Roller Betties To Welcome Idaho Team in Doubleheader Bout

Roller Betties To Welcome Idaho Team in Doubleheader Bout

Home LocalTalk Roller Betties To Welcome Idaho Team in Doubleheader Bout Photo courtesy: Bellingham Roller Betties by Nick Sadigh Photography Roller Betties To Welcome Idaho Team in Doubleheader Bout By
Submitted by: Bellingham Roller Betties The Bellingham Roller Betties (BRB) will host an exciting roller derby doubleheader in the third home bout of Season 12 with Cog Blockerseagerly taking on Coeur D’Alene’s Snake Pit Derby Dames, followed by defending champions, Team F.L.A.S.H. taking on Tough Love, on Saturday, May 18th at 5:00 p.m. at the Whatcom Community College Pavilion (237 West Kellogg Rd, Bellingham, WA 98226). Photo courtesy: Bellingham Roller Betties by Nick Sadigh Photography
The BRB have three homes teams (F.L.A.S.H., Tough Love and The Cog Blockers) who have a five-bout home season that culminates with the championship bout for the Golden Skate on Saturday, July 13.
At each doubleheader bout, two home teams play each other for rank while the third team plays a team visiting from another city.
The first bout of the evening features the away team Snake Pit Derby Dames (Coeur D’Alene, Idaho) led by their coach, Ziggy Scardust. Cheer them on as they try to take down BRB’s Cog Blockers.
The Cog Blockers have had a tough season so far and are the first BRB team to lock in their spot at the Season 12 semi-final bout on June 22. Photo courtesy: Bellingham Roller Betties by Nick Sadigh Photography
The Formidable League of Amazing Superheroes (F.L.A.S.H) are led by superhero captains Princess Rainbow and Tornado Ally. These Season 11 champions are hoping to secure their spot in this year’s championship bout by beating Tough Love.
Tough Love led this season by Bertha Beatdown and Kim Carnage, has a strong line-up of new skaters this season including Baby Bull, Shammunition, and T-Wrekz Yo Face.
The Bellingham Roller Betties invite a food truck to each of their bouts to give fans an option for delicious local eats. At this bout, Simmering Tava will be serving up delicious Indian cuisine. In addition, there is a concession stand selling chips, candy and soda, and a Boundary Bay Beer Garden serving beer, wine, and cider trackside. There are both 21+ and Family Seating options in the stands. Photo courtesy: Bellingham Roller Betties by Nick Sadigh Photography
Be sure to visit the Betties merch booth to pick up all your Betties and home team swag. Most extras are cash only, so come prepared. The Betties volunteers also provide an activity table for our youngest fans – the Bitties.
This year, our community partner is NAMI Whatcom—the National Alliance for Mental Illness—that aims to provide hope and improve the quality of life for those who are affected by mental illness through support, education, and advocacy. NAMI Whatcom will be present at all of our bouts this season. Stop by their booth to learn more or offer support for this growing nonprofit organization.
Doors open at 4:00 p.m. and the first bout starts at 5:00 p.m. Advance tickets are available online at www.bellinghamrollerbetties.com/tickets . Tickets are also available at the door. Seating is limited. Tickets for this event are $15 for adults, $7 for kids ages 8-12, and free for kids 7 and under. Volunteers get in free. If you are interested in volunteering, sign up at www.bellinghamrollerbetties.com/volunteers .

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Most of the world’s popular cuisines – and this includes Indian food – taste good. The only bland and boring cuisines I can think of from the places I’ve traveled to are Russian, German, British and Scandinavian
Most Asian cuisine is amazing. Chinese, Japanese, Thai, Vietnamese, Lebanese – they all know how to use spices
And of course, Indian
Italians and Spaniards seem to be the only Europeans who know what a spice is

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Ramadan inspirations

Kebabs at Tresind’s Indian Steakhouse iftar Image Credit: Supplied fter years of being criticised for wasteful buffets that break the bank and run contrary to the very spirit of Ramadan, UAE restaurants finally seem to have gotten the message. In what’s probably also a response to the greater degree of competition — 1,109 new restaurants opened in Dubai last year; figures for closures are not easily available — this year’s iftar propositions certainly hew closer to the principles of the holy month, although more can be done. From value offerings and sustainable menus to more traditional fare, there’s more for the discerning diner although there are still plenty of blowout buffets to be had for those who want them.
After years of being criticised for wasteful buffets that break the bank and run contrary to the very spirit of Ramadan, UAE restaurants finally seem to have gotten the message. In what’s probably also a response to the greater degree of competition — 1,109 new restaurants opened in Dubai last year; figures for closures are not easily available — this year’s iftar propositions certainly hew closer to the principles of the holy month, although more can be done. From value offerings and sustainable menus to more traditional fare, there’s more for the discerning diner although there are still plenty of blowout buffets to be had for those who want them.
A serving of value “Diners in Dubai have a wide variety of dining options at their disposal and are looking for a value-for-money spot to enjoy iftar with friends and families that serve staple iftar items, so our menu at Purani Dilli offers Arab and Indian favourites,” says Afroz Alam, Sous Chef, Purani Dilli, Four Points by Sheraton, Downtown Dubai.
For Dh95 per person, you’ll get your fill of hummus, moutabbal and fattoush, as well as signature Indian mains such as lagan ka murgh, dal makhani and biryani.
The sub-Dh100 iftar is well in evidence: City Walk casual Italian Sapori’s four-course home-style iftar is priced Dh89, while Aussie chain Coffee Club has a three-course deal for Dh85 per head across the UAE.
Sustainability rules Value takes a different twist elsewhere, with other eateries choosing to communicate some of the principles behind the holy month this year. Sofra BLD at the Shangri-La Hotel, Qaryat Al Beri in Abu Dhabi is laying on a classic spread, while donating $1 for every iftar purchased to the UN’s World Food Programme through the ShareTheMeal crowdfunding app. Each donation feeds two children one full meal each, the hotel said in a handout. Vida Downtown’s contemporary 3in1 setting, meanwhile, bills its iftar as sustainable because its main courses are cooked to order. This cuts down on food waste and underscores the hotel’s environmentally responsible credentials.
A touch of culture Ramadan is also about culture and tradition. At the Emirati restaurant Seven Sands on The Beach in JBR, the traditional iftar comes with a side of Arab culture for Dh255 per head. On Mondays and Fridays during the holy month, the restaurant hosts business coach and cultural tourism designer Nasif Kayed, who will lead an open discussion on topics such as ablution, fasting, culture, food and the significance of Ramadan.
“Our philosophy is focused on offering uniquely local experiences that celebrate the traditions, culture and cuisine of the UAE,” says Saad Tassoufra, Operations Manager of Seven Sands.
Over in Fujairah, meanwhile, the Majlis at the Fairmont Fujairah Resort’s Thamella Hall hosts Emirati heritage experts to talk about Fujairah’s historical sites, Emirati cuisine, fishing heritage of the UAE and Eid traditions.
A repast for renewal Dubai diners are well known for their obsession with innovation, so we’re expecting Jiggs Kalra’s Masala Library at JW Marriott Marquis will be the most-Instagrammed iftar this season. Iftar at the new restaurant takes the form of a modernist tasting menu in contrast to the more usual buffets and giant platters, says promoter Zorawar Kalra. “We offer an experiential meal with an experimental menu that is still steeped in and respectful of tradition,” he tells GN Focus. “People are hungry after fasting all day, and it’s only fair that someone spends time and energy into creating something special for them.”
We offer an experiential meal with an experimental menu that is still steeped in and respectful of tradition. – Zorawar Kalra, promoter, Masala Library, JW Marriott Marquis Dubai That something special is a series of 12 dishes, including a starter of date granola with power grains and superfoods, followed by the brand’s signature mushroom tea, kebabs, biryani and fusion desserts, priced at Dh230 per person (Dh195 vegetarian).
At Dubai favourite Tresind, this year’s twist is the Indian Steakhouse, a theme chef Himanshu Saini and his team have been working on for months. For Dh179, its date candy in edible paper makes a comeback, followed by six meat dishes, including kebabs and a gueridon-style lamb recipe, Pot Nihari, as well as a mango and deconstructed baklava dessert.
Innovative food at value pricing? Sounds just the ticket.
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Azerbaijan invites football enthusiasts to witness the UEFA Europa League Final live in Baku

