Simply Amazing !!!

Simply Amazing !!!

Just spent a weekend at the hotel. Amazing ambience, panoramic sea view and best food ever. FnB team of Dhruba Ananda Saransh Nizamuddin Rahul and Pankaj made sure we tried different type if cuisine from Indian , Grill , Goan and italian. Yummy. Keep it going Team ITC GOA. See you soon.

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Ramadan Buffet 2019 @ Mandarin Oriental KL: Royal Cuisine of Pahang

Dine like royalty this Ramadan at Mandarin Oriental, Kuala Lumpur as you break fast to an amazing spread featuring the Royal Cuisine of Pahang.
With the permission of Her Majesty Seri Paduka Baginda The Raja Permaisuri Agong Tunku Hajah Azizah Aminah Maimunah Iskandariah Binti Almarhum Al-Mutawakkil Alallah Sultan Iskandar Al-Haj, The Queen of Malaysia, Mandarin Oriental, Kuala Lumpur proudly presents Royal Cuisine of Pahang featuring recipes from Her Majesty’s cookbook ‘Air Tangan Tengku Puan Pahang Masakan Tradisional Pahang’ at Mosaic and Diamond Ballroom from 13 May to 4 June 2019 . Commencing the Holy Month of Ramadan from 6 to 12 May will be an array of local buka puasa delights prepared by Mosaic’s culinary maestros.
When preparing for her cookbook, Her Majesty Seri Paduka Baginda The Raja Permaisuri Agong Tunku Hajah Azizah Aminah Maimunah Iskandariah Binti Almarhum Al-Mutawakkil Alallah Sultan Iskandar Al-Haj, fondly known as Tengku Puan Pahang, spent countless hours travelling to villages in her resident state Pahang; one of the 14 states in Malaysia, to seek traditional food recipes from the womenfolk. Known for her skills in culinary, Tengku Puan Pahang is passionate about preserving the local food heritage and believed that it is important for the future generation of Malaysia to know the various cuisines of the country.
Humbled by Tengku Puan Pahang’s noble effort in upholding the local cuisine, Chef Saiful Asrul Bin Saidin and team were moved when they were given an exclusive opportunity to work with Her Majesty and the Royal kitchen in conjunction with the launch of the cookbook last year in Mandarin Oriental. With continued enthusiasm and the support of the Royal kitchen, Chef Saiful and team will be treating Malaysians to a grand showcase of traditional dishes of the country infused with a selection of Pahang cuisine.
Break fast with family, friends, and business partners over an assortment of Kerabu that includes Kerabu Daging; Kerabu Pucuk Selembut; Kerabu Pucuk Paku; Kerabu Pucuk Pegaga and more before sampling warm dishes such as Otak-Otak Kukus; Nasi Kebawah Duli; Ikan Patin Pais Tempoyak; Opor Burung Puyuh; Rendang Haji Mahmud; Ketupat Pulut Sotong and Sambal Pahang, just to name a few. Classic favourites such as Laksa Pahang; Mee Jawa and Lempeng Debab Sambal Ikan Bilis are available at live stations.
Sup ekor pekat berempah – a delicious, well-spiced oxtail soup
Sotong sumbat masak lemak – one of our favorites, tnsquid stuffed with glutinous rice cooked with coconut milk, fenugreek and black pepper.
Ikan Patin Bakar Tempoyak
Udang Sambal Petai – loved this! Mouthwateringly delicious and spicy.
Ayam golek Pekan – tender, well-marinated chicken
Mixed satay
Daging Salai Masak Lemak Kuning Rebung Madu – Hubby’s favorite, smoked beef slices cooked in coconut milk and turmeric
Briyani rice with Indian roast lamb leg
Kerabu daging kelapa parut
Kerabu pucuk paku
Ulam-ulam kampong
Ketupat palas and lemang
Urap nangka and Malay kuih
Diners in favour of sampling international cuisine will be treated to a melting pot of dishes featured at the grill, wok, and noodle stations. These stations will be preparing herb marinated lamb chops; beef steaks; fresh homemade pastas; lemon and garlic sea bass; crispy roasted chicken with Thai mango salad; Rajasthani Laal Maas – mutton cooked in onion spice and yoghurt; Palak Mutter Paneer – cottage cheese green peas cooked in spinach spice sauce, and more.
Complete the meal with a selection of desserts at Mosaic’s dessert bar and Lounge on the Park. Diners with a sweet tooth can indulge in Puding Raja; Kujub Labu; Seri Kaya Nangka; Kuih Telor Kancil; assortment of Malaysian Kuih and more. A special live station with Pisang Goreng; Cempedak Goreng; Cucur Udang; Cucur Kodok, Apam Balik; cakes and pastries are also available. From 15 to 26 May, Lounge on the Park will present its popular outdoor Fruit Terrace where guests are invited to sample exotic local fruits such as durian and fresh coconuts.
A Taste of Malaysia buffet (from 6 to 12 May) is priced at RM 168 while the Royal Cuisine of Pahang buffet (from 13 May to 4 June) is priced at RM 218. Guests can enjoy an early bird discount of 25% off for bookings made by 30 April 2019, for dining on the first week (ie 6 to 12 May).
Guests who prefer the grandeur of the Diamond Ballroom can enjoy the Royal Cuisine of Pahang buffet at RM 188 per person from 13 to 26 May. For bookings of 30 guests and above, there will be 10% discount, while groups for 50-100 guests will enjoy 15% discount. This group booking discounts are only applicable at the Diamond Ballroom. Diners will be entertained with traditional gamelan performances daily from 6 May to 4 June between 6.30 and 9.30pm.
Her Majesty’s cookbook ‘Air Tangan Tengku Puan Pahang Masakan Tradisional Pahang’ will be available for purchase at The Mandarin Cake Shop at RM 380 per copy. All proceeds from the sale will be channelled to Tunku Azizah Fertility Foundation (TAFF); a foundation established by Her Majesty Seri Paduka Baginda The Raja Permaisuri Agong Tunku Hajah Azizah Aminah Maimunah Iskandariah Binti Almarhum Al-Mutawakkil Alallah Sultan Iskandar Al-Haj to help women who face difficulties in conceiving.
For a unique buka puasa experience, guests can also dine in AQUA Restaurant where it will be offering Barbecue Under The Stars for a minimum of 30 guests at RM 208 per person.
For dining reservation, please contact +60(3) 2330 8798 or email mokul-fb@mohg.com.
For the extensive Ramadan Buffet Listing for 2019, kindly click here .
Location: Mosaic, Lobby Level, Mandarin Oriental Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur City Centre, 50088 Kuala Lumpur.
Tel: 03-2179 8881
GPS Coordinates: 3.15568, 101.7120
Website: http://www.mandarinoriental.com/kualalumpur/fine-dining/mosaic/
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Changing Tastes

