@thebananaleafapolo) on Jul 7, 2017 at 5:52am PDT
One of the most popular restaurants in Little India, the bustling spot is always brimming with hungry foodies. We love that meals are served in a traditional manner — on a banana leaf instead of a plate. Take your pick from their extensive menu, which ranges from curries to masala dishes, sambal options, tikka, tandoori, paneer and dhall. Both North and South cuisine are available. The Apolo Fish Head Curry, which is made from scratch with authentic Indian spices and herbs and served with assorted vegetables such as Okra, Tomato and Eggplants, is an absolute popular favourite at this place. Mouthwateringly good, it comes highly recommended. Banana Leaf Apolo also has a swankier, quieter and more upmarket outlet over at Parkway Parade if you want to dine in comfort.
Where: 54 Race Course Road For more info: Visit www.thebananaleafapolo.com or call 6293-8682. Samy’s Curry Restaurant Photo: Samy’s Curry Restaurant
A family-run favourite since the 1960’s, Samy’s Curry restaurant is a multi-award winning curry house set in the lush greenery of tranquil Dempsey. If Trip Advisor awards this place a certificate of excellence three years in a row, you know you will not be disappointed with their offerings. Their legendary masala chicken, signature fish head curry and mysore mutton made from their secret blend of Indian spices are firm favourites, not to mention their flavourful biryani rice. Food is also served on a banana leaf so you can be sure the experience is authentic.
Where: 25 Dempsey Road For more info: Visit www.samyscurry.com or call 6472-2080. A1 Restaurant

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My gastronomical journey through Turkey