Written by Indian Newz The 68,700-seater Baku Olympic Stadium, the venue for the match, will stage the final later this month X May 2019: Azerbaijan’s economy continues to diversify through the influx of visitors to the country in recent years. A new group of tourists are being attracted to the country with high-profile sporting events such as the Formula 1 Azerbaijan Grand Prix. Added to the list this year is the UEFA Europa League, Europe’s second biggest club football tournament, the final of which will be hosted at the Baku Olympic Stadium on 29 May 2019. The highly anticipated final will attract not only football aficionados from Europe, but from across the world. Azerbaijan hopes to capture the attention of sporting enthusiasts with its many offerings of outdoor pursuits and high-energy activities, to turn spectators into adventurers and to allow them to ‘take another look’ at all the country has to offer. We suggest a few experiences to indulge in while you visit the country to watch the riveting final: Discover Icherisheher The walls of Icherisheher whispers the ancient mysteries of the city. Known as old town or inner city, it is located in the heart of Baku and is a maze of narrow roads spotted with limestone buildings. A sight that’s difficult to miss is the Shirvanshahs’ Palace and Maiden Tower, both listed in UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites List. The Palace itself is known as the Pearl of Azerbaijani architecture as it is made up of several different structures built throughout the ages with each adding a beautiful amalgamation of medieval, Asian and Islamic influences. Another mystery is the Maiden Tower. This cylindrical stark tower has baffled historians and to date has theories aplenty about its origins and the exact date of construction. Despite that, it is one of the most iconic structures in the city housing a museum covering the history of Baku and marked around it are beautiful scriptures that hint at the possible roots of this historical feat. It is also home to the International Festival of Arts and regularly showcasing work from innovative artists against its mystic backdrop. Besides that, Icherisheher offers some of the most eccentric and outstanding feats. The Museum of Miniature Books, a Guinness Book record-holder, open to all for free, houses the largest number of miniature books at 5,600 and don’t forget to spot your national flag to find books from your home country. Another place to stop by is the Ali Shamsi Studio, a wonderland of paintings that transport you to another dimension of reality and mind-boggling installations. You will often find the artist and philosopher Ali Shamsi there who can talk you through the burgeoning art scene in the city. The iconic work at the Heydar Aliyev Centre Designed by the illustrious architect, Zaha Hadid, it is notably one of the most iconic landmarks in the city of Baku. Besides the building’s magnificent architecture, it houses some of the best art curations in the city and right in the front of the centre you cannot miss the plethora of free masterclasses from tango, chess to capoeira reaffirming that the Heydar Aliyev Centre is the place to be. There are four massive floors dedicated to modern and classic art and culture including a colossal collection of vintage cars, several salivating and decedent fashion exhibits alongside a full-fledged museum to add to the mix. Authentic Azerbaijani cuisine From their kebabs to tandir bread, Azerbaijan’s food is truly a melting pot of cultures with fragrances and flavours influenced by European, Middle Eastern and Asian food. The local delicacies you must not miss though are the fragrant saffron plov (pilaf), barbequed kebabs, and dolma stuffed with hearty minced lamb topped with a touch of sourness from fermented pickles. Prehistoric petroglyphs of Gobustan Rising out of the semi-desert Gobustan is a UNESCO World Heritage site of more than 6,000 rock engravings, which go back 40,000 years. You can also see graffiti by a Roman legionary – the furthest east it has ever been found. The petroglyphs of Gobustan are artistic chronicles of the past that span a period of approximately 20,000 years beginning from the end of Upper Palaeolithic until the beginning of our era. Besides that, did you know that almost half of the world’s mud volcanoes are located in Azerbaijan? Most of them are situated near the Gobustan preserve. Due to their size and diversity mud volcanoes are considered natural monuments of Azerbaijan. Ateshgah and the ‘Burning Mountain’ The Ateshgah Fire Temple amazes visitors with its ever-burning flames and features 16 inscriptions that harbour centuries-old secrets. This ancient fire-worshipping temple in Surakhani dates to the 19 th century and is sure to leave you and the kids in awe. Still got time before you head back to the city? A short drive away in Mehemmedi village is the gas-rich terrain of Yanar Dag, known as the ‘Burning Mountain’ because of the flames that blaze away naturally on the hillside. This will definitely keep the children gawking in delight. Buzzing atmosphere of Baku Boulevard Breathe in the fresh air of the Caspian Sea while you stroll the pleasant Baku Boulevard. On it you will find a small replica of Venice made up of a myriad of islands with gondolas floating along canals and past restaurants. The Boulevard also offers eye-catching Instagram photo opportunities: from old Soviet trains to panoramic views of the city from the Baku Ferris Wheel (Baku Eye), there is so much to see before the day ends. Don’t forget to check out the Yarat Modern Art Space that offers world-class master classes and exhibitions for the whole family. End the day with an excursion on the Mirvari ship that has its own restaurant so you can truly relish the Caspian seaside experience. Therapeutic oils of Azerbaijan Getting messy never felt so therapeutic. Spend the day indulging in therapeutic wellness treatments where the curative properties of crude oil baths (yes – soaking in liquid oil) are used to treat musculoskeletal diseases, as well as neurological, urological, gynecological, skin and other ailments. Soak up the healing properties of Azerbaijan’s natural resources and gentle climate with views of the stunning landscape at Chinar Hotel & Spa Naftalan, which is a 4-hour drive from Baku. The Naftalan Health Centre, located in Baku is another option for those with limited time who want to try this unique treatment. You can apply for an Azerbaijan visa from https://www.evisa.gov.az/en/ and for tickets to the final visit www.europaleague.tickets.uefa. com About Azerbaijan Tourism Board (ATB): Azerbaijan Tourism Board (ATB) is a national promotion body established under the State Tourism Agency of the Republic of Azerbaijan. Its main objectives are to support the growth of Azerbaijan’s tourism industry and encourage visitors to explore the country’s rich cultural offering and experience its ancient heritage. For more information, visit http://azerbaijan.travel/en/ home or follow us on Instagram @ExperienceAzerbaijan. Advertisements