Passion fruits in my backyard (a few months ago)
When I had a chance to dine out, my usual choice was Chinese cuisine in my youth. A little fried rice with some chilly chicken, and possibly a bit of noodles too as a starter. I was particularly fond of Chinese style soups but marriage put an end to that like, less because marriage put me in the soup than because Maggie had a particular aversion towards soups of all sorts. She didn’t quite agree that a first-rate soup was far superior to a second-rate book.
Eventually I grew out of the Chinese kitchen probably by Maggie’s influence and cultivated a love for the Shillong version of biryani which tasted more like the Chinese fried rice with a piece or two of chicken buried in it than any biryani I ever tasted before or after. The transition was smooth because Shillong’s biryani was more Chinese than Indian.
Delhi, later, introduced me to all sorts of North Indian delicacies: Punjabi and Mughalai, particularly. However, our bellies shrank as we grew older and the largesse of the North Indian palate exerted a pressure which they couldn’t stomach.
Then we discovered the delights of KFC which remained our favourite until we left Delhi though our visits to the MNC outlets were quite rare. The truth is I had fallen in love with the vegetarianism of the school where I worked. Sawan provided excellent food to the students and staff and the variety of vegetarian dishes it offered was as unforgettable as their taste.
I prefer vegetarian dishes now though Kerala has abandoned its wonderful variety in that category. The Malayali has developed an unhealthy fondness for what is generally (and rather ludicrously) known in India as ‘non-vegetarian’ food. I’m left longing for Sawan’s ingenious combinations of potato with everything from spinach to capsicum.
My cat will frown at me, however, if I give him any vegetarian dish. He just sniffs at it and walks away after giving me a contemptuous look. So I have become a regular customer of the local fish stall. “Lucky cat,” people tell me. These people don’t know that I share some transcendental bond with the cat: his supercilious contempt for a whole lot of things engendered by our stubborn attachments to very clear likes and dislikes. King of tastes
xZx

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Top 9 Sectors Driving the Growth of Industrial Robotics in India

