Sarnia-Lambton restaurant scene booming

Sarnia-Lambton restaurant scene booming

Cathy Dobson – The Sarnia Journal, April 2, 2019
The local restaurant industry is experiencing a flurry of moves and expansions this spring.
Just a year ago Burger Rebellion began serving upscale pub fare at the Refined Fool brewery on London Road. Now, says owner Chris Lewis, those burgers will soon be available at two more locations, one in downtown Sarnia, the other in Corunna.
“It’s part of my job to grow the company,” Lewis said. “We knew we wanted to stay in Lambton County and began looking for space that would be good for us.”
When the Corunna Restaurant at 391 Lyndoch St. closed in February, Burger Rebellion found its next location. George and Helene Tsaprailis had operated a successful business there for 46 years before retiring, proving the location works with the right product and work ethic.
Lewis oversees day-to-day operations for Burger Rebellion, with partners Nathan Colquhoun, Dan Slade, Robb Armstrong and Chad Ouellette.
The five local men started the business in a seasonal food truck parked at Front and Davis streets. None has a food and beverage background – Lewis has a religious studies degree and a Masters in international development – but diners responded to their everything-fresh-and-made-from-scratch approach.
“At London Road, we’ve figured out what we didn’t know and ironed out the kinks,” said Lewis. “We learned a lot of lessons this year about staffing numbers, inventory control and making sure you have enough food prepped.”
When the Corunna location opens, likely in late April, the brand will have its first stand-alone restaurant with some significant menu tweaks.
For instance, the Corunna Burger Rebellion will serve breakfast, offer a banquet hall for 40, and sell conventional beer brands in addition to Refined Fool craft beer. The core menu of burgers and fries will be augmented with salads and nachos.
The restaurant is getting a facelift with fresh paint, modern fixtures, lots of shiny steel and new flooring. It will have seating for 120 people and employ about 15.
Shortly after, in early May, Lewis expects Burger Rebellion’s third location to open. It will occupy the former Republik Eatery at 211 Christina Street N. The building fronts both Christina and Front streets with a kitchen in the centre and a patio on Christina.
The downtown Burger Rebellion will open up simultaneously with the new location for Café Mexico, another restaurant Lewis owns with Colquhoun, Slade and other investors.
Café Mexico opened at 410 Front St., across from Centennial Park, in November of 2017. It’s doing well, says Colquhoun, but the partners feel it’s just outside what most Sarnians consider the downtown.
“We need to be closer to downtown and all that’s happening there,” he said. “Business was great in the summer but slowed a little in winter.”
Mexico will share the former Republik building with Burger Rebellion but face Front Street. The two establishments will share one kitchen but have distinctly different styles, separate dining rooms and bars.
Mexico’s offerings will expand, said Colquhoun.
“We’ve been restricted by the size of our kitchen and bar at our current location and want to have a bigger cocktail, drink and food menu.”
Meanwhile, Indian fare joined the downtown’s restaurant options a month ago.
Sitara Indian Cuisine, which has operated at 1308 London Rd. the past seven years, now has a second location called Sitara Downtown, at 138 Cromwell St.
Owner Manjit Singh says he has seating for 20 as well as a busy takeout service, that’s ready in five to 10 minutes and caters to the office crowd.
Sitara Downtown is open 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Monday to Thursday; 11 a.m.- 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays.
Do you have a great idea for a business story? Send it to cathy.dobson@thesarniajournal.ca .
Read more on Sarnia-Lambton Economic Partnership .

Read More…

Sindhi food: A vibrant cuisine hidden from the Pakistani and Indian public

Maryam Jillani How do you tell the story of a cuisine that lives and breathes in two countries and refuses to identify itself with either? I spent the last few weeks speaking to Sindhis in Pakistan, India and overseas about the history of their families and their food. Sindhi cuisine, which features a range of complex flavours through simple, seasonal ingredients, defies simple categorisations. It is informed by the subcontinent’s rich migrant history, yet firmly rooted in its geography while tying thousands of diaspora Sindhis to a land they might never have visited. “When my grandparents migrated to Pune from Sukkur, they wanted to make the area’s customs their own. They were Hindus, of course, but our customs weren’t very Hindu. They were closer to Muslims,” Ankiet Gulabani tells me. He runs the popular Mumbai-based food blog, Belly Over Mind , that covers a range of modern and traditional recipes (You can also find on the blog the recipes for the dishes in the photos below). Pooja Makhijani, a writer based in New Jersey whose grandparents migrated from Karachi and Hyderabad, also found that the food Sindhis grow up eating — bone marrow, liver, kidney — are unfamiliar to many other Hindu north Indians. While Ankiet’s family was initially conscious about the distinctiveness of their cuisine in Maharashtra, like other Sindhi families who migrated during Partition, they did not give up their Sindh culinary traditions. In fact, Sindhis both in India and overseas predominantly cook Sindhi food at home. “People who are displaced, in whatever way, cling to their customs, language and traditions. (Hindu) Sindhis have not changed. They have exactly the same food habits regardless of where they are,” Pooja tells me. Sindhi khatti daal.—Belly Over Mind While Sindhi food, influenced by Central Asian culinary traditions, certainly has strains of Mughal cuisine, it is distinctive enough that even in Pakistan, Sindhis find that the food they have at home is not necessarily what their friends eat. Speaking to an old college friend, Shahwar, who grew up in Karachi but whose family is from Larkana, she said she did not realise that her friends did not necessarily grow up eating bhindi aloo with roti or bori kutti for breakfast or busri , which is a sweet roti . Despite the rich and accessible flavours of Sindhi food, it has not found its way to Pakistani or Indian mainstream cuisine. While you can find Sindhi food in smaller highway restaurants in the province in Pakistan, it is difficult to find dedicated Sindhi restaurants that serve the full range of Sindhi classics in major cities. Sumayya Usmani, Glasgow-based food writer and author of Under the Tamarind Tree , finds that the enjoyment of Sindhi food has remained regional. She hypothesises it could be because Sindhi food is less meat heavy and spice laden, or that Sindhi recipe sharing is mostly within families. To this point, Ankiet laughs that Sindhis like their home-cooked food so much that they likely will not seek out Sindhi food at restaurants. Sindhi carrot bhaji.—Belly Over Mind We may be turning a corner. There is a promising trend of new restaurants dedicated to Sindhi food — such as Café Sindh in Karachi or Sindhful in Mumbai — and of young Sindhis excited to share traditional recipes with the broader public. Sapna Ajwani, a London-based chef, quit her job in banking four years ago to start a supper club focused on Sindhi food. Sapna’s family are Amil Hindus originally from Hyderabad, Pakistan. She learned to prepare Sindhi food by watching her mother, aunts and grandmothers cook at home. Sapna’s supper clubs feature a range of Sindhi dishes that are rooted in her family’s Rajput history: bhee chaat , which is steamed lotus stem in chutney or kairkumatsangri , desert beans and berries cooked in mustard oil. She would often serve Sindhi food to her friends who encouraged her to start a Sindh-focused supper club since the flavours were so distinct from the Indian and Pakistani food they normally found at restaurants. Kutti.—Belly Over Mind Sindhi cuisine draws upon a stunning variety of greens in their food. The Sindhi staple, sai bhaji , for instance, is a mix of lentils and at least three types of greens: palak , methi , dill and sometimes khata palak . Along with the use of greens, it has a push-pull of texture and flavour, Pooja and Ankiet explain. There is tartness through spices such as amchur , dried pomegranate seeds and tamarind; and frequent coupling of sweet and savoury. Daal pakwan , for instance, by itself is bitter and creamy but it is served with sweet lolas that are thick flatbreads doused in syrup. While some Sindhi dishes remain unknown to the public, others have become quite popular. Kausar Ahmed, culinary instructor and author of the cookbook The Karachi Kitchen , grew up eating Sindhi biryani and palla (hilsa) every Friday. She would make weekly trips to the fish market with her mother to get palla machi , which is a popular Sindhi delicacy cooked in numerous ways. One method, according to Kausar, is to marinate the fish in a dry spice rub and fresh ginger and garlic and pan fry it till the skin is crispy. The other is to prepare it in a flavourful gravy and serve it alongside cumin rice, green chutney and kachumber salad. Palla.—Belly Over Mind Ankiet tells me that palla carries great significance for Sindhis, as Jhulelal, who in Sindhi Hinduism is regarded as the incarnation of the Hindu diety Varuna, is frequently depicted as riding the fish. According to Sindhi folklore, Jhulelal controls the currents of the Indus and when palla swims against the current upstream to reach the Jhulelal/Zinda Pir shrine in Sukkur, it is rewarded with its distinct taste. In a description of Jhulelal and his relationship to the Indus and palla , Parineeta Dandekar of the South Asian Network of Dams describes the fish as the unofficial regional dish of Sindh. It is the delicacy of honour in most Sindhi festivals and given to relatives visiting from cities. Ankiet’s grandmother frequently speaks of the hilsa she had in Pakistan. While they live in Mumbai, that is a port city, he said that his grandmother finds that the hilsa she has here is never as good as the one they had in Pakistan. I hope that Ankiet will one day try palla machi in Pakistan and that it lives up to his grandmother’s memories. Maryam Jillani is a Washington, DC-based aid worker and food writer. She is founder of the award-winning blog Pakistan Eats and was TASTE magazine’s first Cook in Residence. You can follow her on Twitter @pakistaneats Click to expand… my mami ji is sindhi and she makes tasty sindhi kardi

Read More…

Chicken 65 Biriyani Recipe | How to cook Chicken 65 Biryani.