Turkish food does have some similarities to the food in UAE since it is in the Arab region, but there are a lot of different dishes, and also the same dishes which taste a bit different made the Turkish way. Hence, I decided to write a post dedicated to just the food there. I have written another post detailing our visit (excluding the food). It includes the hotel, sightseeing, visa process, currency information, and a lot more in detail. You can read it here .
Since we had taken guided tours on almost all the days, we had lunch included in our tour. These were local restaurants with good food, but not necessarily ones which would have specifically been on my list to try. Although, we did go to different places and explored local food ourselves. Read on to find out.
Index:
Street snacks – Simit and roasted chestnuts 15th March – local food in Old Istanbul, and nightlife in Karakoy 16th March – lunch by the sea, raki, nightlife in Taksim 17th March – local food at Cappadocia, Turkish night 18th March – cig kofte, and our best dinner in Turkey 19th March – Turkish tea with a view, organic local food 20th March – coffee with a view, local food
Street snacks: Let me start with the street snacks there. One of the things I saw very prominently all over Istanbul was the cart selling bread; it is called simit . It looks like a pretzel. It comes in various flavours (savory as well as sweet). You might find it a tad bit dry, but there are options like the one with cream cheese (which I tried). It still was a bit hard, but tasted really good after they put the cream cheese inside. It also had sesame seeds on top.
The other thing which caught my attention was the cart on which they were roasting something. I asked our guide and he said they are chestnuts . I got a small bag of these (100 gms cost 10 lira). You peel the skin which turns black in colour after roasting it, and have the chestnut. The texture was softer than I imagined, and I really liked the way it tasted.
A sweet that is famous there is the Turkish delights . We saw a shop near the grand bazaar which our guide suggested. We went crazy looking at the variety of offerings in this store. They were of different shapes and textures. We did taste quite a bit of them (and did buy some too). Not just that, but they also had a wide variety of teas as well as soaps. You’ll see a lot of these shops in the grand bazaar area where you can buy the Turkish delights.
We had gone there for about a week, and I will mention the eateries in chronological order. (You can click on the names of the restaurants for their location.)
15th March: Part of our Old Istanbul tour was the lunch in Serbathane . The word Serbat is used in similar form as it is in Hindi / Arabic – a refreshing drink. Serbat has been served traditionally, and that’s where the name comes from.
We started with the bulghur (cracked wheat) soup. I saw this at a lot of restaurants in Turkey, so I’m assuming it is a very famous dish. This was mildly spiced and really tasted good.
We then had some cold mezze like hummus, fava beans, Russian salad, and a few more; one of which was a tomato based mezze which tasted a bit like salsa.
For our mains, there were mixed kebabs – chicken and beef. These were more greasy than what I usually have in Dubai, and tasted delicious. They were served with potato wedges and rice.
I had a cup of Turkish cay (tea) at the end.
We were told that the Karakoy area has some nice pubs, so we ventured out to explore them. We didn’t find too many good places, so finally ended up going to a place called Finn which we had seen online. It was a small place, and the indoors were full (only by reservation) so we sat outdoors. It was summer and most of the places there have heaters for outdoors. Coming from Dubai, it was something I found fascinating.
We had a couple of drinks there and the service was good enough. Sadly, it was past 11pm and their kitchen was closed so we couldn’t get any food there.
We came near our hotel and decided to go for a bite nearby. We saw Mado cafe ; and surprisingly there are a lot of these around the city. We saw a different outlet almost every day that we were there.
The names and descriptions of the dishes were in Turkish. I called for what looked like a meat dish on a bed of fried potato sticks. It tasted just about average.
We also ordered a chicken pizza (which wasn’t in the menu but the waiter understood when we told him). This tasted pretty good.
For dessert we had Kazandibi . It is an Ottoman dessert and a popular one in Turkish cuisine. It is a type of caramelized milk pudding, and tasted fantastic. A lot of their desserts use goat milk (which has a sticky consistency) and I think the same was used in this. It does taste really good, and I recommend trying it out.
16th March: We had gone to the Buyukada island where we ate at a sea-side restaurant called Milano . No, it wasn’t Italian. We started with some salad, and for main course I had fish. This did not have too many spices on it, but had a nice flavour by itself.
I also tried a local liqueur – Raki . It is really strong and tastes like absinthe. Personally, I wasn’t much of a fan.
In the end, I had a sweet called lokmasi (it is just like the luquaimat that we get in UAE, but a bit crispier).
The good part about dining here was that the seagulls came and sat right outside the window; it was almost as if they were dining with us.
We spotted another Mado around here, and went there for some coffee. I ordered an affogato; I was expecting the usual espresso with a scoop of ice-cream, but this had cream, and chocolate sauce in it too. It did taste really good, although not the affogato that I had in mind.
That night we decided to explore the Taksim square area. It is quite happening, and the Istiklal road is like a walking street at night. At the beginning of the street we spotted few shawerma places, and I just couldn’t resist. We went to the one called Çılgın Dürüm I had a chicken shawerma and it tasted heavenly. It had more stuffing in it apart form chicken and I really enjoyed having it.