Top 9 Sectors Driving the Growth of Industrial Robotics in India Home / Blogs / Top 9 Sectors Driving the Growth of Industrial Robotics in India
Robotics in India is going through a phase of accelerated growth. But what fuels this acceleration? Is this news about growth a mere token of consolation for the Indian readers/bloggers/audience or is automation indeed trending in the country?
About Being a Token of Consolation
For a clear-cut answer, let us go straight to some serious statistics.
According to the World Robotics Report 2018 by the International Federation of Robotics (IFR), India has set a new record with the sale of 3,412 new industrial robot units in 2017—an increase of 30% compared to that in 2016. The compound annual growth rate (CAGR) was 18% between 2012 and 2017.
Owing to the rapid increase in robot installation since 2009, India stands at the 14 th position in terms of global annual supply (after Thailand and Spain) and at the 13 th position in terms of operational stock (following Canada, Spain and Singapore).
As a result of the Make in India campaign, Robotics companies in India are springing up at an astonishing rate. India now has the third-largest startup technology base in the world.
Believe it or not, India is projected as the Big 3 in the robot race. Malcolm Frank—head of Strategy at Cognizant and author of What to Do When Machines Do Everything —supported this projection by saying “India, after US and China, is the frontrunner in the automation race”.
So, with a clear idea that the news about India’s exponential growth in robotics is anything but bogus, let us proceed to the next section.
Who’s (or Rather What’s) Behind the Wheel?
An expanding knowledge bank, eagerness to find easy solutions to difficult problems (agriculture-related suicides, medical imprecision, enraging attacks by neighboring countries, etc.) and a never-seen-before thirst for entrepreneurial ventures must have hastened India’s stride toward automation. The country is slowly but steadily pushing its way to the front, stepping over every stumbling block.
Let us take a glance at the sectors driving the growth of industrial robotics in India. Automotive Sector
“The automotive industry will remain the main driver of the increasing robot installations in India”– Junji Tsuda, president of the IFR.
India is expected to become the 4th largest automobile producer in the world by 2020, after China, US and Japan. The industry has registered a CAGR of 14%, with profit scaling to USD 39 billion in 2015–2016. Exports also show a similar growth pattern, with a CAGR of 14% that scales to USD 10.8 billion.
Although factors like robust demand, rising indigenization, export opportunities and recent policies have quite strong roles to play in the swell of the automotive sector, adoption of Robots is the prime force that has made this success invincible.
So, the answer to what’s common among the Indian automobile giants Hyundai, Honda and Maruti Suzuki would be—they manufacture great cars, draw huge profit and have robots at their service.
Electric and Electronic Sector
There’s an unimaginable fetish for electronic appliances all over the world. In fact, it isn’t a fetish anymore; it’s a dire need. In India alone, the market for electronics and home appliances is expected to reach a staggering $400 billion by 2020, according to experts.
This upsurge in the Electronics industry can be dedicated to an equivalent increase in the application of robots in the industry, which supports IFR’s report stating “growth in robot sales to the Electric and Electronic industry is in part linked to the growth of the industry itself”. From cutting metal housings to assembling miniature, fragile components on boards and fro quality testing to the transportation of the finished goods, robots can accomplish myriad tasks with great precision and speed, thus hastening the entire production cycle.
Food and Beverage Sector
Robotics has become imperative in the Food industry. A report released by ResearchAndMarkets.com anticipates the global food robotics market to reach $3.35bn by 2025, with Asia-Pacific deemed to have the highest CAGR.
Robots are no longer confined to palletizing and packing food, but are slowly entering our kitchens. Mechanical Kitchen, a very recent Bangalore-based startup, is keeping no stones unturned in developing the Mechanical chef—a robot that will cook hundreds of customizable Indian cuisines with ease. Not only this, Chennai homes the first robot-themed restaurant “Robot” that has real robots for waiters. Robots have established their domains in meat processing and dairy industries as well (Automatic Milking Systems and SCARA robots). Apart from these, robots can efficiently carry out cutting and slicing; picking and placing; cake decorating; burger making; pizza making; and washing up. (Graph presents different tasks and the extent to which robots can carry them out.) Healthcare Sector
Ever since Dr. Naresh Trehan conducted India’s first fully robotic heart surgery in 2002, robots have become indispensable in Indian operation theatres. Accompanying him in the surgery was minimum invasive surgery expert, da Vinci—the endoscopic coronary bypass system created by Intuitive. Another unique endeavor was from gastrointestinal surgeon Dr. Apurva Vyas of Sterling Hospital, Ahmedabad. With the help of da Vinci, Dr. Vyas performed robotic surgery on a 37-year patient suffering from a rare condition—median arcuate ligament syndrome. This surgery was the first of its kind in India and third in the world. However, history was created when Gujarat-based cardiac surgeon Dr. Tejas Patel operated on a patient with block artery while sitting 32 km away from him—this was the first telerobotic surgery ever.
Besides surgical interventions, medical robotics in India has expanded its reach to medical transportation, prosthetics, sanitation and disinfectants, prescription dispensing and much more.
These are a few of the many success stories of surgical robotics in India. The Indian medical market is adapting robotics at a rather fast pace. With about 50 players in the market, India’s surgical robotics domain is estimated to expand at a CAGR of 20% between 2017 and 2025, while the global estimate is 12% ( BIS Research ). This expansion will scale to $350 million, compared with $64.9 million in 2016.
Warehouse Sector
India is one of the key markets for warehouse automation systems in Asia. The Indian market for warehouse automation is projected to grow at a CAGR of 10–12% during 2015–2020 and is expected to reach $3.49 billion by 2020 according to a market survey.
The answer to ‘ why the sudden surge’ is the appetite for improved efficiency, enhanced quality, reduced cost for human labor and competitive attempts of the warehouses at getting through the e-commerce boom. Today, warehouse automation stands as the backbone of important e-commerce players, like Flipkart, Zivame, Myntra, Pepperfry etc., and their delivery partners, like Gati Ltd, DTDC etc.
While Gati Ltd and Flipkart have turned to Pitney Bowes TrueSort for their warehouse automation, GreyOrange, the Indian pioneer in warehouse automation, is pinning the country on a global map.
Military Sector
India is in a state of no war, no peace with two of its neighboring countries since time immemorial, not to mention the incessant terrorist activities that handicap the country every now and then. The current military scenario in India calls for definitive actions. Hence, the Indian Government has thought of bringing autonomous or semi-autonomous robotic systems into the battlefield. As robots can operate under difficult situations and varied environmental terrains, they may present the ideal solution to these attacks.
Currently, robots in the Indian Army are used as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs; commonly called drones), unmanned ground systems (UGS) and landmine/explosive detection/disarmament devices. However, the Government and the Indian Army are interested in harnessing this technology beyond their existing roles. Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics (CAIR), the primary R&D laboratory in Defense, is at work since 1986 and has created myriad robotic systems for the Army, including DRDO Daksh, Wheeled Robot, Snake Robot, Legged Robot, Wall-climbing Robot, Robot Sentry, etc.
This seals the fact that the Indian Defense sector has significant roles to play in the growth of robotics in the country.
Pharmaceuticals
The rise in chronic diseases and conditions has led to a huge demand of pharmaceuticals in the market. The industry now uses robots in their production to meet the demand and hasten the process. Robotics plays a vital role in accomplishing complicated processes like R&D, production and packaging in the Pharmaceutical industry. The various benefits of automation in the pharmaceutical domain include: enhancing quality and quantity of drugs; preventing workers’ exposure to hazardous environments; eliminating human error; and reducing the potential for human contamination.
With robots assisting the drug-manufacturing process, the global pharmaceutical market is expected to reach USD 119.5 Million by 2021 from USD 64.4 Million in 2016—a CAGR of 13.2% during the forecast period.
These were some of the sectors that have shot up the sale and use of robots in India. But will robots be a medium for the greater good or just a lucrative intervention?
A Farsighted View
Though Luddites have succeeded in painting a dystopian mechanical picture of robotics in our mind, let us link the growth of robotics to the rise of a buoyant society for this one time.
Agriculture Sector
India is primarily an agricultural country; but, ironically, the only thing that’s in store for the Indian farmers is never-ending poverty. Robotics has every potential to change that scenario.
With robots, farmers can closely monitor the land, besides obtaining site-specific and timely data about the crop. Robot-assisted precision irrigation systems can help in the efficient use of water by directly watering the roots of the crop. Fertilizer-, pesticide- and weedicide-dispensing robots can protect crops by preventing excessive use of chemicals. Besides these, robots can help with the picking and harvesting of crops. Once harvested, the crops/fruits/vegetables can be thinned or pruned and packaged for marketing with robotic assistance. Robots can, thus, increase the agricultural yield to manifold.
However, it’s a yin and yang situation here. According to Trading Economics, GDP from Agriculture in India increased to 5862.40 INR Billion in the fourth quarter of 2018 from 3550.64 INR Billion in the third quarter of 2018. So, Agro-India has tremendous potential for the growth of robotics as well.
Robots can be harnessed to undo what man has done to the environment.
The sight of plastic bottles and packets floating freely in the crystal-clear water of Unmgot River (Dawki) can bring down the spirit of anybody. Littering has only started there; imagine ten years from now—the clearest river will turn into another sad story of human inhabitation. Robots can prevent this! A trash bot named SEARCh has been developed by students of Vivekanand Education Society’s Institute of Technology that can skim waste from the water surface. This may be the start of a new road toward clean water bodies.
Autonomous robots can also be used to clean-up hazardous or contaminated environments, such as nuclear test sites, like Pokhran, or PCB-contaminated soil.
UAVs can be used to keep tab on a number of environmental issues, like monitoring illegal human interference (e.g. poaching and deforestation); mapping changes (e.g., river erosion, urbanization etc.); disaster management (pre-assessing natural disasters like flood, fires, volcanoes and landslides); and monitoring other natural factors like migration, number of endangered species and foliation.
Final Words
If you were avid while reading, you must have learned which sectors drive automation forward and which sectors hold great promise for the future. Probably, now you are able to fathom what sectors need to be focused on to drive forward robotics in India. Play your part in this new age accordingly—if you are someone from the Government make robotics reachable to the public, and if you are a student or an employee grab everything that’s on the plate to get upskilled.
You will be glad to know that iNurture, in collaboration with some of the top-notch Universities, is introducing PG Diploma in Robotics . You can catch hold of one of these specializations to get ready for automation.

