Spice Waala’s Indian street food going ‘brick and mortar’ on Capitol Hill — UPDATE

Spice Waala’s Indian street food going ‘brick and mortar’ on Capitol Hill — UPDATE

(Image: Spice Waala)
If you are tired of “street food” variations of your favorite global cuisine, we cannot help you. You might be a bad person.
Spice Waala , Seattle’s purveyor of “authentic Indian street food,” will be the next mobile venture to put down brick and mortar roots on Capitol Hill.
“This allows us to start bringing to life a lot more Indian street food that we couldn’t do at the markets,” Uttam Mukherjee tells CHS. “Our focus is Indian street food, quick, below $10 price marks, a lot of fresh grilling in front of you.”
It will be a bit of a one for one trade on 15th Ave E where Kanak Cuisine of India has been “temporarily” closed after just over four years of business.
Spice Waala will bring a newer, fresher, but more nostalgic take on Indian food to the small restaurant warren that has been on a bit of a global jaunt in recent years with Indian Kanak and a Middle Eastern joint filling the space in recent years.
“Spice Waala aims to take Indians on a nostalgic journey back home while simultaneously introducing non-Indians to the multitude of authentic Indian flavors,” its creators say.
The restaurant is described as the “passion child” of Dr. Aakanksha Sinha , Asst. Professor of Social Work at Seattle University , and her husband Mukherjee, a brand manager at Procter & Gamble , and now a Capitol Hill restaurateur.
“Having grown up in India, we crave authentic Indian food all the time and dream of bringing these flavors to everyone in America,” they write.
“Community is a big aspect of what we bring to the table,” Mukherjee says. The restaurteurs will be focused on providing a “living wage” not just a minimum wage for its workers and all will be profit sharing members, Mukherjee said.
With a regular presence at markets in Fremont and South Lake Union, Spice Waala has created a following for its kathi rolls filled with chicken, lamb, potato, and cheese, and garnished with its “signature green chutney,” and “wrapped in thin roti.” Other specials like suji ka halwa and chicken dum biryani have also been part of the menu. With a brick and mortar kitchen — and a liquor license — Spice Waala’s menu opportunities will surely expand.
Mukherjee said Spice Waala will stay loyal to its street beginnings but is looking forward to expanding offerings with fried pakoras, samosas, and more specials. To help with the spice, Mukherjee said they will “bring authentic Indian beer to the people of Capitol Hill.”
Spice Waala joins a block with another new 15th Ave E food and drink player after Bites of Bangkok debuted with Thai food and, yes, comedy, in November.
To live up to its community and authenticity goals, the restaurant space needs a significant overhaul. Mukherjee said the work will open up the space and the kitchen and create a more communal seating area. It will be close quarters. “We were operating in a 10′ by 10′ tent so we don’t need a lot of space,” Mukherjee said. The weird lower area at the base of the stairs will also go away to make a new entrance for the Dance Underground studio below. Mukherjee hopes to have the work wrapped up in April.
Its new home on Capitol Hill should give Spice Waala a start on a larger mission around food, business, and community. Part of the draw of 15th Ave E was simply an affordable opportunity. Mukherjee said realtors tell prospective restaurateurs they’ll need at least $300,000 to get started in Seattle. Mukherjee and Sinha were glad to find the opportunity to get the Kanak space from its owners for much less. The goal now is for Mukherjee and Sinha to begin “hiring locally” and, they hope, hiring the types of people that high rents and costs are “pushing out” of the neighborhood.
Spice Waala will open soon at 340 15th Ave E. You can learn more on the Spice Waala Facebook page .
UPDATE 2/25/2019: Thanks! We did it! CHS has reached 800 subscribers! If you appreciate and value CHS coverage, please tell your friends and neighbors TODAY to become a subscriber at $1/$5/$10 a month to help CHS provide community news with NO PAYWALL . You can also sign up for a one-time annual payment . Why support CHS? More here .

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Nyum Bai, Angler and Sorrel lead Bay Area nominees in 2019 James Beard Awards