We were looking for some nightlife, and ended up at 360 Istanbul – a place that I had in mind before going to Turkey, especially for the view. This had good ratings online among the pubs there; surprisingly, kids were allowed too. The music wasn’t too loud, and the place had dim lighting. If you’re sitting outdoors, you’ll get a pretty good view of the city (keep in mind you’re in the heart of the city which is quite a crowded area). If you’re looking for a place which is at the rooftop and serves drinks, then this is a good option.
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A post shared by Famished Explorer [ UDIT ] (@uditss) on Mar 16, 2019 at 8:15pm PDT
17th March: We landed in Cappadocia in the afternoon and decided to have something at our hotel before our tour. We tried this delicious “omelette”. It was actually half-fried eggs along with meat sausages. This was totally mouth watering (I don’t remember the name though).
We then had shish tawook served with grilled vegetables and rice. This was flavourful too.
That evening, we had gone for the Turkish night which takes place in a cave restaurant and includes dinner with drinks. We had Turkish chicken stew along with bulghur rice. This had a tomato based gravy and tasted okay. We did enjoy the wine and the Turkish dances though.
18th March: After the hot air balloon and the red & green tour , we had lunch at a restaurant called Han . They had a buffet but not a very wide variety among mains. It did have a lot of salads and cold appetisers though. One of which was cig kofte – it is a Turkish speciality made from bulghur. I personally loved it and would recommend trying it out in Turkey, although given its texture and the fact that it is cold and a bit spicy, might take some time to get accustomed to for your taste-buds.
The salads were really good. The mains were average though. I had it along with bulghur rice to which I had taken a fond liking while in Turkey.
The restaurant which I had heard a lot about and really wanted to try in Cappadocia was Dibek . It has a cave like feel to it, and as soon as you enter, you get a cozy vibe. They have majlis style seating. A speciality of Cappadocia is the pottery kebab (testi kebab in Turkish). They make the dish in an earthern pot and break it open the pot in front of you. We ordered for the chicken one; it was made with a tomato base, and tasted delicious. The meat was soft and had a smokey flavour to it. Definitely check it out if you’re going there. For all you non-meat eaters, there is also have a vegetarian version of the testi kebabs that is available.
We also had Borek which is a local savory pastry. The “dibek pastry” had a stuffing of yellow cheese, carrot, cabbage and onion with olive oil and lemon dressing. We loved this so much that we ordered another portion of this.
Another dish that we had was the bamya yemegi which is okra cooked with tomatoes, peppers and onions; i liked this one too.
For dessert, we had Aside which is a local dessert made from flour and grape molasses. It had the texture of halwa and tasted superb.
19th March: We were on our jeep safari in Cappadocia when we stopped at a beautiful spot for some Turkish tea. It wasn’t the tea but the lovely view of the town that we got from here which makes the place worth it. They also make Turkish coffee in the hot furnace here.
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A post shared by Famished Explorer [ UDIT ] (@uditss) on Mar 22, 2019 at 3:02am PDT
For lunch, we went to Organic Cave Kitchen . This restaurant serves delicious organic Turkish style cuisine. It has seating on multiple levels (indoor as well as outdoor) and has a lovely ambience that feels earthy.
For appetisers we had the Turkish stuffed crepes which were stuffed with cheese. We really liked these a lot.
They have some nice combos. I had the meatball combo served along with lentil soup, rice, salad, and an apricot dessert. The meatballs were really delicious. Less of spices but I could get the nice meaty flavour. The apricot dessert was an whole apricot that was caramelized. It was something interesting.
The other dish was the chicken with thyme and this one was flavourful too.
The spaghetti bolognese was a bit dry and tasted just alright.
In the evening, we were looking for some chai, and found an Indian restaurant called Namaste India . The chai was really good for Turkish standards, and we were having the milk tea after a long time. This was another thing in Turkey… I did not find the Indian chai very easily. Since we were already at the restaurant we decided to have some samosas and pakodas too. Being the foodies that we are, we ended up having a full meal after that.
20th March: On our last day in Istanbul, we visited the galata tower . The view was so good that we just had to have a cup of coffee here. I would highly recommend that you visit this tower with enough time on your hands, so that you can enjoy the view of the city from here.
We stopped for lunch at Saray Muhallebicisi which is a well-known restaurant for local food. We had the ezme salad with walnuts and cheese which had a burst of flavours to it. I then had a durum wrap (something similar to a shawerma) which tasted nice. In Turkey, I noticed that the wraps have more stuffing apart from the meat; also, the bread that they use to wrap it is a bit thicker than the ones in Dubai.
We had some meatballs with mushroom sauce which also tasted quite good.
We had a chicken pizza too and it was just average.
For dessert, we had the muhallabia. It was topped with a tangy berry sauce which was a bit of a shock for me. The muhallabia tasted really good, and was a bit sticky due to the goat milk used.
At night, while we had some time to kill before our flight, we decided to grab a shawerma from the nearby roadside stall. The weather was really chilly, and I was too hungry to even take a picture, but of-course the shawerma felt comforting.
Conclusion: Do try the various kebabs as well as the shawermas around Turkey. Turkish tea and Turkish coffee is offered just about everywhere. Dine at a sea-side restaurant watching the birds either in mainland Istanbul or one of the Prince islands. Go to one of the cafes with a view (like the galata tower or Pier Loti) and sit there sipping on some coffee or snacks. Try the pottery kebabs which are a speciality of Cappadocia. There are plenty of Turkish desserts, so plan to satisfy your sweet tooth to the fullest when in Turkey.
Do let me know your thoughts in the comment section below.
Know about great places and food around Dubai on my Instagram .