Chicken 65 Biriyani Recipe | How to cook Chicken 65 Biryani . Sharing today another delight chicken 65 biryani. I feel chicken cooked in the usual biryani is not my cup of tea and hence I try to prepare either Chicken Tikka Biryani or Chicken 65 biryani, coz in this way the chicken is cooked and then kept in the dum is really flavourful. Chicken Dum biryani is also my favourite thought its bit elaborate process every grain is worth the taste. Now lets see how to cook Chicken 65 biryani. Chicken 65 Biryani Recipe Recipe Cuisine: South Indian| Recipe Category: Mains Prep Time: 30 mins | Cook Time: 40 mins | Serves: 3 | Author: Sharmila Kingsly Ingredients:
For chicken 65 Chicken – ½ kg Chilli powder – 1 tsp Garam Masala -1 tsp Turmeric powder – ¼ tsp Ginger garlic paste – 1 tbsp Coriander powder – ½ tsp Egg – 1 Corn flour / Rice flour – 2 tsp Red Food colour – a pinch (optional) Lemon juice – ½ tsp Oil for deep frying Salt as needed Curry Leaves – 2 springs Other Ingredients: Basmati Rice – 2 cups Oil / Ghee – 2 tbsp Fennel seeds – 1 tsp Bay leaf – 2 Black Stone Flower – few Cinnamon stick – 1 inch piece Onion – 3 Ginger garlic paste – 1tsp Mint Leaves – a handful Coriander Leaves – ¼ cup tightly packed Tomato – 2 Chilli powder – 1 tbsp Garam Masala – 1 tsp Turmeric powder – ½ tsp Food Colour – ¼ tsp Salt as needed Lemon Juice – 2 tsp Water – 4 cups Method: 1. In a mixing bowl add in the Chicken and then add in the chilli powder, Garam Masala, Turmeric powder, Ginger garlic paste and coriander powder. 2. Break open an egg and mix everything together. Next add in Corn flour and Red Food colour if using. Next add in the lemon juice and mix everything. Allow it to marinate for 3 hours. 3. Heat a pan with oil for deep frying . 4. Once the oil is hot drop in the marinated chicken pieces and fry in a medium flame along with few curry leaves. 5. Cook till the chicken turns golden and its cooked completely. Drain in paper towels. 6. Meanwhile soak the rice in water for 30 mins. Heat another pan with oil once its hot add all the whole spices and fry for few secs. Next add in the onions. 7. Saute till the onions turn glossy and then add in the ginger garlic paste. Cook till the raw smell leaves. 8. Next add in the Mint and coriander leaves saute till the leaves shrink and then add in the tomatoes. Cook till mushy. If you have saved the masala which was left after marinating the chicken. You could add it to the biryani now. 9. Mix well and then add in the chilli powder, Turmeric powder, Garam Masala and Salt. 10. Next add in the soaked Rice and saute for few mins and then add in the measured Water. And then add in the food color. Dont mix the rice after adding the food colour. You can omit this if you don’t prefer. 11. Finally add in the lemon juice and check for salt and spice and add if anything is required. Close and cook the rice. Once the rice is fully cooked fluff the rice and dig a small portion of the rice to this add in the prepared chicken 65 and cover. Seal it properly till you serve. Flavourful Chicken 65 Biryani is now ready to be served. Notes: Serve hot with Onion Raita I used an electric rice cooker for preparing the biryani. You can also use the Pressure cooker to cook the rice. In that case. After closing the cooker. Wait till the steam comes well and then put the whistles and then cook in high flame for 4 mins and then switch off the cooker. Wait till the pressure is released on its own and then open the cooker and fluff the rice. Click here for the detailed Recipe of Chicken 65 .
Enjoy this yummy biryani with Onion Raita .
A small recap of the Mega BM in the past: Day 2 April 2017 : Basbousa Sept 2017 : Kerala Olan April 2018 : Kodo Millet Tamarind Rice .
Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM#99 An InLinkz Link-up

Read More…

The Luxury Show at Taj Banjara Hyderabad

Event Description The Luxury Show at Taj Banjara Hyderabad
The Luxury Show is a semi – Annual pop-up show in Hyderabad. Which brings designers and entrepreneurs. Creating a Fashion Eco system. We will have an array of premium designer outlets and a handpicked range of products for all age groups Along with some amazing Food and kids play area.
Exhibition in Hyderabad
When : 13th April 2019, Saturday
Time : 12:00 PM Onwards
Venue : Hotel Taj Banjara Hyderabad
For more details contact : 9121870885/ 7569203237 Organizers Share
Visited 9 times, 9 Visits today Your Rating for this listing: Review Taj Krishna, Road Number 1, Mada Manzil, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad, Telangana, India March 28, 2019 To March 30, 2019
Style Bazaar Exhibitions – Ugadi Special in Hyderabad STYLE BAZAAR showcases a unique exhibition exploring the rare fashion pieces from the best designers on 28th 29th & 30th March, 2019 in a… Read More Indian Foodies HUB, Road Number 12, NBT Nagar, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad, Telangana, India November 11, 2018 12:00 pm To 5:00 pm
La Musica – Eat with Beats at Indian Foodies Hub Hyderabad Live music, Board games, Delicious multi – cuisine food and three types of different ambiances at… Read More Radisson Blu Plaza Hotel Hyderabad Banjara Hills, Road Number 6, Green Valley, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad, Telangana, India March 4, 2019 To March 31, 2019
Magnificent Mexican Meals at Radisson Hotel Banjara Hills Hyderabad Indulge in our spicy and tangy Mexican delights with our exclusive Cuisine of the Month.

Read More…

Get your tastebuds ready for a great line up of free foodie treats at An Lanntair’s fifth food festival on April 13

Get your tastebuds ready for a great line up of free foodie treats at An Lanntair’s fifth food festival on April 13 Sampling the foodie treats on offer at last year’s festival. Published: 11:59 Share this article
An Lanntair arts centre in Stornoway is set to celebrate Hebridean cuisine (and a bit of the exotic with Polish, Indian and Korean recipes) at its free Food Festival on Saturday, April 13th.
The Fèille (Food Festival) will return for its fifth year with a FREE menu of offerings from across the Hebrides – followed by a Hebridean Banquet at 7pm, offering three courses for £24.95. There will be many traditional Hebridean food recipes on offer on the day.
This year’s event will begin with a morning-into-lunch session where the emphasis will be on local and traditional foods.
The main hosts for the day will be gourmet, enthusiast and expert practitioner Alasdair Macleod who will be assisted and enabled – particularly on the deeply traditional aspects of island cuisine – by Cudaig.
Roddy Murray, programmer of the Food Festival, said: “The Food Festival is great for a day’s grazing, sampling and nibbling.
“And it’s a perfect appetiser for the Hebridean Banquet in the restaurant that same evening.
“An Lanntair are grateful to those taking part, amateur and professional, the suppliers, the providers, participants and – of course, not least – you the consumers. You are what you eat. So eat Hebridean.”
MORNING TREATS
10am Baking Hot: Jayne Poustie from the Woodlands Centre Art of the Duff, Secret of the scone, Oatcake
10.30 Baking the Isles: Stag Bakery: Daniel Smith, Catherine Maclean
11am Cake Decoration. Edible Art. Almost too good to eat.
11.30 Sheer Butchery. A Family Favourite where a pig is dismembered. Macleod & Macleod.
12pm Venison: Deer but not dear.
12.15 Smoking Area: Ranald Fraser, Stornoway Smokehouse. (+ optional tour of the Smokery afterwards)
12.35 Collam Skink: Ruaraidh Munro. The west coast version of the east coast classic
1pm DOUBLE HEADER: (Two heads are better than one) Alasdair Maacleod will present Ceann Cropaig: Cod’s Head ‘Haggis’ AND Cudaig on the now banned ‘delicacy’Ceann-Caora: Sheep’s Head Soup: 1.45pm Feamainn: Seaweed: Three-free-seaweed samples. Steve Dilworth
AFTERNOON TREATS
2pm Cutting the Mustard: The Hebridean Mustard Company
2.30 Poland: Eastern Europe. Marcin Juscek
3pm Feast from the East. Manoj
3.30 Korea: Kimchi. Eunkyung Jade:
WITH EXTRA SIDE DISHES AND MUSIC BY RODDY B ON THE BOX! Trending Stornoway Port Authority awards £5m marina contract **VIDEO** History made by SYRFC Ladies Camanachd Leòdhais claim record win Urgent need for ferries investment says Western Isles Council Loganair aim to reduce impact of strike action The Essentials