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Kenya’s best food is a kaleidoscope of flavors

Words by Maureen O’Hare, video by Channon Hodge, Nick Migwi and Joshua Sarlo, CNN
“Food tastes much better when you eat it with your hands,” declares Nairobi-based food blogger Kaluhi Adagala , using her fingers to tease some freshly baked tilapia off the bone. “It’s like a hands-on, intimate relationship between you and the food.”
Adagala is in the dining room of the Delta Plaza branch of contemporary Kenyan restaurant Nyama Mama — bold with African wax prints — with a colorful feast of fish, meat, samosas, cornmeal and greens prepared by executive chef Lesiamon Sempele.
Nairobi is the vibrant, chaotic heart of Kenya . It’s a fast-evolving city in sharp contrast to the ageless calm of the country’s sweeping savannah, lakelands, mountain highlands and Indian Ocean coastline.
Adagala is here to tell us about the essential dishes visitors to the country should try — though there’s huge diversity here in both communities and in the food.
“I’d say landscape has affected the cuisine of our people,” explains Adagala. “The people who are in Turkana or the Masai Mara, they are traditional people and their cuisine is influenced by their livestock. The people at the coast, their cuisine is influenced by the trade they have done with Arabs and Indians.”
Meat
“People love their meat!,” laughs Adagala. If it’s a gathering or celebration, then nyama choma — Swahili for roast meat, usually goat or beef — is sure to be center stage.
“It varies from region to region,” says Adagala. “In the west, we might roast goat with eucalyptus wood, but in Nairobi it’s just a normal roast and served with kachumbari .”
Kachumbari (or salsa) “goes well with everything,” she adds. “It’s very simple to make. I like mine with tomatoes, a splash of lime juice, some onions and chili.”
Ugali , a polenta-like cornmeal slab, is the other essential side dish. It’s “our staple food,” she says, but it’s “an acquired taste.” Outsiders might complain it’s bland, but for Kenyans, it’s the ultimate starchy comfort food, and with the right spicy accompaniments, it comes to life.
“Have ugali with some vegetables and a very rich meat dish, like well-cooked tilapia or matumbo , to bring everything together,” advises Adagala.
Matumbo, or tripe, “is dark and black and looks like a towel,” but served up in bao in Nyama Mama’s Asian fusion take on a Kenyan classic, it’s some of the tastiest stomach you’ll eat this year.
“We are not wasteful at all,” says Adagala. It’s not just offal that’s on the menu. When the goat is slaughtered for the nyama choma, its blood might find its way into a mutura sausage, a spicy delicacy of offal, garlic, ginger, chili and coriander, all bound together by the red stuff.
Fish and chicken
” Tilapia is the most common fish in our country,” says Adagala, and, traditionally, it’s often fried. The vast Lake Victoria, which Kenya shares with Uganda and Tanzania, is the main producer of freshwater fish.
Uduvi (shrimp) and kamba (prawns) are particularly delicious wa kupaka , which means “with a rich coconut curry stew.” Kuku kienjeyi — free-range chicken — is also a top candidate for the coconut treatment.
Pulses and vegetables
Nyama choma might be popular for gatherings, but when it comes to everyday eating, “Kenyan cuisine in its essence is actually heavily vegetarian,” says Adagala.
One of the country’s vegetable staples is sukuma wiki , collard greens cooked with onions and spices. Its literal translation is “end of the week,” typical of a food culture which traditionally has been more about subsistence than extravagance.
” Mboga is the umbrella term for vegetables,” explains Adagala. “We have many traditional vegetables which are common in the western part of the country, whch is where I came from.” Kanzira is African kale, managu is African nightshade and terere is “similar to wild spinach.”
Adagali recommends trying githeri , a casserole of maize and beans, with a side of avocado, while other popular pulses include ndengu (mung beans) and njahi (black beans).
Every cuisine benefits from a starchy potato fix, so for the Kenyan twist try viazi karai (fried potatoes) or viazi via ryo (potatoes in a tomato and coconut sauce). Mukimo is a vividly hued mash of potatoes and green vegetables while irio is a variant with peas and corn.
And then there’s matoke , which is part of the plantain family. Adagala says “it’s a lot starchier, a little bit less sweet” and “fantastic for stewing.”
Indian and Arabic influence
Kenya has a large Indian population, a migration which began in the late 19th century when indentured laborers were recruited from British-ruled India to build the Kenya-Uganda railway.
There are plenty of Swahili classics whose names will sound familiar to fans of Indian food — chapati , samosas , bhajia , biryani and pilau — although they’re given a local spin.
Kenyan chapati, for example, are made with white or all-purpose flour, and are fried in vegetable oil or ghee before serving.
“For festivities, we like having pilau, and also masala fries (French fries with spicy sauce), because they’re just considered a bit more festive,” says Adagala.
Cuisine on Kenya’s eastern coast is influenced by the fresh ideas — and ingredients — brought in by trading with India and Arabic countries.
“The coastal people are more expressive when it comes to spices, they’re very bold and very assertive,” explains Adagala. “When you come inland, people like their food more simple. They like tasting the essence of the ingredients. They even consider use of spices as an interruption.
“When you go to the west, we also like our food more simple. The only difference is we put more traditional salts. We like smoking our meats; we like roasting our meats with specific types of woods.”
Sweet things and drinks
Mendazi — samosa-shaped but donut-tasting — are a delicious breakfast treat. Vibibi, rice and coconut pancakes, are another light, fluffy delicacy to start the day.
And of course, you need something to wash them down with.
“We export the best coffee in the world but what Kenyans really love is tea,” says Adagala. Chai masala , lightly fragrant, lightly sweet, milky tea, is a breakfast classic.
Tea might often be enjoyed at breakfast with nduma , a starchy tuber which is prepared simply by boiling with a pinch of salt.
Alternatively, Adagala prepares it with a crispy coating:
Falooda , an Indian-style milkshake, is another of the imports to have made it here from Asia.
When it comes to street snacks, sugar cane is often seen for sale. Kenyans old and young like to slice it up and suck upon it like a straw.
“For the older folk there’s an alcoholic juice called busaa ; it’s made using fermented soghurm flour,” says Adagala. “You put fermented soghurm flour or just the seeds in a big pot, pour in some water and some yeast, then let it ferment.” When it’s ready, men like to “gather around the pot and they all drink from it.”
Where to eat in Nairobi
Nyama Mama is “one of the best Kenyan restaurants” in Nairobi, says Adagala. “It’s very popular because it takes Kenyan classics and gives them a nice twist.”
She also recommends Swahili Plate, in the Central Business District, for tasty, no-nonsense local cuisine, and for nyama choma she recommends Roadhouse Grill and Carnivore. “Carnivore does everything from beef to crocodile to duck. Everything!,” she says.
And for Kenyan-style gourmet burgers, her top tip is Mama Rocks, at hip hangout and “creative hub” The Alchemist.
Nyama Mama Delta , Delta Towers, Nairobi, Kenya; +254 704 567567
Roadhouse Grill, Dennis Pritt Road, Nairobi, Kenya; +254 720 768663
Carnivore , Langata Road, near Wilson Airport, Nairobi, Kenya; +254 722 204647
Swahili Plate, Muindi Mbingu St, Nairobi, Kenya; +254 772 435765
Mama Rocks @ The Alchemist, Parklands Rd, Nairobi, Kenya; +254 705 155 155
For more of Kaluhi Adagala’s tips, visit her blog Kaluhi’s Kitchen and follow her on Instagram and YouTube