The James Beard Foundation has announced the semifinalists for its 2019 chef and restaurant awards.
Angler and Nyum Bai are the local representatives for Best New Restaurant in the country. A trio of chefs from three-Michelin star restaurants — Corey Lee of Benu, David Kinch of Manresa and Christopher Kostow of Meadowood — are nominated for Outstanding Chef. Alexander Hong of Sorrel in San Francisco (a Chronicle Rising Star Chef in 2018 ) is the sole local up for Rising Star Chef.
In the regional category (Best Chef: West), locals dominated with nominees including Reem Assil of Reem’s, Gabriela Cámara of Cala, Brandon Rodgers and Ian Scaramuzza of In Situ, Dominica Rice-Cisneros of Cosecha Café, Joshua Skenes of Saison, James Syhabout of Commis, Karen Taylor of El Molino Central, Sonoma, and Pim Techamuanvivit of Kin Khao.
Of particular note is that two San Francisco restaurants are recognized in the Outstanding Service category: Fine dining destination Saison and local seafood favorite Swan Oyster Depot.
Several local pastry talents are also nominated: Greg Mindel (Neighbor Bakehouse) and Avery Ruzicka (Manresa Bread) in the Outstanding Baker category, and Juan Contreras (Atelier Crenn) and Michelle Polzine (20th Century Café) in the Best Pastry Chef category.
The nominees will be whittled down to a smaller group of finalists on March 27, with the awards taking place on May 6. The full list of nominees follows, with locals in bold:
Best New Restaurant
A restaurant opened in 2018 that already demonstrates excellence in cuisine and hospitality, and that is likely to make a significant impact in years to come.
Adda Indian Canteen, NYC
Andiario, West Chester, PA
Angler, San Francisco
Atomix, NYC
Bardea Food & Drink, Wilmington, DE
Bavel, Los Angeles
Bywater American Bistro, New Orleans
Canard, Portland, OR
Celeste, Somerville, MA
Chickadee, Boston
Ellē, Washington, D.C.
The Elysian Bar, New Orleans
Folk, Nashville
Frenchette, NYC
Kyoten, Chicago
Larder Delicatessen and Bakery, Cleveland
Lineage, Wailea, HI
Majordomo, Los Angeles
Marrow, Detroit
Nyum Bai, Oakland, CA
Passerotto, Chicago
Petra and the Beast, Dallas
Popol Vuh, Minneapolis
Q House, Denver
Sawyer, Seattle
Spoken English, Washington, D.C.
The Stanley, Charlotte, NC
Suerte, Austin
The Surf Club Restaurant, Surfside, FL
Vianda, San Juan, PR
Outstanding Baker
A pastry chef or baker who demonstrates exceptional skill, integrity, and character in the preparation of desserts, pastries, or breads served in a retail bakery. Must have been working as a pastry chef or baker for the past five years.
Umber Ahmad, Mah-Ze-Dahr Bakery, NYC
Kim Boyce, Bakeshop, Portland, OR
Andy Clark, Moxie Bread Co., Louisville, CO
Evrim Dogu and Evin Dogu, Sub Rosa Bakery, Richmond, VA
Tova du Plessis, Essen Bakery, Philadelphia
Zachary Golper, Bien Cuit, NYC
Don Guerra, Barrio Bread, Tucson, AZ
Naomi Harris, Madruga Bakery, Coral Gables, FL
Stephanie Hart, Brown Sugar Bakery, Chicago
Maura Kilpatrick, Sofra Bakery and Café, Cambridge, MA
Lisa Ludwinski, Sister Pie, Detroit
Greg Mindel, Neighbor Bakehouse, San Francisco
Taylor Petrehn, 1900 Barker, Lawrence, KS
Alison Pray, Standard Baking Co., Portland, ME
Nathaniel Reid, Nathaniel Reid Bakery, Kirkwood, MO
Avery Ruzicka, Manresa Bread, Los Gatos, CA
Kit Schumann and Jesse Schumann, Sea Wolf Bakers, Seattle
Debbie Swenerton, Black Bear Bread Co., Grayton Beach, FL
Greg Wade, Publican Quality Bread, Chicago
Chris Wilkins, Root Baking Co., Atlanta
Outstanding Bar Program
A restaurant or bar that demonstrates exceptional care and skill in the selection, preparation, and serving of cocktails, spirits, and/or beer.
Anvil Bar & Refuge, Houston
The Atomic Lounge, Birmingham, AL
The Baldwin Bar, Woburn, MA
Bar Agricole, San Francisco
Bryant’s Cocktail Lounge, Milwaukee
Clavel Mezcaleria, Baltimore
Columbia Room, Washington, D.C.
Dead Rabbit, NYC
Expatriate, Portland, OR
Kimball House, Decatur, GA
La Factoría, San Juan, PR
Leyenda, Brooklyn, NY
Lost Lake, Chicago
The Monarch Bar, Kansas City, MO
Monk’s Café, Philadelphia
No Anchor, Seattle
Old Lightning, Marina Del Rey, CA
Planter’s House, St. Louis
Saint Leo, Oxford, MS
Ticonderoga Club, Atlanta
Outstanding Chef (Presented by All-Clad Metalcrafters)
A chef who sets high culinary standards and who has served as a positive example for other food professionals. Must have been working as a chef for the past five years.
Ashley Christensen, Poole’s Diner, Raleigh, NC
Renee Erickson, Bateau, Seattle
Colby Garrelts, Bluestem, Kansas City, MO
Sarah Grueneberg, Monteverde, Chicago
Shiro Kashiba, Sushi Kashiba, Seattle
David Kinch, Manresa, Los Gatos, CA
Christopher Kostow, The Restaurant at Meadowood, St. Helena, CA
Corey Lee, Benu, San Francisco
Donald Link, Herbsaint, New Orleans
Margot McCormack, Margot Café & Bar, Nashville
Tory Miller, L’Etoile, Madison, WI
Maricel Presilla, Cucharamama, Hoboken, NJ
Missy Robbins, Lilia, Brooklyn, NY
Chrysa Robertson, Rancho Pinot, Scottsdale, AZ
Gabriel Rucker, Le Pigeon, Portland, OR
Chris Shepherd, Georgia James, Houston
Ana Sortun, Oleana, Cambridge, MA
Vikram Sunderam, Rasika, Washington, D.C.
Fabio Trabocchi, Fiola, Washington, D.C.
Marc Vetri, Vetri Cucina, Philadelphia
Outstanding Pastry Chef
A pastry chef or baker who demonstrates exceptional skill, integrity, and character in the preparation of desserts, pastries, or breads served in a restaurant. Must have been working as a pastry chef or baker for the past five years.
Jeb Breakell, The Wolf’s Tailor, Denver
Ashley Capps, Buxton Hall, Asheville, NC
Juan Contreras, Atelier Crenn, San Francisco
Kelly Fields, Willa Jean, New Orleans
Meg Galus, Boka, Chicago
Megan Garrelts, Rye, Leawood, KS
Zoe Kanan, Simon & the Whale, NYC
Michelle Karr-Ueoka, MW Restaurant, Honolulu
Margarita Manzke, République, Los Angeles
James Matty, Suraya, Philadelphia
Junko Mine, Cafe Juanita, Kirkland, WA
Diane Moua, Spoon and Stable, Minneapolis
Pichet Ong, Brothers and Sisters, Washington, D.C.
Natasha Pickowicz, Flora Bar, NYC
Michelle Polzine, 20th Century Café, San Francisco
Rabii Saber, Four Seasons Resort, Orlando, FL
Ricardo “Ricchi” Sanchez, Bullion, Dallas
Laura Sawicki, Launderette, Austin
Whang Suh, Hen & Heifer, Guilford, CT
Cynthia Wong, Life Raft Treats, Charleston, SC
Outstanding Restaurant
A restaurant that demonstrates consistent excellence in food, atmosphere, service, and operations. Must have been in business 10 or more consecutive years.
Balthazar, NYC
Bolete, Bethlehem, PA
Cafe Juanita, Kirkland, WA
El Charro Café, Tucson, AZ
FIG, Charleston, SC
Fore Street, Portland, ME
Jaleo, Washington, D.C.
Komi, Washington, D.C.
Marché, Eugene, OR
Nopa, San Francisco
Norman’s, Orlando, FL
North Pond, Chicago
O Ya, Boston
The Original Ninfa’s on Navigation, Houston
Park’s BBQ, Los Angeles
Quince, San Francisco
Restaurant Alma, Minneapolis
Sagami, Collingswood, NJ
SriPraPhai, NYC
Zahav, Philadelphia
Outstanding Restaurateur (Presented by Magellan Corporation)
A restaurateur who demonstrates creativity in entrepreneurship and integrity in restaurant operations. Must have been in the restaurant business for at least 10 years. Must not have been nominated for a James Beard Foundation chef award in the past five years.
Hugh Acheson, Atlanta (Empire State South, Five & Ten, The National, and others)
Paul Bartolotta and Joe Bartolotta, The Bartolotta Restaurants, Milwaukee (Ristorante Bartolotta, Harbor House, Lake Park Bistro, and others)
JoAnn Clevenger, Upperline, New Orleans
Richard DeShantz and Tolga Sevdik, Richard DeShantz Restaurant Group, Pittsburgh (Poulet Bleu, Fish nor Fowl, Butcher and the Rye, and others)
Benjamin Goldberg and Max Goldberg, Strategic Hospitality, Nashville (The Catbird Seat, The Patterson House, Henrietta Red, and others)
Ruth Gresser, Pizzeria Paradiso, Washington, D.C. (Pizzeria Paradiso, Birreria Paradiso)
Martha Hoover, Patachou Inc., Indianapolis (Café Patachou, Petite Chou, Public Greens, and others)
Rob Katz and Kevin Boehm, Boka Restaurant Group, Chicago (Boka, Girl & the Goat, Momotaro, and others)
Ed Kenney, Honolulu (Town, Mud Hen Water, Mahina & Sun’s, and others)
Brenda Langton and Timothy Kane, Spoonriver, Minneapolis
Anthony Myint and Karen Leibowitz, San Francisco (Mission Chinese Food, The Perennial, Commonwealth)
Akkapong (Earl) Ninsom, Portland, OR (Langbaan, Hat Yai, PaaDee, and others)
Ken Oringer, Boston (Little Donkey, Toro, Uni, and others)
Steve Palmer, The Indigo Road, Charleston, SC (The Macintosh, Oak Steakhouse, Indaco, and others)
Julie Petrakis and James Petrakis, Swine Family Restaurant Group, Orlando, FL (The Ravenous Pig, Cask & Larder, The Polite Pig, and others)
Alex Raij and Eder Montero, NYC (La Vara, Txikito, Saint Julivert Fisherie, and others)
Ethan Stowell, Ethan Stowell Restaurants, Seattle (Ballard Pizza Co., Bramling Cross, Cortina, and others)
Tracy Vaught, H Town Restaurant Group, Houston (Hugo’s, Caracol, Xochi, and others)
Jason Wang, Xi’an Famous Foods, NYC
Ellen Yin, High Street Hospitality Group, Philadelphia (Fork, High Street on Market, High Street on Hudson)
Outstanding Service
A restaurant in operation for five or more years that demonstrates consistency and exceptional thoughtfulness in hospitality and service.
Back Bay Grill, Portland, ME
Birrieria Zaragoza, Chicago
Brigtsen’s, New Orleans
Canlis, Seattle
Chef Vola’s, Atlantic City, NJ
Frasca Food and Wine, Boulder, CO
The French Room, Dallas
Gibsons Bar & Steakhouse, Chicago
Hugo’s, Houston
Kai Restaurant, Chandler, AZ
Kimball House, Decatur, GA
Mama J’s, Richmond, VA
Marcel’s by Robert Wiedmaier, Washington, D.C.
n/naka, Los Angeles
Peking Gourmet Inn, Falls Church, VA
Saison, San Francisco
Swan Oyster Depot, San Francisco
Tony’s, Houston
Victoria & Albert’s, Orlando, FL
Zingerman’s Roadhouse, Ann Arbor, MI
Outstanding Wine Program (Presented by Robert Mondavi Winery)
A restaurant or bar that demonstrates excellence in wine service through a carefully considered wine list and a well-informed approach to helping customers choose and drink wine.
Bacchanal, New Orleans
The Bachelor Farmer, Minneapolis
Bar Marco, Pittsburgh
Benu, San Francisco
The Butcher Shop, Boston
Cote, NYC
element 47 at the Little Nell, Aspen, CO
Great China, Berkeley, CA
Davenport, Portland, OR
haley.henry, Boston
Income Tax, Chicago
L’Oursin, Seattle
Lucky Palace, Bossier City, LA
Miller Union, Atlanta
Night + Market, Los Angeles
Ops, Brooklyn, NY
Pappas Bros. Steakhouse at the Galleria, Houston
Spiaggia, Chicago
Stems & Skins, North Charleston, SC
Tail Up Goat, Washington, D.C.
Outstanding Wine, Spirits, or Beer Producer
A beer, wine, or spirits producer who demonstrates consistency and exceptional skill in his or her craft.
An Bui, Mekong and The Answer Brewpub, Richmond, VA
Cathy Corison, Corison Winery, St. Helena, CA
Rutger de Vink, RdV Vineyards, Delaplane, VA
Dave Green, Skagit Valley Malting, Burlington, WA
Deirdre Heekin, La Garagista, Bethel, VT
Nancy Irelan, Red Tail Ridge Winery, Penn Yan, NY
Drew Kulsveen, Willett Distillery, Bardstown, KY
Todd Leopold and Scott Leopold, Leopold Bros., Denver