Read More…

Israel’s Tourism Triumph

The BDS movement’s massive fail. April 2, 2019 Edwin Black
The virulently anti-Israel movement known as Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions—BDS—is roiling through campuses, overflowing into city councils, encroaching into corporate boardrooms, and now chomping at the essence of Israel’s special niche in the world: its travel and tourism industry. Everywhere, the boycotters have been asking to isolate Israel. BDS even convinced Airbnb to stop listing Jewish locations in Judea and Samaria—also known as the West Bank (a term invented after Jordan invaded in 1948, when the UN’s partition suggestion failed to create two states). In Ireland, a bill advancing through Parliament may criminalize visiting the old city and even purchasing lunch or a keepsake.
Whereas similar boycotts against other countries have inflicted withering effects on national economies, in Israel—it simply hasn’t worked. The opposite is true. Yes, boycotters are busy demonizing Israel. Yet despite this, Israel’s tourism industry has rocketed to a singular triumph and now employs tens of thousands. Flights are packed and new non-stops are being added across the globe. Even though new luxury hotels are going up as fast as the Mideast sun will dry concrete, rooms remain in high demand and, thus, are scarce and expensive. Israel has become world famous for creative cuisine and trendy eateries; so if you want to get a table at the most popular restaurants, you’ll need to book weeks in advance.
Travel and tourism to Israel has dramatically changed. It’s not just synagogue sisterhoods and Jewish organizations. Swelling up from Israel’s “Start-up Nation,” world famous top chef culture, and hard-won penetration of markets beyond America and West Europe, as well as its sophisticated travel industry burnishing, Israel is now a destination for the entire world. Traditional Jewish-American travelers from Miami to Seattle must now compete with Silicon Valley techies, Chinese students, Indian tourists, East European Christian pilgrims, and diverse businessmen from across the planet. The numbers are multiplying.
In 2016, 2.9 million total worldwide visitors visited Israel. By the close of 2018, that number had boomed to 4.1 million —and the totals keep climbing. Within the coming decade, Israel expects to employ 98,000 people in its tourism sector.
When Israeli tourism prospers, so does the Palestinian community. Christian pilgrims make a beeline for Bethlehem. Thus, tourism breeds economic interdependence and strengthens co-existence.
Arrivals stream in from everywhere.
Today, most North American travelers to Israel are not Jewish; they are Christian, often seeking Biblical discovery. From North America, Jews comprise about 40 to 45 percent of the travelers, while Christians generally hover at about 60 percent year to year, according to official estimates. While the Jewish-Christian percentages remain the same, the growth spurt for North America has seen the overall numbers increase by 42 percent since 2016.
In 2009, only 20,000 Indians visited Israel, reports Israel’s tourism office in New Delhi. Some years ago, Israel hosted Indian travel agents knowing that in India, such agents book most of the travel. Reciprocal travel programs tapped such markets as India’s Kerala Christians . Dramatically improved diplomatic relations between New Delhi and Jerusalem combined with thrice-weekly direct Air India Boeing 787 Dreamliner service—which was granted special Saudi flyover permission, saving more than two hours—has created a steady flow of Indian visitors. This year, Israel expects more than 80,000 Indian arrivals, with travel officials working to achieve a further 65 percent increase . That may happen if, as planned, the Israeli film industry entices Bollywood producers to use Israeli locations.
In 2015, only 30,000 tourists visited Israel from China. But when direct flights between Ben Gurion airport and numerous Chinese cities were added, the number more than trebled to 100,000-plus annually. Today, China is Israel’s greatest growth market. Celebrity Chinese chefs are now flown in, and Chinese-speaking guides are easily found.
Air connections are the lifeblood of Israel’s tourism as well as its international viability. Nowadays you can fly nonstop to Israel from numerous North American cities. From New York’s JFK, Delta is launching a twice daily nonstop. From Newark’s Liberty, United also flies nonstop twice daily. From Washington, D.C.’s Dulles, United will soon inaugurate thrice weekly non-stop service. From Toronto, Air Canada offers daily non-stops. From Montreal, Air Canada will fly twice weekly during the summer. From San Francisco, United flies daily, primarily for the surging nexus to Silicon Valley.
North American carriers all compete with El Al , which is by far the dominant carrier linking our continent with Israel—boasting 45 nonstop flights weekly that carry more than 50,000 passengers per month. For many Israel-bound travelers, El Al is the one and only carrier. And it has vastly improved. With the exception of the Jewish sabbath and holidays, Israel’s star-emblazoned national carrier flies day or night, rain or shine, good news or bad news, rockets or not. Its unique extra security, where young security staffers at the airport ask invasive personal questions to evaluate risk, are sometimes viewed as a mix between reassurance, ritual, and a Jewish guilt trip. “ You’re coming to Israel? Why now ?” Or the classic: “ Who do you know in Israel ?” Answer: “ Everyone .”
El Al has conquered labor problems, on-board religious tiffs, and more to expand and enhance its daily service to and from multiple U.S. cities. Not only can you fly El Al nonstop direct from New York, Newark, and Miami, but now also from Boston, Los Angeles, Toronto, and this summer, from Las Vegas and San Francisco. In spring 2020, Chicago service starts. Most of all, El Al predominantly offers Dreamliner service. On its 747 and 777 fleet, El Al still offers Economy Seat PLUS , relatively affordable, spacious, and comfortable—especially in the bulkhead row . For many traveling to Israel, El Al’s Economy Seat PLUS is now the go-to booking. What’s more, you can purchase business class check-in at either JFK or Newark for $35–$45, and your travel experience will be delightful. The lounge is restful and stocked with good food and beverages, allowing you await departure in luxury.
Israel’s tourism triumph would not have been possible without an airline triumph as well. That triumph in the skies has finally happened.

Read More…

The Lords and Barons – a touch of Royal pub dining in Kolkata!

Categories Restaurant review food review , foodiedada review , gastropub kolkata , gastropub park street , new pub kolkata , park street pub , royal diner , royal pub dining , the lords and barons , TLB review Leave a Comment on The Lords and Barons – a touch of Royal pub dining in Kolkata!
Somehow Kolkatans love beautiful architecture, especially if it’s from the Victorian era. The intricate carvings, high ceilings and larger than life structures and architectures have always fascinated us. In fact, most of the iconic Calcutta structures, sculptures and buildings like Writer’s Building, GPO, Indian Museum, Victoria Memorial, etc were built during the British era by the East India Company obviously having a European, somewhat a Greco-Roman touch! And we have somewhat inherited the natural liking for this architecture. But frankly speaking, Kolkata somewhat lacked this touch of heritage in eating places or pubs till date, unless it is an age-old eating house. All set for Royal dining!
But a couple of weeks back I discovered this royal touch of the bygone era in a newly opened city pub – The Lords and Barons , which actually made my day! I just kept gazing at the intricate wood carvings, antique stained glass window, high ceilings, wooden furniture from a bygone era, and more! This place actually brings together everything that a Kolkatan lives for – delicious food, good music, royal architecture, and yes, a dose of your favorite spirits. A dose of dreamy cocktails!
It will let you go happy high with your loved ones in an unmatched mystical ambiance that you need to experience, words aren’t really enough to express that amazing atmosphere! Bar Counter (1st floor), Lords and Barons
Basically, Lords and Barons is housed in an age-old building at Park Street (opposite Hard Rock Café) which anyway had all the touches of Victorian architecture and loads of heritage attached to it. The huge place has been redesigned, renovated and revamped (keeping the basic structure and architecture intact) to bring an inimitable dining experience to you; basically they call this a Royal Pub Dining , which you won’t find anywhere else in Kolkata (as of today). It is lavishly spread over three floors though the first and second floors are operational as of now. First floor, Lords and Barons
The first floor is basically café and club where you will find the DJ console, so if you are in a mood to party be here at this floor. The décor of this floor, as already said, is neat, classy and aesthetically appealing! Seating arrangements are well spaced out and the highlight of this floor is definitely the 30 ft long bar counter with a woody rustic finish! The lighting is optimum and somewhat has a Wild West touch to it. First floor, Lords and Barons Second floor, Lords and Barons
Moving to the 2 nd floor, this floor is basically for the signature Royal pub dining with Live performances and a private party room, and yes, there is obviously a bar counter at this floor as well. This floor is basically for laid back quite cozy dining with a drink or two. And then maybe later on after few drinks if you want to party and dance, you can just shift to 1 st floor. So if you are at Park Street, this place is perfect for unwinding and weekend parties for sure. Touch of Royal dining (second floor), Lords and Barons
So let’s now focus on the food and beverages – the elements which are keys to the success of any restaurant. Firstly, this place serves you Global cuisine and some lovely cocktails – so you know what to expect when you are there. The menu has got some really nice North Indian dishes which are a joy to savor, so you must try those as well. We started off with Malai Mirchi Cigars and Korean Chilli Garlic Prawns. Well, the cigars were nice but the prawns blew me away. As the name suggests, they were spicy, tangy, garlicky and packed with flavours and yes, the prawns were really fresh! Korean Chili Garlic Prawns
This was shortly followed by Gandhoraj Fish Tikka, Konkani Paneer Tikka and Spicy Peshawari Murg Tikka. I am not a big fan of paneer so I will talk about the other items. Murg Tikka was nice and juicy with the perfect balance of flavours though I feel Gandhoraj Fish TIkka was the best of the lot. It had that perfect dash of lemon zest which took the dish to another level, perfectly executed and ably supported by the freshness of the fish in there. Narkel Chingri Risotto
Moving on to the main course, we started off with a spoonful of Narkel Chingri Risotto and Shepherd’s Pie. I can still feel that Shepherd’s pie in my mouth, it was that good, and I remember I had asked for a second helping. The risotto had a desi touch to it with coconut and prawns coming in, though the final product was nice and subtle, like it should be. I tried the Rareya Gosht next with steamed rice, that was the highlight of my meal. The mutton was slow cooked and it was a typical spicy ‘kosha’ preparation with the thick gravy loaded with minced mutton and finished with ground spices, cream and freshly chopped ginger! The preparation was truly royal and it felt heavenly with warm steamed rice! Rareya Gosht
The desserts came in next and there we found a twist. A Chilli Halwa was served which I was pretty skeptical about. It looked green like the green chillies and frankly wasn’t that inviting, but when I tasted it I felt the looks can be sometimes so misleading. Obviously it wasn’t spicy and absolutely felt like any other halwa with a flavourful rich feel to it. There was another dessert called American Magic which was icecream based, and since I was having a bit of cold didn’t try much of it but it looked damn sinful and my friends loved having it. American Magic
And yes, as of now I haven’t mentioned anything about the cocktails which I feel are the highlights of this place. Very few places in the city give so much attention to their beverages, like Lords and Barons do. Definitely try their Nawabi Julep, Popcorn Collins, TLB Granade, Holy Blood. Gin Bouquet
You can also try the colorful Gin Bouquet if you love having gin. All the cocktails were presented exceptionally well, kudos to the team for that. And they tasted so damn good, and I really mean it. The Nawabi Julep was surely the highlight and best of the lot according to me. It was a whiskey-based cocktail having an intoxicating smokey touch to it that’s sure to bring you back for more! The addition of clove, ginger, betel leaf and other Indian spices take this drink to a whole new level. Nawabi Julep
The service was really warm, prompt and friendly, something which is so crucial in the hospitality industry. I really feel if they can maintain this quality of food and beverages, this place will surely be one of the most visited places in Park Street.
The royal touch to the décor, food and cocktails will surely make your day, and definitely, this place is worth your hard earned money and precious time. It’s like your dream come true, so spend some quality time like a king and don’t let your boss ruin this dream sequence! 🙂
Cheers!
to this place by management/PR for review purpose. Share this:

Read More…

NZ Friends Ask about Midwest Farmers

HTML Comment Box is loading comments… NZ Friends Ask about Midwest Farmers 31 March 2019 Organic farmer friends with whom I did WWOOF-ing in New Zealand have been checking in about the Midwest floods, re utter farm destruction, and general lack of citizen awareness and preparedness.. Reply: The floods are expected to spread and continue for two months, with snow-melt dead ahead. Many farmers are uninsured for harvested grain losses; most have federal insurance for loss of growing crops. Planting will not occur. Winter wheat crop lost. The huge farm equipment required in the monsanto paradigm, untold millions of investment, is under water. Anguish for the farmers, and for those who refuse to understand what this will mean. That said, it may mean that status quo of monster monoculture, Glyphosate-saturated acreage cannot continue. If so, I will not live to witness the restoration of some of the richest lands on the planet, but young folks will roll up their sleeves, and we may see sanity again of diverse and sustainable family farms. Disaster may be a gift to future generations, God willing, of finally undoing the death grip of the chemical and biotech industries. The lands flooded are declared disasters, meaning federal govt assistance, but how much and how effective? And the damage is still impossible to fully quantify; it is ongoing. Nonetheless, farmers are among the most adult of any population, and their agony may help draw adolescent embarrassments in the US back to honest work. I don’t know, but am somewhat hopeful. WWOOF = What? Willing (or Worldwide) Workers on Organic Farms. Generally means farm room and (groaning) board in exchange for labor. Often a boon for small farmers during their busiest seasons. Also a way to travel the world on small budget. Bright-Eyed & Bushy-Tailed 28 January 2019 Home-Schoolers still learn Civics & US History. The years I read aloud each week to kids at the local library consisted primarily of home-schoolers in the nor’easter winter months. In summer, munchkins from all over joined in. The kids were flat out amazing. They wanted to know WHY. If not liking the why, they went into solution mode. They also apprenticed as part of their schooling. When I sink into some minor key fugue-state about sociopathic government, I remember those kids. Blood Moon Stars 22 January 2019 First the hush, the waiting for huge full moon to peep over the mountains, rising, rising higher. Going outside, though freezing, held special magic in store. At full eclipse–a dazzling surge of starlight–the Milky Way revealed and brilliant at occluded full moon. I jumped up and down to get warm and did a joy-spin. Began singing the old Black spiritual, My Lord, what a morning… When the stars begin to fall… No more grief and pain for me, I heard from Heaven today. God’s gonna set His people free. I heard from Heaven today… My Lord what a morning, When the stars begin to fall… Thought then about MLK’s birthday next morning, and the great swath of planet folks all watching together in the quiet of the night–Millions gazing into the sky, craning our necks as the eclipse was high, and probably many more in big city light-pollution or darkness, watching on screens. The full blood moon lasted and lasted. An omen? A frenzy-pause? A reset of some kind? Even stuffed into down layers, standing in snow drove me toward hearth and home. I left before the rose-umber shadow withdrew, to stoke the fire in the woodstove room and watch the piñon flames dance. “I’m Just T.A.F.” 17 January 2019 The excitement-acronym, TAF is courtesy of a life-long friend of the family. My dad had known her since childhood. Her father was a pooh-bah and she married one, but hadn’t a pretentious bone in her chunky body. The pooh-bah mother, besotted with Shirley Temple, had tormented her daughter’s childhood with tap dance lessons, and attempted to turn the kid’s straight brunette hair into adorable curls. I called our friend, “The Good Ship” with great affection. She was funny as heck, and if I laughed and coaxed, she would launch into a song and dance routine of The Good Ship Lollipop! So, when wildly excited about something, she’d say: I’m just TAF! Which translates as: “Tits A-Flutter.” She was outrageous. Not All As Seems To quote the Korean Sensei in “The Karate Kid.” A stranger has taught me to not be too quick in making assumptions. Like many folks, I’d been snowed in for several days, snow on snow, all but hearing the strains of balalaika in Dr. Zhivago. Once the snow stopped and I mustered more zeal to shovel out, the Post Office was one of the gazillion errands. My fave person there warned me about a tub, a trolley…. Just a mo. Uh, how was I to even get out the door? While trying to do that, a baritone voice behind me asked if I needed help.. Here let me help. I stepped aside and held the doors. The guy was huge, shaved head, a walking tattoo parlor. Everyone’s bundled up, but I could see amazing Maori-dense work on head, neck, arms, hands. And God forgive me, what leaped to mind? MS-13, till I met his eyes which had known long journey, and were kind. When he loaded all the heavy mail into the car, he gave me a shy smile and nodded. I told him he was my hee-ro. He laughed then and said, Have a blest day. I held his hand, thanking him, and noted the skeletal bones tattooed on the back. YOU have a blest day, you lovely man. Avalanche Crashes into Swiss Restaurant 11 January 2019 Severe snow storms are raging across the European Alps. An avalanche has burst though the windows of the Hotel Säntis Dining Room. Shocking photo, and interesting re Grand Solar Minimum, but so what? Am having a reprise experience. I nearly lost my life on the Säntis–a school outing with an idiot leading, who told the kids as young as 8 that tennies would be enough. I was 16 and the only one with the sense to have worn climbing boots. Didn’t stop severe frostbite, but I didn’t die just then, and neither did anyone else. A freak blizzard and gale force winds slammed us against the mountain. The leader did deer caught in the headlights, but managed to tell the kids to huddle. He eyed my boots, knew I was one of the few who spoke the lingo, and shouted for me to go for help. There was a restaurant on top of the mountain, otherwise reached by a gondola. Longest climb of my life with tears freezing on my lashes and cheeks. I staggered into the restaurant. The Schnitzel-eaters seemed to think I was part of the entertainment, but a Swiss Mt. Guide grabbed me, asked rapid-fire questions and thrust my hands into cold water, poured brandy down my gullet. He was enraged when I begged him to save the children in the storm. He grabbed ropes, organized the competent and brought them all to safety, some kids on the backs of the men. It was a near thing, as I look out on snow falling quietly in the Rockies. Night Watch 2 January 2019 I grew up in an American nautical family, on the coasts of many seas, and to the sound of my grandfather’s ship’s bell clock chiming the 4 hour shifts, or watches, through each 24 hour cycle. While still an attentive munchkin, I learned that one particular excuse was utterly beneath contempt: “It didn’t happen on my watch.” Nor would “the dog ate my homework” have legs! On board ship, given mandatory drills and safety checks, and round the clock watches, if something went wrong, someone(s) had been present. Whatever happened anywhere, anytime, it all landed at the Skipper’s door. It may have been 2AM, but everything “happened on his watch”—Potential outcome: Court Martial. I’ve wondered if that focusing of the mind would be useful in the nation’s capitol, among the slithery. Have been reminded of watches in the night by an account of a state of the art fishing vessel in the South Pacific. The seaman on watch in the engine room fell asleep, waking to fire and smoke, a conflagration. He ran, rousing the crew from their bunks. The fire had spread to the ship’s deck, with no time to launch anything. They jumped overboard without life vests, one crewman cutting a line with big corks spaced, to which they clung for days without food or water. (Thanks to Headlines w/ a Voice for reporting.) In all the Murphy’s Law of that night, the sinking vessel did auto-beam the equivalent of MAY DAY to a satellite.. A 747 at 30,000 ft. locked in on the GPS coordinates and transmitted them to Samoa. The Coast Guard alerted all vessels in the area. The closest would take a couple days to reach the floating crew. Sharks swim in those waters. A Coast Guard plane took off, as the situation grew desperate, and located the survivors. After several passes, the pilot pinpoint-dropped an inflatable raft. The crew were near their last efforts and could not even raise their arms to wave at the low-flying plane. (One crew member summoned his whatevers and swam the 100 yards to the raft, inflated it and paddled back to his shipmates. They rolled into the raft one by one.) When the closest fishing vessel reached them, SIXTY HOURS after the sinking, the cook was among those who helped the sunburned, starving and dehydrated seamen aboard. He said, “I’ll never forget their eyes.” While clinging to the abrasive corks, they had lost all reasonable hope of rescue, in a rendezvous with death on the high seas. One man fell asleep on his watch…A ship was lost and nearly all hands. In this New Year, let us hope for good men and women, awake in the night. Candlelight Christmas Eve 25 Dec. 2018 I joined the somewhat dour Presbyterians last night for Lessons & Carols, in their soaring adobe church with high clerestory windows and wreaths in between. Christmas Eve among transplanted Scots, lovely tartans and Harris tweeds, and ethereal bell-ringing from the choir loft. The rendition of “We Three Kings” swept me away, to harness bells and soft foot falls of Magi camels under long ago desert nights: Star of wonder Perhaps their Highland Bagpiper will be back for Epiphany when, we hope, the wise men come. Hoot of a female Pastor–Sitting on the altar steps with the kiddos–lovely mélange of Hispanic, blond and Indio–she held a brown paper grocery sack full of the nativity scene characters–ken and barbie dolls for which the kids had fashioned wee costumes. As a child named one of the dramatis personae, Pastor pulled out the doll for the child to set up in the Parish Hall Nativity Scene. Then a munchkin said, Animals! … Pastor: We don’t have sheep, but we have–( she rummaged in the sack and drew out a very green)– dinosaur, and a zebra I’m the only one who laughed out loud. And am still chuckling, as it reminds me of the Crèche of dear friends whose menagerie includes jungle creatures and surprise visitors. Bonfires & Luminarias! 