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5 tips to making delicious, flavoursome curries at home

5 tips to making delicious, flavoursome curries at home 5 tips to making delicious, flavoursome curries at home 5 tips to making delicious, flavoursome curries at home 5 tips to making delicious, flavoursome curries at home
Michelin-starred chef Manjunath Mural brings modern Indian cuisine ‘with a light French kiss’ to Auckland’s épicer. MiNDFOOD catches up with the award-winning chef to discuss the new flavour he brings to the city of sails and his advice for making the perfect home-style curry.
Why is now the time for a new style of Indian dining in Auckland?
“I think diners have also had a huge shift in both wanting to know where their food comes from, and they want to feel good about the choices they make: at épicer we’re coupling ethically-sourced proteins with a commitment to organic produce where possible, and we’ve shunned plastic straws in favour of sustainable wheat straws,” says Manjunath Mural, head chef. “Where curry house culture has traditionally offered the option of chicken and beef with your tikka masala, the public is looking to quality of cut, and wants to know there’s been a real consideration of protein selection. With market-fresh lobster, tiger prawns and lamb shank on the menu, we made a choice to meet the wants and needs of a well-educated diner.”
“The expectations of restaurant-goers in terms of a drinks offering and service has also changed,” says Aditya Sudan, owner. “Where once, calls for Kingfisher and a BYO bottle of wine were the norm, guests are looking to cocktails, a considered wine list that compliments the food, and craft beer. Behind our bar we have some of New Zealand’s best mixologists serving up highly Instagrammable cocktails, a sommelier-trained GM, and an extensive list of craft beer and wine that pair beautifully with our menu.”
“They say ‘we eat with our eyes’ as well as our tastebuds, and today’s diner eats with their phone camera, too,” says Manjunath. “Indian cuisine is colourful and vibrant, and with careful considering as to plating and dish construction we’ve created unforgettable visual experiences that surprise and delight diners (and their followers).”
Tell me about your inspiration and influence when it comes to Indian cuisine?
“Travel has been a huge inspiration: it has significantly impacted the way I plate food,” says Manjunath. “I draw from a myriad different cuisines and techniques when I think about how great chefs excite their diners. Creating theatre on a plate and in service creates an experience for our guests that goes beyond flavour. An example: our slow-cooked lamb chop Kashmiri arrives to the table alight, flambeed in India’s famous Old Monk dark Rum, rich in vanilla. Executive chef Manjunath Mural of Épicer, Ponsonby’s newest opening
What can diners expect when they come to épicer? What does ‘with a light French kiss’ mean?
We hope diners enjoy discovering how the echoes of Indian spices they know and love can be reinvented with a different approach. Diners should expect a considered wine and beer list that brings out the flavour of their meal, with staff on-hand to make recommendations.
‘A light French kiss’ is an expression used to explain the French influence on the plating, techniques and ingredients we adopt at épicer. A few examples: our crispy pork belly vindaloo, espuma yoghurt, mushroom and truffle naans, and oatmeal roti.
Do you have tips/ advice for making delicious, flavoursome curries at home?
Here are 5 tips to making delicious, flavoursome curries at home: they’re similar to what you’d expect when cooking any recipe; Use fresh produce and meat: talk to your butcher about the best cuts. Use fresh spices (go to your local market), and be generous with them. Don’t be shy with the use of Ghee (a much required ingredient in authentic Indian cooking). Add the fresh green herbs at the end for full and added flavour in the curry – cooking at high temperature can kill the flavour of fresh herbs. Last but not the least, slow cooking a curry will always result in a better flavour and a full body as well as meat tenderisation.
How does one get the balance between flavour and heat/spice just right?
Taste as you go. Put a tasting spoon up by the cooker and keep coming back to the dish. Don’t be afraid to add more heat, than use coconut milk to cool it down if you need to.