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From worst date to her weakest point, DJ Nyc tells it all – Entertainment News

Share via Email DJ Nyc [Photo: Courtesy]
From worst date out to her weakest point, DJ Nyc takes on the heat and reveals it all.
Pulse: What is your weakest point?
Nyc: I am too nice to people who don’t deserve it.
P: What part of your body are you most likely to show off?
N: I’m from Thika, so, thighs.
P: What is the lamest pick-up line a guy has ever used on you?
N: Hey Miss Deejay, did you just fall down from heaven with your mixes?
P: Heels or sneakers?
N: Sneakers any day. My work involves lots of movement so funky kicks work for me.
P: What was your most embarrassing moment on stage?
N: There’s a day I was playing at an event and the MC handed me the microphone. I got too nervous to say anything while the whole crowd stared at my face turning grim red. I wanted the grounds to open up. DJ Nyc [Photo: Courtesy]
N: Surely, didn’t all mother’s union stables close shop?
P: Would you hit on a girl?
N: That’s freaky, but I’m not that crazy.
P: What is your most memorable moment while on a date?
N: There’s this time I was meeting a guy for the first time on a dinner date. We did Indian cuisine and I unknowingly put extra pepper in my food. I couldn’t control my tears yet I was too hungry to stop eating.
P: Have you ever found yourself in the wrong bed?
N: Yes I have, but gladly I roll with my girls and we hurriedly fixed the situation.
P: What gets you weak in the knees?
N: If you blindfold me and have a guy with great vocals sing, I will shake and drop flat. I’m a sucker for good vocals. DJ Nyc [Photo: Courtesy]
P: Who is your worst crush ever?
N: Alejandro.
P: What is the shortest time you dated?
N: Two disastrous weeks of trying to mix water and oil. It was a statistic, not even a relationship.
P: What is the most honest thing you have ever told a fan.
N: “No sir. Not even any time tonight.” It was a political song at the height of the political tensions.
P: What is the best gift you have received from an event or fan?
N: I treasure a Rastafarian shawl a fan gave me at a reggae concert. Simple honest things sweep me. DJ Nyc [Photo: Courtesy]
P: What is your choice destination for a romantic escapade?
N: Those clean beaches of Diani. You can do a lot there, let loose, if you know what I am saying.
P: How did you make your first shilling?
N: My cousin bought my silence after he sneaked out to play yet he was grounded. I was Sh5 richer at only five years and I’ve never looked back since (laughs).
P: What is the worst lie you ever told your parents?
N: (Laughs) That was too recent so we’ll have to let that wait… I beg.
P: Have you ever caught a boyfriend cheating on you?
N: Long story. Let’s just say, I was nice.

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Here comes the spring!

Here comes the spring! Here comes the spring!
In our online shop you can buy herbs of the finest quality. Red, Green, and Yellow are the colors of the three most popular Thai curry pastes.
Thai Herbal > Enjoy Eating > Spicy Food > Tea from Thailand > Delicious Curry Pates
Delicious herbs for connoisseurs & gourmet. The herbs and the good taste come directly from our garden and refine each dish with intensive and delicious notes. Our passion are herbs, which we brings to the kitchen every morning from our herbgarden. Again and again gourmets and connoisseurs praise our quality. No matter what the temperature is outside, it’s never been a better time.
Thai coriander and the Thai cuisine Coriander (Pak Chi) is a versatile herb popular in Thai cooking. Both the seeds and the leaves of the plant can be used, and offer two distinct flavours. How to Grow Coriander Coriander or Asian parsley enjoys a sunny position but appreciates a little shade during the hottest part of the day. Coriander is best grown from seed directly into the soil. Germination of coriander takes up to 3 weeks. Water them in dry periods and ensure the soil never dries out. Coriander does well in containers and can be grown on a sunny windowsill or balcony. The container must be quite deep as coriander has a long taproot. Harvesting Coriander Harvest the Coriander leaves when the plant is big and robust enough. Cut each leaf off the stem or snip whole stems if necessary. Both the leaves and the stalks can be used. Coriander is a tasty herb to grow, if you re-sow seeds every three weeks you can have lush coriander leaves throughout the summer to add to salads and Thai dishes.
Seeds – Thai-Coriander Seeds 10g
The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many Indian foods (such as chutneys and salads); in Chinese and Thai dishes; in Mexican cooking, particularly in salsa and guacamole and as a garnish. As heat diminishes their flavour, coriander leaves are often used raw or added to the dish immediately before serving. In Indian and Central Asian recipes, coriander leaves are used in large amounts and cooked until the flavour diminishes. The leaves spoil quickly when removed from the plant, and lose their aroma when dried or frozen.
Culinary Coriander leaves resemble European parsley leaves in a number of ways: They have similar shape and are both best used raw, as the flavour vanishes after prolonged cooking. Few recipes boil either of these herbs, but there is again the coincidence the parsley is often used in European broth recipes, usually in the form of bouquet garni, and this finds a sibling in the South Indian spice broth rasam, where coriander leaves are boiled (see tamarinde for more). In both plants, the root has a similar flavour than the leaves, and its flavour turns out to tolerate boiling or simmering much better. Coriander leaves, however, are a rare ingredient in the cooking of Western Asia. The key ingredients are green chiles, garlic, cardamom and black pepper. Further, optional ingredients are cumin, lemon juice and olive oil. Several recipes name caraway as an ingredient, but I am not sure that this is not a translation error for cumin. All components are processed to a thick paste. The only other Western Asian cuisine using green coriander is Georgian cooking. Rather uniquely, Georgians like to combine parsley and coriander leaves do decorate their stews, or serve both types of leaves together as a fresh contrast to cheese. Often, the green power of these two herbs is augmented by dill leaves. Use of coriander leaves is very frequent in Latin America, especially México (e. g., in salsa, see long coriander, or ceviche, see lime). Another famous Mexican food relying on coriander leaves is guacamole, a spicy coarse mash from avocados, chopped tomatoes, lime juice, onions, garlic, chiles and coriander leaves. For the heat, Mexicans most often use the green jalapeño or the slightly hotter serrano (see also paprika), but actually I prefer the flavourful habanero or related chiles for that food. Bai Kraphao
Thai basil has a sweet flavor reminiscent of anise, licorice and clove. Popular in the cuisine of Thailand. Thai Basil krapao is mild and has a fascinating anise flavor somewhat comparable to tarragon. Bai Maeng lak
Thai sweet basil maeng lak is mild and has a fascinating anise flavour somewhat comparable to tarragon, but more intensive. The flavour will not tolerate prolonged cooking. The herb is often sprinkled over Thai food. Bai Saranee
Our selection of exceptional organic Thai herbs – Herbs for Your Garden! Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), common balm, or balm mint, is a perennial herbaceous plant in the mint family Lamiaceae.