9 Dec. 2018 Last evening the Old Town, adobe and pedestrian-welcoming, literally sparkled. Fragrant piñon fires glowed in copper tripod basins. Rooftops and sidewalks, are lined with small, sand-filled paper sacks, set with tea lights. Scrumptious free food galore. I met a friend and grinned, Merry Christmas!”… “To a good Jewish boy?!”… I laughed: “Yes, all High Holy Days, and how can we forget that Jeshua ben Yusuf, was a Jewish Rabbi?” A friend in Eastern mountains has lost power to the messy-mix winter storm; his propane generator kicked in. A good idea, if one’s situation permits… As I hand out tins of beans at stop lights. The hand-lettered cardboard signs may just read: HUNGRY, or DISABLED VET. While sugar plums dance in our heads, some are sleeping rough. And our social safety net may not be adequate to the task. A retired medical pro friend is doing weekly kindness/dharma. He goes to a couple groceries and collects a truckful of otherwise thrown-away food, also “free box” clothes and toys, which he washes–for families of illegals who have no transportation to get to the town food pantries. He says we could learn so much from displaced people who have lived closer to the land. They do not shun rutabagas; they are marvelously creative in fixing meals; they share. The open borders issue remains a mess: Dems want cheap votes; Rethugs want cheap labor; anarchists want societal violence. In Advent, at the dark of the year. A Real World Anecdote 21 November 2018 A Romaine Lettuce, E. coli Alert, right before the US holiday, started this rumination . That aside, wishing all a convivial and Happy Thanksgiving! Free-access borders to Cent.Americans, and Islamic-world migrants to the EU..bring in Third World intestinal parasites. Plus un-treatable TB, scabies, typhus, cholera, rodent-host diseases, etc.. Indios had no immunity to measles, smallpox… Anglos blessed with better Public Health (Talking indoor plumbing, sewage treatment, soap…) don’t do well with Third World endemic diseases. When I was tenting fwiw, a nice family of illegals joined the BLM campground, splatting apparent amoebic dysentery all over the public latrine, floors, walls, defecation-hole. The campground host had daily misery to clean up and try to disinfect. Bottom line, everyone camping there went down disgusting-sick. The well failed–no water for clean up at all. Everyone fled. I went north and stayed at a friend’s organic ranch, and fasted on herb tea and goats’ milk for 10 days. Emerged many pounds lighter and less sanguine about come-one-come-all immigration. We once had medical screening at Ellis Island. We have none now. Autumn Endings 3 November 2018 Lovers of color will soon resonate with subtleties of winter–beige, dun, conifer piney-green to blue-green, under lowering skies. Also beautiful, but Indian Summer did a show-stopper this week. After raining hard on the sun porch tin roof through the night, I woke to all day snow. Tawny gold and orange cottonwood leaves glowed through the falling powder, then drifting flakes. Clouds settled low on the valley rims I lit a fire and curled up with a good book, pausing often to watch the turning of the year. As autumn was ending.I remembered a Gray Ghost, the tabby cat, story of summertime. My neighbor’s much-loved geriatric dog really, finally, had to be put down. Turned out to be a neighborhood event. One neighbor dug the grave, and had ordered a paw print chunk of rosy sandstone with the dog’s name. We brought late summer flowers and pot luck. It being a small town, the vet came into the country to do the deed. We all sat around the critter as she administered first sleepy-time, and then the coup de grace shot. As she administered the final shot, the tabby cat lay along the dog’s back and slid his fore paw across the dog’s neck, looking at me with opaline eyes. Gray Ghost lay there till the dog’s spirit had floated free of the body. Autumn Equinox 22 Sept. 2018 Lapis skies today. Gray-Ghost (neighborhood tabby cat) and I walked down to the river. Beautiful golden crepuscular light. Two hammocks by the water, and a hammock chair. Friends have edged pools with big rock. The river is low but wonderfully melodious. Watched three bay horses which live across the water, and a mule deer doing its hooves on springs leaping through the autumn wild flowers. Munched an apple from the wild tree, mindful of more bear scat than I’ve seen in ages (last of the chokecherries, apple, and someone’s winter squash or pumpkin.) We ran the acequia on Thursday and filled the huge blue bucket with rope handles that I use to dip the small copper watering can.. Friday morning at first light, the bucket level had been halved, having served as an apparent ursine water bowl! Baked tart apples in the solar oven… served with Jersey cream as Equinox celebration, and reminder that life lived simply is also sane. 1929 Crash Remembered But who here can remember 1929? Not I, but I was a little kid who paid attention. Wandering into a tea at my grandmother’s, one of the silver-haired ladies ordained that I come sit by her, and listen. Old money was sipping Earl Grey and remembering not just 1929 but also 1933 and the govt-violation of safety deposit boxes to confiscate citizen gold, and even jewelry. They described suicides leaping out of windows and going splat, fortunes lost overnight, factories, farms, homes called in as bank collateral. I sat there in my Mary Jane’s, puffed sleeves and ruffled petticoat, attentive. Much of this went over my head, but I could read their anguish just fine, and have always had excellent verbal memory, hence my storyteller skills. The grande dame who had called me over, turned her full attention my way, and said: “NEVER, never buy on margin.” “Oh no, ma’am. I never will.” Some years passed before I studied the history which she had lived, and understood her urgency, and my childhood promise. I have never, by the by, bought on margin. Grape Jelly Making 16 Sept. 2018 Am about to pull on blue work shirt & bib-overalls to process grapes. Messy business straight ahead! I resist buying fruit given the bounty of this river valley, but excellent grapes are grown by an organic farmer friend at a more favorable, lower elevation. Am trying a variation on the grape jelly theme. I have Mama’s 1953 Joy of Cooking (with copyright from 1931 on.) She was a fab cook all my growing up, and it tugs at my heart knowing I’m reading her culinary map. This older Joy (than my more Calif. Cuisine edition) still has farming, canning and grandmother info. For example my current project, calling for 15# of concord grapes! Roundup Weedkiller Weeds-R-Us 9 September 2018 We’re serving up weedkiller in Cheerios, sandwiches, corn chips and everything soy. We were sold a bill of goods. Not to worry; totally harmless. First successful lawsuit has challenged Monsanto’s in-house research assurances. A few million in litigation pain, and a jolly good start. My cousin lost her life, leaving two little kids, via a Glyphosate-infiltrated well–Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma thirty years ago, age 27. Many neighbors had the same issue and were ailing. I attended her funeral; she was the first to die. They lived in rural, flat Virginia–hot, humid. They were not farmers but plenty Roundup-based farming in her area. Sprays tended to settle and not disperse. Have often thought with pity of the American Midwest, former breadbasket of the world–now laid waste by GMO corn and soy mega-plantings, mega-sprayed. (Also those who spend big bucks to live alongside heavily-sprayed–at night–golf courses) My commodities broker lived in the Midwest, an old farm boy into the GMO-corn-ethanol canard, but cognizant of herbicides approaching eco-saturation, land, air and water. He worried about having children, and longed for a family. When I organic-farmed in dairy country in the Blue Ridge Mts. of Virginia, the dairy farms had stopped crop-rotation, and gone to no-till corn (spray the living daylights out of the land instead–dead roots help prevent erosion.) Farmers who sprayed looked like death warmed over, liver-poison-sallow. The deep valleys and wind didn’t stop wind drift of their Ag-sprays, but dispersed much of it. When I finally went down for the count from Power Co. right-of-way !surprise! use of 2,4-D, I couldn’t tolerate spray drift anymore, Had to sell the farm and get a year’s worth of holistic medical intervention. Had dropped to less than 4% female body fat while ill. The MD said, no more acute or chronic exposures; eat only organically grown food… Decided then, that if I lived, doubtful at the time, I would find somewhere with contiguous ranches and family farms deciding for sustainable agriculture. Did so and consider myself blessed, though with an attitude-problem toward regulatory agencies and the revolving doors with bayer/monsatan and their ilk. East Coast Hurricanes 9 September 2018 Am watching potential Florence, etc. trajectories, and the NC/SC declared states of emergency. fwiw a hurricane slammed my Blue Ridge farm my first year. I had business down below the mountain, but family friends from the Piedmont stayed while I was away, to help oversee renovations. A worker, in haste to get gone as the winds picked up, replaced clapboards by nailing them so the overlap faced upward… Bridges over-topped, washed away, and the farm kitchen and wall flooded with incoming torrents. The visiting hubby was a retired Marine Colonel, Mr. Can-Do, who tried to secure a tarp over the clapboard idiocy, but the winds were too violent. They mopped up flood for hours, filling and emptying buckets. Trees and branches came down; roads washed away; power went out. I had left candles and oil lamps. Pump from the spring stopped working, but they were able to dip sweet water out of the spring box. The stove was propane. I’d left wood in the house; they were able to build woodstove fires. It was a working farm with already a pretty good pantry. They were snug, and the epitome of good neighbors. Food for thought. Chokecherry Time 22 August 2018 A hardy native tree across the US, the blossoms are rarely frosted. Old timers