Sean Lilly Wilson, Fullsteam Brewery, Durham, NC
Ann Marshall and Scott Blackwell, High Wire Distilling Co., Charleston, SC
Steve Matthiasson, Matthiasson Wines, Napa, CA
Kim McPherson, McPherson Cellars, Lubbock, TX
Meredith Meyer Grelli, Wigle Whiskey, Pittsburgh
Yoshihiro Sako, Den Sake Brewery, Oakland, CA
Jordan Salcito, Ramona, NYC
Mike Sauer, Red Willow Vineyard, Wapato, WA
Jeffrey Stuffings, Jester King Brewery, Austin
Rob Tod, Allagash Brewing Company, Portland, ME
Mhairi Voelsgen, broVo Spirits, Woodinville, WA
Lance Winters, St. George Spirits, Alameda, CA
Rising Star Chef of the Year (Presented by S.Pellegrino® Sparkling Natural Mineral Water)
A chef age 30 or younger who displays exceptional talent, character, and leadership ability, and who is likely to make a significant impact in years to come.
Rachel Bennett, The Library, St. Petersburg, FL
Jay Blackinton, Aelder/Hogstone’s Wood Oven, Orcas Island, WA
Nick Bognar, Nippon Tei, St. Louis
Ana Castro, Coquette, New Orleans
Valerie Chang and Nando Chang, Itamae, Miami
Calvin Davis, Freshwater, Kansas City, MO
Alisha Elenz, MFK, Chicago
Evan Gaudreau, Renzo, Charleston, SC
Rikki Giambruno, Hyacinth, St. Paul, MN
Becca Hegarty, Bitter Ends Luncheonette, Pittsburgh
Alexander Hong, Sorrel, San Francisco
Jesse Ito, Royal Izakaya, Philadelphia
Irene Li, Mei Mei, Boston
Giselle Miller, Menton, Boston
Shota Nakajima, Adana, Seattle
Kwame Onwuachi, Kith and Kin, Washington, D.C.
Ian Redshaw, Lampo Neapolitan Pizzeria, Charlottesville, VA
Jonathan “Jonny” Rhodes, Restaurant Indigo, Houston
Samantha Sanz, Talavera at the Four Seasons, Scottsdale, AZ
Lena Sareini, Selden Standard, Detroit
Cassie Shortino, Tratto, Phoenix
Nolan Wynn, Banshee, Atlanta
Jonathan Yao, Kato, Los Angeles
Best Chefs
Chefs who set high culinary standards and also demonstrate integrity and admirable leadership skills in their respective regions. A nominee may be from any kind of dining establishment but must have been working as a chef for at least five years, with the three most recent years spent in the region.
Best Chef: West (CA, HI, NV)
Genet Agonafer, Meals by Genet, Los Angeles
Reem Assil, Reem’s California, Oakland, CA
Gabriela Cámara, Cala, San Francisco
Michael Cimarusti, Providence, Los Angeles
Jeremy Fox, Rustic Canyon, Santa Monica, CA
Chris Kajioka and Anthony Rush, Senia, Honolulu
Matthew Kammerer, Harbor House Inn, Elk, CA
Jessica Koslow, Sqirl, Los Angeles
Brandon Rodgers and Ian Scaramuzza, In Situ, San Francisco
Travis Lett, Gjelina, Venice, CA
Niki Nakayama, n/naka, Los Angeles
Dominica Rice-Cisneros, Cosecha Café, Oakland, CA
Carlos Salgado, Taco María, Costa Mesa, CA
Joshua Skenes, Saison, San Francisco
Sheridan Su, Flock and Fowl, Las Vegas
James Syhabout, Commis, Oakland, CA
Karen Taylor, El Molino Central, Sonoma, CA
Pim Techamuanvivit, Kin Khao, San Francisco
Kris Yenbamroong, Night + Market, Los Angeles
Claudette Zepeda-Wilkins, El Jardín, San Diego
Best Chef: Great Lakes (IL, IN, MI, OH)
Thai Dang and Danielle Dang, HaiSous Vietnamese Kitchen, Chicago
Diana Dávila, Mi Tocaya Antojería, Chicago
Paul Fehribach, Big Jones, Chicago
Norberto Garita, El Barzon, Detroit
Jason Hammel, Lula Café, Chicago
Brian Jupiter, Frontier, Chicago
Beverly Kim and Johnny Clark, Parachute, Chicago
Anthony Lombardo, SheWolf, Detroit
Abbi Merriss, Bluebeard, Indianapolis
Ethan Pikas, Cellar Door Provisions, Chicago
David Posey and Anna Posey, Elske, Chicago
Iliana Regan, Kitsune, Chicago
James Rigato, Mabel Gray, Hazel Park, MI
Jose Salazar, Mita’s, Cincinnati
Noah Sandoval, Oriole, Chicago
Steven Oakley, Oakleys Bistro, Indianapolis
Genevieve Vang, Bangkok 96, Dearborn, MI
Jill Vedaa, Salt, Lakewood, OH
Kate Williams, Lady of the House, Detroit
Lee Wolen, Boka, Chicago
Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic (D.C., DE, MD, NJ, PA, VA)
Joey Baldino, Zeppoli, Collingswood, NJ
Sandeep “Sunny” Baweja, Lehja, Richmond, VA
Jamilka Borges, The Independent Brewing Company, Pittsburgh
Amy Brandwein, Centrolina, Washington, D.C.
Erik Bruner-Yang, Brothers and Sisters, Washington, D.C.
Kristin Butterworth, Lautrec, Farmington, PA
Tom Cunanan, Bad Saint, Washington, D.C.
Nicholas Elmi, Laurel, Philadelphia
Randy Forrester, Osteria Radici, Allentown, NJ
Jerome Grant, Sweet Home Café, Washington, D.C.
Haidar Karoum, Chloë, Washington, D.C.
Matthew Kern, Heirloom, Lewes, DE
Rich Landau, Vedge, Philadelphia
Cristina Martinez, South Philly Barbacoa, Philadelphia
Dan Richer, Razza Pizza Artigianale, Jersey City, NJ
Jon Sybert, Tail Up Goat, Washington, D.C.
Kevin Tien, Himitsu, Washington, D.C.
Cindy Wolf, Charleston, Baltimore
Nobu Yamazaki, Sushi Taro, Washington, D.C.
Wei Zhu, Chengdu Gourmet, Pittsburgh
Best Chef: Midwest (IA, KS, MN, MO, NE, ND, SD, WI)
Dane Baldwin, The Diplomat, Milwaukee
Karen Bell, Bavette La Boucherie, Milwaukee
Thomas Boemer, In Bloom, Minneapolis
Steven Brown, Tilia, Minneapolis
Michael Corvino, Corvino Supper Club & Tasting Room, Kansas City, MO
Daniel del Prado, Martina, Minneapolis
Linda Duerr, The Restaurant at 1900, Mission Woods, KS
Michael Gallina, Vicia, St. Louis
Nicholas Goellner, The Antler Room, Kansas City, MO
Jonny Hunter, Forequarter, Madison, WI
Dan Jacobs and Dan Van Rite, EsterEv, Milwaukee
Ann Kim, Young Joni, Minneapolis
Lona Luo, Lona’s Lil Eats, St. Louis
Jamie Malone, Grand Café, Minneapolis
Jesse Mendica, Olive + Oak, Webster Groves, MO
Tim Nicholson, The Boiler Room, Omaha, NE
Christina Nguyen, Hai Hai, Minneapolis
Karyn Tomlinson, Corner Table, Minneapolis
Joe Tripp, Harbinger, Des Moines, IA
Ny Vongsaly, Billie-Jean, Clayton, MO
Best Chef: New York City (Five Boroughs)
Cosme Aguilar, Casa Enrique
Emma Bengtsson, Aquavit
Rawia Bishara, Tanoreen, Brooklyn, NY
Amanda Cohen, Dirt Candy
Billy Durney, Hometown Bar-B-Que, Brooklyn, NY
Sean Gray, Momofuku Ko
Brooks Headley, Superiority Burger
Joseph “JJ” Johnson, Henry at Life Hotel
Sohui Kim, Insa, Brooklyn, NY
Josh Ku and Trigg Brown, Win Son, Brooklyn, NY
Angie Mar, Beatrice Inn
Kyo Pang, Kopitiam
Erik Ramirez, Llama Inn, Brooklyn, NY
Ann Redding and Matt Danzer, Uncle Boons
Daniela Soto-Innes, Atla
Jeremiah Stone and Fabián von Hauske, Wildair
Alex Stupak, Empellón Midtown
Scott Tacinelli and Angie Rito, Don Angie
Jody Williams and Rita Sodi, Via Carota
Helen You, Dumpling Galaxy, Queens, NY
Best Chef: Northeast (CT, MA, ME, NH, NY State, RI, VT)
Unmi Abkin, Coco & The Cellar Bar, Easthampton, MA
Tyler Anderson, Millwright’s, Simsbury, CT
Hannah Black and Carla Perez-Gallardo, Lil’ Deb’s Oasis, Hudson, NY
Cara Chigazola-Tobin, Honey Road, Burlington, VT
Chad Conley and Greg Mitchell, Palace Diner, Biddeford, ME
Krista Kern Desjarlais, The Purple House, North Yarmouth, ME
Vien Dobui, Cong Tu Bot, Portland, ME
Carl Dooley, The Table at Season to Taste, Cambridge, MA
Tiffani Faison, Tiger Mama, Boston
Erin French, The Lost Kitchen, Freedom, ME
Victor Parra Gonzalez, Las Puertas, Buffalo, NY
Seizi Imura, Cafe Sushi, Cambridge, MA
Evan Mallett, Black Trumpet, Portsmouth, NH
James Mark, North, Providence
Tony Messina, Uni, Boston
Cassie Piuma, Sarma, Somerville, MA
Keiko Suzuki Steinberger, Suzuki’s Sushi Bar, Rockland, ME
Benjamin Sukle, Oberlin, Providence, RI
Peter Ungár, Tasting Counter, Somerville, MA
David Vargas, Vida Cantina, Portsmouth, NH
Best Chef: Northwest (AK, ID, MT, OR, WA, WY)
Jose Chesa, Ataula, Portland, OR
Peter Cho, Han Oak, Portland, OR
Laura Cole, 229 Parks Restaurant & Tavern, Denali National Park & Preserve, AK
Logan Cox, Homer, Seattle
Alejandro Cruz, Novo Modern Latin Table, Eugene, OR
Eric Donnelly, RockCreek, Seattle
Gregory Gourdet, Departure, Portland, OR
Eric Johnson, Stateside, Seattle
Taichi Kitamura, Sushi Kappo Tamura, Seattle
Ha (Christina) Luu and Peter Vuong, Ha VL, Portland, OR
Katy Millard, Coquine, Portland, OR
Kristen Murray, Måurice, Portland, OR
Colin Patterson, Mana Restaurant, Leavenworth, WA
Ryan Roadhouse, Nodoguro, Portland, OR
Beau Schooler, In Bocca Al Lupo, Juneau, AK
Mutsuko Soma, Kamonegi, Seattle
Dave Wells, The Dining Room at Chico Hot Springs, Pray, MT
Brady Williams, Canlis, Seattle
Justin Woodward, Castagna, Portland, OR
Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi, Joule, Seattle
Best Chef: South (AL, AR, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, FL, LA, MS)
Lindsay Autry, The Regional Kitchen & Public House, West Palm Beach, FL
David Bancroft, Acre, Auburn, AL
Vishwesh Bhatt, Snackbar, Oxford, MS
Bill Briand, Fisher’s Upstairs at Orange Beach Marina, Orange Beach, AL
Clay Conley, Buccan, Palm Beach, FL
Alex Eaton, The Manship Wood Fired Kitchen, Jackson, MS
Jose Enrique, Jose Enrique, San Juan, PR
Kristen Essig and Michael Stoltzfus, Coquette, New Orleans
Maria Mercedes Grubb, Gallo Negro, San Juan, PR
Michael Gulotta, Maypop, New Orleans
Mason Hereford, Turkey and the Wolf, New Orleans
Timothy Hontzas, Johnny’s Restaurant, Homewood, AL
Brad Kilgore, Alter, Miami
Niven Patel, Ghee Indian Kitchen, Miami
Matthew McClure, The Hive, Bentonville, AR
Alex Perry, Vestige, Ocean Springs, MS
Jeannie Pierola, Edison: Food+Drink Lab, Tampa, FL
Slade Rushing, Brennan’s, New Orleans
Melissa Donahue-Talmage, Sweet Melissa’s Café, Sanibel, FL
Isaac Toups, Toups’ Meatery, New Orleans
Best Chef: Southeast (GA, KY, NC, SC, TN, WV)
Mashama Bailey, The Grey, Savannah, GA
Rebecca Barron, St. John’s Restaurant, Chattanooga, TN
Jon Buck, Husk Greenville, Greenville, SC
Katie Button, Cúrate, Asheville, NC
Gregory Collier, Loft & Cellar, Charlotte, NC
Cassidee Dabney, The Barn at Blackberry Farm, Walland, TN
Steven Devereaux Greene, Herons, Cary, NC
Oscar Diaz, The Cortez, Raleigh, NC
Bryan Furman, B’s Cracklin’ BBQ, Atlanta
Josh Habiger, Bastion, Nashville
Meherwan Irani, Chai Pani, Asheville, NC
Kevin Johnson, The Grocery, Charleston, SC
Joe Kindred, Kindred, Davidson, NC
Cheetie Kumar, Garland, Raleigh, NC
Jacques Larson, The Obstinate Daughter, Sullivan’s Island, SC
Dean Neff, PinPoint, Wilmington, NC
Ryan Smith, Staplehouse, Atlanta
Brian So, Spring, Marietta, GA
Julia Sullivan, Henrietta Red, Nashville
Andrew Ticer and Michael Hudman, Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen, Memphis
Best Chef: Southwest (AZ, CO, NM, OK, TX, UT)
Charleen Badman, FnB, Scottsdale, AZ
Kevin Binkley, Binkley’s Restaurant, Phoenix
Jen Castle and Blake Spalding, Hell’s Backbone Grill, Boulder, UT
Bruno Davaillon, Bullion, Dallas
Iliana de la Vega, El Naranjo, Austin
Kevin Fink, Emmer & Rye, Austin
Michael Fojtasek, Olamaie, Austin
Bryce Gilmore, Barley Swine, Austin
Caroline Glover, Annette, Aurora, CO
Nadia Holguin, Roland’s Cafe Market Bar, Phoenix
Ronnie Killen, Killen’s Steakhouse, Pearland, TX
Kaiser Lashkari, Himalaya, Houston
Steve McHugh, Cured, San Antonio
Trong Nguyen, Crawfish & Noodles, Houston
Jonathan Perno, Campo at Los Poblanos, Albuquerque, NM
Maribel Rivero, Yuyo, Austin
Regino Rojas, Purépecha Room by Revolver Taco Lounge, Dallas
Silvana Salcido Esparza, Barrio Café Gran Reserva, Phoenix
David Uygur, Lucia, Dallas
Kelly Whitaker, The Wolf’s Tailor, Denver