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TAPPA, Aerocity

Weekend is here, are you reminiscing ? Don’t worry as there lands TAPPA by Lite Bite Foods tucked away in Aerocity! It’s a mixed bag of modern-Indian cuisine, quirky words, love for bollywood, striking interiors with hints of yellow & teal and a perfect place to have a relaxing meal or a fun game of beer-pong with your gang or unwinding after-work-hours with colleagues to DJ’s music. Whatever the case, it oozes nostalgia. As soon as one enters, you’ll witness Stapoo on the floor and there you have your childhood flashbacks. Yes! This is what we experienced. Overall, space has been well utilised and offers comfortable seating. The beverage selection has many attractions like *Mango Bite* mocktail, the *Masala Guava*; they also offer selection of six different bottled beers along with international scotch brands, wines and other spirits however I didn’t try any. Masala Guava Mango Bite Menu is proudly rooted in Indian traditions but sprinkled with twists that face decidedly into the future through innovation and culinary methods. We tried many dishes and here are our top picks as per our preference ~ *Super Grain* which had kale, red quinoa, couscous, charred veggies, goat cheese with Puffed Sorghum crisp in veg, and in non-veg *Guacamole Greens* which had the perfect blend of fresh veggies, spices, sous vide chicken, cherry tomatoes with a crispy element of Bengali Jhalmuri crisps. Completely healthy, nourishing and scrumptious salads (Al Perfecto and must try). This was followed by yum *Palak Patta Chaat* bringing a creative flare to presentation with charred artichokes, purple chips and sweet dahi(curd) foam, the *Kashmiri Cheese Kulcha* made of red kidney beans, the Turkish *Pide Pizza*, the *Chili Oil Dimsums*, the *Tenderloin Stir Fry* served on rice pancake with lemon podi aioli and our favourite *Pork Short Rib Nihari* drizzled with rich gravy served with Taftan. Perfectly cooked, they were finger lickin’, fall off the bone ribs I ever had. For the desert, we shared dense *Fudge Brownie* paired with chocolate litchi and Pomm. granita and surprisingly tasteful *Avocado & naan khatai cheese cake* paired with sinful Anjeer delight (irresistible fig icecream).
Instagram – DelhiDelites Well, had a good dining experience. Also the staff is warm and welcoming. We left satisfied and I would totally recommend this to all of ya. Wishing the whole Lite Bite Foods(makers of Punjab Grill, Zambar, & more) a fun-filled year ahead with only Merry things. With Love,