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From Brew Hall to defensive miscues, Loons seek improvements at Allianz Field

By Andy Greder / St. Paul Pioneer Press Today at 6:35 p.m. Minnesota United midfielder Jan Gregus (8) prepares for a corner kick against New York City in front of Loons fans during the first half of their April 13 game at Allianz Field in St. Paul. David Berding / USA TODAY Sports
ST. PAUL — Minnesota United wants Allianz Field to be both a cathedral and a fortress.
A cathedral — in soccer parlance — for fans to revere the beautiful game, and a fortress in terms of difficulty for opposing MLS teams to visit and come away with a win.
United has been working to refine both that consumer experience and its sporting operations after the St. Paul stadium debuted April 13 with 19,796 fans watching the Loons settle for a 3-3 draw with New York City.
The Loons (3-3-1) will now face the Los Angeles Galaxy (6-1-0) in the first night game at Allianz Field at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 24. It will kickoff three straight home games, including matches against D.C. United at 12:30 p.m. Sunday and the Seattle Sounders visiting at 7 p.m. May 4. In the stands
United had about 15 run-up events before the stadium opener, but only one training session for the Loons ahead of their first game there. A snowfall of 8 1/2 inches fell on the grass field about 48 hours before kickoff and precluded the Loons from training at the stadium a few days before to the game. A few snowbanks on the West side of the field were the only traces of winter left by game time.
“When a stadium gets opened, there can be a a negative tone to what happened,” United CEO Chris Wright said. “There can be a negative tone to what went awry operationally, or something happened that maybe was a deflection from the pride that everybody has in the stadium. To be very honest, we didn’t get that.”
But Wright said United has a list of 200 items to be improved, all organized on a big spreadsheet. Some of the main objectives come in food and beverage service.
The Brew Hall on the north side of the stadium was a massive success during the Saturday opener, Wright said. The demand, however, was too much for United — which is self-managing the stadium — to keep up with the sales of suds.
Delaware North, United’s food and beverage partner, has since spent $25,000 to convert its paper point-of-sale system to a digital operation to speed up sales. The club hopes to have that enhancement up and running by Wednesday’s game.
Allianz Field also had shortages of pizza and cuisine from Hot Indian and Brasa. “(They) got completely shellacked,” Wright said of the latter two stands. “They were out of food about halfway through halftime. So that is over 400 units per stand. We’ve got to address that, which they are. That’s a good problem to have.”
The Allianz Field opener, which also dealt with the stress of nearly 1,000 credentialed staff, media and other officials, also served as the rollout of Minnesota United using 100 percent digital tickets. Wright reports few substantial issues in how that software on MNUFC’s app was first adopted. On the field
On the soccer side, Minnesota reverted back to the defensive struggles from its first two years of MLS play, which originated at TCF Bank Stadium. After giving up three goals to New York City, they gave up four to Toronto FC in a 4-3 loss Friday in Ontario.
With that spike, the Loons are on pace to give up more goals than they did in either of their first two MLS seasons. That in itself is remarkable considering they set an MLS record for most goals allowed in consecutive campaigns.
“One of the things that we are searching for is a defensive identity,” said Wright, who oversees sporting director Manny Lagos, coach Adrian Heath and the rest of the sporting staff. “We’ve long been criticized, and rightfully so, for the number of goals that we give up, the way we give up goals, etc.
“I know our coaching staff and players are working very, very hard on changing that,” Wright said. “I want Allianz Field to become a place that is very, very difficult for opponents to play in. We’ve got to seek that, and a big part of that is the mentality of our players and our coaching staff. The mentality of our soccer operations and the mentality of our supporters.”
Heath and players such as Ozzie Alonso, Michael Boxall and Brent Kallman have chalked up the defensive lapses to individual errors or a lull that has come in the moments after one goal is scored. Against New York City and Toronto, the Loons gave up two goals over a few short minutes.
“We are trying to eradicate individual mistakes,” Heath said Monday. “It’s what we’ve spoke about. I don’t think there has been anything wrong with the collective positioning of the group, but individuals are making errors that’s costing us dearly every single game.”
Loons players said the first game at Allianz Field was difficult because the stadium was new to them, too.
“We’ve got to go on and make it our home now,” Heath said. “It’s early days, I know, but we’ve got to make it a fortress.”