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I have visited London a number of times during my travels. Whenever I go there, I always have sought out “Pakistani” restaurants. I found it difficult to identify when searching for Pakistani restaurants, because they always carry the tag line, “Indian Cusine, or Authentic Indian Cusine”. Upon inquiring at one of the restaurants, I found out the food was Pakistani, the owner of the restaurants were Pakistani, the staff was Pakistani, yet the restaurant board outside said indian cuisine. When I asked the owner, he said, well title it because everyone else does it. So I asked a question (rhetorical), that if everyone jumped into the english channel, would he do the same? He had no answer. I even told him that I had almost not entered his restaurant because it said indian cuisine. Because I was looking to eat food which is Pakistani, and if wanted indian food, I would’ve gone to an indian restaurant (as if). And I have to say, this one of the most disgusting attitudes or approach I have come across my travels in London. No where else in the world have Pakistanis done this, not in Malaysia, not in America, not in Turkey, or anywhere else I have visited. I hope that Pakistanis living in this tiny island country of britain, show that they are Muslim first, as a consequence of which, a Pakistani and after which, you can add whatever the heck their britishness means. Don’t you ever forget who you are, a MUSLIM FIRST, due which you are PAKISTANI. Everything else, has little to no consequence or meaning for you. No matter which part of the world you may live in or undertake business ventures.

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https://theoutline.com/post/7398/beyond-meat-impossible-burger-delicious?zd=1&zi=53lgt3wm