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Fairground festival celebrates food

The event, which was held at Fairgrocunds in Gaborone attracted top chefs who amused food lovers with insightful demonstrations.
They proved they could cook just about anything and anywhere.
The festival also attracted most top Chinese and Indian restaurants in town.
They created some fabulous recipes during exhibitions and further showed their greatest influence on cuisines.
Attendees also saw some of the finest produce and ingredients being showcased by the festival’s exhibitors and they got a chance to have a chat with the chefs to see what they were preparing.
Most importantly, people bought food products to support all of those amazing food and drink producers.
Inside their VIP marquee, KBL also gave their guests a variety of dishes from across the world as they provided thirst-quenching selection of beverages to keep them going until the sun went down.
During her welcome speech, Fairground Holdings chief executive officer, Gorata Gabaraane said they were Banners extremely humbled and grateful to participants at their event.
“It is new in our portfolio of events so the turnout is really great and we expect more next year,” she said. Gabaraane revealed that the idea behind the event was to bring together people from all walks of life and celebrate food.
“We have different nations from across the nations of the world so we had to come together to celebrate food culture and culinary prowess.”
Gabaraane also commended her team for organising the event.
She said she hopes the event will one day qualify to appear in the national calendar of events.
“I hope exhibitors also realised the importance of this event because it sells their brands,” she highlighted.
There was also a chef competition where people were judged on how they handle their products, knowledge of product, skills of cooking, style of cooking, time management and hygiene.

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Mumbais neighbourhood trattorias

Avocado toast is getting some serious competition on millennial Instagram feeds—and it’s not a hipster food fad. It is something any Italian nonna (grandmother) would approve of: fat ringlets of hand-cut pasta glistening in cheese with a sprinkling of coarsely ground pepper—simple, hearty and messy food. Hashtags like #girlswithgluten are slowly beginning to do the rounds, bringing pasta and pizza back to food conversations.
The trend seems to be taking shape in Mumbai too. Last year saw the opening of a clutch of fine-dining Italian restaurants that are taking the focus back to home-style regional Italian food.
A Sunday brunch is under way at CinCin in Mumbai’s Bandra Kurla Complex. Sunlit tables in the alfresco section seat families, young couples and groups of friends. Plates of food keep coming and the waitstaff keeps the glasses of wine filled. Here, it is all about shared conversations, fuss-free food, shared plates and good times.
A March 2019 survey by UK-based public opinion and data company YouGov showed that Italian and Chinese food tops the popularity charts when it comes to international cuisines around the world. And this includes India as well.
Over the decades, there has been a near complete assimilation of Italian cuisine into the country’s street food culture, even spawning regional variations like a chicken tikka pizza or a masala pasta. At the other end of the spectrum, “authentic” Italian food has retreated to the dining rooms of five-star hotels and contemporary high-end restaurants where ingredients are flown in from Italy on a weekly basis. It is only in the last few years that things have begun to change as a new generation of chefs has turned the focus back to the diversity and ingredients that define Italian food rather than its presentation or even authenticity.
CinCin is one such restaurant, playing with the idea of comforting and fresh Italian food. “I wanted to bring in the fun elements of the culture and also create a pasta-focused menu,” says Karyna Bajaj, owner and executive director of CinCin. The restaurant has also instituted its own wine programme and serves all its wines by the glass.
The Burrata Caponata at Sorrentina It is a similar unhurried vibe which permeates Sorrentina, a new Italian restaurant in Foodhall, the gourmet speciality store on Linking Road, Mumbai. Cristian Borchi, who is the consultant chef at Sorrentina and has helped put together its Tuscan-inspired menu, is a firm believer in traditional cooking. The restaurant is a showcase for ingredients stocked in the store as well as Italian cooking from Sorrento in south-western Italy.
Cecconi’s at Soho House is a breezy seaside all-day Italian diner which also believes in the idea of slow dining and a relaxed experience where food is just part of the whole story—this holds true for its eight other branches around the world.
By playing with Italy’s regional diversity, this new wave of chefs and restaurateurs is also able to extract flavour profiles and dishes that might be more suited to the Indian palate without actually tweaking the original. “We have explored Italy’s flavours and taken inspiration from some specific regions, like, for example, Calabria, which has a lot of spicy food,” says Bajaj.
In the Mumbai branch of Cecconi’s, head chef Luca D’Amora focuses on dishes from northern Italy while using the region’s fresh and seasonal produce. “We use a lot of seasonal and local ingredients, especially seafood, due to the freshness and ease of availability. Our food is accessible to the Indian palate because of the strong and prominent flavours present in both cuisines. Having said that, we have stayed true to the authenticity of the Italian flavours, keeping the philosophy of Italian home-cooking intact, but amalgamating dishes with local ingredients,” says D’Amora.
Hand-rolled pasta is a big hit at all the restaurant Pasta is undoubtedly the hero ingredient across these restaurants and the usual suspects of penne and fusilli are conspicuously absent, as are the standard pesto-arrabiatta sauce combinations. Instead, there is a focus on regional, hand-rolled pasta, cooked al dente and tossed with minimal ingredients. It is all about technique, skill and texture rather than an overpowering sauce. In all three restaurants, pastas with beautiful exotic names evoke small Italian villages and home-style pasta. A dish that keeps appearing across menus is the cacio e pepe. This adult version of mac and cheese is deceptively simple—pasta, olive oil, Pecorino Romano cheese and fresh black pepper—and an undisputed crowd pleaser.
For those who can let go of their gluten anxiety, these dishes herald a renaissance of pasta in the city. The health conscious can also explore other aspects of the menus that are less carb-centric and channel the benefits of the Mediterranean diet with plenty of fresh ingredients and salads.
Another constant across these restaurants is their cicchetti, or small plates section, which fuels the whole philosophy of Italian food as a community experience. Essentially, the idea is to kick back in a relaxed space, escape the daily grind and bond with friends or family over a glass of wine, a comforting plate of pasta and endless cheer.
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Sanchez’s Italian job

