SOME TRUCK STOP CHICKEN?

SOME TRUCK STOP CHICKEN?

February 01, 2019 11:25 IST Updated: February 01, 2019 11:26 IST more-in Chef and traveller, Pramod Nair speaks of his many journeys to foreign lands and of cooking rare meats—seal, moose, reindeer, wild birds— Kerala style
Pramod Nair, a seasoned chef and perfectionist, always finds himself restless, trying to seek new avenues. His passion goes beyond cooking as he dons the role of a curator—with an eye for kitchen and menu design, catering, banquets, customer service, guest relation and staff training. With a head full of ideas and innovations backed by vast culinary experience in Iceland, Norway, UK, India, and Africa, Pramod at 47 is constantly refining and upgrading his skills.
“The greatest compliment for a chef is when he sees his plate licked clean,” he says. “Any dish cooked with love and passion tastes good. My grandfather ran a military canteen. So cooking is in my blood. It is spontaneous. But as was the trend those days, I applied for medicine but am glad I failed as I wanted to be a chef. As a chef, I can serve only what is on the menu. Yet, once I grease the pan and the aroma engulfs me, I get charged and I try to improvise and fine-tune the dish, blending originality with novelty.” Popularising jackfruit
Pramod, who is from Badagara, began his career in 1993 at Taj Malabar, Kochi, as senior chef de partie. Early in his career, he tried out-of-the-ordinary dishes such as jack fruit soufflé, jack seed bread spread and the like. Years later, as executive chef at Mint and Mustard Restaurant, London, when he prepared these dishes with jack fruit imported from Bangladesh, they were a hit. He has even served a banquet lunch to Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip at Taj Malabar.
Within a few years, Pramod became head chef of Coromandel Restaurant, London. Before long Coromandel was voted one of the top five Indian restaurants. A chef, he believes, should never compromise on quality. He/she should use only the freshest and the best ingredients to serve wholesome, healthy dishes.
Yearning to savour unexplored territories, Pramod embarked upon a culinary trip to Iceland. During his nine-year stint, he was head chef of Austurindia Felagid (East India Company in Icelenska) restaurant in Reykjavik, which bagged the Best Indian Restaurant title in 2001. Kaffi Duus Hotel at Keflavik too, where he later served, won the best Icelandic Sea Food restaurant award in 2005. He popularised Indian dishes contributing Indian recipes in magazines and hosting TV cookery shows. He even modelled for two brands of Basmati Rice in Iceland. Serving the presidential dinner hosted by the Icelandic President, Olafur Ragnar Grimsson, for the then Indian President, Abdul Kalam, was a fulfilling moment. Cooking game
From Iceland, Pramod took up an assignment in Norway, Hotel Rica, at Nordfjordeid. He recollects: “Norway’s culinary habits are outlandish. Hunting and cooking are synonymous, as many Norwegians cook what they hunt. I grilled, baked and fried wild ducks, wild pigeons, moose and many other game birds and animals. A hunter once approached me, with a dead reindeer across his shoulder, to be cooked.” Recognised for his expertise, he was one of the chefs chosen to cook for Queen Sonja of Norway for the inauguration of an opera house.
He later settled in London with his fam ily, where he served as the executive chef at Mint and Mustard Restaurant outlets at Taunton, Cardiff and Chai Street. Mint and Mustard, under his proficiency, received the Michelin’s Bib Gourmand award, a distinction for the best restaurant that serves high quality food with value for money. Somerset Life magazine selected him the best chef.
He had always felt an overwhelming need to popularise the rustic Kerala cuisine. A fondness for oriental, especially Indian cuisine, had swept over the west. But the hotels that did serve Indian food were not serving the authentic deal—it was diluted, deconstructed and was served in a fusion form. Pramod brought in his expertise here. At Spiceberry restaurant, Cardiff, Wales, where he was director and chef, he introduced the Kerala village concept in cuisine and ambience, by launching the Kuttanad Duck fry. He presented thattukada chicken and beef curries and baptised them ‘Truck Stop Chicken’ and ‘Hawker’s Beef’. Later as production and development chef of Chaiholics, Cardiff, an authentic Indian bistro cocktail bar, Pramod won the prestigious Welsh Curry Chef of the year award in regional and national categories.
After two years at Chaiholics, Pramod sojourned to Siguiri in the Republic Of Guinea, an isolated far away land in West Africa to offer his services to Praana, a remote camp management company that offers five star facilities for Anglo Gold Ashanthi, a gold mining company. Siguiri is famous for black magic and gold mines.
He says: “From the cool London climate to the scorching temperature in Guinea was tough. The chefs in the kitchen unused to cool temperatures, always switched off the exhaust and air conditioner whenever I switched them on. Venomous snakes always slithered at close range giving me the jitters. Language was the biggest barrier. French was the official language though many unknown tongues like Fela, Malinke, Susu etc were spoken there. Hardly anybody knew English. So I had to communicate through sign language, which was bizarre but fun later on. These factors however made me flexible and resilient to handle strange and high stress environments, which a chef should possess.” Horse and seal meat
“There is only one life for a chef. Burn it by cooking for others,” he says, recollecting a few of his personal experiences with food. “During a dinner party, I once consumed horse meat. unsure what it was. I felt queasy upon realising what it was. At a food festival, I was asked to cook seal meat. I prepared it the traditional Kerala way—seal meat varattiyathu and all found it delicious.” he narrates.
After a short stint at Oman as consultant of Foodland chain restaurants, Pramod at present is a consultant chef for Horecahow, UK ‘Horeca’ is an acronym for hotel restaurant catering and ‘how’ literally stands for how to start and succeed in hotel and catering business. Horecahow helps and guides entrepreneurs through all aspects in restaurant and catering.
Pramod hasn’t stopped dreaming. “ I want to create a quirky, casual Indian dining restaurant by 2020 with an unusual and mouthwatering concept,” he signs off.

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Indian food is all about guarding traditional flavours and techniques: chef Scott Baechler | Bengaluru News

Canadian chef Scott Baechler is a big fan of Indian cuisine , and says that Canadians and North Americans can learn a thing or two from Indian cuisine. The chef, who is currently in India for a culinary competition, talks about food trends, fads and why young chefs shouldn’t be carried away by modern technology. Excerpts…
What is your take on people choosing local ingredients over authentic ingredients?
Local ingredients are important, but on the condition that they’re good and you have enough quantity to carry you through. If you have a restaurant and you barely have any local ingredients to meet demand, it’s not a good thing. There are certain demands that need to be respected. When in season, you can make the most of local ingredients.
You are a culinary instructor back home. What is the one thing you always tell your students?
Basics are very important. Youngsters get wowed very quickly with gadgets like a smoking gun. They think molecular cuisine is a new thing, but it’s not. It’s been around for 15 years. Discipline and respect for the uniform and systematic skill set development are traits a young cook will carry with himself/herself in the industry for years. I see many young chefs, who want titles and money too fast. I always tell my students that for five years they have to pursue and hone their skill set, and the rest will follow.
From holistic eating to excessively healthy diets — people are trying out everything. How long do you think this trend will last?
I hope that it’s not a trend, because it’s a real problem. Honestly, we need to eat less meat. Half or three quarter of you plate should be vegetables. I always tell people that one can learn from the way Indians eat, as a majority of them are vegetarians, but there are also days when they eat meat, say once or twice a week.
Why do you think a lot of people are switching to traditional techniques and dishes?
Most of the older techniques surpass modern ones. For e.g., we cook with gas for convenience, but when you cook over dried hardwood charcoal, the smell, taste and texture is far better. Traditional cooking and classical dishes are classics for a reason.
What trends can one expect to see in the food industry this year?
There’s a circle when it comes to following trends. We eat rich food, put on little weight and then opt for healthier food, and so on. I think less is more right now. Young cooks feel that they need to showcase their entire skill set on one single plate, which is not appropriate. ‘Indian food is all about guarding traditional flavours and techniques’
What are your thoughts about Indian cuisine?
Indian cuisine is one of the best in the world. I tell my students all about it, and the importance of guarding traditional flavours and techniques, which can be seen in Indian food. This is also one of the challenges we have in North America, where people blend a lot of cuisines. You need to respect tradition and culture, but at the same time, you cannot dull down flavours.
Which region in India you want to explore, in terms of food?
Like India, in Canada, too, food differs from province to province. The food and culture demographics are different there, as it is here. So, India and Canada are similar that way. I, however, would love to go to Goa and try out some authentic Goan Fish Curry and other local delicacies.
What can Indians learn from the Canadian food culture?
That is a very difficult question to answer, since the cuisines are very different. But I truly believe that India is gifted in hospitality and service. That’s something that Canadians and North Americans can learn and improve upon.