The aesthetic case for fake meat Eating vegan meat substitutes is more than the ethical choice, it’s the delicious one. Tom Whyman MAY—07—2019 09:38AM EST
There is a familiar complaint about vegetarianism, that I’m sure most people who are, or have been, vegetarian or vegan will have had put to them while trying to eat at some point. This is the complaint from the sort of carnivore, who insists they have no problem with vegetarianism per se , but who doesn’t see why if you want to be a vegetarian, you can’t just stick to vegetables. Vegetables are great! they’ll say. So why do you need to eat fake sausages or burgers? You should stick to salads . Uh-huh, you nod along, while swallowing a bite of your seitan dog.
I am the exact opposite of this variety of carnivore. I hardly ever eat meat — which of course can be justified ethically in all sorts of ways, relative to the well-being of animals or relative to the continued existence of the planet. But if I’m honest, in my heart of hearts (and stomach of stomachs) my everyday refusal to eat meat comes naturally only because I prefer vegetarian meat substitutes to a significant extent. Sausages are great — so why would anyone want them to be made out of anything other than rehydrated textured soy protein?
But for me, vegetarian meat feels and tastes like adulthood: I specifically associate it with a sense of wonder, the joys the world seemed to contain at the moment when I began to be mature enough to both explore and appreciate it. My first girlfriend, who I dated in my late teens and early 20s, had been raised vegetarian, and all of our first dates were in places that served vegan and vegetarian food. It was in these restaurants that I first discovered the simply pleasures of Quorn sausages, soft tubes of chewy stodge; the sweet-and-sour bite of bacon rashers made from tempeh; the doughy, crunchy, waxy warmth of halloumi fish and chips.
From there, I was gradually brought to realize that tofu was nothing like the punchline food from the dad jokes I heard in my youth; that vegetarian black pudding and haggis could not only exist, but tasted basically the same as the versions full of blood and offal; that deli ham was pretty much the same regardless of whether it started life as an actual pig; that you can get spookily convincing seitan duck out of a can. These are the imitation versions of food that have sustained my life, for as long as it has felt like real life.
Before I met my first girlfriend, a “meal” for me had been half a loaf of bread filled with fried bacon and eggs, or maybe coronation chicken (I’m not sure if this food exists anywhere other than the U.K., but it’s basically cold roast chicken and raisins covered in curry powder and mayonnaise). The only exception had been a week in my first year of university when I’d tried to “rationalize” my diet by eating only pomegranates and plain yogurt — a now ridiculous-seeming experiment that I had to put a stop to after I almost passed out on the bus. If nothing else, it was a relief for my body to finally consume food that didn’t make it feel sick. I’ve never really been “fully” vegetarian; I’m not the sort of person who likes to make a fuss, so in any awkward situation I know I’d always cave, and I’ve never felt at all inclined to give up fish. But what I do have is a very definite and lasting preference for the fake stuff, not the real.
SAUSAGES ARE GREAT — SO WHY WOULD ANYONE WANT THEM TO BE MADE OUT OF ANYTHING OTHER THAN REHYDRATED TEXTURED SOY PROTEIN?
Increasingly, I am hardly alone in my preference for veggie meat. By the end of the year, every Burger King in the U.S. will sell an authentically “bleeding” vegan burger called the Impossible Whopper ; Del Taco recently partnered with a company called Beyond Meat in order to offer meatless tacos . At the start of this year in the U.K., the bakery chain Greggs, which exists in the British political imagination as a by-word for a sort of cheap-and-cheerful authenticity (“Nationalize Greggs!” has become a meme on the Labour left), kick-started some of the weirdest few days in our ongoing culture war when it launched, to the outraged horror of commentators such as Piers Morgan, a vegan sausage roll . There is every reason to suggest that these changes are, more than anything else, just good business .
But this of course makes the leftist case for vegetarian meat substitutes look a lot more shaky. Veggie meat is being appropriated by capitalism — as Outline editors Drew Millard argued in a recent exchange with (the right, justly and correctly pro-veggie meat substitutes) Brandy Jensen for this publication , there is every reason to suggest that fake meat is being favored by fast food chains as a way of lowering production costs, thus increasing their profit margins; moreover, we have little real knowledge of the long-term health risks associated with eating mass-produced fake meat (that said, it’s not like fast food chains are currently highly unprofitable businesses which draw what small turnover they do from selling food that keeps us healthy).
Our society’s current appetite for meat is obviously disastrous from a climate perspective — but is the problem really the raising of livestock as such ? Might the “right” amount of meat to farm just be a much smaller amount, not none at all? Capitalism and the meat industry obviously go together — but of them, the former is the one that’s ultimately to blame.
So perhaps it’s time for vegetarian meat enthusiasts to stop relying so much on the ethical case for fake meat, and start making an aesthetic case for it as well. This might say more about me and where I live/choose to eat than anything else, but almost all of the best meals I’ve had in the past year have been vegan and vegetarian junk food: from fake McRib-style sandwiches; to vegan chilli corn dogs; to battered “fish” made from banana blossom . This food is delicious in a very gleeful, obvious way: it is fatty, and nourishing, and anyone whose soul still works would want to devour it in seconds (it is, after all, junk food). But it also achieves a subtlety of flavor that all but the very best non-vegetarian junk food typically lacks; plus you typically feel a lot better, in comparison to the meat stuff, just sort of in yourself and in your body, after consuming it.
THE ART OF VEGETARIAN MEAT IS THAT OF MAKING SOMETHING THAT LOOKS, FEELS, AND TASTES CONVINCINGLY LIKE SOMETHING IT IS NOT.
But flavor’s not the only thing that matters here. Vegetarian meat substitutes also exemplify something that “real” meat simply doesn’t: the aesthetic virtue of imitation. The art of vegetarian meat is that of making something that looks, feels, and tastes convincingly like something it is not.
Imitation is a bit of an odd virtue: in some artistic contexts, such as that of representational painting, it’s usually taken for granted that the “good” artist will be the one who makes something that looks convincingly like the “real” object being represented. But equally, perhaps the earliest Western theory of art is founded on a certain suspiciousness towards imitation. Notoriously, Plato’s Socrates would expel the poets from his ideal Republic: “All poets from Homer downward,” he tells us, “have no grasp of truth but merely produce a superficial likeness of any subject they treat, including human excellence.” Imitation is always in tension with authenticity — while it might be considered impressive for representational artists to imitate reality effectively, the convincing imitation of their imitations can have you fined or thrown in jail.
A concern with authenticity also seems paramount in Western cuisine. Eastern cooking tends to bring together ingredients with complex, contrasting flavors; whereas Western cuisine tends to focus on a narrower range of flavors, intensifying the existing flavors of, for instance, meat . On this theory, the point of cooking is not to alter, disguise, or invent a particular flavor — but to draw flavor out, to make ingredients taste as much as possible like themselves. Indeed, the carnivore whose objection to vegetarianism I voiced at the start of this article seems precisely to be driven by a concern with authenticity: he wants real vegetarianism, not fake meat-eating (and then he wants you to do it, not him — but hey).
Obviously a lot of fake meat has its roots in Asian cooking, with products such as tofu, seitan, and tempeh enjoying a long history well before vegetarianism caught on en masse in the West. But Western cooking did not always place a taboo on imitation. In the Middle Ages, the Catholic church prohibited the consumption of animal products of Fridays, which led to cooks inventing things like fake eggs made from discarded eggshells filled with almond jelly, and “bacon” made from salmon rolled with pike roe .
As often today, dietary prohibitions obliged chefs of yore to practice the virtue of imitation (Middle Ages cooking in general was based around clashing sweet-and-sour flavours, much like Indian cuisine) — although in contrast to contemporary fake meat, the emphasis seems to have been on producing a visual illusion, more than a gustatory one. All of this changed, of course, with the emergence of Protestantism and the loosening of dietary restrictions — and the development of modern Western cuisine is very much associated with societal changes that accompanied a nascent capitalism and imperialism, forces alongside Protestantism emerged.
It would be hard to construct an argument to the effect that inauthenticity is always good and authenticity always bad. I’ve already noted the association of authenticity with intellectual property — but that’s not the only way the notion might stand as the marker of an important right. The invocation of authenticity can often be the last recourse non-western people have against the incursions of celebrity chefs like Gordon Ramsay, who are otherwise rich and powerful enough to simply decide, as if on a whim, to adopt their cuisine . Certainly the likes of Jamie Oliver don’t seem to pay authenticity too much heed when producing, for instance, knock-off versions of “jerk” rice that do not contain actual Jamaican jerk spices . In this sense inauthenticity and soulless profiteering go hand-in-hand.
But perhaps fake meat can be a sort of remedy to this. Fake meat exemplifies what is good about imitation and inauthenticity: the creation, through imitation, of a unique product with a value all of its own (in a sense this is much like what is produced through original representational art — which helps explain why originals are different from copies). Our imitative instincts should be focused not on making bad, bastardized versions of the culinary products of other cultures, but rather on delicious bastardizations of whatever meat products we might imagine. Share this:

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Top 10 Things to See and Do in Bengaluru, India