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Brief Gerographic background of from where Anna Hazare was born Essay

Anna Hazargon was born and lived the 1st 6 years of his life in Bhingar which is a small townspeople in Ahmednagar district. It is in the fix of Maharashtra in India. Bhingar got its name from a rishi called Bhrigu that did tapsya there on a hillock and later a temple was erected in his honour. Aurangzeb, the get going Mughal emperor, died at Bhingar in 1707. Also, there is a very(prenominal) far-famed and very old temple of Lord shiva called Shukleshwar Temple in Bhingar.In 2001, the total population was 7620 mint out of which 51% were males and 49% females. At the time, the literacy rate was 73% , which was higher than the subject field average of 59.5%. The language communicate in this town Bhingar is Marathi.Ahmednagar is the largest district in the state of Maharashtra. The district is famous of the town of Shirdi associated with Sai Baba. In olden days it was part of Bombay presidency until Indias independence in 1947 when it became part of Bombay state and in 1960 the new state of Maharashtra. In 2006, the Ministry of Panchayati Raj named Ahmednagar one of the countrys 250 most backward districts. In 2011 India census, Ahmednagar district recorded a population of 4,543,083 people and the sex ration out was 934 females for every 1000 males. It had a literacy rate of 80.22%. According to the census, 82% people were Hindus, 9% Muslims, 5% Christians and and the balance religions were 4%.Ahmednagar is home to the Indian Armored Corps Centre & groom (ACC&S), the Mechanized Infantry regimental Centre (MIRC), the Vehicle Research and Development Establishment (VRDE) and the Controllerate of Quality self-confidence Vehicles (CQAV). Training and recruitment for the Indian Army Armoured Corps takes stead at the ACC&S. Formerly, the metropolis was the Indian base of the British Armys Royal Tank Corps / Indian Armoured Corps, amongst other units. The town ho workouts the morsel largest display of military tanks in the populace.Few Famous personalities f rom Ahmednagar beSai Baba of Shirdi, spiritual masterAnand Rishiji, Jain saintMeher Baba, spiritual leaderSant Dnyaneshwar, Marathi saint, wrote Dnyaneshwari, a discourse on the Bhagavad Gita.Zaheer Khan Indian CricketerDagdu Maruti Pawar, a Marathi author and poet know for his constituents to Dalit literature. B.J. Khatal- Patil Ex. Cabinet Minister of Maharashtra, a senior Maharashtra leader and a mollifyed Congressman.Places of interest are as followsAkolner a village near city is birthplace of saint Dasganu to a fault famous for chariot festival (Rath yatra). bailiwick razzing peacocks are found here. Dongargan An old temple of Lord Shiva in mountains 8 km from Ahmednagar City, having notable waterfalls. Shingnapur A village containing a Shani (planet Saturn) temple and where all the houses are doorlessprobably the only village in the world where locks are unnecessary. Tank Museum The Armoured Corps Centre and School has created a museum with an extensive collection o f 20th-century armoured fighting vehicles.Ahmednagar Fort create by Ahmed Nizam Shah in 1490, this is one of the best-designed and most impregnable forts in India. As of 2013, it is under the control of the military command of India. Oval in shape, with 18-metre-high walls and 24 citadels, its defence system includes a moat 30 metres wide and 4 to 6 metres deep.Maharashtra is a state in the westbound region of India and is the nations second most populous. It is alike the second most populous sub-national entity in the world with over 110 million inhabitants. It is bordered by the Arabian sea to the west and the Indian states of Karnataka, Telangana, Goa, Gujarat, Chhattisgarg, Madya Pradesh and the Union territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli. The state neat is Mumbai which is also the financial capital of the nation. Maharashtra is the wealthiest and most developed state in India contribution 15% of the countrys industrial output and 13.3% of its GDP as of 2006-2007. Maharashtr a is the 3rd largest state by area in the India.Rice is the overriding crop of the state but cashews, mangoes, vegetable cotton, oilseeds and tobacco are also important. Maharashtra is change integrity into five geographic regions. Konkan is the western coastal region,between the horse opera Ghats and the sea. Kandesh is the northwestern region lying in the valley of the Tapti River. Maharashtra is divided into 36 districts under given 6 divisions. These 36 districts are further divided into 109 sub-divisions of the districts and 357 talukas.The Governor of Maharashtra is Kateekal.Sankaranaryanan on 22nd January 2010. The Chief Minister is Prithiviraj Chavan from the political political party Indian National Congress. He was sworn in on 11th November 2010.Maharashtra has a typical monsoon climate with hot, rainy and cold bear seasons. However, dew, frost, hail can also happen according to the seasonal weather. wintertime is in January and February followed by summer between Ma rch and May and the monsoon season is between June and September.The economy of Maharashtra is driven by international trade, entertainment (television, movement pictures, video games, recorded music), aerospace, technology, petroleum, fashion, apparel, and tourism. Maharashtra is the most industrialised state and has primary(prenominal)tained leading(a) position in the industrial sector in India. The State is start in Small Scale industries. Mumbai, the capital of state and the financial capital of India, houses the headquarters of most of the major corporate & financial institutions.Indias main stock exchanges & capital market and commodity exchanges are located in Mumbai. The State continues to attract industrial investments from both, domestic as well as foreign institutions. Maharashtra has the largest proportion of taxpayers in India and its share markets transact almost 70 per cent of the countrys stocks.The flora of Maharashtra is heterogeneous in composition. In 2012 th e recorded thick forest area in the state was 61,939 km2 (23,915 sq mi) which was round 20.13% of the states geographical area.Maharashtra is known for its extensive avifauna. Maharashtra is said to redeem 3 game reserves, 5 national parks and 24 bird sanctuaries.40 Wild sanctuaries in the state include Radhanagari Wildlife Sanctuary, Bor Wildlife Sanctuary, Koyna Wildlife Sanctuary, Chandoli National put, SanjayGandhi National Park and Mhadei Wildlife Sanctuary.The most common animals which are found in the state are Tigers, Black panthers, Leopards, Gaur, Sloth bears, Sambar, Four-headed antelope, Blue Bull, Chital, Barking deer, Mouse deer, Civet cats, Jackals, Jungle cats, scratchy hyena, and Hare. Other animals in the state include reptiles such as lizards, cobras and kraits. The national parks of Maharashtra possess a variety of plant species that include Jamun, Palas, Shisam, Neem, Teak, Dhawada, Kalam, Saja / Ain, Bija, Shirish, Mango, Acacia, Awala, Kadamba, Moha, Acaci a, Terminalia, Hedu and Ficus. robesMarathi women commonly wear the sari, often distinctly designed according to topical anaesthetic cultural customs. In urban areas, many women and men wear Western attire. Men also wear traditional costumes such as the dhoti and pheta on cultural occasions. Women wear traditional jewelleries derived from Marathas and Peshwas dynasties. Another very much favourite jewellery for the Marathi women is Kolhapuri saaj, a special type of necklace.CuisineMaharashtra cuisine covers a range from being mild to very spicy dishes. Wheat, rice, jowar, bajri, vegetables, lentils and fruit line Staples of Maharashtrian diet. Some of the Popular dishes include puran poli, ukdiche Modak, and batata wada. Meals (mainly lunch and dinner) are served on a plate called thali. Each food item served on the thali has a particular proposition place. People of this state believe in offering their food first to the lord as a thanksgiving for all that he has given. Maharash tras cuisine is divided into two, viz. Konkani, and Varadi. Though quite different, both use a lot of seafood and coconut.