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Aruba

Adam Attew
Summer was gently drawing to a close in the UK, but not for myself and Cheeky, for we had been invited on a romantic holiday to have one last fling with the summer sun on the Dutch Caribbean island of Aruba . I must admit that I did not know much about the island, so I was intrigued to discover more about the history, the customs, the environment and of course the cuisine. We hopped on a KLM flight to Amsterdam and due to delays had about 20 sweaty minutes to run to our connecting flight, who said travel was glamorous? Three or four films later we touched down on the runway of Queen Beatrix International Airport. Of course 20 minutes was never going to be enough time for our luggage to run for its connecting flight, so we were travelling rather lighter than expected now. However, we jumped into our ride and made our way to what would be our home for the week, the Aruba Marriott Resort & Stellaris Casino on the north-west side of Aruba. We entered into the very large and grand entrance, this would certainly do for the week; we freshened up the best that we could and made our way to the hotel’s beach restaurant Atardi for our welcome dinner. Situated right on the white sands of the waterfront, our hearts and souls began to relax and slow to the gentle pace of the island as we sipped our the first cocktail. As the sun set in a pink sky, we tucked into meaty local lobster and threw off the last of the stresses of travel. Who needs luggage anyway?
The following morning the Marriott hotel was unbelievably generous, due to us still wearing the clothes we travelled in, they allowed us to select some beach outfits from their two in-hotel beachwear shops, which I must say are VERY well stocked for hotel shops. Once dressed appropriately, we could now enjoy the first of many excursions, a sailing trip on board the Tanquilo . The skies were ridiculously deep blue and the temperature at an all time high, for the usual winds that keep the temperatures of Aruba at a manageable level had been stolen by the recent hurricanes that had been hitting the rest of the Caribbean. Suffice to say we were happy to be going out on the water were it was a little cooler. Captain Anthony welcomed us on to his 43 foot sailing yacht and we made ourselves comfortable on deck with a couple of Pina Coladas (when in the Caribbean I say); what a great start to the morning. We sailed along between Aruba and the very long and thin Renaissance Island, until we made it to ‘Mike’s Reef’ named after the captain’s father who started the business. Anthony’s father had built a little jetty on some rocks where the waters were phenomenally clear and thus the perfect area for some snorkelling. With such clear shallow waters, this was a great opportunity to spot all kinds of colourful fish and some outstanding reef structures. After a deeper snorkelling session we headed back to the boat for some delicious food and more cocktails. Eventually we headed back to port under the shelter of the yacht’s rear canopy for the sun was beating down with all of its might.
After an afternoon of lounging at the beach in front of the Marriot, taking dips in the crystal clear ocean to keep cool, we made out way to Eagle beach for a sunset champagne toast with House of Mosaic , Aruba’s premier luxury organiser for weddings, events and exclusive parties. The devil is in the details where these guys are concerned, the exceptional location was turned into a decedent beach part with finely dressed serving staff, beautifully arranged tables and sunshades, champagne cocktails and the most moreish bites. A few champagne cocktails later, it was then off for dinner at the Screaming Eagle the restaurant that the Caribbean Journal voted number one restaurant in the Caribbean. With plenty of fresh seafood prepared in various international ways from Mexican and Asian to Peruvian and French; and some interesting meats such as reindeer, we were in for an evening of gourmet delights. As well as the usual dining tables, the restaurant also offers romantic and rather intimate beds where one can whisper sweet nothings into loved one’s ears, just do not do it with your mouth full. After many sweet nothings it was time to head to bed back at the Marriott.
The next morning we drove out to Spaans Lagoon to meet with Aruba Kayak Tours . After some simple instructions, we kitted up and we were off down to the pontoons. Once launched in our Kayaks, we were ready to explore the Aruban coastline with our guide. Once again, because of the lack of wind we made good speed tearing through the calm coastal waters, exploring the rocky shores finding sea urchins, crabs and dozens of Iguanas clinging to the coastal rock face. After a short period travelling south-east we reached Mangel Halto Beach, where we swapped the kayaks for fins and diving masks and once again explored the local seabed, whereupon I spotted a spooky boat-wreck looming out of the depths. Eventually stomachs were rumbling and it was time to jump back in the kayaks and paddle back to Spaans Lagoon. Lunch had been organised at the restaurant Zeerovers , taking its name for the Dutch name for pirate. Situated at a local fisherman’s wharf in Savaneta they serve the freshest seafood straight out of the ocean from wahoo, snapper, barracuda to kingfish and when available big shrimps. Sitting right over the water, with baskets of various fish this is genuine Aruban hospitality that should not to be missed!
It was then back to the hotel’s adult swimming pool, with no screaming kids for an afternoon of lazing around soaking up some Vitamin D whilst the iguanas posed around us. It was then time to get dressed up for the high seas, for we had a date with Monforte Luxury Cruises aboard their teak schooner. We were welcomed with bubbles and before you could say ‘Aye Aye Cap’n’ we were aboard and sailing out to sea. We explored the various cocktails on board as the sky and ocean put on the most picturesque entertainment for us as it changed colour from gold against light blue to deep marine blue with fiery burning clouds which eventually transformed into the most gorgeous pink candy floss. As the light left the sky it was time to anchor up and sit for our 4 course meal of red snapper ceviche, creole shrimp salad, tenderloin with Lobster and coconut quesillo dessert all with live music; this is a cruise not to be missed, the setting is delightful and the food fresh and full of flavour. After dinner we sipped our way through the wine list whilst putting the world to rights as we slowly meandered our way back to port.
We awoke the next day and dressed ourselves for dust and dirt for we were off for a UTV adventure (utility task vehicle) with ABC tours . We drove in convoy across the island to Aruba’s largest park, Arikok National Park ; the pace was fast and once we hit the dirt tracks of the park the dust was really flying. We flew along the parks tracks at some pace, this certainly felt like a desert island adventure as we travelled through terrain not dissimilar to Mars! Along the way we visited the highest peak in the park, ancient Indian caves, Dos Playa Beach and went snorkelling in the natural ‘Conchi’ pools. When you visit Aruba, if you like fast paced adventure then do not miss this experience, it is certainly one not to forget. After building up a huge appetite, we made our way to Antesala Cafe for the most delicious lunch of panini’s, wraps and bagels. Make sure you leave space for the iced coffees and cakes which are out of this world. With full bellies we made our way to San Nicolas to see the famous street art. Despite the temperatures, it was so worth braving the blazing heat to walk around the town taking in the giant art dotted around the buildings. The artists have been invited from around the globe and the variety of styles and skills are spectacular, and has put San Nicolas on the map; make sure to fit this one into your itinerary when in Aruba. That evening we headed out to visit one of Aruba’s most icon restaurants, Papiamento housed in a 126 year old Aruban “Cunucu” house. We sat in the lush tropical gardens and immediately felt at home with the twinkly lights and light evening breeze. The menu is vast and full of many wondrous delights, one will certainly not be disappointed. We had the Neptune, which is a feast of Caribbean Rock Lobster, Mahi-Mahi and Shrimp which one cooks on a hot lava stone and then douses in lemon butter, absolutely delicious!
As an alternative to the previous day of adventure and culture, the next morning we awoke ready to reset our chakras with some meditation on the rocks of Tres Trapi with local yoga and meditation guru Maria Pucci. Having explored meditation further since this experience, I can certainly say that this is a great place to practice with the sound of the waves crashing underneath the rocks, Maria certainly provided an inspirational class in meditation. Now our bodies and minds were in balance it was time to fill our bellies once again so we drove over to White Modern Cusine restaurant. The architecture and interior design would not be out of place in Ibiza and the brunch menu was a delight with lots of small dishes, so one could eat through many different and varied dishes from Rosbeef Benedict, ‘Kibbeling’ steamed buns, Chicken Ton Katsu and Tuna Poke to moreish desserts like quesillo and churros all washed down with endless Mimosas. To continue the day of relaxation we headed over to the splendid Ritz Carlton Aruba Spa for a very tranquil massage; today was all about relaxation and I think that we had achieved our goal, any more relaxed and I would be zombified. For our last evening on Aruba we had been booked into restaurant Wilhelmina , named after a beloved Dutch queen. This is fine dining Aruba style with plenty of fresh seafood alongside meat dishes from around the world. The presentation of the gourmet food is outstanding and up there with many of the best restaurants I have been lucky enough to visit across Europe and beyond. Their wine list is also rather impressive so be sure to ask for recommendations with your meal.
Aruba is quite different from the other Caribbean island that I have visited; the history is very unique so many of the people are of Indian descent with the Spanish and Dutch leaving something of their genealogy too through their time on the island. However, they do have the same friendly and warm traits that can been found on the other Caribbean islands. Always quick to smile and welcome strangers Aruba was a real pleasure to visit and travel around. The food is delicious and what with local cuisine being fused with dutch fare one could get rather large if not careful, but then when on holiday who cares. There is so much do and to explore on the island but most of all make sure you do not miss the sunsets every evening, for nothing could be more romantic that sipping cocktails watching the pink Aruban sun sink into the sea.
For more information on the Island of Aruba see online www.Aruba.com
Adam stayed at the Aruba Marriott Resort & Stellaris Casino, L.G. Smith Boulevard 101, Palm Beach, Aruba for details on rooms and rates see online . Tagged in

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Travel contests & sweepstakes: win luxury holidays!