in the mountains consider the juice/jelly/syrup a medicine. I stood in a chokecherry thicket by the cascading river and picked 15 kilos, barely moving location. I did wait till the sun was up–nocturnal bears leave scat full of chokecherry seed! Tree identification in its seasons: https://gardenerdy.com/how-to-identify-chokecherry-tree-easily The fruit is tart and local jellies are made with cloying amounts of sugar. Here’s a recipe using Pomona’s Pectin: https://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2012/08/how-to-make-chokecherry-jelly-low-sugar-and-honey-variations.html Thunder Rumbling 9 August 2018 This morning I picked peaches on the north side of the tree–the south ripening first–a fragrant and overflowing lady-basket. The bird-pecked peaches, quite a few, I bit free the good part and tossed the pits over my shoulder, some juice running down my chin. The young cats chased windfalls in the tall grass and wildflowers. Am just in from checking on things and how vivid the flower colors in this haunting light. Heirloom tomatoes are coming in–Brandywine–the old Amish luscious one, reminding us that tomato is a fruit. Time Measured by Garden Bounty 6 August 2018 Peach jam! Am soaking goji berries and grating ginger root to add, for winter time pizazz. Plums ripen next, then a neighborhood apple cider pressing. Followed by firewood stacking; the nights grow cooler in the high country. The neighborhood kitties have been leaping in the air and catching grasshoppers to a very satisfying attrition. Thanks to the wee tigers, looks as though there will be enough basil to dry. Have planted it by/around the tomatoes. Picked first ones yesterday–Black Kirim and Striped German so far. Am wanting to try the solar oven way of doing sweet corn, when corn reaches the farmers market. You peel back leaves; rub off silks with circular motion; re-cover kernels; set ears in water to soak a bit. Shake off excess water. Then into the black pots, un-shucked and covered, for an hour or so. The vid I watched of the process evoked speechless bliss, corn buttered and hot. A Land Still Wild 21 July 2018 As I headed out of the boonies, very much in ranch country, two horses, spectacular ones with bloodline, came speeding across the road right in front of me. I, who tap brakes, slammed them. A near miss of the second horse’s hind quarters. I saw the flying hooves just clear. Happened quickly but looked like a chestnut stallion and palomino mare. Most of the horses around here are more on the order of Indian ponies, small from drought and poverty owners who couldn’t feed out enough hay. These beauties leapt out of another lineage altogether. A fellow in an ATV maybe 300 yards ahead was watching. Looked Apache/Hispano, grounded, silent. I drove level with him, and asked if he knew who they belonged to?… No, he said, but I’m about to find out. He was waiting to go straight, but put on his turn signal and headed off into the hinterland. It moves me that suburbia has not inflicted itself on this wild country. Even off the main roads in town, you’ll find small farm holdings–chickens, a few black or red Angus, Navajo sheep, horses. Horse trailers are a common conveyance here. Cowboys on horseback still ride the range in the high desert and mountains of the American West. Where most everyone is praying for rain, and a solar oven is cooking my supper. Too hot to roast anything, including me, indoors. It’s over 100 degrees under the blazing white sun, but mercifully 74 in the thick-walled adobe. A Firefighter’s Report 14 July 2018 I encountered a friend today who was all but emitting sparks herself. Her rancher husband served as a So. Colorado Volunteer Firefighter for 25 years. He’s retired now but mobilized when the arsonists got to work. He had also taught his four sons the firefighting skills of First Responders. My friend’s hubby had smelled smoke in severe drought conditions, and 35 miles away saw a wall of flame headed toward their ranch. He estimated the height of the fire-tsunami at 400 ft. He shouted for his sons who saddled up and galloped into the high country and began doing controlled burns of bone-dry sage brush and chamisa. They worked day and night for four days and saved two of the ranch buildings… but lost their home-place. The hubby roared to the thick of the blaze to help his colleagues. Some of the volunteer fire-folks got trapped and frantically tried to do a controlled burn and dove into their protective tents still in their gear. The hubby went in after the fire passed; friends’ feet and faces were scorched, their hair burned off. Firefighters, all but dead on their feet with exhaustion, joined Forest Rangers, the Smokey the Bear folks. They went into the destroyed lands, over 100,000 acres, and did their duty by the surviving critters. They went in with rifles and handguns. Wife said you would not believe the hordes of half-burnt animals they had to mercy-kill…elk, deer, bear, raccoon, porcupine, and ranchers’ cattle. The guy who started it is is jail, but has not been charged with arson, and that’s why my friend was spitting mad–“He should be charged like any citizen!”–the guy’s an illegal who came in across the southern US border. Locals who love the mountains like their mother have known for months that it wasn’t safe to have an open fire, or risk using a chainsaw. The illegal had fixed himself a campfire meal, got soused, fell asleep, and a fire from hell was off to the races… Over 200 ancestral homes were destroyed, gone forever. By then I was hyperventilating… “And the protected illegal?”… She squinted her eyes, and said, “He’s in a jail without individual cells…” Drought & Heirloom Corn 25 June 2018 In the Southern Rockies, the adobe Pueblos are gradually returning to native foods, as healthier, and more adapted, to challenging ecosystems. than coddled hybrids or GMO’s. That includes the “Three Sisters” of maize, beans, squash. Some of the Pueblos are making a success of sustainable Ag, but with little to no rain, all bets are off. Locally, the river for Pueblo irrigation has gone dry. Large plantings of heirloom maize are being lost–ancestral seed stock of Hopi blue corn and ceremonial white. I had to explain to the friend with whom I do small veggie effort that we would be letting the heirloom sugar snap peas set seed only, much reduced by drought. She could see a few pods forming. “We won’t eat any?” she asked, a bit p.o.’d. “No, we’ll save any seed for next year and hope for winter snow pack and rain.” Before countries began relying on availability of annual purchase of hybrid seed (which cannot be saved; it does not bear true, reverting to either parent) families, gardeners and farmers saved the best seed for next year. In Europe, corn (Korn) refers to grains in general, pre-dating the introduction of New World maize. So in desperate times, “eating the seed corn” meant loss of hope; it meant there would be no seed to plant next year. Unless stolen from others in war. Farmers are seldom stoopid, though Monsanto certainly pulled a toxic number on the “Bread Basket of the World.” Farmers know to save back seed to allow for crop failures. Farmers in India had saved locally-adapted seed for countless generations. Those beguiled into planting non-save-able Monsanto seed went into debt to do so. The seeds have turned out to be poorly adapted/poor-yielding. Farmers went ever deeper into unpayable debt. Tens of thousands of Indian farmers have committed suicide by drinking Monsanto poisons. Cui bono? Black Bear Adventures 20 June 2018 A friend in the Smoky Mts where it’s rained all but incessantly reports a 12 hr. power outage from a tree down, but with no wind. There have, however, been bear sightings in the area. Might that be pertinent? Oh? said I… Bears have two pertinent behaviors which might affect tree roots in soggy ground: 1) They stand with back to trunk and rub up and down to scratch where it itches, with enough vigah to take down evergreen branches. 2) They leave formidable scratch marks down tree trunks with hundreds of pounds leaning into same. An elder friend of mine was camping some years back, a city-girl newbie to the SW. She’s generally feisty. Also unaware, she had food INSIDE her tent. She woke up to a large clawed paw coming through the tent fly. The bear started leaning on the tent. She: 1) Screamed bloody murder 2) Pushed back on the ursine body mass She was in a campground fortunately, and male persons began roaring out of their tents, bellowing. The bear settled back on all fours and decided to skedaddle. Rain, Blessed Rain 4 June, 2018 Rain and some small but not damaging hail yesterday. I sat on the sun porch where there’s a tin roof and listened to rain music. Light shining through rain droplets on apricot leaf tips, particularly beautiful. Aesthetics aside, the economy out West just had a reprieve, ditto fire fighters. Red and Black Angus will have pasture; alfalfa and hay fields will re-surge. Orchard fruit will swell. Cider pressings this fall, we hope. River running businesses have adventures to offer. A good refresher on the tenuousness of economy. minus.. xyz. Kunstler would re-iterate our dependence on cheap oil; he lives back East where cheap oil fueled manufacturing, now left derelict. El aqua es la vida. Donnerwetter! 