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Global Iodine Industry

SOURCE ReportBuyer
LONDON This report analyzes the worldwide markets for Iodine in Metric Tons by the following End-Use Applications: Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals, & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film, Catalysts, & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors, and Others.
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The report provides separate comprehensive analytics for the US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific , Middle East & Africa and Latin America . Annual estimates and forecasts are provided for the period 2016 through 2024. Also, a five-year historic analysis is provided for these markets. Market data and analytics are derived from primary and secondary research. Company profiles are primarily based on public domain information including company URLs.
The report profiles 22 companies including many key and niche players such as:
– ACF Minera S.A
– Algorta Norte S.A.
– AZER YOD LLC
– COSAYACH Compañía de Salitre y Yodo
– Godo Shigen Sangyo Co., Ltd.
– IOCHEM Corporation
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IODINE MCP-2083 A GLOBAL STRATEGIC BUSINESS REPORT CONTENTS
I. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & PRODUCT DEFINITIONS
II. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1. INDUSTRY OVERVIEW
A Prelude
Major Applications Driving Demand for Iodine
Iodine Market – A Historic Perspective
Outlook
Competitive Landscape
Sociedad Quimica y Minera de Chile SA (SQM) – The Market Leader
Table 1: Global Iodine Market (2015): Percentage Share Breakdown of Production by Leading Players for SQM, Cosayach, Ise Chemical Corporation, Algorta Norte, and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Iodine Recycling Reaching Saturation
Chile : World€™s Largest Producer of Iodine
Table 2: Global Iodine Production (2015): Percentage Share Breakdown of Production by Country for Chile , Japan , Russia , the US, and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 3: Select Iodine Producing Countries in the World (2015 & 2016): Production in Metric Tons for Select Countries (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Chilean Operations Pose Heavy Competition to Global Counterparts
Iodine Reserves – Japan Dominates
Table 4: Global Iodine Market (2016): Mine Reserves by Country for Azerbaijan , Chile , China , Indonesia , Japan , Russia , Turkmenistan and US in Metric Tons (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
2. MARKET TRENDS, ISSUES AND DRIVERS
Increasing Global Population Offers Significant Growth Opportunities
Table 5: Top 25 Countries Worldwide (2016): Total Population (in Million) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 6: Proportion of Population with Insufficient Iodine Intake (2015): Percentage of Proportion by Geographic Region – Europe , Africa , Eastern Mediterranean, South-East Asia , Western Pacific and Americas (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Aging Population Spurs Market Growth
Table 7: Elderly Population (60+ Years) as a Percentage of Total Population (2015 & 2050) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 8: Global Aging Population in Select Regions/ Countries: Population of 60+ Individuals in €˜000s and as a Percentage of Total Population for 2015 & 2050 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Iodine Deficiency Levels in Developing Asian Countries Bode Well for the Market
Iodine Deficiency – Still a Major Concern in Africa
Iodine Pricing Trends
Table 9: Global Iodine Market (2012-2016): Average Prices of Iodine (in US$ per Kilogram) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Traditional End-Use Segments Regain Balance
Emerging Application Areas for Iodine
Iodine in Human Health: Largest Application Area
Iodine Deficiency: A Major Threat
Correlation Between Iodine and IDD
Correcting IDD through Iodine Supplementation
Food Fortification with Iodine: A Sound Strategy to Curb Iodine Deficiency Disorders
Consumption of Iodized Salt on the Rise
Table 10: Proportion of Households Using Adequate Iodized Salt (2013): Percentage Breakdown by Geographic Region – East Asia & Pacific, South Asia , Sub-Saharan Africa, West and Central Africa , and Other Under-Developed Countries (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 11: Number of Newborns Protected and Unprotected from Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDDs) in Million (2013) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Global Initiatives and the Fight against IDD
3. PRODUCT OVERVIEW
4. IODINE – AN END-USE OVERVIEW
Major Uses of Iodine
End-Use Areas for Iodine
Table 13: Iodine Consumption as Compounds (2015): Percentage Share Breakdown by Iodine Compounds – Organic Compounds, Crude Iodine, Povidine-Iodine (idophors), Sodium Iodide, Potassium Iodide and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Major Applications
Animal Feed
Human Health
Industrial Applications
Biocides/Iodophors
Other Applications
5. TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENTS IN RECENT YEARS
Useful Properties of Aryl Iodonium Salts
Inventors Devise New Method to Make Cadexomer Iodine
Electrically Conductive Polymers Formed by Doping Iodine in Polyacetylene
Myriad Uses Offered by Poly Vinyl Pyrroliodone Polymers
Newly Discovered Properties of Iodine
Uses of Iodine-125 and Iodine-131 in Imaging
Iodine€™s Usage in Radiotherapy
Detection of Catalytic Kinetic Resolution in Racemic Primary Amines
Cyclodextrin-Iodine and Polyvinylpyrroliodone-Iodine Used as Biocides
Organic Synthesis is Possible Using Titanium Tetraiodide
COIL
Trifluoroiodomethane as a Fire Extinguisher
Hydrogen Iodide in LCDs
6. FOCUS ON SELECT PLAYERS
ACF Minera S.A. ( Chile )
Algorta Norte S.A. ( Chile )
AZER YOD LLC ( Azerbaijan )
COSAYACH Compañía de Salitre y Yodo ( Chile )
Godo Shigen Sangyo Co., Ltd. ( Japan )
IOCHEM Corporation ( USA )
Iofina plc (UK)
Ise Chemicals Corporation ( Japan )
Kanto Natural Gas Development Co., Ltd. ( Japan )
Nippoh Chemicals Co., Ltd. ( Japan )
Sociedad Quimica Y Minera de Chile S.A. ( Chile )
Ajay-SQM Group ( USA )
Toyota Tsusho Corporation ( Japan )
Deepwater Chemicals, Inc. ( USA )
7. GLOBAL MARKET PERSPECTIVE
Table 14: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 15: World Historic Review for Iodine by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 16: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Iodine Market by End-Use Application
Table 17: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in Animal Feed by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 18: World Historic Review for Iodine in Animal Feed by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 19: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in Animal Feed by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 20: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in Human Health Applications by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 21: World Historic Review for Iodine in Human Health Applications by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 22: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in Human Health Applications by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 23: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in Human Health Applications by Product Segment – X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals and Nutrition Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 24: World Historic Review for Iodine in Human Health Applications by Product Segment – X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals and Nutrition Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 25: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in Human Health Applications by Product Segment – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals and Nutrition Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 26: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in X-Ray Contrast Media by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 27: World Historic Review for Iodine in X-Ray Contrast Media by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 28: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in X-Ray Contrast Media by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 29: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in Pharmaceuticals by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 30: World Historic Review for Iodine in Pharmaceuticals by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 31: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in Pharmaceuticals by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 32: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in Nutrition by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 33: World Historic Review for Iodine in Nutrition by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 34: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in Nutrition by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 35: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in Industrial Applications by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 36: World Historic Review for Iodine in Industrial Applications by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 37: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in Industrial Applications by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 38: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in Industrial Applications by Product Segment – Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) and Stabilizers Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 39: World Historic Review for Iodine in Industrial Applications by Product Segment – Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) and Stabilizers Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 40: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in Industrial Applications by Product Segment – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) and Stabilizers Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 41: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 42: World Historic Review for Iodine in Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 43: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 44: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in Stabilizers by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 45: World Historic Review for Iodine in Stabilizers by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 46: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in Stabilizers by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 47: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in Biocides/Iodophors by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 48: World Historic Review for Iodine in Biocides/Iodophors by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 49: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in Biocides/Iodophors by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 50: World Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine in Other End-Use Applications by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 51: World Historic Review for Iodine in Other End-Use Applications by Geographic Region – US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 52: World 14-Year Perspective for Iodine in Other End-Use Applications by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for US, Canada , Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan ), Middle East & Africa and Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
III. MARKET
1. THE UNITED STATES
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
Imports – A Major Source of Supply
Oklahoma – The Largest Iodine Producer
End-Use Applications Drive Iodine Demand in the US
Iodine Deficiency in the US Population Creates Demand for Supplementation
Export-Import Statistics
Table 53: US Iodine Market (2012-2016): Exports Volume in Metric Tons (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Select Players
B.Market Analytics
Table 54: US Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 55: US Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 56: US 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
2. CANADA
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
Increasing Iodine Deficiency Levels to Drive Growth
Export/Import Statistics – A Historic Perspective
Table 57: Canadian Iodine Market (2010-2013): Exports Value in US$ Thousand (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 58: Canadian Exports for Iodine (2013): Percentage Breakdown of Export Value by Destination – US, Vietnam , India , Australia , and Honduras Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 59: Canadian Iodine Market (2010-2013): Imports Value in US$ Thousand (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 60: Canadian Imports of Iodine (2013): Percentage Breakdown of Import Value by Origin – Chile , Japan , US, India and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
B.Market Analytics
Table 61: Canadian Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 62: Canadian Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 63: Canadian 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
3. JAPAN
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
Largest Reserves of Iodine
Seaweed: Main Source of Iodine in Japanese Cuisine
Southern Kanto Gas Field – Powerhouse of Iodine
Natural Calamity Adversely Affects Iodine Production in Japan
Select Players
B.Market Analytics
Table 64: Japanese Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 65: Japanese Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 66: Japanese 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
4. EUROPE
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
Export/Import Statistics – A Historic Perspective
Table 67: European Exports of Iodine (2013): Percentage Breakdown of Export Value by Destination – Italy , France , Germany , Spain and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 68: European Imports of Iodine (2013): Percentage Breakdown of Import Value by Origin – Belgium , Netherlands , UK, Germany , France and Others (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
B.Market Analytics
Table 69: European Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by Geographic Region – France , Germany , Italy , UK, Spain , Russia and Rest of Europe Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 70: European Historic Review for Iodine by Geographic Region – France , Germany , Italy , UK, Spain , Russia and Rest of Europe Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 71: European 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for France , Germany , Italy , UK, Spain , Russia and Rest of Europe Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 72: European Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 73: European Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 74: European 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
4a. FRANCE
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
B.Market Analytics
Table 75: French Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 76: French Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 77: French 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
4b . GERMANY
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
B.Market Analytics
Table 78: German Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 79: German Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 80: German 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
4c. ITALY
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
B.Market Analytics
Table 81: Italian Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 82: Italian Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 83: Italian 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
4d. THE UNITED KINGDOM
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
Iodine Deficiency on Rise
Iofina plc – A Key Player
B.Market Analytics
Table 84: UK Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 85: UK Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 86: UK 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
4e. SPAIN
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
B.Market Analytics
Table 87: Spanish Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 88: Spanish Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 89: Spanish 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
4f. RUSSIA
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
Russia – A Fringe Player in Iodine Production
B.Market Analytics
Table 90: Russian Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 91: Russian Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 92: Russian 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
4g. REST OF EUROPE
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
Azerbaijan Continues to Battle Iodine Deficiency
AZER YOD LLC ( Azerbaijan ) – A Major Iodine Producer
B.Market Analytics
Table 93: Rest of Europe Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 94: Rest of Europe Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 95: Rest of Europe 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
5. ASIA-PACIFIC
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
Iodine Deficiency Levels in the Developing Asian Countries Spur Growth
B.Market Analytics
Table 96: Asia-Pacific Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by Geographic Region – China , India and Rest of Asia-Pacific Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 97: Asia-Pacific Historic Review for Iodine by Geographic Region – China , India and Rest of Asia-Pacific Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 98: Asia-Pacific 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for China , India and Rest of Asia-Pacific Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 99: Asia-Pacific Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 100: Asia-Pacific Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 101: Asia-Pacific 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
5a. CHINA
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
Limited Production in China Benefits Exporting Nations
Competitive scenario
IDD in China – An Outline
Seaweed Snacks: Risky for Kids
B.Market Analytics
Table 102: Chinese Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 103: Chinese Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 104: Chinese 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
5b . INDIA
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
High IDD Prevalence to Drive Market
B.Market Analytics
Table 105: Indian Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 106: Indian Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 107: Indian 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
5c. REST OF ASIA-PACIFIC
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
B.Market Analytics
Table 108: Rest of Asia-Pacific Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 109: Rest of Asia-Pacific Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 110: Rest of Asia-Pacific 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
6. THE MIDDLE EAST & AFRICA
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
B.Market Analytics
Table 111: Middle East & Africa Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 112: Middle East & Africa Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 113: Middle East & Africa 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
7. LATIN AMERICA
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
B.Market Analytics
Table 114: Latin American Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by Geographic Region – Brazil and Rest of Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 115: Latin American Historic Review for Iodine by Geographic Region – Brazil and Rest of Latin America Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 116: Latin American 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by Geographic Region – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Brazil and Rest of Latin America Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 117: Latin American Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 118: Latin American Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 119: Latin American 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
7a. BRAZIL
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
B.Market Analytics
Table 120: Brazilian Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 121: Brazilian Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 122: Brazilian 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
7b . REST OF LATIN AMERICA
A.Market Analysis
Current and Future Analysis
Chile Leads Worldwide Iodine Production
Table 123: Chilean Iodine Market (2010-2013): Production in Metric Tons (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Chilean Operations Pose Heavy Competition to Global Counterparts
The Atacama Desert – Enriched with Iodine Deposits
Select Chilean Players
B.Market Analytics
Table 124: Rest of Latin America Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2016 through 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 125: Rest of Latin America Historic Review for Iodine by End-Use Application – Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
Table 126: Rest of Latin America 14-Year Perspective for Iodine by End-Use Application – Percentage Breakdown of Consumption Volume for Animal Feed, Human Health Applications (X-Ray Contrast Media, Pharmaceuticals & Nutrition), Industrial Applications (Optical Polarizing Film (OPF) & Stabilizers), Biocides/Iodophors and Other Markets for Years 2011, 2017 & 2024 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart)
IV. COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE
Total Companies Profiled: 22 (including Divisions/Subsidiaries – 25) The United States (4) Canada (1) Japan (7) Europe (3) – The United Kingdom (1) – Italy (1) – Rest of Europe (1) Asia-Pacific (Excluding Japan) (5) Latin America (5)
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AL-AZHAR