Home Travel contests Travel contests & sweepstakes: win luxury holidays! Travel contests & sweepstakes: win luxury holidays!
Friday newsletters always feature luxury travel contests , tips , series or news . Today (February 1, 2019): Travel contests & sweepstakes: win luxury holidays!
Every first Friday of the month, you can win exclusive prizes & free holidays in my pick of the best luxury travel contests & sweepstakes on the internet. These contests are weekly updated on my travel blog here , so check back regularly.
In this issue: win Business & Economy Class flights as well as luxury holidays to South Africa, Cuba, Thailand, New York, California, Paris, Grenada, Antigua, Sanya, Beijing, India, Greece, Bali, Florida, Mauritius, Norway, Jamaica, Japan, Turkey, Hamburg, Canada, and Lisbon. WIN A HOLIDAY ON THE GREEK ISLAND OF KOS Win a trip to Cape Town with KLM . The grand prize is two Economy Class tickets to Cape Town with two nights of luxury accommodation in the in the Grootbos Private Nature Reserve, including breakfast, two 3-course lunches, two 5-course dinners, and various excursions, such as a 4×4 botanical jeep safari, a visit to the Klipgat cave, and a hike through the Milkwood Forest. Eligibility: open to all End date: 3 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a world tour with Manchester United . The famous soccer team is giving fans around the world the chance to win a place on its world tour! The prize includes all flights, accommodation and tickets for two people to every Tour 2019 fixture. You will be whisked away to enjoy a 19 night trip taking in everything that the world tour has to offer! Eligibility: open to all End date: 31 May 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a 3 night stay in Cuba . The grand prize is a three-night stay at the Iberostar Grand Packard in Havana, for two people, including breakfast. Eligibility: open to all End date: 28 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a three night stay in Thailand . The grand prize is a three-night stay in a Balcony Suite at The Barai Spa and Residential Suites in Hua Hin, Thailand. This winner will also enjoy 2 days of the Lifestyle Collection program which includes: 1 x healthy lifestyle consultation 1 x body composition analysis plus full board (3 meals per day at McFarland House) and all beverages, excluding imported drinks and alcohol. Eligibility: open to all End date: 3 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a trip to New York for two . The grand prize is 4 days & 3 nights in a hotel for 2 with a total value of £2,250 GBP. This prize also includes flights to and from New York, airport transfers to and from Manhattan, and two Sightseeing Flex Passes for 6 attractions. Eligibility: open to residents of the European Union, Norway, Switzerland and the UK End date: 31 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a Paris wine and food adventure . The grand prize is a $1,000 USD gift card towards round trip flights for two, 4 nights at the trendy hotel (The Hoxton), wine tasting at Le Garde Robe (up to $100 USD value) and cocktails and French cuisine at Vivié (up to $100 value) Eligibility: open to USA residents End date: 28 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a three night ultraluxurious wellness retreat in California . One lucky winner will receive an all-inclusive stay at Golden Door – spa sessions, massage packages, fitness programs, healthy food and more. This highly exclusive resort is popular among top celebrities, including Julia Roberts, Amy Schumer, Oprah, and more! Eligibility: open to USA residents End date: 6 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win four days in paradise . The grand prize is a 4‐day, 3‐night luxury vacation at a Sandals or Beaches Resort of your choice, including airport transfers, all meals, all snacks, unlimited premium spirits, water sports, scuba diving, land sports, and entertainment. Eligibility: open to USA & Canada residents End date: 31 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a trip around the world . Vote for an internationally inspired new flavor of peanut M&Ms and you could win a trip around the world from Mars Wrigley – Flavor Vote Sweepstakes. The prize, which is worth up to $47,714, includes stops in three different countries (Thailand, Mexico, and England), airfare around the world, and cash for vacation expenses and taxes. Eligibility: open to USA & Canada residents End date: 17 May 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win two Business Class tickets from Manchester to Beijing with Hainan Airlines . Manchester Airport and Hainan Airlines are celebrating the Chinese New Year by offering you the chance to win these return Business Class tickets valid for travel from 14th Feb to 31st Dec 2019. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 13 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win two Economy Class tickets from London to Sanya with China Southern Airlines . Surrounded by rainforests and mountains, Sanya is the southernmost city on Hainan Island in South China. With its warm weather and miles of pristine beaches, it is easy to see why this city has been called the Hawaii of the East. Sanya has a tropical climate perfect for an island getaway – the average temperature never drops below 70.9°F (21.6°C). Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 21 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a holiday on the Caribbean island of Grenada . The grand prize is a seven-night stay with breakfast in a twin or double room at True Blue Bay Boutique Resort in Grenada, two Economy Class return flights from London Gatwick to Grenada with British Airways, dinner for two at Street Food Night, and a chocolate tour and tasting at the House of Chocolate in St George’s. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 10 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a holiday on the Caribbean island of Antigua . The grand prize includes return flights from London to Antigua, transfers and 7 nights on an all-inclusive basis at the 5-star Verandah Hotel. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 30 June 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win an eight day luxury cruise on the Rhine . The prize includes return flights from London Gatwick Airport, overseas airport transfers, and accommodation in a Stateroom cabin on a luxurious romantic Rhine river cruise from Amsterdam to Basel. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 12 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a seven night spa getaway to India . The grand prize is a seven-night stay at Ananda in the Himalayas in India on the new Ananda Rebalance program, which is particularly brilliant for anyone who is stressed out emotionally and physically. A second person can travel and share a room with the winner, but their stay will only include meals and no programme or spa treatments. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 31 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a five night stay for two in Kos . The grand prize is an all-inclusive five-night stay for two at the new Ikos Aria resort. The prize also includes a Mini Drive adventure experience that gives you complimentary use of a Mini Cooper for the day to explore Kos. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 22 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a luxurious spa break to Bali . The grand prize is 7 nights in a private villa with pool at Karma Kandara on a room only basis. Transfers to and from the airport in Bali to the Karma Kandara resort and a specially curated spa package consisting of a 75 minute intuitive Balinese massage and 30 minute intraceuticals oxygen infusions facial for each person is also included. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 15 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a honeymoon to Thailand worth £10,000 GBP. The grand prize includes three nights bed and breakfast at Banyan Tree Bangkok in the Presidential Suite, a four-course dinner with wine at Vertigo, Apsara dining cruise, drinks at Saffron Sky Garden, three nights bed and breakfast at Banyan Tree Phuket in a Signature Pool Villa plus return flights from London to Bangkok and domestic flights between Bangkok and Phuket Eligibility: open to UK & Ireland residents End date: 28 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a luxurious getaway in Oman . The grand prize is a two-night stay at Hormuz Grand Muscat, a Radisson Collection Hotel in Oman, plus a £1,000 GBP Radisson Hotel Group gift card. Flights are not included in this prize. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 24 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a stay at a chateau in the South of France . The grand prize is a two-night stay for two people at Château De Montcaud in the South of France. The prizewinner and a guest will also enjoy a dinner at the hotel and take a wine tasting at nearby Château La Nerthe at Chateauneuf-du-Pape. Breakfast is included in your stay, but you’ll have to arrange your own travel to and from France. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 10 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a family holiday to Legoland Florida . The grand prize includes return flights and 3 nights at the Legoland Hotel with breakfast, park entry and a chance to meet the characters. The prize is valid for a family of four. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 8 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win flights to Rio de Janeiro with Norwegian . Gatwick Airport and Norwegian will fly the winner to Rio de Janeiro in Brazil in a Boeing 787 Dreamliner non-stop from London Gatwick. To win a pair of tickets just enter your details on the Gatwick Airport website. Eligibility: open to all End date: 30 April 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win 2 Business Class or 4 Economy Class tickets with Etihad Airways . One prize of either 2 Business Class flights to anywhere on the Etihad Airways network or 4 Economy Class flights to Abu Dhabi, will be awarded to one winner at the conclusion of the competition period. Eligibility: open to Australia residents End date: 11 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a week-long, all-inclusive holiday in Mauritius . The prizewinner and a guest will spend seven nights in a superior room at La Plantation d’Albion in Mauritius, a luxury Club Med hotel in the Indian Ocean. All meals and drinks are included, as are return flights from the UK for two people. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 18 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a trip to Norway . The grand prize is a four night stay at the Herangtunet Boutique Hotel, nestled in the outdoor wonderland of Heggefjord, with £500 travel expenses and a Nikon Z 7 camera. Eligibility: open to UK & Ireland residents End date: 31 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win an all-inclusive honeymoon in Jamaica . The grand prize includes an all-inclusive stay of seven nights at Couples Resorts Jamaica, 4 nights at Couples Resort Ocho Rios and 3 nights at Couples Resort Negri, with 24-hour dining, excursions to local sights and unlimited water sports. This prize does not include flights but does include transfers to and from Montego Bay Airport. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 17 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a VIP trip to Japan . The grand prize includes airport transfers in Tokyo and Osaka, 3 nights’ luxury hotel accommodation in Tokyo Queen Karaoke, 1 x 7-day Japan Rail Pass (includes access to bullet trains), 2 nights’ accommodation in the ‘Rockstar Hotel’ in Osaka, two concert tickets, and a spa treatment. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 30 May 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a week away in a French villa , plus return flights from the UK, on behalf of luxury villa holiday specialists Oliver’s Travels. The prize-winner will spend seven nights at La Maison du Sud, a one-of-a-kind villa in the Languedoc region. The prize includes return flights from the UK for two, car hire throughout the stay and a welcome hamper made up of local produce. The winner may invite up to four more guests, but they will travel at their own expense. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 13 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a holiday to Hamburg . The prizewinner and a guest will spend two nights in a Sir Boutique room at the trendy, revamped Sir Nikolai Hotel, set in a former warehouse on the canals in the Old Town of Hamburg. Return flights from the UK are included. Breakfast at IZAKAYA Asian kitchen & bar, the hotel’s restaurant, is also included. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 17 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a villa holiday for four in Turkey , on behalf of luxury villa holiday specialists Oliver’s Travels. The prize-winner will spend one week at Yuksel Evi, a family-friendly two-bedroom villa with private pool and magnificent views of the naturally beautiful Gokova Gulf. The villa holiday is valid for four persons, including return flights from the UK, car hire throughout your stay and a local welcome hamper on arrival. The prize is valued at £2,800. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 10 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a family holiday to Amelia Island in Florida worth £6,000. The grand prize includes Economy flights with Wow Air from the UK via Iceland to Orlando International Airport, Florida for two adults and two children, five nights accommodation within a family room, and family attraction tickets to top attractions across the island. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 7 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a family holiday to Malta . One lucky family of four will win a four-night stay at the Urban Valley Resort & Spa, 13-17 April 2019, located within the beautiful landscapes of “Wied Għollieqa” Nature Reserve. The resort boasts an impressive children’s program including arts and crafts, a playground, children’s pool with organized pool activities and a treehouse. The prize offers the winners four nights in a family room on bed and breakfast basis. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 10 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a snowy 7 night holiday to Whistler in Canada . The winner plus a friend will get to spend seven snowy nights in Whistler Village courtesy of Delta Hotels by Marriott Whistler Village Suites, as well as return flights, airport transfers, and plenty of extras (e.g. 3-day lift tickets at Whistler Blackcomb, a guided day of skiing or snowboarding including lift line priority, a 3-day premium ski or snowboard rental, an adventure into the Callaghan backcountry by snowmobile, a helicopter tour, a spa day followed by a 3-course dinner, and more). Eligibility: open to residents of the USA, Canada and UK. End date: 28 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a trip to Lisbon . The prizewinner and their guest will stay at AlmaLusa Baixa/Chiado, a hotel set in the Praça do Município, a historic downtown square near the waterfront. Breakfast is included in the prize, as well as a £1,000 Radisson Hotel Group gift card that you can use to spend at any Radisson Hotel Group property in Europe and the Middle East. Return economy flights with TAP Air Portugal from the UK are included. Eligibility: open to UK residents End date: 6 February 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win a cruise for two . The grand prize is a 7-day cruise for two with Holland America Line to your choice of Europe, Caribbean, Alaska, Mexico or Canada & New England. Eligibility: open to USA and Canada residents End date: 31 March 2019 Enter the competition: click here Win one return ticket with Brussels Airlines to an European destination of your choice . The ticket includes all taxes, and will be valid for one year from the date the winner is contacted informing him/her of the win. Eligibility: open to all End date: no closure date (monthly contest) Enter the competition: click here
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In London, eat your way through the history – and future – of fish and chips