3 June 2018 In the Southern Rockies wildfires are roaring in the dry tinder and resinous forests. Sagebrush flats offer more flammable resin, as though smudging the land. Wind is picking up, a whooshing prelude to thunderstorms, and hopefully not including, the predicted large hail. A neighbor’s well has gone dry; rivers and acequias are low. I learned about no water when the Appalachian spring (the water kind) went dry on my organic farm ( Earth-Whisperers .) We haven’t much awareness of water as precious resource, till we’re hauling it in jugs, or in a tank on a truck. Memorial Day 2018 The American Civil War Nastiness, and also gallantry. Gen. Robert E. Lee comes to mind as a last of the gentlemen soldiers. In my family, indeed kin were arrayed on opposite sides in the long brutality. A several greats Missouri Grandmother was widowed, a Confederate officer. She had freed their few slaves before the Emancipation Proclamation. Nothing left for her, she decided to head to Texas where she had kin. It meant passing though the fighting. Her former slaves had elected to stay with her. She drove the buggy; they drove mule and oxen, a cow hitched to the back of one of the wagons. At a river crossing, she was threatened with thievery and worse by Union soldiers. A Union officer roared up–her deceased husband’s best friend. He gave her safe passage and an escort out of the war zone. She had no skills other than embroidery and sewing a fine seam. running a household. Her black companions, employees settled with her in Texas and taught her to spin, weave, plant, harvest, hunt, butcher. My grandfather knew her when he was a boy, still a gentlewoman, but one who could bring down a deer to feed her family. After Europe’s Great War, WW1, there were many maimed, and many dead husbands and fiance’s, and a generation of spinsters. Ditto after the US Civil War–maiden lady aunts who moved in with some family member. They became school teachers as a demographic. And the “Blue Coat” soldiers? They were sent West to help fulfill Manifest Destiny by destroying the Plains Indians. Aye, we’ll rally ’round the flag, boys, Rally once again, Shouting the battle cry of freedom… Country Wild Life 24 May 2018 A mule deer has dined on rose, delphinium, lily and columbine buds in the upper flower garden, despite abundant wild forage. Harrumph. Was late planting out nasturtiums, which repel deer and wabbits, and it’s been so dry, the self-sown ones from last year hadn’t sprouted. Three kitties have adopted me, mischief makers and entertaining. My neighbors, to whom they ostensibly belong, don’t feed them, so I put out some crunchettes with nutritional yeast and garlic powder in the early AM on an improv apricot tree platform–as an appetizer to moles and mice. They walk along the top of the garden fence and prefer lapping water from the top of the watering can. Underfoot whenever I appear, ankle-twiners with major purr melodics. Brilliant orioles are nesting. They like hummingbird nectar and the color, orange. Sunflower seed and suet feeders came down this week at the first bear sighting at dawn. The feeder pole will forever list to starboard from last year’s first ursine leaning on it. I learned my lesson! Orchard Blossoms 5 April 2018 The music of the bees alerted me to an early apricot tree suddenly burst into bloom! Overhead, red tail hawk was swooping on updraft. Song sparrow sings in the wild plum thicket, and nesting business has begun. I’d started to feel punch-drunk and less jolly, too much life force gone splat, following world news. Good to settle one’s tusch on the earth and remember we’re still part of it. Mountain Snow, Magical Light 28 March 2018 Three inches of fluffy snow here, and more tonight after a concerningly dry winter. Ominous (I would say, promising) clouds massing N/NW. Very little glimpse of the mountains, hidden away in snow fog. Am just back from a walk through the woods along the river, with plenty of snow dumped on the walker! Bit of misty sun shone on the cascading water and the veils of fine snow drifting down. Knowing I’d return to a warm fire and hot spicy chocolate, I could enthuse about sparkling fairy dust. Were I sleeping rough, like more folks than we imagine, beauty of the moment might have been a stretch. Friends in the South inform me of blooming camellias, forsythia, red bud, dogwood and daffydowndillies. I do remember, but will wait out the high country seasons, grateful for cooler summer. Much that we’ve known is giving way, dying to new beginnings. As winter dies in its season and spring returns, tree sap and life rising from the dead. Cassandras-Anonymous The New Recovery Program! 3 March 2018 The Wayfaring Traveler books are all about storytelling, ancestral, historical, the riveting present moment, and the prescient. Online articles, wellness info from long experience, and expose’s, I wrote at feastandfamine.blogspot With so much tumultuous change and yes, malfeasance, I’d felt an urgency. But the Cassandra phase–heart-felt warning or just noise from the battlements–may be concluding. Train’s left the station; boat’s left the shore. It’s getting real, down & dirty… Jackboots trampling the Bill of Rights. And lots of fact-free shouting, once known as reportage. Who are we? Do we seek out waymarkers of integrity, or grab the remote, with its mind control patents and obfuscation? Am hoping we land on our feet. I write this to cyber-friends on a day of high elevation, lapis skies and cold. Single digit nights ahead. It’s too soon for pruning (botanically speaking) but am already thinking roses, fruit trees, and please, may the frosts be kind. Communication in the Google Age 20 Feb. 2018 I wanted to let readers know that Gurgle finally succeeded in blocking this writer from the two “free” blogspot sites. This, after years of interference patterns–messing with stats, temporarily impeding author-access… Now it’s permanent, and I cannot even let readers there know what caused the sudden cessation of stories and articles. Though being blocked did activate my “flea spleech” attitude problem, I’ve made peace with it. A large body of work is still available to readers in the Cyber-Commons at: feastandfamine.blogspot.com wayfaringtraveler.blogspot.com If you also read books, thank you. If you delve the Wayfaring Traveler books, would you kindly leave an Amazon review? Meanwhile, reporting from the Rocky Mts and the global asylum, I remain optimistic. It’s snowy in the high country. I haul in armloads of piñon, grateful for the woodstove BTU’s. A friend helped me resolve a wrenching uncertainty about giving money to those standing on windy street corners with cardboard signs. Some of the dollar bills go straight into booze or drugs. The friend saves leftovers to share. Give food, she said! I invested in a case of organic pinto beans and hand a tin to those who are clearly sleeping rough under bitter conditions. Indoors, flowers bloom: a geranium, paperwhite narcissus, a Meyer lemon. The trellis’d evergreen star jasmine is budding. Days grow longer, though it’s still pitch dark when this ex-farmer greets the new day. In a wider vista, the sun is strange; weather is weird; harvests are not certain. Locally the Food Banks serve the community. I hope community gardens become more common. Within living memory, this area was food self-sufficient. The schools are teaching heritage skills and the astonishment of seed planted, sprout tended… leading to the miracle of fresh corn, tomatoes and greens for the family. Diurnal Black Bear August 2017 A young black bear apparently didn’t get the word about nocturnal feeding. Sitting at my desk, I look out agog at 12:15 PM: Three meters away outside the patio doors, the bear starts bending the bird feeder pole to get at sunny seeds. I pound on the window as the feeder pole lists 20 degrees to starboard. Ursa glances my way and tilts the hummingbird feeder so syrup pours onto its paw. Licks it up. I open the other window and begin bellowing. It ambles through the garden and climbs the north fence onto the road. This is not your usual gardening season with late snow and frosts, then seven weeks of drought. The last two mornings I’ve poked my nose out at first light to 35 degrees F. Late planted tomatoes are bent heavy with green fruit. Which may soon decorate windowsills, to ripen over the following weeks. With a few dishes of fried green tomatoes and cream gravy to fortify guests as the nights grow longer and colder. Music of Bees April 2017 Wild and honeybees filled a bright snowy morning with their buzzy song. Wet snow had somehow spared the fruit tree blossoms, though not some branches of a huge apricot fruiting for generations. Birds are doing feeding frenzies over sunflower and thistle seed and suet. I bring the feeders in at night, so as to preserve them from black bears down from their caves and burrows in the higher mountains. Last year a grumpy bear surprised me early, squashed a woven wire fence, tromped a raised bed and bent the wrought iron bird feeder pole at right angle! Duly noted. Years ago a woman here named the bears and would shoo them from the garden with a broom. Hm. Apparently not annoying a mama bear with cubs nearby, a potentially lethal encounter. Am maybe not too late shmart; I ponder that proximity to ursine wildness from respectful distance. More snow is expected, but flower treats are peeking up through the mulch: a Madonna lily, delphiniums, herbs. Am keen to plant pansies. It may finally be Spring! Freedom March 2017 Friends who quietly attend to the introspection time of winter’s long nights are reporting pain-release, familial pain. Convoluted enough and where is the Ariadne thread? But on a societal level, am wondering about the rage and hysteria being encouraged toward a president-elect who vows to bring down the mafia-like takeover of government. We’re a few generations into broken families, Daddy’s gone missing in the welfare state, and in both parents, often divorced, frenetically holding down high-stress jobs. Curious fury against an alpha male president-elect. The nation seems to be acting out an almost Borderline sense of abandonment and lash-out. Snowflakes raised by daycare, by indulgent guilty absent parents and government schools, come to pieces if not rewarded. It’s a striking failure of reality check on the spectre of growing up. This winter an extraordinary Pueblo man died quietly after celebrating his 100th birthday. He was the last local survivor of the Bataan Death March, He recovered and became a mentor to tribal younglings and the larger community. He had lost everything but his heart. Winter Snows Falling Dec. 2016 Am dreaming of this weekend’s “Scottish Christmas” with a piper in full Highland regalia. Amazing Grace, and carols all but shivering one’s bone marrow! Following the arc of seasons to ancient bonfires which welcomed the return of sunlight at Winter Solstice, am startled to realize the gift of Keltic music. I hear surf crashing, the wild cry of seagulls, the howl of wolves, bells, harp and dancing! Torchlight is long ago, and we forget it, flicking the light switch, that night time light eluded our ancestors through long cold months. I hope to hear an Irish band on the Solstice, assuming the snowy roads are navigable. And bell-ringers at Christmas as “angels wing their flight o’er all the earth.” On 19 Dec. Mercury begins its three week danse macabre through cyberspace. Am already having techno-difficulties. Attempt at paragraphs trigger sudden repetitions of text. So will leave with warm wishes to readers all over the world.