May 6, 2019 0
On the Deccan Plateau in southern India is the cosmopolitan city of Bengaluru , formerly known as Bangalore. The city, whose roots date back to the age of the Vijayanagara Empire in 1537, is the capital of the state of Karnataka. Since its founding, it has blossomed into a megacity of over ten million, making it the third-most populous city in India after Mumbai and Delhi. Because of its size, history, and multicultural atmosphere, there are tons of things to see and do in Bengaluru for all types of travelers.
If you’re a foodie, you’re in luck; Bengaluru is home to some of the best restaurants and street food vendors I’ve ever had in southern India. History lovers will delight in the opportunity to dive deep into the origins of the city and its surrounding area. And those looking to experience a little bit of everything will never find a shortage of places to visit. These are the top 10 things to see and do in Bengaluru, India. Have a Southern Indian Breakfast
When you visit a city in the southern part of India like Bengaluru, something you must do is experience an authentic southern Indian breakfast. Two of the best spots in the city to have one are Central Tiffin Room (more commonly known as CTR) and Vidyarthi Bhavan .
I was surprised to learn that people come from as far as 50 kilometers away to have breakfast at CTR, a legendary breakfast spot in the city. After tasting their food for myself, I understand why it’s one of the top things to see and do in Bengaluru. The place will likely be jam-packed when you visit, but wait patiently because the offerings here are worth it.
The main event at CTR are the dosas, which are buttery and crispy in some spots and spongy in others. It creates a wonderful mixture of textures whether you eat it plain with ghee or with aloo masala (a mashed potato dish with chilies, curry leaves, and shallots) like I did. Try it with their coconut chutney! It’s thinner than others I’ve had, but still packs a wonderful coconut flavor I couldn’t get enough of.
Another great option at CTR is their chow chow bath, which consists of two contrasting dishes: the spicy khara bath and the sweet kesari bath. The cloves and raisins of the kesari bath balance out the chilies of the khara bath perfectly.
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This polenta-like dish is best eaten with CTR’s outstanding coconut chutney. Finish off your meal with an outstanding Karnataka filtered coffee. It’s rich and sweet, with a slight bitterness. If it’s too hot for you, pour it back and forth between your cup and the metal bowl that’s provided. It does the trick!
The other popular breakfast place you must visit is Vidyarthi Bhavan, a 75-year-old eatery where the waits are also long but worth it. Breakfast here is quite a spectacle. The waiters here carry towering stacks of plated dosas up their arms and somehow manage to weave between customers and not drop anything!
Despite the spices and peppers in their potato curry, it’s not spicy at all, so it’s perfect for those who like more mild food. Try it with the puri and if you want a spicier kick, dip it in the coconut chutney. Their vada, a crispy and savory doughnut, arrives soaking in sambar and is bursting with tomato flavor. Like the puri, it’s even better with the coconut chutney. The idli and chow chow bath are also fantastic.
But as with CTR, the dosa is the star of the show at Vidyarthi Bhavan. They are coated in delicious ghee, a type of clarified butter that is popular in Indian cuisine. Despite the amount of ghee, the dosa is crispy and flaky. Eat it with the potato filling it comes with and dip it into the sambar and coconut chutney for an added flavor explosion in your mouth! It’s one of the best dosas I’ve ever had!
End your meal at Vidyarthi Bhavan with a Karnataka filtered coffee. As you pour it back and forth to cool it off, it becomes frothy and extra delicious. It’s reminiscent of a cortadito, a type of Cuban coffee that’s popular in my hometown of Miami! Visit Church Street
If you’re looking to do some shopping or people watching during your time in Bengaluru, Church Street is the place to do it. The 750-meter-long stretch is located between Brigade Road and St. Mark’s Road in the Central Business District. It leads straight to St. Mark’s Cathedral, which is how it got its name.
Church Street is a tourist hotspot and one of the city’s biggest revenue-producing areas. I recommend visiting the Entertainment Store for a major pop culture fix. At the time I visited, hype was growing steadily for the release of the first Avengers: Endgame trailer, so the store was filled with Marvel merchandise, including T-shirts, character figurines, and props like Thor’s hammer Mjolnir. There, you can also find T-shirts dedicated to musical bands like Nirvana.
After leaving the store, I also recommend making a stop at Indian Coffee House. While the air was thick with the heavenly aromas of masala and chai, I suggest going with a cool drink like a cold coffee. Bengaluru’s location in southern India means it’s sweltering most of the time and you’ll need a cold drink to help you beat the heat! Street Food in Frazer Town
Frazer Town is an important historical and cultural area in Bengaluru. This residential and commercial suburb is in the northeastern part of town and is known for its harmonious atmosphere. Here, Hindus, Muslims, and Christians live together peacefully. It’s also one of the best places to find flavorful non-veg food in the city!
Stop by Shahi Kabab for their Sheek Sambo Rolls, which consists of six spicy beef kebabs and lots of onions rolled up in a roti. It’s hearty, tasty, and extremely inexpensive for the amount of food you get. Meanwhile, at Empire Restaurant, you can find a rich and creamy butter chicken, spicy grilled chicken, and some refreshing mosambi juice. I also recommend the chicken shawarma with vegetables and a creamy yogurt sauce in a slightly charred pita. The flavor combination is out of this world.
Don’t overlook the stall known as Taj Tea House; there, you can find an ultra-sweet and potent lemon chai, which reminded me of teas I’d had in Morocco and Jordan.
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If you still have room in your belly, grab some Death by Chocolate at Corner House for dessert. This decadent sundae contains vanilla ice cream, chocolate cake, cream, honey, chocolate sauce, peanuts, and cherries. It is sweet and rich beyond belief and is the perfect way to cap off a night of meaty street foods. Just look out for the cherry pits! Visit Cubbon Park
As I mentioned earlier, Bengaluru experiences extremely hot weather, so be prepared to sweat a lot as you explore. One of the best places to cool off and just chill out is Sri Chamarajendra Park, better known as Cubbon Park .
The park is located very close to the Airbnb I stayed at and contains lots of greenery. There are many tall trees, which keep much of the park in the shade. The shade makes the temperature in the park much cooler than the rest of the city.
You’ll find a cool military jet at the park’s entrance, and inside are vendors selling chaats, coconuts, ice cream, and other snacks. The park seemed pretty popular when I visited. There were lots of locals there, especially families enjoying a nice, relaxing Sunday. It’s a wonderful spot to relax, cool off, and enjoy a snack in-between your adventures! Banana Leaf Southern Indian Thali at Nagarjuna Restaurant
One of my favorite things about traveling through India is the amount of diversity in the food. Nowhere is that more apparent in Bengaluru, and to taste some of that amazing diversity, head over to Nagarjuna Restaurant . This restaurant has been serving Andhra-style food since 1984 and eating there is easily one of the best things to see and do in Bengaluru.
My recommendation is to go with the southern Indian thali. It’s served on a large banana leaf and is meant to be mixed and eaten with your hands. Don’t be afraid to get messy! Ease your way in with some chicken Nagarjuna. It’s not spicy at first, but it will creep up on you as you eat!
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Try mixing a bit of peppery spice called gun powder into your ghee rice. Mix it thoroughly with your fingertips and enjoy! Other highlights of the meal there include the dal with spinach and the palya, a refreshing vegetable dish that contains carrots and chickpeas.
Also try your ghee rice and gun powder with their peanut chutney, which is so flavorful it’s almost like peanut butter, and their light and soupy sambar. You can also try your rice with curd, and don’t forget to try everything with the thin and crispy papadum as well. Order the rice pudding-like payasam for dessert. Trust me, it’s fantastic. Eat Street Food on VV Puram Food Street
Another hotspot for street food in Bengaluru is VV Puram Food Street , which is located in the Basavanagudi locality. This food street is lined with at least twenty stalls selling a variety of extreme and exceptional foods. This place is a foodie paradise!
I suggest starting off with the thatte idli, a dense rice and lentil cake that is easily two or three times the size of a regular idli. It’s soft and fluffy, with a very mild and almost bland flavor. Combine it with the coconut and tomato chutneys it’s served with and you’ve got a proper flavor explosion that will make your taste buds dance!
Along VV Puram Food Street, you’ll also find my all-time favorite Indian food, pani puri. The variation here is called floating pani puri, and consists of the slightly spicy and loaded puris floating in a plate of jaljeera water. Crunching into these little delights is like heaven in your mouth!
Other treats you must try include fried cauliflower with a tomato-based sauce, the crispy potato twisters, the spicy roasted chili corn, and the doughy and saccharine sweet roti. The nitrogen biscuits, which are doused in liquid nitrogen and make you look like you’re breathing smoke, are also a fun treat. But the main spectacle here is the fire paan.
Fire paan is a flaming version of the palate cleanser and stimulant called paan. The regular version consists of an areca nut, seeds, dried fruit, and other ingredients that are rolled up in a betel leaf, which you then chew for its benefits. But with fire pan, the mixture is lit on fire and shoved straight into your mouth by the vendor! It may sound scary, but it’s actually more exhilarating than anything.
The fire paan has a minty and smoky flavor and is easily one of the top things to see and do in Bengaluru. It’s a wild experience you will remember for the rest of your life! Visit Bangalore Fort
History enthusiasts visiting Bengaluru should take the time to explore Bangalore Fort , a former mud fort that is now made of granite and dates back to 1537. The mud fort was built by Kempe Gowda I during the Vijayanagara Empire .
In 1761, Hyder Ali, the sultan and ruler of the Kingdom of Mysore, replaced it with the current stone fort, which played a role in the Third Mysore War. Today, the fort’s Delhi gate and two bastions still remain, and a marble plaque commemorates the spot where the British breached the fort’s wall.
Inside the massive, foot-thick gates is a temple and a little statue of Nandi, a gate-guardian deity usually depicted as a bull. There are also lots of beautiful carvings of different animals around a tiny doorway.
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Throughout the fort are massive walls built with giant blocks of stone. Inside, you can also find a beautiful garden. Unlike many other Indian forts, Bangalore Fort is free to visit, so make sure to pay it a visit! It’s easily one of the most amazing things to see and do in Bengaluru. Eat Spicy Non-Veg Food at Shivaji Military Hotel
Traveling foodies looking for some of Bengaluru’s finest non-veg food should make the trip to Shivaji Military Hotel . Like many other popular restaurants in Bengaluru, it will likely be packed when you arrive, so be prepared to wait.
Unlike some other restaurants, you and your party can wait inside and take a table as soon as a patron finishes their meal. It can be a bit hectic, but as is commonly the case in Bengaluru, the food is more than worth it.
At Shivaji Military Hotel, everyone eats their meal off banana leaves, which you rinse with water before you place your food on it. As is customary in southern India, the meal is meant to be eaten with your hands, so wash them well before you start!
It’s hard to go wrong with anything on Shivaji Military Hotel’s menu, but I highly recommend the flavorful mutton biryani and the buttery and tender liver, which comes in a minty and earthy gravy. Even if you think you don’t like liver, you have to try this one. It is exceptional. The mutton dry’s texture is every bit as divine as its flavor, and the fiery spices in the chicken fry will open up your sinuses!
Another dish with a real kick to it is the chili chicken, which along with the other meats, pairs extremely well with the ghee rice. If your mouth gets too hot, try the milky cucumber salad. It helps calm down the heat on your tongue and in your throat! Visit Tipu Sultan’s Summer Palace
While sightseeing at Bangalore Fort, be sure to stop by an incredible site within the old fort area, Tipu Sultan’s Summer Palace . The palace was built in 1791 and is a beautiful example of Indo-Islamic architecture.
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It was the summer residence of Tipu Sultan, a Mysorean ruler who died during the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War. The palace is built entirely of teak and boasts many stunning pillars, arches, and balconies.
Inside the palace is a huge terrace with balconies and walkways branching off of it, as well as multiple rooms below and a garden outside. The palace is gorgeous, but be forewarned: the entry fee for foreigners is 300 rupees, while locals only pay 25 rupees.
A note for photographers: when you visit Tipu Sultan’s Summer Palace, bring a lens that can capture in low light so you get the best results. Visit KR Market
When you visit Bengaluru, one of the things you must do is visit KR Market . This colorful local market puts out fresh flowers, fruits, and vegetables early in the morning and is particularly active during the festive season. A lot of the flowers at this particular market come from the outskirts of Bengaluru.
Visiting local flower markets in India gives a lot of insight into elements of local life. Many people in Bengaluru use flowers for worship and significant events like weddings. For example, there is a custom where white, red, and green garlands of flowers are put around one another during marriages. Here, you can watch local women make these garlands.
As I watched one woman craft her garland, I estimated that it must take her about an hour to complete just one. It’s painstaking work, but the end result is gorgeous. It’s always a beautifully human experience to watch locals do the work they’re so proud of. Because of the people and their amazing craftmanship, visiting any flower market in the city is one of the top things to see and do in Bengaluru.
Whether you go to Bengaluru looking to explore historical sites, try unique street food, or eat traditional southern Indian cuisine in some of the city’s best restaurants, you won’t be disappointed by what you find. Everything offered there is at the highest of high standards and the people are quite friendly as well. Book your trip to Bengaluru today to see for yourself!
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Indian Style Whole Masala Roast Chicken