Frank Dobson Square is no place to linger, even on a warm October day. This brick-paved chunk of East London has seen better days, not least because its centerpiece, Dobson’s 1951 sculpture “Woman With Fish,” was vandalized beyond repair and removed in 2002. Those sitting on the benches around the square – who number three, including me, this Thursday morning – have only its former home, a forlorn metal plinth, to look at now.
I haven’t come to see the sculpture, though, or its plinth. I’m searching for something else, something that records this locale’s unique place in British history. This is where the world’s first fish and chip shop, Malin’s, was founded in the early 1860s; before the square arrived in 1963, this was the north end of Cleveland Way, and Malin’s opened at No. 78.
There are rival claimants, of course, but this appears the most likely origin of Britain’s iconic dish. “I can’t find any alternative, really,” Panikos Panayi, author of “Fish and Chips: A History,” tells me from his office at De Montfort University in Leicester. “In one sense I can’t see any reason to disbelieve it; on the other hand, fish and chips shops don’t really take off until the beginning of the 20th century. I couldn’t find many fish and chip shops that existed between Malin’s and then.”
In the absence of certainty, I’m happy to accept the Malin’s claim. Frank Dobson Square does not, though, offer much encouragement. A group of skittish pigeons, a mini-supermarket, a digital billboard congratulating racing driver Lewis Hamilton on his latest triumph; it has all of these. Anything about fish and chips? Nope.
Elsewhere in the city, things are different. Despite the arrival of Indian and Chinese takeaways, fried chicken shops, and the emergence of London as a bullishly self-confident “foodie” city, the British capital still has plenty of chippys. As a lifelong devotee, I’ve decided to go in search of the best – and, in between stodgy, salt-and-vinegar-laden bites, I’ll find out more about its history, ingredients and unique place in British culture.
First, history. Frank Dobson Square is a few minutes’ walk from the heart of London’s most fascinating neighborhood, Whitechapel, which has been home to successive waves of immigrants over the past few centuries. It’s now the center of Britain’s largest Bangladeshi community but between the mid-19th century and World War II, this was Jewish London, a “shtetl” called Whitechapel.
That’s why fish and chips emerged here – or at least the fish part, which was bequeathed to Britain by Jewish immigrants. (The origin of chips is more opaque, but France seems most probable.) “Fried fish is indisputably Jewish,” Panayi says. “All the evidence points to that. When I was researching the book, I found loads of references to Jewish fish fryers, both men and women.” Until the late 19th century, indeed, the smell of fried fish was a common anti-Semitic trope in Britain.
Malin’s may be long gone, but there’s still good food in Whitechapel. Walking east from Cleveland Way along Mile End Road and Whitechapel Road offers plenty of temptation. Whitechapel Market, which runs for perhaps 500 meters between Cambridge Heath Road and Vallance Road, has among its offerings good-value boxes of mangoes, handfuls of coriander and fist-size lumps of ginger. Then there’s a trio of sweet shops, all in a row, selling vibrantly colored treats like jalebi (deep-fried batter soaked in syrup), gulab jamun (milk-based dumplings) and ras malai (a rich cheesecake). At Panshi, a Bangladeshi restaurant, samosas are piled enticingly in the window.
This is rich soil. Here, the Salvation Army was founded in 1865; here, the offices of a former brewery, Mann, Crossman and Paulin, sit next to the Blind Beggar pub, where an infamous gangland murder was carried out in 1966 by East End mobster Ronnie Kray. As I walk past, a gaggle of red-blazered schoolkids are making sketches of it.
Religion, like food, is a constant. Outside Whitechapel Station, which is being redeveloped for the arrival of the new Elizabeth underground line, a preacher styling himself as the “Open Air Mission” is questioning passers-by. “My Bible tells me that God put a living soul in you,” he tells one man. “Isn’t that right, sir? That God made you in his image?”
I turn left into Osborn Street, which leads into Brick Lane. It’s well past time for lunch. On the corner of Hanbury and Commercial streets, I find Poppie’s, one of the city’s newer chippys. I’m intrigued to try it because it’s part of a small chain, which is unusual; most British fish-and-chip shops are independent.
Inside, Poppie’s is a boisterous mixture of the traditional and harmlessly ersatz. A huge frying range dominates the main room; a shiny, steel staple of fish and chip shops, the range is where the food is cooked and sometimes stored. It’s common to see a tantalizing array of already cooked items, such as fish and battered sausages, sitting in a glass compartment at eye-level.
On the walls are pictures of the old East End, caricatures of famous personalities (including, naturally, Churchill), old advertisements, regimental badges, newspaper front pages and a thin strip running around the room containing translations of cockney rhyming slang. It’s deeply unreliable, however.
I order cod, the classic choice in the South of England. (Northerners prefer haddock; a friend from the northern fishing town of Grimsby told me that cod is a “bottom-feeder,” which is why they send it elsewhere.) It’s on the small side, but well-cooked – crisp, crunchy batter, moist and clearly fresh inside. And although the chips are a little pallid for my taste, a gentle buzz of happiness suggests other diners do not share my reservations.
Fish and chips being what it is, it’s a day before I have sufficient space for any more. That’s appropriate, since Friday is the day to eat fish and chips. At my sons’ primary school, for example, it’s always served for Friday lunch, while my local chippy, Brockley’s Rock, is bursting at the seams by 5 p.m. with customers waiting for their weekly treat.
Many of the best chip shops, like Brockley’s Rock, are based outside of the city center; this is homey food, after all, not haute cuisine. None has a better reputation than Olley’s, which has just been named in the 10-strong national shortlist for the annual National Fish & Chip Awards. It’s in Herne Hill, an increasingly well-to-do South London neighborhood; I arrive hungry, just after 1 p.m.
It’s quickly clear that if the interior of Olley’s – with its rustic brick walls and wooden interior windows – is idiosyncratic in the extreme, then the food adheres to the best traditions. Harry Niazi, who opened Olley’s in 1987, is a stickler for quality. The chips are blanched and then fried, “which gives a crispy shell on the outside and makes them soft and fluffy on the inside,” he tells me. The fish is sustainable; it’s all fried in sunflower oil with a touch of rosemary essence, which, Niazi says, ensures that the batter – made simply, with flour and water – isn’t greasy.
Niazi, with his Turkish Cypriot background, is part of a grand tradition. Greek Cypriots are prominent in the trade in the South and Midlands, while Italians have long been associated with the dish in Scotland; Chinese-run shops are common, too. Immigrants not only created fish and chips, but they’ve done much to sustain its popularity, too.
Few people, though, do it as well as Olley’s. The cod is moist and flaky, and the chips are cooked to a crisp, golden turn. Mushy peas – more commonly found on menus in the North – provide a soft, gently flavorsome accompaniment. Niazi, 55, buzzes around the room. “When a customer comes through that door, I want them to feel relaxed,” he says. “I want to put a smile on their face. Once you relax, it’s like being on holiday.”
And like being on holiday, you end up eating too much. I take a 10-minute train ride into London Victoria station, aiming to work off my sizable lunch (there was treacle pudding with custard, too) with a long walk. I pass a handful of interesting fish-and-chip shops on the way – the Rock and Sole Plaice in Covent Garden, for example, or the Fryer’s Delight in Holborn, whose sparse 1960s interior is a charismatic classic of the genre. Plenty of pubs serve the dish, too, although that’s a modern thing. Historically, the pub was reserved for drinking.
I walk through Clerkenwell, where United Chip opened to much fanfare earlier this year, aiming “to shake up fish and chips.” Alas, it has fallen victim to a complaint as old as the dish itself. In the restaurant’s doorway is a sign announcing that “due to odor complaints from local residents, we have had to close the shop for the remainder of the summer.” It’s now fall and the restaurant remains closed.
I hurry on, as there’s another new shop that I’m particularly keen to try. Sutton and Sons, a small chain in East London, has just opened the capital’s first vegan-only chip shop in Hackney.
Hackney is, like many East London neighborhoods, caught between a working-class tradition and the rapid onset of gentrification. It’s a place where you’ll find real estate agents offering two-bedroom flats for the equivalent of a million dollars cheek-by-jowl with workmen in the cafes. Vegan fish and chips, I guess, fits somewhere in between the two, but not everyone is convinced. As I approach, two middle-aged women come bowling out of Sutton and Sons, one apologizing to the other: “I saw the sign and I thought it would be ordinary fish and chips!”
I’m not put off. The number of customers in this hole-in-the-wall place and, more important, the smell, are encouraging. “Vegan fish” is offered in three forms here. I order battered banana blossom, which has been marinated in seaweed and the marine vegetable samphire, to take away. It’s a wonderful surprise; gently flavorsome, with a texture not unlike artichoke heart, and very good with a squeeze of lemon. Is it like fish? Not really. But it’s delicious.
By the time I arrive at Hackney Central station to get my train home, it’s all gone. It’s heartening, I suppose, that fish and chips retains enough cultural cachet for a vegan version to be thought desirable, and even better that it’s so good. The next step, I think, is for London to start celebrating this simple native dish – and I know exactly where to start. There’s an empty plinth in Frank Dobson Square that could do with a nice new statue.
If you go: London Olley’s
65-69 Norwood Rd., Herne Hill
011-44-20-8671-8259
olleys.info
Expect friendly service and sustainably-caught fish at this South London staple. Classic puddings (try the treacle pudding, at $4.95) join a wide selection of fish on the menu; cod and chips costs about $21.70.
Poppie’s, Spitalfields
6-8 Hanbury St.
011-44-20-7247-0892
poppiesfishandchips.co.uk
Situated on the corner of Hanbury Street, close to lively Brick Lane and Spitalfields Market, Poppie’s offers a long menu: A gherkin (or “wally,” about $1.30) is a tangy accompaniment to regular cod and chips (about $18.40).
Sutton and Sons
240 Graham Rd.
011-44-20-3643-2017
suttonandsons.co.uk
This tiny shop is a bit short on seats, but it’s worth the wait. A sausage-shaped portion of battered banana blossom (about $7.30) is superb with a squeeze of lemon.
Hoxton Hotel
81 Great Eastern St.
011-44-20-7550-1000
thehoxton.com
Rooms come in three sizes – shoebox, double and roomy – at this elegantly designed East London spot. Doubles from about $144, which includes light breakfast, WiFi and calls to anywhere in the world.
The Culpeper
40 Commercial St.
011-44-20-7247-5371
theculpeper.com
This stylish street-corner pub close to the heart of Whitechapel offers five rooms on its second floor plus a rooftop greenhouse with great views across the city. Doubles, with breakfast included, start at about $158.
Museum of London
150 London Wall
011-44-20-7030-3300
museumoflondon.org.uk
This marvelous free museum will soon be on the move to a new site in Smithfield, but wherever it is it’s an essential for anyone wanting to get to know this city. From Roman Londinium to the modern day, it’s all here.
Old Jewish Quarter Walk
Meet at Tower Hill tube station
011-44-20-7624-3978
walks.com/our-walks/the-old-jewish-quarter
For a taste of Whitechapel’s lost Jewish world, there’s nothing better than this great-value walking tour (about $13.20). Expect “synagogues and sweatshops,” as they put it.
Published in The Washington Post.
St. Louis food scene is full of surprises, from Paris-worthy pastries to daring microbrews
Save money, ski until midnight with Friday special at Galena’s Chestnut Mountain
Millennials are called a lot of things — lazy, attention-seeking, entitled, etc. But murderous?
The internet, in all its glory, is home to countless articles about the age-old products, businesses and traditions millennials have sent to the gallows.
Canned tuna? Gone. The mayonnaise you mix with it? Gone. Hooters? Say it isn’t so!
We investigated some of the more prevalent claims to see which have merit and which don’t.
(Lauren Hill) Midwestern kindness runs deep, but throughout the city’s neighborhoods, it turns out some residents are more polite than others (or simply complain less). Digital Third Coast, a Chicago-based digital marketing firm, recently analyzed 2018 data of complaints to 311 from the 30 most densely populated neighborhoods. They looked at noise, garbage and dog poop complaints to determine where residents were less than pleased with their surroundings. How did your ‘hood fair? Click through to see which 10 city locales yielded the most complaints per capita.
(Darcel Rockett) Old jail in Galena has been named the best B&B in the U.S. by TripAdvisor travelers Ask Amy: Insecurities are triggered by jealousy Why millennial women are seeking out plastic surgeons: ‘Now it’s part of my routine.’ Copyright © 2019, Chicago Tribune Europe Britain