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Al-Azhar reinvents the dining experience with a fresh approach and energy, focusing on the quality of ingredients and its execution while retaining its familiarity and authenticity. Through the innovative use of ingredients and its execution, each visit brings it new flavours and a different type of experience. Most dishes are designed for sharing, so guest can try a variety of offering. Al-Azhar restaurants catered to customers in meeting their daily meal to fulfil your needs regardless of breakfast, lunch, supper or dinner. We ensure that we are always open for 24hours. We provide varieties of food from Thai Muslim food, local dishes, indian cuisine, seafood, western grill varieties, Mediterranean dishes and if you are fast enough to grab our Malay Nasi padang dishes that will be cleared after Lunch hour. At Al-Azhar, we take our drinks seriously. The produce are carefully sourced and procured fresh daily. The experience nurtures innovation and creativity. From fresh fruit juice to combinations of drinks, you can have it with mixed flavour or fruits. Even our desserts is full of creativity with a wide range of selections. iPhone Screenshots

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Quick question. In the US we have “Americanized” Chinese food, for example. Does India have any “Indianized” cuisine? (I’m sure it’s good)

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Mr_Fabulous : NobleHam: The same can be said of Indian, and in many ways it’s even truer. Most cheap Indian food is made by Bangladeshis and Pakistanis, and most Indian food here is cheap. Of course, people don’t realize that. But it’s true. More than 70 percent of the Indian restaurants in New York City, for instance, are not run by Indians. They are run by Bangladeshi and Pakistani restaurateurs.
We also can’t tell the difference between South Asian cuisines because they’re largely very similar. Much of what we call Indian is Punjabi, which is split between India and Pakistan. Complaining that it’s actually Pakistanis making my pakoras rather than Indians is like complaining that Guatemalans are making my tamales rather than Mexicans.Incidentally, my favorite “Indian” restaurant in Seattle is actually Nepalese, so in addition to the Indian staples it has momos, noodle soups, and some other Himalayan dishes.
I made some butter chicken at home this weekend, and it was utterly phenomenal. It’s amazing what you can do in your own kitchen with the right ingredients and a little time on your hands.
[img.fark.net image 267×362]
Shown here served with roasted cauliflower and warm naan.
Well, there goes my cholesterol, A1c and calories thus week. That looks like a righteous–good gut-bomb and I’mma making it

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Review and Photos: Anandapur Local Food Cafes (AKA Yak and Yeti Counter Service) in Disney’s Animal Kingdom

Hello from Asia in Disney’s Animal Kingdom ! We got so excited seeing Kevin from Up that we worked up an appetite!
Kevin from UP is now in Animal Kingdom!
It’s been a while since we’ve stopped at Yak & Yeti Local Food Cafes , so we decided to swing by for a quick lunch.
Yak & Yeti Local Foods Cafe
As, the menu suggests, Yak & Yeti features “tasty food,” which, in this case, is Asian cuisine. One of the best things about this spot is the large portions — you certainly get a good bang for your buck. (or dining plan!)
Yak & Yeti Menu
We decided to go for the Teriyaki Beef Bowl and Vegetable Tikka Masala . We also had to stop by the awesome condiment cart, which truly is one of the best reasons to dine here. There’s a large and unique variety of sauces — from soy sauce to duck sauce.
We grabbed some hot sauce, and off we go! First up, the Teriyaki Beef Bowl . This dish is Marinated Beef, Carrots, Snap Peas, Onions, and Mushrooms in a Sweet Teriyaki Sauce and served with White Rice.
Teriyaki Beef Bowl
Can’t you almost taste this through the screen?! These veggies were a great part of the meal – a perfect blend of marinade and spices. The teriyaki sauce is good too, and the steak is cooked nicely.
Beef Teriyaki Bowl
My only real complaint is that I wished I had more meat! I ran out of steak far before I ran out of the rice and veggies. However, the steak is flavored nicely and pairs well with the crisp vegetables. I also added this awesome sauce I found to kick it up a notch. This is available on the condiment bars. Did I grab an extra or two for my purse? You’ll never know…
… yes.
Chili Sauce
Next it was time to try the Vegetarian Tikka Masala . This dish is Garbanzo beans, Zucchini, Peppers, Onions, and Tomatoes covered in a creamy yogurt Tikka Masala sauce and served with white rice .
Tikka Masala
Honestly, this was meh. The sauce was pretty bland — I was hoping to really be able to pick up on the Indian spices, but they weren’t very prominent. The garbanzo beans are good, and I appreciate them in the dish — just not as the main attraction. That is to say, they are fine, but honestly, I wish I had some chicken to accompany them. The vegetables add some favor, but overall, I would not order this again. If you’re a vegetarian who’s sick of salads however, this is a unique option for you to try.
Overall, Yak & Yeti is still a good spot to grab a counter service meal in Animal Kingdom. It’s certainly different than burgers and fries, and you’re going to get a large portion!
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With mini-reviews of every single restaurant, bar, lounge, kiosk and more ; an entire chapter on the best snacks in Disney World ; full Disney Dining Plan analysis (and how to get FREE dining) ; and a full chapter on discounts and deals ; you’ll have everything you need to plan your best vacation yet. Click here to order your copy of the 2019 DFB Guide to Walt Disney World Dining E-book with code WDW2019 to save 25% today!
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Do you like the Yak & Yeti Local Foods Cafe? Pleas let us know in the comments!
Related posts: New DFB Video Review: Ample Hills Creamery in Disney World 25 Can’t-Miss Experiences to Celebrate the Holidays at Walt Disney World This Year! The Halloween Cupcake at Walt Disney World’s Animal Kingdom is Just Right for Fall!

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Kiln to host celebrated Thai cook Chef Num for one-off guest dinner