Few things intrigue me more, as someone who loves to cook and loves to learn about food, than Indian cuisine. As someone who loves to dive into the cuisine of a culture or a nation, I am most fascinated by the regionalization of cuisine. When I first started cooking, I focused on Italy, and I spent a lot of time learning about northern Italian cooking and southern Italian cooking. Then I started to focus upon the cooking of particular provinces, such as Emilia-Romagna, Tuscany and Abruzzo. The focus — from general to regional — was fascinating to me.
In many ways, India is a lot like Italy. There is northern Indian food and southern Indian food. But, then there are the regions. From Punjab to Rajastan to Goa to Kerala (and everywhere in between), there is a wide variety of regional Indian cuisine. I have made some dishes from some of these regions, like Goa and Kerala, but I have only scratched the surface. Much more is to come.
But, for now, a general Indian dish. I say that because whenever I see a recipe that has a title of -style, I know that it is a dish inspired by, but may not actually constitute part of, a country’s established cuisine. That is not necessarily a bad thing, there are very many -style dishes that are very delicious. (I have made quite a few -style dishes, and, hopefully, they are good). So, when I saw an Indian Style Whole Masala Roast Chicken recipe, I decided that I had to make it.
Masalas are spice mixtures. While one can find masala spice mixtures in stores, the best ones are made at home. Dried whole seeds and pods, lightly toasted, and ground into a fine powder. Most people don’t have the whole seeds, but you can still make your own masala from ground spices, it will just not be as good.
In any event, the masala for this recipe is very simple. Kashmiri red chile pepper, “pepper powder” and cumin. I wasn’t quite sure what “pepper powder” was supposed to be, so I just used more Kashmiri peppers (which you can get from your local Indian food market). This masala was very simple and it worked for this recipe. In the future, I may try some different masalas to see how they work with a whole roasted chicken.
INDIAN STYLE WHOLE ROAST MASALA CHICKEN Recipe from My Food Story Serves 4-6
Ingredients: 1 whole chicken (about 2 1/4 pounds) 2 1/2 tablespoons Kashmiri red chile powder 1 1/2 tablespoons ginger paste 1 tablespoon garlic paste 1/2 tablespoon pepper powder 1 teaspoon cumin powder 2 tablespoons honey 1 1/2 tablespoons vinegar 4 tablespoons of butter Salt, to taste 3-4 potatoes, peeled and quartered 3 onions, quartered 3 cloves garlic
Directions: 1. Prepare the chicken. Wash the chicken and pat dry. Mix together the chile powder, ginger, garlic paste, pepper, cumin, honey, vinegar, butter and salt into a smooth paste. Apply the chile paste all over the chicken, into the crevices and under the skin wherever there are gaps If you have extra marinade remaining, you can use it to brush the chicken while it cooks. Cover and marinate the chicken for at least 2 hours or overnight.
2. Roast the chicken. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit, Use an oven proof baking dish and add potatoes, onions garlic and lemon slices to the bottom. Bake for 75 to 90 minutes. Keep brushing the chicken with the fat and gravy from the pan every thirty minutes or so. After 1 hour, cover the chicken with oil to avoid the breast from drying out. Once cooked, cover with foil and let it rest for 10 minutes.
3. Finish the dish. Serve the chicken with all the veggies at the bottom of the pan.
ENJOY!