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F.A.Qs: Anadi Misra of Cooking With Anadi

FlavorfulWorld 0 Comments Anadi Misra , chef , cooking , Cooking With Anadi , Indian cuisine , Instagram , interview , recipes , sushi , YouTube
Our monthly interview series keeps rolling into 2019, and our first conversation of the year is with Anadi Misra, creator of food and cooking website Cooking With Anadi . A talented young sushi chef and line cook, Anadi launched his online food journey on YouTube and Instagram, where he continues to share images of his culinary masterpieces and how-to videos for making them happen in your own kitchen. These place Anadi’s skills on full display as he approaches cooking—Indian recipes in particular, a thing that makes me happy as one who has adored Indian cuisine for years—with affection and a sense of whimsy. This month’s interview revealed us to have quite a bit in common: we each spent a fair share of our respective childhoods in our parents’ kitchens, our kitchen prowess helped each of us romance our respective partners, and, not least of all, we’re both excited for the next Avengers movie. Continue reading to see what else we discussed.
Flavorful World: On your site, you wrote about spending lots of time in the kitchen in your childhood. What was the first family dish that you can remember helping to prepare as a small child?
Anadi Misra: I spent a lot of time at home shadowing my family members preparing food. Food was such an integral part of our family as it brought us all together. I have lots of great memories associated with food and every time I recreate these dishes, I am full of joy and happy memories rush back. This is what makes the meal even more special. I think the most special meal which I remember helping out with was probably at the age of 5-6. This dish was Puri Sabji (Puffed bread with a rich tomato and potato curry) and it is the ultimate Sunday brunch meal in our family. I think I helped roll out and dust a dough ball to help fry the Puris in Desi Ghee (Clarified Butter).
FW: You launched your YouTube channel in Spring 2017. Tell us how you go about deciding on and creating you video content, and how long the process takes on average from concept to finished article?
AM: It is mostly based on my cravings and favourites, ranging from a meal I recently prepared that I feel can be worked on, refined and be presented in a video recipe! Also, I occasionally get recipe requests from my Instagram posts, which helps drive the creative juices to bring on my own twist in the dish. This process can sometimes last for months, consisting of experimenting where I either make the meal multiple times a week or sometimes I just get it on the first try! The latter is usually the case with most of my fun pancake recipes. If I feel the dish is up to my standard and people will find it extremely delicious, it is ready to go up on YouTube or on my website!
FW: On your site, you write about being excited to bring gourmet-quality meals right into the homes of your viewers and visitors. Tell us what the term “gourmet” means to you in terms of cooking and eating.
AM: I feel that the term “gourmet” represents food that is considered highly desirable, is stunning to look at and whose flavours transports you to another world! I associate this with my favourite meals at restaurants, childhood favourites or delicious meals I see on social media. Bringing these meals to life in my tiny home kitchen is truly magical, it is gourmet! Creating a Chicago-style deep dish pizza, from scratch which closely remember the real deal is gourmet magic, because I am transported to my time in Chicago where I tried my first deep dish pizza and the all wonderful memories with it! The message I intend to send with my social media platforms is that creating gourmet quality meals is not only within reach for us regular folks, but something that can be enjoyed every day at home! This is one of the reasons why my restaurant outings have reduced so heavily, I can just make delicious meals at home, which in some cases are as good as my favourite restaurants.
FW: You are currently a sushi chef and a restaurant line cook. If you could share with us one little-known fact about the reality of working as a professional line cook in a restaurant kitchen, what would it be? What is one aspect or standard of restaurant kitchen cooking that has spilled over into your home/personal cooking practices?
AM: I believe the most important aspect of restaurant cooking lies in the mise en place or the set up prior to service. Not only does it ensure food reaches diners in a timely manner, but ensures portion control, freshness, save food cost and make the cooking experience a true pleasure. This was actually the topic of my latest video targeted for beginners where I talk all about saving time to create epic meals every day, without stress and ensuring proper nutrition. Having elements of a dish prepared ahead of time and in place is the key to success for any meal!
I have completely adopted the aspect of mise en place from my work in the restaurant to my personal cooking practices. This includes portioning groceries such as any meats, baguettes. Or when I create big batches of breakfast sausage, homemade breads, naan or pizza dough. This has made my life so much easier. I waste little to no food, therefore save money and I end up saving time in the long run. Now when I freeze food, most times they aren’t cooked (except homemade breads). The doughs are frozen, let’s say, after the first stage of fermentation so I when I decide of have pizza lets say, I just take out the dough and complete the final fermentation. Similarly, my meats are portioned out so no food ever goes bad, and I keep my portions in control and ensure freshness. It’s one of the biggest life hacks which I am proud to have discovered and follow to the T.
FW: Your online social presence is driven in part by the desire to see greater attention devoted to proper Indian cuisine. Who are some of the culinary experts, chefs, notable gastronomes in the Indian culinary world, that you’d encourage interested people to seek out in order to learn valuable Indian cooking fundamentals?
AM: I would say my desire for people to identify proper Indian Cuisine is rooted in the experiences I have had eating at some so-called Indian restaurants in North America. I guess I haven’t discovered the good ones yet and would love any recommendations. I want to emphasize that wherever I have tried Indian food here, it is far from the real deal, so I want people to learn the flavours of real Indian food through my channel. My knowledge of experts or chefs from the Indian culinary world is extremely limited. Coming from a food-loving family, I trust my taste buds and my experience eating various cuisines dictate the quality of food. To mention a few, you can never go wrong with Chef Sanjeev Kapoor , Madhur Jaffery , or Tarla Dalal to deliver quality Indian meals.
FW: Your passion for food and cooking has succeeded in making a more adventurous eater of your significant other. What dish(es) of yours do you recall as marking a turning point in those eating habits? How have your own eating/cooking habits evolved since you began your website and YouTube channel?
AM: I would have to say it was my second attempt at Butter Chicken in first year of university was for my significant other, which we can agree had an influence for us to get together. I made this dish for her a few days after I made it for the first time and soon after, our relationship began. I would say everything I made, little by little helped change her habits, simply due to the fact that her options for her meals were so limited. Little by little, trying new things cooked by me helped her become more adventurous to the point that she is confident enough to point at whatever meal that looks good on the internet or social media and I make it for her. Her life changed completely!
My personal eating habits have remained the same, the website and YouTube had little to no impact. This is simply because I am not doing anything out of the norm. All I am doing is filming in addition to what I would cook anyways. I guess I need to start cooking earlier than usual to cook and record at the same time, but my life is mostly the same. I guess it’s a blessing!
FW: Tell us about the restaurant scene in your city of residence, relative to the current season, ingredient trends, etc. Describe the last memorable restaurant meal that made an impression on you. What meal did you have, and what made it memorable?
AM: I feel like there is a heavy influence of healthy buddha bowls and Asian inspired cuisine in Ottawa which people tend to enjoy. Mediterranean food also is popular with exciting renditions hummus and pita plates being introduced in the restaurant scene. Also during winter Beavertails are always a popular choice. I would have to say, the last most memorable meal was at Bukhara at the Maurya Hotel in New Delhi. The meal included their classic Dal Bukhara , which is slow cooked on a tandoor overnight. So creamy, buttery and mind-blowing, there is nothing that can compare to it! Alongside it was one of the best Butter Naans I have had, Murgh Malai Tikk a (chunks of creamy tandoor grilled chicken) and Gulab Jamun for dessert. I wish I could have it every day. The freshness of each dish is superior. Even though the meal is loaded with butter, cream, and ghee, it does not weigh you down and finally the service and atmosphere excellent. It was one of the highlights of my last trip to India.
FW: Excluding the name of any of your pre-existing blogs, websites, or print/online personas, tell us what name you would give to your memoir about your culinary exploits?
AM: I like the sound of “Digging Up Dirt!”
FW: When you aren’t cooking delicious things, how do you most enjoy spending your time?
AM: I enjoy weightlifting and strength training, I have been doing it consistently for almost a year now and it is a lot of fun. I also love watch watching tech channels on YouTube and watching movies. Currently I am doing a Marvel Movie Monday Marathon leading up to the new Avengers movie which I super excited for! And of course, spending time enjoying our epic meals with my significant other.
Note to readers: Continue getting to know Anadi by checking out his site, Cooking With Anadi at https://www.cookingwithanadi.com/ . or following him on Facebook , Twitter , Instagram . If that’s not enough for you, getting acquainted with his YouTube channel is also a great way to improve your kitchen skills as well as expand your recipe skill set. This article first appeared on FlavorfulWorld.com . Share this love:

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Mexican food Essay Essay

Despite the popularity of wetback Bell and Chipotle across the country, many Ameri fecal matters bustt really envision Mexican forage. Most people who live in America dont get to see the true beauty of food. We have luxuriant food and microwavable food, succession Mexican food is fresh and homemade. Mexican food varies by region, and there are certain ing ruborients that are used end-to-end Mexico. Mexican food has its roots from contrary countries. Each region in Mexico has its own type of food. Meat dishes are popular in the north, while in the south more dishes with vegetables and chicken are common.Communities along the ocean enjoy a lot of seafood dishes using fish like grouper, red snapper, mojarra and snook. Lobster, crab and oysters are abundant. Some Mexican recipes incorporate influences from South America, the Caribbean and Africa. third estate foods, such as tacos and tamales, receive a special touch in each region of Mexico.White corn, beans, squash, tomatoes an d chiles are the staples that have formed the radix of Mexican formulation. The Mexican Indians relied on the combination of corn and beans for their protein, and they included refined game, birds and fish whenever available. They either simmered or smoked the food. They did not have bread, moreover invented tortillas made of corn.When the Spainards arrived in Mexico, they brought influences from the Romans wheat, bread, olives and olive oil, the Germanic tribes pork and lard, and the North African Moors sheep, chickens and spices, such as cinnamon and cumin, fruit, rices and nuts. The Mexican Indians incorporated these ingredients into tacos, stews and tamales which we now need typical Mexican cuisine.Chiles, one of the most recognizable flavors in Mexican cooking, was originally cultivated in South America. Mexicans continue to use scores of varieties of chiles in cooking. Anchiote seeds and paste often season chicken and fish modify and smoke jalapeos give Mexican soups, s alsas and sauces a smoky flavor. Mexicans cooking also uses canella (white cinnamon), which has a more delicate flavor than its American counterpart.In conclusion, Mexican food is unique in many ways The food they eat can be exotic but delightful . Most food that they cook is healthy, filling, and is well desired. Different types of food comes from different regions of Mexico. Chiles is one of the most used ingredient of Mexican food. The ingredient can be used as a spice and was originated in Mexico.

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21 Things to Know Before You Go to Kolkata