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Already have an account? Log in Award-winning Soho restaurant Kiln is to welcome one of Thailand ’s most celebrated chefs for a one-off guest dinner next month. Werawat Triyasenawat, who is better known as Chef Num, will come to Kiln on March 25. He will be cooking a £55 set menu at the Thai grill, which was named the best restaurant in the UK at 2018’s National Restaurant Awards . Chef Num is the owner of innovative and influential restaurant Samuay & Sons in Udon Thani, Esarn, a north-eastern region of Thailand. Before opening the acclaimed restaurant in his family’s former tailoring shop in 2014, the Chef Num worked at Michelin-starred Bo.Lan in Bangkok. Dishes available on the night are expected to include the likes of mum yang – a grilled bitter sausage made with offal and blood – and mok pla with jaew tub pla, a fish dish steamed in a banana leaf and served with spicy fish liver sauce. The menu will be served with wines from lesser-known producers chosen by Kiln’s Luke Pyper. Chef Num is best known for celebrating the cuisine of Esarn through progressive cooking, foraging for native ingredients and exploring its culinary traditions. The dinner at Kiln is expected to focus on the region’s food heritage, following on from a visit made by Kiln’s owners to Udon Thani last year. Tickets to Chef Num x Kiln cost £55 per head and can be booked via . For more information, visit kilnsoho.com . The 55 must-try dishes in London 55 show all The 55 must-try dishes in London 1/55 1. Bone marrow on toast with parsley salad at St John Neither restaurants or dishes get more iconic than this. Fergus Henderson’s best-known creation has been much emulated over the years, but never bettered. 2/55 2. Polenta at The Palomar There’s a high chance that there’s more butter in this than polenta, along with plenty of mushrooms, truffle and parmesan. This is the highlight dish on a menu of highlights. 3/55 3. Croquetas at Barrafina When the original Barrafina launched in Soho in 2007 — modelled on Barcelona tapas bar Cal Pep — it helped introduce the city to both Spanish food and counter dining. Croquetas are among the most popular items on the menu at all three Barrafina restaurants, with different signature serves at each. They might just be the best in town. 4/55 4. Anchovies and lardo at Sabor Sabor, the Spanish powerhouse from former Barrafina chef Nieves Barragán Mohacho, has lots to offer across its tapas bar, restaurant and upstairs asador. This simple plate of salty, oil-rich anchovies laid on bright white sheets of shaved lardo is as simple as it comes, but all the better for it. Best eaten counterside with a sherry in hand and southern Spain in mind. 5/55 5. Chorizo roll at Brindisa Prepare to wait in line for this Borough Market classic: a ciabatta roll stuffed to bursting with smoky chorizo fresh from the grill, roasted red peppers and rocket. It’s a good to start the day as it is to soak up a few pints later on. 6/55 6. Al pastor tacos at El Pastor These soft corn tortillas filled with cured pork that’s been cooked doner kebab-style are the salty, saliva-inducing highlight at this Borough Market taco joint. 7/55 7. Meat Fruit at Dinner This canny creation from Heston Blumenthal takes inspiration from c1500. It combines mandarin, chicken liver and foie gras in a pâté, and resembles a mandarin. 8/55 8. San Daniele at Santa Maria For pizza traditionalists, Santa Maria do it like in old Napoli. The San Daniele doesn’t have any tomato sauce, but is topped instead with cherry tomatoes, rocket, parmesan shavings and generous amounts of excellent quality San Daniele Parma ham. See more of the best pizzas in London. 9/55 9. Brick Lane bagel at Beigel Bake People have been known to fall out arguing which of Brick Lane’s two neighbouring all-night bagel shops is best, but we have no definitive answer. Both offer superbly moist salt beef and sweet, chewy bagel perfection. Have one of each. Getty Images 10/55 10. Lamb chops at Lahore Kebab House Leave your airs and graces at the door at Lahore, where it’s all about you and the amazing things they do with that grill. Lamb chops is the star dish at the worthy cult favourite. 11/55 11. Spiced lamb, savoy cabbage and sumac yoghurt pizza at Homeslice Once you get over the fact that the pizzas are a whopping 20 inches, Homeslice’s exciting toppings get their own gawping rights. This middle eastern creation is fresh, crunchy and served on their wonderful garlic base. Purists need not apply. 12/55 12. Ari Gold at Patty & Bun There’s plenty of cheeseburgers in London, but there’s also the Ari Gold: a 35 day aged Aberdeen Angus patty dripping with gooey American cheese and smokey P&B mayo, topped with salad and home-pickled red onion rings. 13/55 13. Venison Scotch Egg at The Harwood Arms The British beauty that is the scotch egg has to be the ultimate pub snack. And this well seasoned, gamey, reliably runny-yolked version served at London’s only Michelin-starred gastropub is the leader of its kind. 14/55 14. Steak at Hawksmoor When it comes to steak, Hawksmoor is the daddy. It doesn’t matter what cut you go for or which accompaniments you choose, it’s almost impossible to go wrong. Oh, but do get some bone marrow. 15/55 15. Bacon naan at Dishoom A bacon sarnie, Indian style. A London breakfast classic, especially well-received when a hangover lurks. 16/55 16. Beef brisket at Smokestak The fat strips of tender, slow-cooked beef are a highlight among many high points at the smoke-filled Shoreditch base of David Carter’s Smokestak. They come either straight-up, with a punchy homemade ketchup, or crammed into a bun. 17/55 17. Oysters at Wright Brothers Seafood supremos Wright Brothers are all about the oysters. Think this snack is only for the fanciest of folks? Head there between 3pm and 6pm, Monday to Friday to pick them up for just £1 a go. 18/55 18. Mushroom, pearl barley and truffle risotto at Pollen Street Social Yes, vegan food can be high end. Jason Atherton proves this with gusto at his flagship Mayfair restaurant, where this autumnal dish is the star of his Michelin-starred all-vegan tasting menu. 19/55 19. Jackfruit Taco at Club Mexicana Vegan food can, however, get down and dirty with the best of them. This punchy, spicy jackfruit taco from Club Mexicana gives pulled pork a serious run for its money. 20/55 20. Cauliflower shawarma at Berber & Q Vegetable dishes don’t come much more thrilling than this smoky, richly-spiced whole cauliflower charred on the grill and adorned with tahini, pomegranate seeds and pine nuts. A match for any meat dish. 21/55 21. Lamb offal flatbread at Black Axe Mangal Spicy, rich and intense, the lamb offal flatbread created by Lee Tiernan at haute kebab spot Black Axe Mangal in Islington is as fabulously full-on as the heavy metal-playing restaurant itself. 22/55 22. Pies at Holborn Dining Room You can take your pick from Calum Franklin’s pies at Holborn Dining Room, because they are all outstanding. The chef is pastry wizard, who works his magic across a range that includes an anything but humble pork pie, and seasonal specials such as curried mutton pie with mango chutney. 23/55 23. Fried courgette flowers at Salt Yard These picture-perfect deep-fried courgette flowers stuffed with goat’s cheese and drizzled in honey are full of Mediterranean splendour. 24/55 24. Sausage roll at The Blue Posts When pub food comes from the team behind The Palomar and The Barbary, then you know you’re going to order more than a bag of nuts. This roll is robustly meaty, with fabulously flakey pastry – served with a dollop of Colman’s, naturally. 25/55 25. Lamb shish kebab at Tarshish Tarshish recently won a particularly well-coveted gong. The reigning champion of the British Kebab Awards fine dining accolade serves up marinated lamb shish, available with a side of mac and cheese. 26/55 26. Sloppy Joe at Jikoni Delicious fatty juices add unctuous backbone to a richly spiced mutton keema which can barely be contained within a toasted brioche bun in this clever take on British-meets-Indian-meets-wherever from Ravinder Bhogal. 27/55 27. Beef fat tacos at Temper There’s a translucent glisten to these indulgent tacos at Neil Rankin’s Temper, where a zero-waste policy means that its tortillas are made with leftover beef fat from the grill – a move which isn’t just good for the environment, but for flavour too. 28/55 28. Pressed duck at Otto’s The pressed duck at this Clerkenwell institution isn’t for the faint-hearted. The multi-course canard fest involves the duck first being brought to the table for inspection complete with its head, while the bones are later crushed to produce an epic-tasting jus. Breast meat, chopped liver and grilled legs all feature in what is a delicious if deathly dish. 29/55 29. The English at The Wolseley This grand Piccadilly Brasserie from Chris Corbin and Jeremy King not only does the best breakfast in town, it pretty much invented the notion of breakfasting out. The English features a choice of fried, poached or scrambled eggs with bacon, sausage, baked beans, tomato, black pudding and mushroom. It’s the quality of ingredients – plus the atmosphere – which makes it really special. 30/55 30. Shakshuka at Ottolenghi and Nopi A bright, North African breakfast staple mastered and popularised by Yotam Ottolenghi. 31/55 31. Cacio e pepe at Padella Few dishes are as splendidly simple as this one from the London Bridge pasta gurus. It is simply spaghetti with parmesan and black pepper. But oh boy, is it good. Find more of the best Italian restaurants in London. 32/55 32. Beef dripping candle at Restaurant Story As it melts, the dripping is collected in the candle holder’s base ready to dip your bread in. It’s been on the menu since the restaurant opened in 2013 and is still one of London’s cleverest dishes. 33/55 33. Duck and waffle at Duck & Waffle A warm, chewy waffle topped with crisp-skinned confit duck and a runny egg, drizzled in maple syrup. Convinced yet? Naturally there are some pretty impressive views, too… 34/55 34. Shepherd’s Pie at The Ivy This Shepherd’s Pie has been a favourite at The Ivy since virtually the beginning, and thanks to the continued roll-out of Ivy brasseries just about everywhere across town, it’s now more accessible than ever. 35/55 35. Whole fried sea bass (nam dtok pla thort) at Som Saa This fiery, aromatic dish became a favourite at Som Saa’s early residencies and pop-ups, and is now a highlight of the menu at its Spitalfields restaurant. 36/55 36. The classic bao at Bao For steamed buns, you can’t beat Bao. Their classic sees a pillowy-soft bun filled with slow-braised pork belly, coarse peanut powder and shredded coriander. Worth queuing for. 37/55 37. Zucchini fritte at Sartoria On the addiction scale, these crispy strands of fried courgette are class A. They come overflowing in a large bowl at Sartoria as well as Francesco Mazzei’s other two restaurants Radici in Islington and Fiume in Battersea. When at any, they should be ordered on the side of absolutely anything. 38/55 38. Buttermilk fried chicken at The Clove Club This fried chicken dusted with pine salt is a well-deserved classic, and not just because of its interesting, pine-flanked presentation. 39/55 39. The Dead Hippie burger at MeatLiquor This well-known burger is the signature serve across Yianni Papoutsis’ burger empire. It’s dirty and drippy, featuring two beef patties fried in mustard and slathered in melted American-style cheese adorned with pickles and minced raw onions. The creamy, mustardy secret-recipe Dead Hippie Sauce seals the deal. 40/55 40. Egg hopper at Hoppers This Sri Lankan sensation which made its name in Soho and has since expanded to Marylebone isn’t just named after the hopper, it does them very well indeed. Pair an egg hopper with the restaurant’s intricately spiced curries. 41/55 41. Hiramasa Tiradito at Coya London has gone loco for ceviche in recent years, but what about its sashimi-like cousin. Coya serves up silky slithers of kingfish come swimming in dashi, chives and an elegant dollop of truffle. 42/55 42. Bhel puri at Kricket Now settled in Soho after outgrowing the Brixton shipping container they started out in, Kricket offers more dishes than ever to please spice fans. This light and bright exemplary version of bhel puri is still top of the pile. 43/55 43. All In at Blacklock Chops, glorious chops. That’s what Blacklock does and it does them very well indeed. Don’t choose between them, opt for the All In option and enjoy a mixed grill of varying beef, lamb and pork chops. 44/55 44. Miso aubergine at Chicama This is as close to a pudding that a vegetable gets. Aubergines lathered in miso sauce and topped with sweet, crunchy pecans. Sweet and savoury, you’ll want to order it again for dessert. 45/55 45. Ham Egg and Chips at Max’s Sandwich Shop A legend of the sandwich scene, Crouch Hill’s lunchtime lot are in luck with Max’s Ham Egg and Chips. Slow cooked ham hock is topped with oozing fried egg, matchstick fries, piccalilli and malt vinegar mayonnaise. Our own Fay Maschler can’t resist this place. Matt Writtle 46/55 46. Red Lantern soft shell crab at Hutong For somewhere so high up, Hutong is pretty warm. Looking down from the 33rd floor of the Shard, this dish of fried soft shell crab is left warm in a bowlful of dried Sichuan chillies, soaking up their smokey spice. 47/55 47. Cronut at Dominique Ansel Bakery When New York master baker Dominique Ansel opened his first European site in Victoria, this hybrid Franken Pastry that merges a croissant and a doughnut led to queues of several hours. Bite into its fluffy, buttery, flaky goodness and you’ll instantly understand the appeal. 48/55 48. Sugar-cured prawn omelette at The Modern Pantry Anna Hansen’s Asian-influenced signature dish, served at The Modern Pantry restaurant in Clerkenwell. 49/55 49. Venison puffs at Yauatcha Flaky buttery pastry encasing tender venison, a highlight of the dim sum at Alan Yau’s Soho restaurant. 50/55 50. Deep-fried olives at Mele e Pere These plump green olives stuffed with chilli and deep fried might just be London’s most noshable nibble. They are juicy, spicy, slightly salty and endlessly addictive. Wash them down with some of Mele e Pere’s homemade vermouth. 51/55 51. Galician beef at Lurra The beef at this Marylebone Basque restaurant is something special. It comes from cows which live until they are at least eight, often 10 and sometimes 14. These cows are fatter, which leads to more marbling in the meat and a lot more flavour. 52/55 52. Chicken Kiev at The Game Bird Playful takes on British classics are a signature of this restaurant set in Mayfair’s The Stafford hotel. Top of the pile is this retro Kiev of tender chicken that oozes with ultra-garlicky, truffle-laced butter. The accompanying mash is dreamily creamy, too. 53/55 53. Jamon at Bar Tozino More a ham cave than a bar, Maltby Street’s Bar Tozino is so full of hanging hams that you’ll likely smell the ageing meat even before walking through the door. Settle in and gorge your way through slice after slice of the varying options, washing it all down with sherry ideally. 54/55 54. Kid goat methi keema at Gymkhana A deep, smoky mince curry served with bread rolls — an example of less is more at this Mayfair Michelin-starred Indian. 55/55 55. Mince and potatoes at Dean Street Townhouse Iconic in its defiant simplicity, this signature dish is ultimate comfort food. Comfort food made with A-listers in mind, naturally. 1/55 1. Bone marrow on toast with parsley salad at St John Neither restaurants or dishes get more iconic than this. Fergus Henderson’s best-known creation has been much emulated over the years, but never bettered. 2/55 2. Polenta at The Palomar There’s a high chance that there’s more butter in this than polenta, along with plenty of mushrooms, truffle and parmesan. This is the highlight dish on a menu of highlights. 3/55 3. Croquetas at Barrafina When the original Barrafina launched in Soho in 2007 — modelled on Barcelona tapas bar Cal Pep — it helped introduce the city to both Spanish food and counter dining. Croquetas are among the most popular items on the menu at all three Barrafina restaurants, with different signature serves at each. They might just be the best in town. 4/55 4. Anchovies and lardo at Sabor Sabor, the Spanish powerhouse from former Barrafina chef Nieves Barragán Mohacho, has lots to offer across its tapas bar, restaurant and upstairs asador. This simple plate of salty, oil-rich anchovies laid on bright white sheets of shaved lardo is as simple as it comes, but all the better for it. Best eaten counterside with a sherry in hand and southern Spain in mind. 5/55 5. Chorizo roll at Brindisa Prepare to wait in line for this Borough Market classic: a ciabatta roll stuffed to bursting with smoky chorizo fresh from the grill, roasted red peppers and rocket. It’s a good to start the day as it is to soak up a few pints later on. 6/55 6. Al pastor tacos at El Pastor These soft corn tortillas filled with cured pork that’s been cooked doner kebab-style are the salty, saliva-inducing highlight at this Borough Market taco joint. 7/55 7. Meat Fruit at Dinner This canny creation from Heston Blumenthal takes inspiration from c1500. It combines mandarin, chicken liver and foie gras in a pâté, and resembles a mandarin. 8/55 8. San Daniele at Santa Maria For pizza traditionalists, Santa Maria do it like in old Napoli. The San Daniele doesn’t have any tomato sauce, but is topped instead with cherry tomatoes, rocket, parmesan shavings and generous amounts of excellent quality San Daniele Parma ham. See more of the best pizzas in London. 9/55 9. Brick Lane bagel at Beigel Bake People have been known to fall out arguing which of Brick Lane’s two neighbouring all-night bagel shops is best, but we have no definitive answer. Both offer superbly moist salt beef and sweet, chewy bagel perfection. Have one of each. Getty Images 10/55 10. Lamb chops at Lahore Kebab House Leave your airs and graces at the door at Lahore, where it’s all about you and the amazing things they do with that grill. Lamb chops is the star dish at the worthy cult favourite. 11/55 11. Spiced lamb, savoy cabbage and sumac yoghurt pizza at Homeslice Once you get over the fact that the pizzas are a whopping 20 inches, Homeslice’s exciting toppings get their own gawping rights. This middle eastern creation is fresh, crunchy and served on their wonderful garlic base. Purists need not apply. 12/55 12. Ari Gold at Patty & Bun There’s plenty of cheeseburgers in London, but there’s also the Ari Gold: a 35 day aged Aberdeen Angus patty dripping with gooey American cheese and smokey P&B mayo, topped with salad and home-pickled red onion rings. 13/55 13. Venison Scotch Egg at The Harwood Arms The British beauty that is the scotch egg has to be the ultimate pub snack. And this well seasoned, gamey, reliably runny-yolked version served at London’s only Michelin-starred gastropub is the leader of its kind. 14/55 14. Steak at Hawksmoor When it comes to steak, Hawksmoor is the daddy. It doesn’t matter what cut you go for or which accompaniments you choose, it’s almost impossible to go wrong. Oh, but do get some bone marrow. 15/55 15. Bacon naan at Dishoom A bacon sarnie, Indian style. A London breakfast classic, especially well-received when a hangover lurks. 16/55 16. Beef brisket at Smokestak The fat strips of tender, slow-cooked beef are a highlight among many high points at the smoke-filled Shoreditch base of David Carter’s Smokestak. They come either straight-up, with a punchy homemade ketchup, or crammed into a bun. 17/55 17. Oysters at Wright Brothers Seafood supremos Wright Brothers are all about the oysters. Think this snack is only for the fanciest of folks? Head there between 3pm and 6pm, Monday to Friday to pick them up for just £1 a go. 18/55 18. Mushroom, pearl barley and truffle risotto at Pollen Street Social Yes, vegan food can be high end. Jason Atherton proves this with gusto at his flagship Mayfair restaurant, where this autumnal dish is the star of his Michelin-starred all-vegan tasting menu. 19/55 19. Jackfruit Taco at Club Mexicana Vegan food can, however, get down and dirty with the best of them. This punchy, spicy jackfruit taco from Club Mexicana gives pulled pork a serious run for its money. 20/55 20. Cauliflower shawarma at Berber & Q Vegetable dishes don’t come much more thrilling than this smoky, richly-spiced whole cauliflower charred on the grill and adorned with tahini, pomegranate seeds and pine nuts. A match for any meat dish. 21/55 21. Lamb offal flatbread at Black Axe Mangal Spicy, rich and intense, the lamb offal flatbread created by Lee Tiernan at haute kebab spot Black Axe Mangal in Islington is as fabulously full-on as the heavy metal-playing restaurant itself. 22/55 22. Pies at Holborn Dining Room You can take your pick from Calum Franklin’s pies at Holborn Dining Room, because they are all outstanding. The chef is pastry wizard, who works his magic across a range that includes an anything but humble pork pie, and seasonal specials such as curried mutton pie with mango chutney. 23/55 23. Fried courgette flowers at Salt Yard These picture-perfect deep-fried courgette flowers stuffed with goat’s cheese and drizzled in honey are full of Mediterranean splendour. 24/55 24. Sausage roll at The Blue Posts When pub food comes from the team behind The Palomar and The Barbary, then you know you’re going to order more than a bag of nuts. This roll is robustly meaty, with fabulously flakey pastry – served with a dollop of Colman’s, naturally. 25/55 25. Lamb shish kebab at Tarshish Tarshish recently won a particularly well-coveted gong. The reigning champion of the British Kebab Awards fine dining accolade serves up marinated lamb shish, available with a side of mac and cheese. 26/55 26. Sloppy Joe at Jikoni Delicious fatty juices add unctuous backbone to a richly spiced mutton keema which can barely be contained within a toasted brioche bun in this clever take on British-meets-Indian-meets-wherever from Ravinder Bhogal. 27/55 27. Beef fat tacos at Temper There’s a translucent glisten to these indulgent tacos at Neil Rankin’s Temper, where a zero-waste policy means that its tortillas are made with leftover beef fat from the grill – a move which isn’t just good for the environment, but for flavour too. 28/55 28. Pressed duck at Otto’s The pressed duck at this Clerkenwell institution isn’t for the faint-hearted. The multi-course canard fest involves the duck first being brought to the table for inspection complete with its head, while the bones are later crushed to produce an epic-tasting jus. Breast meat, chopped liver and grilled legs all feature in what is a delicious if deathly dish. 29/55 29. The English at The Wolseley This grand Piccadilly Brasserie from Chris Corbin and Jeremy King not only does the best breakfast in town, it pretty much invented the notion of breakfasting out. The English features a choice of fried, poached or scrambled eggs with bacon, sausage, baked beans, tomato, black pudding and mushroom. It’s the quality of ingredients – plus the atmosphere – which makes it really special. 30/55 30. Shakshuka at Ottolenghi and Nopi A bright, North African breakfast staple mastered and popularised by Yotam Ottolenghi. 31/55 31. Cacio e pepe at Padella Few dishes are as splendidly simple as this one from the London Bridge pasta gurus. It is simply spaghetti with parmesan and black pepper. But oh boy, is it good. Find more of the best Italian restaurants in London. 32/55 32. Beef dripping candle at Restaurant Story As it melts, the dripping is collected in the candle holder’s base ready to dip your bread in. It’s been on the menu since the restaurant opened in 2013 and is still one of London’s cleverest dishes. 33/55 33. Duck and waffle at Duck & Waffle A warm, chewy waffle topped with crisp-skinned confit duck and a runny egg, drizzled in maple syrup. Convinced yet? Naturally there are some pretty impressive views, too… 34/55 34. Shepherd’s Pie at The Ivy This Shepherd’s Pie has been a favourite at The Ivy since virtually the beginning, and thanks to the continued roll-out of Ivy brasseries just about everywhere across town, it’s now more accessible than ever. 35/55 35. Whole fried sea bass (nam dtok pla thort) at Som Saa This fiery, aromatic dish became a favourite at Som Saa’s early residencies and pop-ups, and is now a highlight of the menu at its Spitalfields restaurant. 36/55 36. The classic bao at Bao For steamed buns, you can’t beat Bao. Their classic sees a pillowy-soft bun filled with slow-braised pork belly, coarse peanut powder and shredded coriander. Worth queuing for. 37/55 37. Zucchini fritte at Sartoria On the addiction scale, these crispy strands of fried courgette are class A. They come overflowing in a large bowl at Sartoria as well as Francesco Mazzei’s other two restaurants Radici in Islington and Fiume in Battersea. When at any, they should be ordered on the side of absolutely anything. 38/55 38. Buttermilk fried chicken at The Clove Club This fried chicken dusted with pine salt is a well-deserved classic, and not just because of its interesting, pine-flanked presentation. 39/55 39. The Dead Hippie burger at MeatLiquor This well-known burger is the signature serve across Yianni Papoutsis’ burger empire. It’s dirty and drippy, featuring two beef patties fried in mustard and slathered in melted American-style cheese adorned with pickles and minced raw onions. The creamy, mustardy secret-recipe Dead Hippie Sauce seals the deal. 40/55 40. Egg hopper at Hoppers This Sri Lankan sensation which made its name in Soho and has since expanded to Marylebone isn’t just named after the hopper, it does them very well indeed. Pair an egg hopper with the restaurant’s intricately spiced curries. 41/55 41. Hiramasa Tiradito at Coya London has gone loco for ceviche in recent years, but what about its sashimi-like cousin. Coya serves up silky slithers of kingfish come swimming in dashi, chives and an elegant dollop of truffle. 42/55 42. Bhel puri at Kricket Now settled in Soho after outgrowing the Brixton shipping container they started out in, Kricket offers more dishes than ever to please spice fans. This light and bright exemplary version of bhel puri is still top of the pile. 43/55 43. All In at Blacklock Chops, glorious chops. That’s what Blacklock does and it does them very well indeed. Don’t choose between them, opt for the All In option and enjoy a mixed grill of varying beef, lamb and pork chops. 44/55 44. Miso aubergine at Chicama This is as close to a pudding that a vegetable gets. Aubergines lathered in miso sauce and topped with sweet, crunchy pecans. Sweet and savoury, you’ll want to order it again for dessert. 45/55 45. Ham Egg and Chips at Max’s Sandwich Shop A legend of the sandwich scene, Crouch Hill’s lunchtime lot are in luck with Max’s Ham Egg and Chips. Slow cooked ham hock is topped with oozing fried egg, matchstick fries, piccalilli and malt vinegar mayonnaise. Our own Fay Maschler can’t resist this place. Matt Writtle 46/55 46. Red Lantern soft shell crab at Hutong For somewhere so high up, Hutong is pretty warm. Looking down from the 33rd floor of the Shard, this dish of fried soft shell crab is left warm in a bowlful of dried Sichuan chillies, soaking up their smokey spice. 47/55 47. Cronut at Dominique Ansel Bakery When New York master baker Dominique Ansel opened his first European site in Victoria, this hybrid Franken Pastry that merges a croissant and a doughnut led to queues of several hours. Bite into its fluffy, buttery, flaky goodness and you’ll instantly understand the appeal. 48/55 48. Sugar-cured prawn omelette at The Modern Pantry Anna Hansen’s Asian-influenced signature dish, served at The Modern Pantry restaurant in Clerkenwell. 49/55 49. Venison puffs at Yauatcha Flaky buttery pastry encasing tender venison, a highlight of the dim sum at Alan Yau’s Soho restaurant. 50/55 50. Deep-fried olives at Mele e Pere These plump green olives stuffed with chilli and deep fried might just be London’s most noshable nibble. They are juicy, spicy, slightly salty and endlessly addictive. Wash them down with some of Mele e Pere’s homemade vermouth. 51/55 51. Galician beef at Lurra The beef at this Marylebone Basque restaurant is something special. It comes from cows which live until they are at least eight, often 10 and sometimes 14. These cows are fatter, which leads to more marbling in the meat and a lot more flavour. 52/55 52. Chicken Kiev at The Game Bird Playful takes on British classics are a signature of this restaurant set in Mayfair’s The Stafford hotel. Top of the pile is this retro Kiev of tender chicken that oozes with ultra-garlicky, truffle-laced butter. The accompanying mash is dreamily creamy, too. 53/55 53. Jamon at Bar Tozino More a ham cave than a bar, Maltby Street’s Bar Tozino is so full of hanging hams that you’ll likely smell the ageing meat even before walking through the door. Settle in and gorge your way through slice after slice of the varying options, washing it all down with sherry ideally. 54/55 54. Kid goat methi keema at Gymkhana A deep, smoky mince curry served with bread rolls — an example of less is more at this Mayfair Michelin-starred Indian. 55/55 55. Mince and potatoes at Dean Street Townhouse Iconic in its defiant simplicity, this signature dish is ultimate comfort food. Comfort food made with A-listers in mind, naturally.