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What’s the fuss about European Ayurveda®?

What’s the fuss about European Ayurveda®?
What’s the fuss about European Ayurveda®? Liked the Story? It is perfectly attuned to Western requirements
Off the peg is out and made-to-measure is in – especially when it comes to health, nutrition and exercise. European Ayurveda® provides just that and is perfectly attuned to Western requirements: healing herbs and foods grown on home soil at the European Ayurveda Resort Sonnhof’s farm, Lindhof; Ayurvedic therapies and treatments combined with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), conventional medicine and the latest scientific findings to tackle lifestyle diseases. Highly innovative, holistic and handed down over the millennia, the Sonnhof also offers Panchakarma combined with Shamanic coaching.
Day after day, we risk the most valuable thing we own: our health. While stress, lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet have a dire impact, Ayurveda provides effective solutions that work with life as it is, not as we wish it was. Tried and tested for over 5,000 years, it is a recognised medical teaching and philosophy of life. Now European Ayurveda® has adapted it to the demands of our Western way of life. Why travel long-haul when the best is so much closer? European Ayurveda® – tailor-made for the individual 1. The wisdom of low food miles
We all love exotic ingredients and flavours, but they can be a digestive challenge. Ayurveda teaches that we should aspire to eat food that has been grown in – and on – the soil on which we were raised too. The body absorbs and processes locally-grown food more easily and at a faster rate. Furthermore, many of our local herbs can replace traditional Ayurvedic healing herbs.
Thanks to the Lindhof European Ayurveda farm , the Sonnhof has an ideal source of regional, organic, healing foods that suit Western digestive systems. Their 11 hectares provide nature’s treasures grown using traditional methods of cultivation. From vegetables, fruit and herbs to beef, chicken, goose, eggs and honey, all produce is used in the Sonnhof’s European Ayurveda Signature cuisine to make wholesome and delicious Ayurvedic dishes better suited to European digestive systems than the Indian originals. 2. The region’s best – for your skin Regional, organic and prepared with the utmost care: this also applies to the remedies and oils used in European Ayurveda® massages and treatments. Plants and herbs with which our body is familiar work much faster and are more effective. This is why the European Ayurveda® Resort Sonnhof’s recipes for oils, teas and herb and spice mixes have been developed by the resort’s own physicians. Using only the highest quality ingredients and tailored to suit specific constitutional types and treatments, they are carefully produced, packed and bottled by selected pharmacists and partners. 3. Holistic Yoga, meditation, detoxing body & mind Change starts in the mind. Accordingly, Yoga, Mind Detox coaching and meditation are essential pillars of European Ayurveda®. These practices and methods offset the mental overload and health issues caused by our fast-paced, modern lifestyle. Learning to let go is central to Mind Detox coaching and coach Elisabeth Mauracher believes a fulfilled, successful life is predicated on the ability to let go of the things that hold us back: e.g. blame, negativity and unhelpful beliefs. ‘There is a moment when the client is freed from years or even decades of negative beliefs, and that’s when their life changes.’ Liberating the mind and learning greater mindfulness are supported by distinctive forms of Yoga developed at the European Ayurveda® Resort Sonnhof. ‘Pranayama and being in the here and now in Yoga practice give us balance and clear the mind – things to which we Europeans tend to pay too little attention.
Over long periods, the emotional toxicity of negative feelings turns into physical toxins. That’s why European Ayurveda® includes spiritual practices, guided meditations and special Yoga programmes such as Vata-Pitta-Kapha Yoga to balance the Doshas.’ 4. Ayurveda PLUS: the best of two worlds of medicine
Ayurveda PLUS at the European Ayurveda Resort Sonnhof adds Western medicine, TCM and kinesiology to Ayurvedic practice. The Ayurveda PLUS treatments were developed by conventional GP and naturopath Dr Alaettin Sinop. Drawing on different schools of healing, he combines them into effective treatment methods exclusive to the European Ayurveda® Resort Sonnhof and specially devised to target western lifestyle ailments. Ayurveda PLUS Intensive is particularly effective for back and joint problems. 5. Less stress for your biorhythms Long-distance travel plays havoc with the body, potentially neutralising all the positive effects of a stay at an Ayurveda retreat. To activate our self-healing powers and achieve positive change in ourselves we require steady and consistent inner balance. Alpine-based European Ayurveda® is closer in more than just physical terms. 6. New Shamanic Energy Healing Retreat The Mauracher family have joined forces with leading Shamanic coach and acting star Gabrielle Scharnitzky. The result is a brand new retreat. Coming to the European Ayurveda® Resort Sonnhof for the first time in 2019, Gabrielle Scharnitzky’s ‘Happy – No Matter What’ Shamanic Healing Retreat paves the way for self-reflection, mindfulness, inner peace, gratitude and happiness. She applies Native American wisdom to allow her clients’ receptivity to metaphysical realities unfold before helping them to recognise and name their mental, spiritual and emotional energy blocks to release pressure, old traumas and belief systems.

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