Asia
When to go, what to see, and what to eat in West Bengal’s cosmopolitan capital.
It might not look like it, with its grand, crumbling buildings, but Kolkata—in eastern India, capital of the state of West Bengal—is one of India’s younger cities. As a port city and capital of British India from 1772 to 1911, then known as Calcutta (an Anglicized rendering of Kolikata , the city’s Bengali name) it drew migrants from all over India, China, the Middle East, and Europe. With wealth and prosperity came the architecture to match, and the cultural and intellectual awakening in the second half of the 19th century known as the Bengali Renaissance. In 1911, in the twilight of the empire and facing increasing nationalist sentiment in India, the British moved the capital to New Delhi, and Kolkata’s prominence began to decline.
The city’s more recent history has too often been framed as tragedy, devastated by Partition (when British India was divided into two separate states in 1947), economic mismanagement, brain-drain, and poverty. I’ve been coming to Kolkata for decades, first as a child staying with family and then as an adult, and to me it has always felt like a chaotic city, almost verging on collapse. But it endures and remains true to its character: culturally vibrant and proudly cosmopolitan.
Visit in winter… The weather is best during northern India’s dry winter (December-February), when temperatures are around the high 70s Fahrenheit during the day and the 50s at night (Kolkatans bundle up like it’s much colder). Bring layers for the early morning and be prepared to shed them by midday. But be warned that in winter, without the rain, and with farmers burning their fields to prepare for the next crop, the air quality (which is already pretty bad ) drops considerably across northern India, Kolkata included. Bring a mask.
…or during Durga Puja . Kolkata lights up during Durga Puja, a five-day festival honoring the patron goddess of Bengali Hindus. Bengalis refer to her as Ma Durga , Mother Durga, and families dress up, give each other gifts, and visit the many pandals ( shrines) usually set up by neighborhood associations. The pandals can be elaborate affairs, and people travel across town to visit the best ones. (Just follow the crowds to find them). It’s a festive time of year for Kolkatans of all classes, and there’s now even a campaign to include transgender women and widows, two groups that have traditionally excluded from the festivities of the sindoor khela , when women apply sindoor —orange, cosmetic powder—to each other’s faces on the final day of the Durga Puja. The timing varies from year to year, but Durga Puja usually lands sometime between late September and November. The goddess Durga is important to Bengalis, and the festival dedicated to her marks a high point in the Bengali cultural calendar.
Find a base in the center. Kolkata is a big, sprawling city. It’s best to find accommodation in the city center (in the areas just east of the Maidan, the city’s largest park) where there are many options, from the luxurious Oberoi Grand to budget hostels, as well as easy access to public transport. Sudder Street, close to the New Market shopping complex, is backpacker central, so avoid that if you want somewhere (slightly) more peaceful. Cricketers in Kolkata’s Maidan, a park in the heart of the city. Related Reads
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Know your neighborhoods. Bengalis call the city’s neighborhoods paras, and in many ways they’re still the organizational unit of the city, dating back to when the British first set up a trading post in 1690 among a series of villages. Paras were sometimes rooted in caste or profession—for example, Kumartuli for potters, Muchipara for cobblers, and Darjipara for tailors. Some of the neighborhoods, such as Kumartuli, are still home to the businesses that gave them their name. Kolkata’s paras each have neighborhood associations that are responsible for setting up religious festivals on the Bengali calendar. The neighborhood (“para”) of Kumartuli is home to sculptors who make idols, religious and secular.
Learn landmarks and major roads. Kolkata’s streets often go by several names (successive governments have been big on changing colonial titles), and street signs are scarce. Instead, think of Kolkata as divided into three sections: North Kolkata, the city center, and South Kolkata. North Kolkata is the crowded, sprawling old part of town, just north of the British colonial capital, where Bengalis settled. It’s packed with little alleyways, and the five-point crossing and market at Shyambazar is a good place to start if you’re spending time there. In central Kolkata, orient yourself around the Maidan and the large avenue that borders it to the east, the Chowringhee, where the city’s big businesses are located. Park Street, which ends at the Chowringhee and the Maidan, is home to some of Kolkata’s famous restaurants and bars. At the northern end of the city center is the New Market complex, a colonial-era shopping arcade where you can buy anything from flowers to groceries to handicrafts and toys (but beware of the touts).
Be strategic about transport. Kolkata’s Metro system (which was the first in India and opened in 1984) is clean, reliable, and easy to use, and it’s the best way to get to North Kolkata and the business center of the city. To get to Metro stations and through crowded neighborhoods, grab a rickshaw or auto-rickshaw (Kolkata is one of the few remaining cities in the world with hand-pulled rickshaws). Kolkata’s fleet of yellow cabs is comprised of bulky Hindustan Motors’ Ambassador cars (a model first manufactured in the 1950s and source of nostalgia for Indians) and their meters don’t work, so you’ll have to negotiate a price. In much of central Kolkata, including the areas east of the Maidan, it’s often fastest to walk, and residents are happy to point you in the right direction if you get lost. Kolkata’s lumbering buses and trams are crowded at any time of day, and while buses display the start the start and final destination the route often isn’t clear—and they tend to get stuck in traffic. Kolkata is one of the few cities that still has hand-pulled rickshaws.
Get stuck into Bengali cuisine. The local cuisine is known for combining bitter and sweet flavors, its extensive use of mustard seed and poppy seed, and for freshwater fish and vegetable curries. It’s a far cry from creamy, meaty cuisine of North India or the Indian takeout in Western countries. Bhojohori Manna is one of the city’s most popular places for Bengali home cooking, and it makes an addictive fish-fry (a flaky, white fish fillet, deep-fried and served with a sinus-clearing mustard sauce). Their menu is large, but order a thali to try a bit of everything. Bengalis love their freshwater fish, but they come with lots of bones that you’ll have to pick apart with your hands. This can be a challenge for the novice, and if you want to start out with something more user-friendly, try Bhojohori Manna’s chingri malai curry, a rich coconut milk-based prawn dish. Oh! Calcutta , inside one of Kolkata’s major shopping malls in the Bhowanipore neighborhood, serves classic Bengali curries.
Try the original kati roll at Nizam’s . This kebab joint is, supposedly, the inventor of the kati roll, a greasy paratha rolled up and filled with kebab- or other kinds of grilled meat. Nizam’s recently stopped serving beef —because right-wing Hindu vigilantes campaigning to end beef-eating have attacked cattle traders, leading to supply issues —but the mutton and chicken fillings are delicious. They come wrapped in paper, and are a great snack to grab while on the go. Nizam’s, in the New Market area, claims to be the inventor of the kati roll.
Speak many languages. Locals often communicate in a mixture of Bengali and Hindi, and the city has drawn so many migrants from Hindi-speaking areas that even basic, pocket translator-powered Hindi can be useful. English has been a hot topic here for decades. In a fit of nationalism, the Marxist government that ruled the state in the 1980s emphasized Bengali over English in primary schools, but now English is making a comeback. People will be eager to practice theirs on you.
See life on the ghats. Street life in Kolkata spills onto the ghats—embankments that serve as public spaces—along the Hooghly river. The ghats are for everything, from buying flowers or trinkets and toys for kids to socializing. Young adults gather at Prinsep Ghat, taking selfies at the Neoclassical arch in the shadow of the Vidyasagar Bridge. Mullick Ghat has a vibrant flower market, best seen in the early mornings when the vendors have replenished their stock for the day. Bathers and worshippers gather on a ghat near the Kalighat temple. Related Reads
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Wander through North Kolkata. The southern parts of the city are more affluent and developed, with malls, condominiums, and even a Trump Tower on the way . The south is where the money is today, but the area known as North Kolkata, including places such as Shyambazar and Jorashanko, is where the money was a century ago. North Kolkata’s alleyways are full of crumbling but beautiful Victorian architecture, built by well-educated Bengali babus (high status, usually high-caste men) who prospered during the city’s golden age at the turn of the 20th century. The better-maintained colonial mansions, such as the home of poet and Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore , aren’t necessarily worth the price of admission. Instead, wander North Kolkata’s streets and admire the hidden architectural wonders amid the hustle and bustle. Old buildings stand alongside new construction near Shyambazar in North Kolkata.
Know your Bengali sweets… Bengalis are known for their sweet tooth (and be warned, Bengali sweets can be very, very sweet). Sandesh is a milk-based confection that comes in various shapes, sizes, and colors; try the caramel-colored nolen gur , sweetened with jaggery. The ladikeni , made of cheese curds and flour and soaked in syrup, is a variant of the gulab jamun, allegedly named after the wife of a British viceroy, Lady Canning, who was said to love the dish. Sweet shops are everywhere in Kolkata, and which are the best is the subject of fierce debate. Try Ghosh & Co in North Kolkata, which makes a terrific gulab jamun with a bit of saffron and pistachio inside, or K.C. Das , which claims to be the inventor of the rossogulla , a cottage-cheese dumpling soaked in syrup. Ballaram Mullick , a chain with a few locations across Kolkata, serves great sandesh and mishti doi (yogurt sweetened with jaggery). The sandesh is a dense, milk-based confection that comes in many shapes.
…and your non-Bengali sweets. Nahoum & Sons , inside the sprawling New Market shopping complex, is the city’s last Jewish bakery and its challah bread, fruitcakes, macaroons, and other cakes are popular gifts for Kolkatans to bring to someone’s home. Nahoum & Sons was founded in 1902 by Nahoum Israel Mordecai, a Baghdadi Jew, and in more than a century of trading the original decor remains unchanged. It’s a cherished legacy of the city’s once-thriving Jewish community—which came mostly from Baghdad, but later also from Burma, Europe, and America, during the British Raj. Their numbers peaked at around 5,000 during World War II, but after India’s independence from Britain in 1947, most of Kolkata’s Jewish population emigrated to U.K., the U.S., Australia, or the newly established Israel. There are now only around 20 Jews left in the city. Kolkatans love the sweet, old-fashioned Western pastries at Nahoum & Sons.
Don’t forget the Chinese food. Kolkata once had a vibrant Chinatown thanks to immigrants who started arriving in the late 18th century, first to work in Calcutta’s sugar mills, then under British rule to work in its thriving port or in the leather business . While the Chinese population in Kolkata is declining as the community eyes opportunities in the West, the hybrid cuisine —pairing Chinese dishes with Indian spices and cooking methods—that originated here remains popular across the country. Kolkatans are addicted to this stuff: sweet-and-spicy chilli chicken, and a dish of fried noodles and vegetables called Hakka noodles (named after the ethnic group that made up a large proportion of Kolkata’s Chinese immigrants) are especially popular. It may not be located in Kolkata’s historic Chinatown, but Eau Chew is a family-run restaurant that claims to have invented the ‘Schezwan sauce’ —made from onions, ginger, garlic, Indian spices, and oil—that features in many Indian-Chinese dishes. For a wider sampling, try Tung Fong in Kolkata’s business districts, which offers a buffet of Chinese and Indian-Chinese dishes.
Join in the national pastime. Adda is hard to translate to English: it can mean anything from ‘shooting the shit’ to lively intellectual debate. In Bengal, this pastime has been raised to an art form. You’ll find groups of people (usually men) chatting away everywhere you go, gathered at street corners or cafes and restaurants. The College Street Coffee House is Kolkata’s church of adda . Across from the prestigious Presidency College, it’s long been a gathering place for the city’s artists, intellectuals, and filmmakers. Today, it’s packed with students aspiring to be the next Rabindranath Tagore (Kolkata native son and India’s first Nobel laureate) or Satyajit Ray (the Oscar-winning filmmaker).
Understand the graffiti — and West Bengal’s history. Don’t be surprised if you see a hammer-and-sickle spray-painted onto buildings. From 1977 to 2011, West Bengal was run by the world’s longest-serving democratically-elected Communist government . While they dominated the state thanks to the votes of the rural poor, the Communists left their mark on Kolkata too, renaming major boulevards for Lenin and Marx. (And, in dig at the the U.S., during the Vietnam war the street that housed its consulate was renamed for Ho Chi Minh.) Some Bengalis blame the left for Kolkata falling economically behind other cities in India; an anti-corporate attitude led to capital flight, and for years, some of the city’s best and brightest fled for Mumbai or Delhi or went abroad. The Communist Party of India is no longer in power, but left-leaning politics endures here, and the state is a hotbed of opposition to the Hindu right. The legacy of the Communists, who ruled the state of West Bengal, from 1977 to 2011, lingers all over Kolkata.
…and be prepared to talk politics . Protest culture is alive and well here, and rallies and marches are frequent. The local government is taking steps to attract global businesses, but economic development is a hotly contested issue here and multinational companies are not always welcome. Talking politics is like a sport here, and strangers won’t hesitate ask you about your opinions on any issue of local, national, or global importance. Just remember that this golden rule applies: Kolkatans will readily criticize their city, they won’t necessarily appreciate criticism from outsiders.
Go book-hunting. The area around College Street is known as boi para ( which literally translates to “ the neighborhood of books”) and is lined with book stalls. Most sell textbooks (Kolkata’s best universities and colleges are nearby) but if you spend enough time browsing you’ll find some treasures. A friend of mine once found a book of Russian fairy tales in Russian. Boi para is a testament to Kolkata’s love of reading and literature.
See art being made in Kumartuli. This neighborhood, a network of alleys in North Kolkata, is home to many potters and sculptors who craft idols, religious and secular—everything from the goddess Durga to leaders of India’s independence movement. Many of the statues are based on armatures made of straw that are then coated in clay, or molds made out of fiberglass. It happens right out in the open for everyone to see, and you’ll see the work at every stage of the process. Many of the idols that fill Kolkata’s temples are made in Kumartuli.
Cross the river. Kolkata sits on the banks of the Hooghly River, a tributary of the Ganges, just north of the Bay of Bengal. There are many points where you can cross, but the best one is north of the city, at Dakshineswar. Hop on one of the rickety boats from the Kalighat temple complex and cross over to Belur Math, a complex of parks and shrines founded by Swami Vivekananda, a 19th-century Hindu reformer. The architecture is a mix of Hindu, Islamic, and Western styles, reflecting its founder’s belief in the unity of all faiths. But the journey there is almost more interesting than the destination itself; temples and crumbling old buildings stand alongside apartment buildings and factories, and bathers and worshippers fill up the ghats as you pass. It makes for a peaceful respite. Belur Math, a religious mission and temple complex founded by the religious reformer Swami Vivekananda, draws families looking for a break from Kolkata’s hustle and bustle.
See the city from above. The view from the bar at the top of the Lindsay Hotel , across from the New Market shopping complex, is as good as it gets in this smoggy, dusty city. Cheesy, Western pop tunes are on blast here, and you can grab a beer and some snacks (try the chili baby-corn!) and take a moment to escape the chaos. See the city from above at the Lindsay Hotel.

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The 14 Best Spots In London For Work Lunches