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Simply fabulous!

This hotel is one of the loveliest anywhere. The fact that all rooms have a balcony with views of the Taj Mahal is just one of the fantastic aspects of the place. The moment you walk into the spectacular entrance past enormous fountains you know you are someplace special. The rooms are large and beautifully decorated and the service is fantastic. The staff are all dressed in elaborate turbans, with huge smiles and quick to meet any needs. The dining room was amazing. We ate in the continental restaurant for dinner and every bite was delicious. We even were treated to a full tour of the kitchen after complimentary round of sorbet. We met ALL of the kitchen staff, who also had big welcoming smiles and seemed proud of their spotless and beautiful kitchen, complete with a separate space for chocolate preparation. Breakfast was a wonderful buffet and they then brought us an Indian specialty plate to make sure we tried local cuisine. It was amazing.nThere was a dance presentation around the pool before dinner and the grounds are completely over the top. nThe best part of all, beyond the service, rooms, flute player in the lobby, food, etc. was the fact you can take the hotel golf cart to the entrance of the Taj, making it especially easy to visit both at sunset when it turns pink and at sunrise, when few tourists are present and you can witness the inlaid stone sparkling in the morning sun. We did not want to leave and wish we could have stayed longer. It is expensive and worth every penny.

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Decoding food buying behaviour of consumers