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BookPeople’s Hand-Picked Favourites | Our 10 Food & Drink Books

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If you love books and bargain prices, you’ll probably already know about BookPeople ; they’ve been selling a wide range of amazingly low-priced titles for over 30 years. You can either buy online, or arrange for a BookPeople team to visit your office, bank, school or hospital. I tend to shop online, as there are additional internet-only titles and promotions available via the BookPeople website.
BookPeople stock many popular titles across a wide range of categories, including my personal selection of ten food and drink titles, below. I’ve chosen all of these from BookPeople’s hand-picked favourites (marked with a red star), after browsing through their online Food & Drink: Cookbooks & Recipe Books section , but there are many more titles I’m interested in too!
Read on for my round up of ten great food and drink books available on BookPeople right now, and scroll down to find out more about our giveaway of all ten titles . Cherish by Anne Shooter
Bringing together the food of Jewish communities around the world, Anne Shooter shares a collection of recipes inspired by childhood memories and her Jewish roots. Many have been handed down through the generations, tried and tested by many cooks over the years – indeed the book came about after one of Shooter’s daughters asked her to make her next book a collection of all the family dinners they loved the most.
Divided into chapters for Soups; Fish; One-Tray Dinners; Chicken, Turkey & Duck; Meat, Vegetarian Dishes; Salads & Sides; Dips, Picks & Nibbles; Desserts; and Breads & Bakes, many of the recipes are illustrated with bright, homely and appealing photography.
At the top of my shortlist to make soon are fish fritters with sumac & tahini dipping sauce; chicken with pomegranate, walnuts & aubergine; frisinsal (tagliatelle with sausage, pinenuts and raisins); Yemenite chicken with potatoes; lamb in coriander sauce from Cochin; lamb shanks with apricots; Syrian courgette & cheese pies; green pashtida (crustless quiche); za’atar & garlic roasted tomatoes; quick pickled red onions; knafeh (cheesecake with shredded filo); Middle Eastern mess; laboch (a cross between a pancake and a crumpet); and Persian love cake.
Cherish by Anne Shooter at BookPeople £7.99 , RRP £28 Classic by Mary Berry
Released to coincide with Mary Berry’s most recent cookery series, Classic shares 120 recipes that are perfect for meals with family and friends. Aimed at cooks of all levels, these are presented in Mary’s well-known and much appreciated clear, easy-to-understand style, making them a sure bet when you need a fail-safe recipe.
If the words ‘delicious’, ‘dependable’ and ‘fuss-free’ appeal to you, this is the cookery book you are looking for. A mix of timeless classics and modern favourites, recipes are divided into chapters for canapes & first courses; fish; poultry & game; pork, lamb & beef; vegetarian, salads & side dishes; puddings and desserts; and teatime. Photographs are bright and clean, with the kind of simple plating home cooks can readily achieve; note that not all recipes have images.
Top of my list to make are French onion soup with mustard cheese croutes, dover sole with lemon butter, honey chicken, chicken supreme with mushrooms & bacon, slow roast duck with port & cherry sauce, royal guineafowl casserole, Irish stew, rack of lamb with orange & thyme sauce, beef stroganoff, leek and stilton tart, Parisienne potatoes, pears in white wine, treacle tart, plum ice cream, and clementine cake
Classic Mary Berry at BookPeople £10.99 , RRP £26 Higgidy: The Cookbook by Camilla Stephens
I have the original edition of this wonderful cookbook, published in 2013. Written by Camilla Stephens, the founder of Higgidy Pies, the book shares over 100 recipes for ‘pies and more’, the ‘more’ being frittatas, tarts, hotpots, pizza, and sauces. The title has now been updated and re-released, with new recipes added (and some from the original book removed).
Chapters cover simple suppers, partie pies, crafty quiches and trusty tarts, sweet treats, and easy extras and proper pastry. Most recipes are illustrated with bright, colourful photography, home cook style.
The Pork and Apple Stroganoff Pie with Cheddar Crust that we loved from the first edition is no longer included (recipe at link) but I’m keen to try sausage and bean pie with ciabatta crumbs, mince and tattie pies, Chinese spiced beef pies, giant gruyere and ham sandwich, lemony chicken pie with quick soured cream pastry, giant garlicky mushroom galette, melt-in-the-middle pesto chicken, hot-smoked salmon gougere, wintry quiche with walnutty pastry, lemony asparagus and ricotta tart, cherry tomato tarte tatin, smoked chicken and parsley pesto quiche, and salted pecan fudge pie.
Higgidy: The Cookbook by Camilla Stephens at BookPeople £5.99 , RRP £20 Jamie Cooks Italy by Jamie Oliver
It’s not a secret that Jamie Oliver has a particular love and affinity for Italian cuisine, dating from his earliest jobs with Antonio Carluccio, Gennaro Contaldo and Ruth Rogers and Rose Gray at The River Cafe. Italian food has always taken a prominent place in his programmes, books and restaurants, from the Naked Chef and Jamie’s Kitchen, to Jamie’s Great Italian Escape and, more recently, Jamie Cooks Italy.
This book shares recipes from that latest series, plus many more, taking domestic cooks to the heart of the Italan kitchen. Recipes are simple, modern and achievable and include trusty favourites like carbonara and ragu, alongside a range of less familiar dishes. Chapters cover antipasti, salads, soups, pasta, rice & dumplings, meat, fish, sides, bread & pastry, and dessert, plus a chapter on basics at the end. Every recipe is illustrated with rustic, mouth-wateringly tempting photographs and written in Jamie’s trademark straightforward, no-nonsense way.
Strewn throughout the book are the Italian nonnas from whom Jamie has learned many of the recipes in the book, each one beautifully photographed and introduced ahead of some of their dishes.
I can’t wait to get cooking and try dishes like spring souffle with creamy mixed cheese sauce; mozzarella fried eggs with sweet tomatoes, fresh basil and toast; baby courgette salad with whipped pecorino ricotta and black olive tapenade; sausage stracci with squash, bay, black pepper and parmesan; corteccia with hot smashed broccoli, pecorino, garlic and anchovy pesto; roasted meat agnolotti in a silky porcini broth and butter sauce; oozy black rice with sweet roasted pears, thyme and creamy gorgonzola; baked risotto pie with sweet spicy squash and oozy cheeses; gnudi with ricotta, hero tomato sauce and sprouting broccoli; chicken under a brick pan-roasted and drowned in salsa piccante salubre; beef cheek ragu with barolo, tomatoes, cinnamon and cloves; Jamie’s Neapolitan pizza base; pizza fritti stuffed with ricotta, parmesan, mozzarella and basil; mozzarella bread with smoky scamorza, smashed green olives, capers and oregano; cocoa rum dessert with amaretti, caramel and creme fraiche; and rice pudding semifreddo with marsala figs spiked with orange, bay and vanilla. And that’s the short list!
Jamie Cooks Italy by Jamie Oliver at BookPeople £9.99 , RRP £26 Jamie’s Friday Night Feast by Jamie Oliver
Jamie’s Friday Night Feast is based on the TV series of the same name, in which Jamie Oliver and Jimmy Doherty invited celebrity guests and members of the public to join them at their cafe by Southend pier. Celebrities joined to two presenters in cooking delicious and indulgent feasts perfect for the weekend, and the food was served up to an appreciative cafe audience.
The cookery book includes all the best recipes featured in the show, beautifully illustrated by the usual bright, colourful and attractive photography common to all Jamie’s books.
Instead of the usual chapters covering different types of dishes, the Contents page provides a full list of every recipe in the book, over 70 of them including Mark Hamill’s roast sirloin and Yorkshire puddings, Greg Davies’ Thai green chicken curry, Simon Pegg’s lamb tagine, mega meatball sub, carbonara cake, Goldie Hawn’s fettucine Alfredo, salt-crust salmon, and David Tennant’s Croatian-style cuttlefish risotto.
All the dishes are great for sharing with family and friends.
Jamie’s Friday Night Feast by Jamie Oliver at BookPeople £7.99 , RRP £20 Khazana by Saliha Mahmood Ahmed
NHS Doctor Saliha Mahmood Ahmed has loved cooking since she was twelve years old, winning a School Chef of the Year competition at just 15. She comes from a large Pakistani family that loves to come together around food. In 2017, Saliha won MasterChef, bring her food and talents to a wider audience, which she has carried forward by taking part in food shows across the country, hosting cookery classes, and collaborating with chefs like Atul Kochar, all whilst continuing her day job as a Gastroenterology specialist doctor.
In her debut cookery book, Saliha explores the rich culinary heritage of Indo-Persia and the Mughal Empire, supported by her own travels across India and Pakistan. Khazana translates to ‘treasure trove’ in Urdu, and that’s exactly what readers will discover in this book’s colourful pages, starting with a fascinating Introduction, a short piece on Saliha’s background followed by a helpful precis on Mughal cuisine.
Recipes are divided into chapters for salads, soups and starters; meat; poultry & game; fish & seafood; lentils & vegetables; rice and bread; pickles, relishes & raitas; sweets; and drinks, and there is also a very handy Recipe Suggestions section which proposes recipes that are well suited to breakfast & brunch, light lunches and quick weekday dinners as well as those that will suit picnics, barbeque or tandoor cooking, vegetarian meals, easy entertaniing and more. Sahila even pulls out recipes that are particular suited to a given season.
The book is illustrated not only with photographs of the food, but beautiful images of Mughal architecture, with it’s intricate decorative tiling and inlay work.
My recipe shortlist from this book includes guava, peach, black salt & mint; Mughal spiced nut mix; goshtaba beef meatballs in yohurt sauce with buttery basmati rice; lamb shanks in pomegranate & date syrup with aubergine & chickpea couscous; smoked chicken & basil kebabs with beetroot basil salad and beetroot buttermilk raita; sticky tamarind & orange salmon; roasted grapes & homemade paneer cheese; cheese, cumin, mint & walnut breads with saffron butter; rose, sultana & ginger relish; and creme fraiche & rose ice cream with honey-glazed figs.
Khazana by Saliha Mahmood Ahmed at BookPeople £8.99 , RRP £25 Lose Weight for Good by Tom Kerridge
The older I get, the more I’m determined to lose weight to improve my health, and it’s something I am prioritising for 2019. Chef Tom Kerridge lost an incredible 12 stone (168 pounds) in weight over four years, by following a low-calorie diet.
He learned that; ‘ It’s impossible to stick to a diet if the food you’re expected to eat is boring and doesn’t fill you up. So I’ve developed lots of tasty and satisfying recipes that people will love to cook and eat, but that will also help them lose weight. I truly believe that this attitude works. I’ve been there myself and now I want to help others get there too. ‘
This book shares plenty of tasty recipes that are perfect for people like me, who love food and find it hard to stick to bland and boring diets. Tom shares ideas for hunger-satisfying portions of food with lots of flavour so that food-lovers don’t feel they are missing out.
A big part of success when dieting is to understand what you can eat lots of, and what you should avoid (or at least limit), and in changing your attitude to food. To this end, the introductory chapter is particularly helpful in arming you with the knowledge you need, as well as the right frame of mind. There’s also a helpful guide to weighing fresh produce at the end of the book.
Recipes are divided into chapters for breakfast; soup; fish & seafood; chicken & turkey; meat; veggie; and sweet things. Flicking through the book, what springs immediately to mind is how appealing the recipes are, in that I wouldn’t even think of them as ‘diet food’, but simply as tasty food. I’m eyeing up blueberry, lemon and thyme pancakes; puffed rice cereal with banana and date yoghurt; smoked ham and courgette tortilla; Thai-style butternut squash soup; South Indian fish curry; fish-in-a-bag Chinese style; Soy-glazed salmon salad; Chicken saltimbocca; turkey and courgette burgers with mozzarella; southern-style chicken with potato salad; roast beef salad with chimichurri sauce; chilli con carne; beef stew with dumplings; pork samosa pie; creamy wild mushroom courgetti; toasted cabbage tart with ricotta and lemon; and rice pudding with rosewater and raspberries.
Lose Weight for Good by Tom Kerridge at BookPeople £7.99 , RRP £22 Mazi by Christina Mouratoglou and Adrien Carré
Lauded as one of the best Greek restaurants in England, Mazi in London’s Notting Hill serves modern Greek cuisine with an emphasis on sharing a feast of small dishes. It’s the brainchild of foodie Christina Mouratoglou, who moved to the UK from Greece as a teenager and despaired at the lack of quality Greek food available here, and partner Adrien Carré, an experienced chef.
This book encapsulates all the flavour and pizazz of their restaurant menu, plus some of Christina’s cherished family recipes. Flavours are authentically Greek but with modern twists, innovations and flair. As a cookbook that was born of a restaurant, the chapters are a little different from most other cookbooks: amuse shots; bread & condiments; jars; salads & raw; hot plates; signature dishes; desserts; and cocktails. Photography of dishes is as vivid as the food itself, with additional images of Greece to add extra sunshine.
Many of the dishes are calling to me, including koulouria (sesame-coated bread rings); beetroot dice with Greek yoghurt, lime and crushed walnuts; Santorinian fava (yellow split peas) with caramelised pearl onions; dolmadakia (vine leaves stuffed with rice) with wasabi yoghurt; sea bream tartare; cannelloni pastitsio (pasta and mince bake) with minced beef and bechamel sauce; lamb shoulder baklavas with cumin yoghurt; imam bayaldi aubergines with Stilton; courgette cakes with cucumber and mint dip; feta tempura with caper meringue and lemon marmalade; Metsovone (cheese) bites with tomato jam; lamb fricassée; rooster pastitsada (spiced beef or rooster with pasta) with truffle oil and graviera (cheese) cream; shitake mushroom and potato dauphinoise moussaka; loukoumades (doughnuts) with lavender honey and crushed walnuts; and melomakarona (orange and cinnamon cakes) tart with chocolate ganache.
Mazi by Christina Mouratoglou and Adrien Carré at BookPeople £8.99 , RRP £25 The GetAhead Cook by Jane Lovett
This book is aimed at cooks who are looking for achievable, foolproof and delicious recipes that have get-ahead elements that allow some of the work to be done in advance – perfect for weekday cooking when short of time, and for entertaining.
Written by experienced cook and author Jane Lovett, the book is full of handy tips and clear guidance to support cooks of all abilities. The introduction includes advice on the planning and preparation needed to cook in this way, advice on how to read the recipes, how to choose to plan menus and choose what to cook, and some notes on seasonality.
Recipes are split into chapters for Starters & Small Plates; Brunching & Lunching; Easy Suppers & Comforting Food; Feasts for Friends; Salads & Sides; and Sweet Things. Dishes are styled in a very achievable way, easy to replicate at home, as shown in bright, colourful photographs. Every recipe includes notes on how to get ahead (which steps can be done ahead of time) as well as some extra hints and tips from Jane.
I’m currently keen to cook baba ghanoush with tortilla crisps; potted prawns; Parmesan & black olive soda bread; courgette, Parmesan and mint fritters; crispy lamb filo rolls with harissa yoghurt; spinach, mushroom and Taleggio galette; Turkish lamb meatballs with bulgur pilaf; one-pan cod, chorizo & chickpeas; slow-braised beef short ribs with horseradish cream; aubergine parmigiana; turkey, mushroom & tarragon pithiviers; bang bang chicken; Swiss chard & Gruyere gratin; easy hot chocolate soufflés with chocolate & cardamom sauce; and hazelnut meringue & praline torte.
The GetAhead Cook by Jane Lovett at BookPeople £6.99 , RRP £20 The Good Pub Guide 2019 by Fiona Stapley
Having just moved from London to Monmouthshire, Wales we are keen to discover pubs in our local area and I chose this book in the hopes of it being a helpful resource. Sadly, although the cover promises 5,000 pubs in the UK, the vast majority of the book covers England, with less than 40 pages of the 1000+ page book dedicated to Wales.
For readers looking for pub recommendations in England, however, it’s a much better resource. The focus is on pubs which offer great food and drink, including gastropubs, pubs lauded for their excellent craft beer, and even pubs that specialise in malt whisky.
Note that there is no photography in the book; the only visuals being the handy maps on which to locate recommended pubs. Main entries provide a detailed description of the pub, and a section specifically about the food. Each county also has a section for secondary recommendations, with a much shorter description covering ambience, food and drink.
Save for later: The Kavey Eats BookPeople Giveaway
Courtesy of BookPeople, we have one set of all ten books above to giveaway to a reader of Kavey Eats. The prize includes delivery to a UK or Ireland address.

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