The 14 Best Spots In London For Work Lunches It’s the time of year where we’ve got our eyes firmly fixed on the year ahead. This means one thing – meetings, and plenty of them. Whether you’re in search of a venue to get the team together for an informal briefing or looking to impress a potential client with a high-end experience, here are 14 of the best places to do lunch in style… 30th January 2019 22 Kettner’s Townhouse
After years of renovations, legendary Soho landmark Kettner’s finally reopened its doors last year. Now part of the Soho House Group, the townhouse – which dates back to 1867 – has been given the full Ned works: opulent furnishings, metallic detailing and a razzmatazz nod to the 1920s. At lunchtime, the French-leaning menu goes heavy on the crowd-pleasing classics – think steak tartare with artichoke crisps, plaice goujons with frites and tartare sauce, and poached Banham chicken with cabbage, carrot and radish. Both bars at Kettner’s are beautiful, so we recommend arriving early for a pre-lunch drink.
29 Romilly Street, Soho, W1D 5HP
Indian Accent
With multi award-winning outposts in New Delhi and New York, expect big things from Indian Accent’s third and latest London outpost. Headed up by acclaimed chef Manish Mehrotra, this luxe Mayfair offering reinterprets nostalgic Indian dishes with a modern twist, drawing on cultural influences from all over the world. Devour bold, flavoursome dishes of ghee roast lamb with roomali roti pancakes or makhan malai, a medieval dish made with saffron-infused aerated milk; or lighter dishes of langoustines, French beans, moilee; soy keema, quail egg, lime leaf butter pao; and beet and peanut butter vadai, goat cheese pachadi.
16 Albemarle Street, Mayfair, W1S 4HW
The Barbary
Taking inspiration from the Barbary Coast (but situated inside Neal’s Yard in Covent Garden), The Barbary’s menu celebrates the North African cuisine, exotic produce, flavoursome spices and cooking techniques passed down through generations. This culinary romanticism continues when it comes to the menu, with meat, fish, vegetables and desserts being categorised as Land, Sea, Earth and Heaven. In terms of what to eat, the kitchen’s hash cake can solve even the biggest of problems, but it’s the Jaffa cauliflower that gets the most praise – and we’ve got to tell you, it lives up to the hype.
16 Neal’s Yard, Covent Garden, WC2H 9DP
No 11 Pimlico Road
No. 11 is an independent neighbourhood bar and restaurant from the same group behind Darwin & Wallace No. 1 Duke Street, No. 32 The Old Town and No. 197 Chiswick Fire Station. Its contemporary interiors provide the perfect backdrop for relaxed eating and drinking, especially when it comes to lunch. Of the whole menu, we like the look of the truffled cauliflower macaroni cheese; lamb kofta skewers; dill and lemon fishcake and the kimchi fried rice. The bar staff know how to make a great cocktail, too.
11 Pimlico Road, Belgravia, SW1W 8NA
Gymkhana
With its retro ceiling fans, marble table tops and walls adorned with vintage photographs, this Mayfair dining haunt has all the glossy charm of an Indian colonial club, but with the added bonus of a Michelin-starred menu that seriously delivers. Patron-chef Karam Sethi’s (also of Trishna and Hoppers) lays on a wondrous spread of contemporary Indian cuisine based on regional masalas and marinades. Devour plates of fried south Indian chicken wings, pork cheek vindaloo and gorgeous game dishes – the quail kebab and tandoori guinea fowl are must-tries.
42 Albemarle Street, Mayfair, W1S 4JH
Bellanger
Brasserie Zédel’s slick little sister is the place to go if you’re hankering after French cuisine. Or German, as the kitchen serves a mix of the two. Within its glossy, cafe-style environs, guests can look forward to classic dishes such as tartes flambées (slim, crispy pizzas with various toppings), veal schnitzel and bavette steaks served alongside moules normande , choucroute à l’alsacienne and – of course – a delicious cheese selection.
9 Islington Green, Angel, N1 2XH
The Ned
Anywhere that has 17 bars should definitely be considered a solid choice for a celebratory lunch (if that’s what you’re after, look to the recently launched Library bar, which has 30 champagnes on offer, sold by the glass or bottle, a martini trolley and a selection of classic house cocktails). Elsewhere, the open-plan restaurant space in the former Banking Hall offers diners plenty of choice (we’re a big fan of the pretty-in-pink, best-of-British Millie’s Lounge). Options range from Café Sou, a Parisian-style café, through to Californian fare at Malibu Kitchen and Asian-pacific menus at Kaia.
27 Poultry, Bank, EC2R 8AJ
The Coal Shed
Spreading its wings from Sussex shores, Brighton favourite The Coal Shed brings a new menu of meaty classics to the swanky setting of London’s One Tower Bridge. Like its flagship namesake, The Coal Shed serves up a succulent selection of Josper-grilled steaks, sourced from the Scottish Highlands and cooked on hot coals to guarantee that signature smoky aroma. Adorned in rich, polished woods, there’s a Japanese influence to this swanky steakhouse, with low lighting, dark-wood beams and wooden screen glazing. It’s set over two floors so there’s plenty of space, and with an open kitchen there’s a buzzing atmosphere.
1 One Tower Bridge, Tower Bridge, SE1 2SE
Frenchie
The original restaurant is in Paris and is one of the city’s foodie gems. Opened by husband and wife team Gregory and Marie Marchand in 2009, tables became like hen’s teeth virtually overnight. The London outpost is as good as the original and has steadily established itself as a discerning destination restaurant. It feels discreet, cosy and intimate, but at the same its interiors are grown up and glamorous. The menu features simple, sophisticated and seasonal dishes: think scallops with black truffle. The lunch menu is just £27 for two courses and £30 for three – that’s the best £27 or £30 you’re likely to enjoy for a long while.
16 Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, WC2E 8QH
Hawksmoor
Think steak in London, and your mind will inevitably drift to the inimitable Hawksmoor. With plenty of large tables in discreet corners, this is a great shout for business dining. But if you’re after something more fun, turn your mind to the Hawksmoor Hamburger. Only available during lunchtime, and only at its Spitalfields site, it has to be one of the very best burgers in town. Served with triple-cooked chips or an English lettuce and herb salad, the burger itself comprises 100% grass-fed beef from traditional British breeds, with small nuggets of bone marrow for extra flavour. Diners can choose from Ogleshield cheese or Colston Bassett Stilton.
Various locations
HIX Oyster & Chop House
Mark Hix’s first solo restaurant, HIX Oyster and Chop House was opened in 2008, a stone’s throw from Smithfield, London’s historic meat market. A stalwart on the steakhouse scene, diners know exactly what to expect – namely, great steaks and chops, with a sprinkling of Hix’s signature British style. The selection is incredible – think Glenarm Estate sirloin, succulent fillet on the bone and porterhouse steak for two – but there’s plenty to choose from, including oysters, scallops, duck heart and smoked salmon. The marble oyster bar is a great place to get things started.
36-37 Greenhill Rents, Clerkenwell, EC1M 6BN
Orrery
One of D&D London’s original sites, this Marylebone spot has always combined high-end classic French cookery with a relaxed neighbourhood vibe. Now, it can add super-sleek to the list: grey tones, smart leather seating and copper embellishments brought the restaurant right up to date when it was given a refurbishment in 2018. Thankfully its floor-to-ceiling oval windows remain, as does its famously well-stocked cheese trolley. Our picks from the menu include Dorset crab with mango and wasabi, followed by steamed salmon, leek, mussels and velouté and rosewater panna cotta with pear sorbet. Come summertime, you’ll find us on the plant-filled terrace.
55 Marylebone High Street, Marylebone, W1U 5RB
Cecconi’s
A relaxed sister restaurant to The Ned’s Cecconi’s, Soho House Group’s Cecconi’s Pizza Bar opened on Old Compton Street last summer. Bearing the brand’s signature marble-striped floor, the interiors reference Italian landmark Harry’s Bar in Venice: picture a rosewood panelled bar and matching walls, brass fittings, and original Italian black and white photos and advertising prints from the 1950s hung on the walls. In its centre is a mid-century Venetian-style bar serving negronis, Aperol spritz and prosecco on tap, while the kitchen serves simple Italian comfort food, including crispy zucchini fritti with lemon aioli; rich crab spaghetti with chilli, parsley and olive oil; and pizzas topped with the likes of bresaola, smoked burrata, rocket and cherry tomatoes.
19-21 Old Compton Street, Soho, W1D 5JJ
The National Café
Away from its ever-popular exhibitions, The National Gallery plays host to one of our favourite restaurants within a London museum, The National Café. Refurbished in late 2017, the restaurant was given a lick of paint and its classic European menu a modern makeover.Away from London’s shopping and sightseeing, the restaurant offers a slice of vintage West End indulgence. Hits from the lunch menu include burrata with beetroot mousse and dehydrated beetroot, followed by crab cake, curly kale and crab velouté. Make sure to leave room for its chocolate and banana sundae.
The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square WC2N 5DN
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Gastronomical Adventure at Feast, Sheraton Grand Bengaluru Whitefield Hotel

Gastronomical Adventure at Feast, Sheraton Grand Bengaluru Whitefield Hotel MacroTraveller January 26, 2019
MacroTraveller was recently invited for the specially curated menu which is designed by the award-winning super-skilled chef and good friend, Nitin Bajaj, an innovative and skilled culinary expert. He recently won an award for Contemporary Best Presentation of Forgotten Recipe at India Level at Go Cheese Indian Chef Awards 2018 and also awarded as Best Chef of the year (2017) by Times Food Award (Jaipur).
Our culinary world has always been an enthralling one, and in recent years it has earned a lot of popularity as chefs themselves are coming to the forefront and presenting their skills to the world. Chef’s Table is a concept adapted by chefs to showcase their food and their inspiration into cooking.
The month-long fest will feature some of his signature dishes like the Tomato Acqua and the Earl Grey Tea Cured Salmon which will be a treat to our plate leaving a lasting effect of an explosion of flavours. MacroTraveller had a specially curated degustation 7-course menu that will take you on a gastronomical adventure into Modern European cuisine. The European sorts one of the most celebrated culinary canvases in the world. So modern European cuisine is one that experiments with techniques and ideas from many different countries. The signature dishes Tomato Acqua with Cucumber Risotto with silver leaf was something different and unique.
Discover the flavours of modern European cuisine and tickle your taste buds with exotic delicacies. Here is my menu at Feast!
Amuse Bouche – The European classic of the menu and I praise the taste because it is one of the tastiest mouth amusers. It is full of exceptional flavours and gives a fresh nourishing element to any food setting.
Next up was Beet Carpaccio, Floral Honey Ricotta, and Citrus and Rucola. This was impressive, yet effortless starter gives you the perfect refreshing and sweet taste. Beet Carpaccio is an actual power salad and vegan starter.
For non-vegetarians you can try Earl Grey Tea Cured Salmon. This was an excellent and almost strong dish. My friends said the meat was tender and the flavour is delicate. You can also try a midwestern classic Pickled Beets and Sago.
I loved the typical warm soup of Tomato Acqua. I recommend you to try it. Then I tried Cucumber Risotto, and it was light and refreshing risotto. Silver Leaf was something different and unique.
The virtue of sorbet lies in its simplicity, and I loved Sorbet.
You can try Lobster & Granny Smith Tortellini. Try the chive-flavoured cream cheese and dill oil. I tried vegan wild mushroom tortellini, and this dish brings the wonderful flavours. Even I tasted Toasted Oats, Sage, and Pecan Nut Butter along with Truffle Air
A perfect centrepiece for the Chef’s Table for non-vegetarians. Lamb loin en sous vide, my friend told it was blended together the rosemary, garlic, thyme, and oil. It was seasoned with salt and pepper. You can also try black rice carbonara represents a classic of the Italian culinary tradition, and you must try this with carrot onion spinach.
Roasted kabocha brushed with olive oil and seasoned with salt and pepper, roasted until tender. It was a fantastic dish to try with parmesan. Truffle choux buns make fantastic feast canapés, and you won’t be disappointed. Other things I tried were Charred asparagus and moutarde cream, and it was excellent and refreshing.
Last but not least! The final course of ‘Chef’s Creation’ was extraordinary.
Drop in now to enjoy a varied fare of exquisite dishes.
Venue: Feast, Sheraton Grand Bengaluru Whitefield Hotel Tags

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