Read More…

Why Liverpool’s Business District is a must visit for foodies

0 Why Liverpool’s Business District is a must visit for foodies Dining at some of the city’s most majestic buildings isn’t just for the suits you know!
Liverpool has been busy establishing itself as a real foodie hub in the North for a number of years. We’ve become huge fans of the indie, street food and casual dining vibe around the Baltic and Bold Street but there’s also another almost un-tapped source of phenomenal food, Liverpool’s Business District.
Populated by workers and tourists alike, Castle Street, Water Street, James St, Exchange Flags and the surrounding areas are littered with fabulous restaurants serving up first class world cuisine. From Indian to Italian, Japanese to British classics done well, these are the top Liverpool Business Quarter restaurants serving up quality breakfast, lunch and dinner menus oh and of course, the best cocktails! 1 – The Vincent Café & Cocktail Bar
Across the cobbles of the imposing Exchange Flags, you’ll find The Vincent Café & Cocktail Bar. With an air of exclusivity, The Vincent’s sophisticated interior, seasonal and specialist sashimi and sushi menus attract breakfast, lunch and dinner guests throughout the day. Coffee, cocktails or a bite to eat, you’ll find it with added finesse here. 2 – The Old Bank
As the name suggests, the former bank has been transformed into a stylish dining room which offers up great value meals with a bit of flair. Pub grub done really well is what you can expect with small plates, sandwiches, posh pies and classic British dishes. An ideal location for a quick lunch or post work bite to eat. 3 – Fazenda
Calling all meat overs! Nestled in the historic Exchange Flags (just behind Liverpool Town Hall) lies Fazenda. On offer you’ll find a selection of the finest quality meats, all of which are carved at your table, as and when you want them. This brand new dining concept has gone down a storm in Liverpool as has the vast array of gourmet sides including salads, meats, cheese and breads. Bring your appetite! 4 – Castle Street Townhouse
Castle Street is a hive of activity morning, noon and night and to complement your all-day dining needs, Castle Street Townhouse offers seasonal menus with something for everyone. From premium bacon butties (or bottomless brunch) to get you started and the likes of Rib Eye Steak, Pan Fried Salmon and more. 5 – The Alchemist
We know and love The Alchemist for its theatrical cocktails and mixology but not a lot of people know that the same innovation and creativity is continued in its kitchen. Serving up a varied, tantalising menu of world cuisine you can pair your Zombie cocktail with the likes of cod dahl, jerk chicken, crispy belly pork and more. 6 – Manhattan Bar & Grill
Fancy a taste of the big apple? Manhattan Bar & Grill is the place for big taste burgers, hearty pasts dishes, pizzas, fresh leafy salads and meaty main courses such as the chicken and rib combo which is served with fries and grilled tomatoes. Don’t forget to check out the cocktail list, it’s a winner. 7 – Silk Rd Alder Hey awards 2018.Images by Gareth Jones
When it comes to impressive venues, few can compete with unparalleled views of the Three Graces from Silk Rd at Beetham Plaza. Serving up mouth watering dishes from the Med to the Pacific, Silk Rd is the place to go for tasty tapas, sharing meze and world beers. 8 – The Underground Gin Society
Friday night drinks never looked so good than at The Underground Gin Society on Castle Street. When it comes to cocktails, these guys will have you watching that office clock til 5pm hits and you’re sipping a classic Negroni. This independent gin & cocktail bar is the place to unwind after work. 9 – Piccolino
The essence of Italian dining is getting everyone together for a big old feast and Piccolino, Cook Street shares that traditional sentiment. The intimate restaurant invites you to arrive early, soak up the atmosphere with a drink at the bar before settling into a stylish booth to enjoy a wide range of Italian dishes made with authentic, seasonal produce. We can’t get enough of the ravioli granchio! 10 – Mowgli
The indian street food jewel of Castle Street (technically Water St but we’re claiming it) has to be Mowgli. Owner Nisha Katona MBE has shared her families recipes with the world and we can’t get enough. From chaat bombs to Bunny Chow curry, Himalayan Cheese Toast and the instantly impressive Office Worker’s Tiffin. Prepare to taste the rainbow at Mowgli. 11 – The Liverpool Gin Distillery
When it comes to breathing new life in to the city’s oldest buildings, none have been more successful than the £1m Liverpool Gin Distillery. The Grade II listed building on Castle St opened its doors just a few months ago and is already considered a food and drink hot spot. With distillery tours, gin making classes in the lab, tasting (of course) and two fully stocked bars and food offering including pizza, tapas, flatbreads and nibbles, the Liverpool Gin Distillery is a must on any visit to the Business District.
Where will you dine next? You can access Quandoo online at Quandoo.co.uk or you can download the free app to your phone or tablet by visiting the App Store or Google Play . Good food at your fingertips . What’s your favourite Liverpool restaurant and why? Drop us a line on Twitter , Facebook or Instagram and we’ll share the best on our socials. Share this article: Related posts

Read More…

Difference Between Brown Lentils and Green Lentils

• Categorized under Food | Difference Between Brown Lentils and Green Lentils
Lentils are a food group belonging to the legume family. They grow in pods and are seeds that are edible. Lentils get their name from the Latin word lens, which means lens and refers to the shape of the lentil as it looks like a lens. The lentil can be categorized into color groups and the green and the brown lentils are part of these color groups. There are differences in taste, cooking time, usage in cuisine and health benefits. Lentils are found in the dried food section of the supermarket alongside other pulses and dried vegetables. The brown lentil is very popular and there are a number of different varieties of brown lentils. It is easy to tell the difference between the two varieties of lentil simply by their color. However, knowing the other differences is useful. Lentils can enhance different cooked foods or stand alone for health benefits. They are nutritious, inexpensive and easy to cook.
What is Brown Lentils?
Brown lentils are the most popular of the lentil groups. In addition to simply buying brown lentils it is possible to find Spanish Brown, German Brown or Indian Brown lentils. The tiniest brown lentil variety is the Bulga lentil. This variety is almost black in color, a very tiny lentil that actually looks like Bulga caviar when cooked, this is how it got its name. Brown lentils have an earthy flavor and take about twenty to thirty minutes to cook. They do not need to be pre-soaked like other pulses and are useful in soups and salads. It is wise to rinse the lentils before cooking to clean them and remove small stones that may be present. Brown lentils are very healthy and a great source of fiber. One cup of lentils yields 16 grams of fiber. They contain calcium, phosphorus ,iron, and vitamin B. Lentils have a low fat and sodium content. Brown lentils are inexpensive and also provide a good source of folate which together with fiber and potassium helps keep the heart healthy. Brown lentils are a good source of nutrients for weight loss because of their low calorie content and the high fiber aspect of their content. What culinary and dietary features are attributed to brown lentils? Brown lentils cook quickly and are a healthy food source. They have a number of minerals and vitamins in their dietary composition including a low fat content and low sodium count. One cup of lentils is equal to two hundred and thirty calories. Brown lentils can be enjoyed in soups and salads and eaten on their own. Brown lentils can be bought canned or dried. They can be flavored to be enjoyed as a stand alone dish using onion, cloves or herbs. Added to other dishes they enhance the flavor of the food. Brown lentils have more potassium content than bananas. The banana is known for its high potassium levels but, ¾ cup of lentils provides more potassium than a large banana. Brown lentils also contain copper, manganese, iron, protein, vitamin B1, pantothenic acid, zinc, and vitamin B6. These lentils contribute to a feeling of fullness after a meal and this was reported to be a positive outcome for weight loss.
What is Green Lentils?
Green lentils are another variety of lentil but because of its harder outer skin it takes longer to cook. It has a more peppery flavor and it stays intact for longer. There are not as many varieties of green lentil compared to the brown lentils. The puy lentil from France is a lot more expensive than other varieties of lentils. The green lentil provides all the minerals and vitamins found in the brown lentil but the protein content of the green lentil is higher. This lentil is suited to being added to other dishes as it retains its shape and withstands longer cooking times. Green lentils also contribute to a healthy life style and are a good addition to soups and salads too. What culinary and dietary features are attributed to green lentils? Green lentils are a good source of fiber but have a high protein content as well. Green lentils retain their shape better than brown lentils and are therefor a better option in dishes needing longer cooking times. The green lentils has all the vitamins and minerals that are found in the brown lentil. Green lentils are a dried food found in the dried vegetables and pulses section of the supermarket and they have a shelf life of up to a year.
Differences between Brown and Green Lentils Nutritional value in brown verses green lentils
Both the green and the brown lentil have a high list of nutritional values including vitamins, minerals and fiber. The main difference is the green lentil has higher protein content while the brown lentil shows a higher fiber content. Versatility in the kitchen
Lentils are a great addition to the kitchen pantry. They keep well as a dried vegetable and cook easily. Green lentils take slightly longer to cook than brown ones because they have a harder exterior but they will old their shape better. Brown lentils are softer and can be mashed. Both varieties add flavor to soups and salads and will stand alone if necessary with some flavor as their own vegetable dish. Health benefits in brown vs. green lentils
Lentils are very healthy because of their high folate and fiber qualities. Fiber and folate help with heart health. Lentils are low in calories and sodium and this makes them a healthy option on any diet. Both brown and green lentils are known as healthy options because of all the vitamins and minerals they provide. Types of recipes they are suited to
Lentils are suited to soups and salads but the green lentil has a slightly different flavor as it tastes peppery while the brown lentil has an earthy flavor. The green lentil is better suited to stews or dishes with longer cooking times because it holds its shape better. Preparation, storage and packaging
Lentils are legumes and stored as dried vegetables. They have a good shelf life of up to a year if stored in sealed containers. They don’t need soaking before cooking and if a really quick batch of cooked lentils is required then they will cook successfully in a pressure cooker for one minute. Comparison Chart to Illustrate the Difference Between B rown verses Green Lentils
Summary of Brown verses Green Lentils: Lentils are a great asset to the average pantry because they are inexpensive and easy to store. They are both very nutritious and especially good for heart health due to the fiber and folate content. The fiber in the brown lentil helps with healthy digestion and the green lentil is a good protein source. Lentils do not require elaborate preparation or cooking methods. They can stand alone or be added to various soups and salads. The green lentil does well in dishes that require more cooking as they retain their shape better. The low calorie count for lentils make them a good weight loss option and the high fiber content means they keep hunger at bay as they give a full feeling for longer. Lentils are a good food source for vegetarians and vegans because of their high protein content. Around 26% of lentils calories are counted as proteins. The increased iron content of the lentils help to transport oxygen through the blood and this increases energy and the metabolic rate too. The low cholesterol value attributed to lentils lowers heart disease and lessens the possibility of having a stroke. Their folate and magnesium content help to improve blood flow and prevent heart disease. The humble lentil is undoubtably underestimated in its contribution to healthy eating and keeping a healthy lifestyle.

Read More…