April 23, 2019 SHARE
This section of the IMRB food report attempts to unravel and understand the changing food & grocery consumption behaviour on the basis of key consumer insights and understand the emerging trends that will shape the future and profitability of food retail in India.
Food is the most primal of human needs and, especially in the Indian culture, food forms the core of our lifestyles. In this section, we move forward to the business of food in India – with nearly 12 million kirana stores which in many ways are the backbone of the rural economy.
Quite obviously, food is the largest retail consumption category in India, accounting for 33 per cent of the overall consumption expenditure. It is also the largest opportunity area, especially in times when market dynamics are changing dramatically and consumer behaviour is no longer generic.
In today’s market, anything is possible – a grocery store where you don’t have to stand in a check out queue, where you don’t need to fish for your wallet to pay and where all that you want gets automatically delivered to your shopping basket, rather than tediously looking through racks and racks of SKUs at the store! Technology is changing shopping behaviour across categories in India.
The old paradigms are changing every day and already the definition of ‘going’ shopping has assumed several meanings in an urban shopper’s life. The first big change is the fading boundary between the brick and mortar and digital world. The shopper is moving seamlessly between the physical and digital world, and the mobile is fast becoming the central processing unit of her life! She is buying more and more food online – grocery buying on the internet has grown by 14% over last year. Over all F&G e-tailing is the fastest growing category in India.
However, while e-commerce is growing, brick and mortar continues to be the mainstay of food retailing in India. And clearly, brick and mortar is here to stay. The powerful sensory experiences of visiting a physical store has a great impact on the purchase behaviour – the smell of bread, the sight of fresh fruits and vegetables, the excitement of unplanned discovery, and the comfort of human interaction cannot be undermined.
However, this does not imply that all is well – brick and mortar F&G stores of the future need to be clearly positioned, be relevant and differentiated from other retail channels. The consumer’s enthusiasm to visit the store is directly proportional to their expectations being met – the shopping experience, store design, service, variety and uniqueness of the product.
We are almost moving to “me-tailing” as the newest format of customised, bespoke shopping experiences of the future customers in urban india.
In the hitherto small category of modern format stores, convenience seems to be the biggest driver of visitation – the fact that all categories and brands are available under one roof. It is apparent that “location convenience”, “customised services” and “easy goods return/exchange facilities” drive a customer towards kirana stores while “product choice”, “efficient store-management” and “value-enhancing services” attract customers towards modern retailers.
Many consumers, in fact, equate grocery shopping to be an enjoyable activity that enhances their sense of self and creates positive feelings.
Some older consumers look forward to their monthly/ weekly grocery shopping trip to the kirana store as an important social activity, rather than just another chore. Technology can create convenience, but may not substitute a real shopping experience. Kiranas, in fact, have emerged the biggest winners in the race towards Modern Retail. While international and national biggies experimented with their store formats, Kiranas quietly and swiftly redeemed themselves by forging stronger engagements with consumers. So much so that today the retail giants in India are tying up with local kiranas or neighbourhood stores to boost their operations.
Women, mothers particularly, continue to be ánnapurnas’, shouldering the onus of nutrition for Indian families. The only shift in their behaviour is the near perfect juggle between time consuming home-made food and the quick and convenient ready to eat/ packaged food. It is also an ongoing tussle between health and convenience. And while she goes food shopping, the factors influencing her food & grocery shopping are: budget, promotional strategy, festival offers, discounts, availability, billing speed and ambience.
As part of IMRB’s retail practice we continuously connect with the physical and online marketplace to understand the consumer from the consumption and psychographic point of view, and by looking and analysing the trends. We look at how consumers are shopping, track their preferences and offer insights on how retailers and CPG companies can use these insights to improve the shopping experience, drive increased footfalls and sales across channels. We also examine this data to determine the trends – how shopping behaviour is changing and how it affects the future of F&G retail in India.
Some of these trends are predictable and in line with the conventional wisdom, like, for example, we know that in absolute terms, the amount spent on food increases with a rise in income, etc.
However, there are other trends that indicate paradigm shifts in the consumer buying behaviour , like, for example, the change in the food palate of the Indian consumer, and the passionate adoption of ‘foreign’foods in daily life.
A few key trends are discussed below: A new breed of bold & experimentative consumers has emerged
– Indian consumers are becoming more and more indulgent with food (and vegetables), and they are experimenting with new and foreign cuisines; they are seeking variety and are open to international brands. They profess to enjoy foreign food and are ready to pay more for premium or organic food items. This is a huge shift from the last decade.
– As a result, new foods like quinoa, different kinds of brands, etc, are now available at regular supermarkets and large kiranas today and they have an increasing shopper base.
– Consumption of new and exotic food items, salad dressings, syrups, etc., have gone up dramatically over the last year.
The future is going to be HEALTHY! Indian consumers are now conscious of the effect their busy lifestyle has on their health. They equate fast food with junk and are showing a marked preference towards branded packaged food, fruit juices, health drinks, low fat , organic food, etc. Packaged fruit juice consumption as a category has grown 15% over the last year. In order to maintain a healthy diet, consumers are limiting the intake of high calorie and high cholesterol food items. They are more likely to indulge in new food items, which they think can also address their health concerns.
Convenience is now the new driver of consumption: Rapid urbanisation, demanding lifestyles have increased time-starved consumers exponentially and the segment that values convenience has grown – consumers are more likely to seek for convenience in their consumption or shopping for food items, over other considerations. This has led to a rising incidence of consumption of food items like ready-to-eat foods, processed foods and packaged foods like frozen paneer, vegetables, etc. The consumption of packaged pasta alone has gone up by 28% over last year! Even for eating out, there is a conspicuous growth of consumers visiting shopping malls for eating out at Food Courts than stand-alone high street restaurants/ joints.
The cocktail of old and new with a twist!
– Food products dominate the lifestyle occasions in Indian life and the combined ‘food’ category accounts for 29% share of the festival wallet.
– Packaged sweets, Juices, Fruits etc. are the most preferred gifting items; chocolates is becoming a new ‘mithai’ though contributed mainly by the north and east.
Old learnings shaping new models The digital natives are representing the new consumption base in India; online shopping is a deeply embedded behaviour in these new customers, a fact which will define how food retailing will take shape in the coming years. It will be critical to include digital touch points along the entire path to purchase. From mom and pop kiranas to super markets, hypermarkets to online grocers, Indian food shopping has slowly arrived full circle with a learning that home delivery is the only constant. Home delivery of groceries and other daily staples like milk was a well-established tradition in Indian families and even though food shopping has become complex, involving several channels, a new model has emerged where consumers can visit the retailer’s website, use an app and pick up the phone to order at home.
Men are from MARS, no longer! Family grocery shopping has been the accepted domain of women for the longest time; however, modern, social and demographic shifts have challenged traditional gender roles within the family unit. Indian men are now engaged in grocery shopping more freely and frequently There has been a 4x increase in male shoppers (Y-o-Y ) compared to 3x growth in women. 69% of the online F&G shoppers in India are in the age group of 25-34 years, and more than half of them are men.
To conclude, the Indian Food Consumer is hungry and the appetite is growing voraciously. Growing disposable incomes, exposure and ambition is breeding even more consumption. The global recession seems to have had little impact on the urban Indian shopper’s consumption habits and her food shopping and consumption behaviour has only evolved.
The emergence of new channels and the combined growth of all of them in tandem is a testament to how hungry the consumer is. What this really means is that convenience is king. And the consumer has to be at the centre of the food business strategy, which should allow her to decide when, where, and how to shop. The consumer should be able to order anytime, anywhere, and from any device. Consumers should have the privilege to get their purchases in the store, at a separate delivery location, or through home delivery; they should have the freedom to decide their own shopping and delivery or pick-up windows to fit their packed schedules; and to be able to return items seamlessly.
The shopping behaviour of the future will be defined by many micro moments leading to the zero moment of truth. Winning at the zero moment will be the new measure for success in Food Retail.

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2019 Starts in Limelight for Holiday Inn Dubai – Al Barsha with 2 Awards!