At age 26, chef Alex Sanchez came to Mumbai, after training in Michelin-starred restaurants in America. He started off as the executive chef at The Table in 2011 and brought a new cuisine-agnostic, ingredient-driven food identity to Mumbai. After eight years, Sanchez decided to take time off and travel to find his next calling. This, as it happens, involved a return to a simpler style of comfort cooking. This is what gave birth to Americano, a restaurant inspired by Italy’s culinary history, located in Mumbai’s chic Kala Ghoda neighbourhood, which opened on 19 March. Edited excerpts from an interview:
Hand-rolled pasta has always been your forte, but are you trying to push the boundaries of pasta even further with Americano?
We have 12 varieties of handmade pastas and some of them are in rather unique shapes that diners might not have experienced before, like the fat Udon-like pasta called pici and the corzetti stampati, a coin-shaped pasta from Liguria. I think all pasta is about how the shape plays with the sauce and textures. What’s most interesting for us is to see how willing people are to eat chewy pasta as that is not a strong tradition in India. Fresh pasta is all about texture and it will be interesting to see how far we can push that.
Spiced sweet corn ‘ribs’ at Americano
How did your trip to Italy inspire Americano and give rise to a different food philosophy?
We (Sanchez has started the restaurant in partnership with food entrepreneur Mallyeka Watsa) travelled around Italy for a month, exploring the country’s rich culinary history. We had decided that we wanted to start something that would be a neighbourhood restaurant and that it would have Italian influences. We wanted to open a place where people would come regularly rather than on special occasions. Our trip wasn’t as much as finding things we could put on our menu, as it was about absorbing that culture. It also made me realize that I was happiest cooking simple food.
How does the idea of a neighbourhood restaurant translate from Italy to Mumbai?
It’s actually more of a mindset. We want people to feel comfortable and to make sure that there are enough tables available for walk-ins and people can just stroll in to grab a drink and a pasta. And, of course, to have service that is not too stuffy. These are all the building blocks of a neighbourhood restaurant, it’s just that our neighbourhood is bigger and encompasses all of Mumbai.
Is fine-dining on the wane?
I believe fine-dining is essential to the food world. Without it, we don’t have innovation and we don’t have these great chefs who train younger chefs. And while great fine-dining is all about creating a wonderful experience, it’s also a little bit about, ‘Look what I can do’, and the cult of the chef. We wanted to move to something that had less focus on us and more focus on the guests.

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