Home > Blog > News > 2019 Starts in Limelight for Holiday Inn Dubai – Al Barsha with 2 Awards! 2019 Starts in Limelight for Holiday Inn Dubai – Al Barsha with 2 Awards!
|| A WINNER IS A DREAMER WHO NEVER GIVES UP ~ NELSON MANDELA ||
27th March, 2019 | Holiday Inn Dubai – Al Barsha (HIAB) begins the New Year by painting illuminating perspectives, by receiving TWO prestigious awards in the region.
The First Award recognized the commitment of the hotel towards UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and exercising policies that protect diversity of the people employed promoting a work culture of unity and care top down.
Competing against the region’s most prominent companies from diverse industries, Holiday Inn Dubai – Al Barsha was awarded as having ‘Best Workplace & HR Practices’ by the third edition of the Gulf Sustainability and CSR Awards. At this moment of recognition, CEO of HIAB, Mrs. Roxana Jaffer stated: “This award is a confirmation of the Holiday Inn Al Barsha being a responsible business, as we profess that our Profits are only defined by putting People and Planet first. Thank you GULF SUSTAINABILITY AND CSR AWARDS for your vote of confidence especially over the prominent contenders from the Gulf who represent several industries.” The second award accorded was for HIAB’s specialty Thai restaurant, The Royal Budha being authenticated and certified as Highly Commended Best Thai by Time Out Dubai Restaurant Awards 2019.
“It’s no wonder that the Royal Budha’s service, ambience, the décor and indeed quality of food lovingly prepared by Chefs from Thailand, being note-worthy are commended year after year through different awards. But this award from Time Out is the icing on the cake!” stated Asantha Colambage, Manager, The Royal Budha. The restaurant team has been empowered to know that their awe-inspiring quality service has again been endorsed and corroborated against some of the prominent names in hospitality industry. With these great achievements, we invite you all to experience the splendor engulfed in elegant and superior service standards at Holiday Inn Dubai. Indeed we will keep you posted as we attain other accolades, which indeed we will, being worthy!!! About Holiday Inn Dubai – Al Barsha Set in the heart of New Dubai, Holiday Inn Dubai – Al Barsha is a perfect blend of contemporary design and classic elegance. The hotel has 309 rooms including 54 suites. Each room is equipped with the latest facilities, tastefully decorated to meet every guest’s needs and comfort. Business houses have access to a wide variety of conference venues equipped with state-of-the-art technology. Completing the Holiday Inn experience are the award winning restaurants “The Royal Budha” (Thai), “Gharana” (Indian) and “Xennya Terrace” (Rooftop Bar & Lounge) as well as bars, banquet facilities and impeccable service. A Full floor of 53 rooms from its portfolio of 309 elegant and contemporary rooms have been refurbished and upgraded to stylish and chic Club rooms. From creative Thai cuisine at The Royal Budha, to traditional Indian experience coupled with enchanting live entertainment at Gharana, to an array of generous buffets at The Gem Garden, the hotel offers a variety of f&b options. Related Posts

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Kare-Kare

tofu vegetables (best with eggplant)
I’ll talk about other suitable vegetables which you can consider later to make your vegetarian kare kare.
Next, most of the flavour comes from ground peanuts and onions. Also, it is often coloured with a condiment called annatto .
Remember to serve it hot! That’s when kare kare is at its best. If you are looking for even more flavour, then I have a handy trick in mind. Keep the stew in the fridge for a day or two so that the flavours fuse together. You’ll see that once you reheat the kare kare, it will be even better and the taste profile will be even more intense!
As a starter, you can also consider serving taro laing or mie ayam (a traditional soup with noodles).
When I heard there’s a Filipino restaurant opening in London, called Romulo Cafe , I jumped at the opportunity to learn more about the culture and food.
Director Rowena Romulo and head chef Lorenzo Maderas graciously invited me to do a three recipe photo shoot and needless to say it was great fun and an enlightening experience.
history of Filipino cuisine
It is said that the first version of this stew came from the province of Pampanga . Pampanga is known as the culinary heart of Filipino cuisine. Other historians argue that this dish actually is from Manilla.
In a historical sense Filipino cuisine reminds me of South Africa. The latter’s food is heavily influenced by the Dutch, who invaded the country, followed by the British. During the colonial period the French, Greek and Italians came. Cape Malay cooking hails from the Indo-Asian slaves that were brought along from Bengal, Java and Malaysia. South Africa also has a large Indian community and, of course, there are the indigenous people with their own way of cooking as well.
Philippines’ history stretches back much further though. Thousands of years ago the Chinese and Taiwanese moved into the area known as the Philippines, which is where its ample use of soy, tofu, bean sprout and fish sauce comes from. The Philippines has an ideal climate for rice, hence the plethora of rice and noodle dishes. Trade took place with Malaya and Java, which introduced new food and cooking methods. Spices were imported from India and Arabia too. In the 16th century the Spanish, with some Mexican influence, came along with their tomatoes, chilli peppers, corn and potatoes which added a completely new element to this already eclectic cuisine. kare kare oxtail
Generally speaking, the stew is made with oxtail. Usually, the skin is left on. The tail is cut into small pieces. Sometimes up to 2-inch pieces. Also, it is very common to include ox tripe for extra flavour. You should boil these until they are completely tender.
The best way to prepare an oxtail kare kare or any kare kare verison with meat is with a slow cooker. Usually, you must wait ages for the meat to tenderise. However, with the slow cooker or even a pressure cooker, the meat will tenderise completely in no time. Let’s be honest, tough oxtail doesn’t sound too appetising does it? beef kare kare recipe
If you don’t want to use oxtail, but still wish to include that rich umami flavour of the meat, then substitute with beef. You can use beef cheeks or beef chuck. Just remember to slice them up into smaller pieces. pork kare kare
Similarly, you can also use pork. For the best version with pork, make sure to use pork hocks or pork shanks. You might also know this version as pata kare kare. vegetarian kare kare recipe
To make this a vegetarian version of kare kare, you should consider these typical ingredients: green beans

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