Rise of online-only restaurants

Rise of online-only restaurants

It is ironical that in a city like Bengaluru, with its ever-increasing population and penchant for eating out, many restaurants are shutting down.
The intensifying competition and rising rents make the F&B industry difficult, and insiders in the restaurant and fine-dine business say it is not as lucrative as it looks from the outside.
Some restaurateurs have found a way to address their rental concerns by moving to online-only models.
Many restaurants now have no seating for customers. They rely on the takeaway and delivery model, and it’s working.
Night owls place: 6 pm to 6 am
Ashish Tiwari, owner of restaurant Raat ki Rani, says the lack of options for late-night diners made him go completely online.
Raat ki Rani is a delivery-only place operational from 6 pm to 6 am. It serves fast food and North Indian cuisine and is known for its paratha, ghee rice, veg burger and white sauce pasta.
“After I quit my job, I started taking orders from people late at night. The response was tremendous and it made me think of making this a proper, full-fledged business. But since physical restaurants can’t stay open beyond a certain time, I made it an online-only model,” he says.
People are desperate for food at odd hours, and Ashish says he gets orders all through the night and till 6 am.
“This was something we had never expected. We would have lost that business if we had been a physical establishment,” he says.
Costs Lower when you go online
Each restaurant has its own challenges, but a common challenge is getting footfalls, says Padma Kumar, co-partner of Thulp, Asia In A Box and Smoke Co.
“The moment your footfalls become fewer, it is a problem. You end up paying rentals and paying the online partners, so it makes sense to plan your model accordingly,” says Padma Kumar.
Thulp, which serves king-size burgers, pasta and more, recently went from a chain of physical joints to an online-only model.
No high rentals, and lower investment
No expensive rentals, fancy interiors, electricity bills, salaries for waiters and so on. A delivery-only place can be run from a cheaper address and with minimal staff.
“You just have to invest in setting up a kitchen away from residential areas and hiring a place for your staff to stay. Then come equipment, licences and bikes for delivery staff,” says Tiwari.
Since last month, Tiwari has done away with exclusive delivery boys. “We have tied up with aggregators like Zomato, Swiggy and UberEats and get their executives to deliver our food,” he says.
They offer a variety of cuisines
‘Oki Poki’ is a delivery-only model that has tied up with Mamagoto, a chain restaurant serving a pan-Asian menu.
So contrary to popular belief of virtual restaurants serving only comfort or home food, Oki Poki has a selection of baos, sushi, salads and dumplings in their delivery menu.
“Apart from getting orders from regular customers of Mamagoto, we have newer enquiries too,” says Ashik, restaurant manager. “We are concentrating on serving a wide variety to our online customers.”
Why not brick-and-mortar?
Profit margins are slim and the middle-class and upper-middle class young consumer is not exactly loyal; so footfalls are inconsistent for upmarket restaurants.
Physical places need a larger investment and investor-entrepreneur alliances are often uneasy. A supply that far outstrips demand is another constraint.
For professionals
No one really has time to go sit at a proper restaurant during weekdays, and many professionals reserve their weekends for bars and pubs. For the young professional who missed lunch or breakfast or is too lazy to cook dinner, a quick takeaway or delivery service makes sense.
Numbers to go up in future
“Bengaluru is one of the fastest growing cities in India and a key focus market for us. Online ordering and food delivery services have not only helped restaurants reach out to more customers but has also proved to be a stable revenue channel, irrespective if they are a dine-in restaurant or a cloud kitchen.” We expect more and more restaurants to join the online ordering ecosystem as it connects more and more users with their favourite food items.”
— Zomato spokesperson
Why not physical biz?
Profit margins are slim and the middle-class and upper-middle-class young consumer is not exactly loyal; so footfalls are inconsistent for upmarket restaurants. Physical places need a larger investment and investor-entrepreneur alliances are often uneasy. A supply that far outstrips demand is another constraint.

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Renowned QSR chain Upsouth launches sixth outlet in Pune

Renowned QSR chain Upsouth launches sixth outlet in Pune 27/02/2019 Plans to launch more outlets in the city by year end
Pune, 27th February 2019: Renowned QSR chain UpSouth recently launched its sixth QSR outlet in Pune. Post creating its successful presence in Viman Nagar, Pune Airport, Aundh, Wakad, Phoenix Market City and now Wanowarie, the brand is looking forward to launch more outlets in the city by the year end.
UpSouthoffers great, authentic, delicious food with lightning speed of service in hygienic and LIVE Kitchen atmosphere. This is a self-service and sit-down restaurant. It is an ideal place to grab a quick bite for students to hover, family to relax and office-goers due to its fast service and tasty food. The menu offers universal favorites like –varieties of Idli and Dosa, MeduWada, Uthappam, Filter Coffee, Paddu, Southindian Combos, meals and many more. It also hosts its patented signature dishes like Uthly, Malabariparota sandwich, Sabudana Cheese Vada, Elaneer Mousse, Mango Moksha and Healthy Super Grain Paratha . All this priced very competitively, the average spends per person ranges between Rs.80-90 only.Truly great value for money combined with supreme quality!
UpSouthis the Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) brand of Billion Smiles Hospitality Pvt Ltd, one of India’s leading hospitality chain.
“We are here to create convenient, affordable, hygienic and quality driven South Indian QSR chain in an upscale environment. We are looking forward to create an impactful presence in Pune market through internal investments and franchising options. South Indian cuisine is recognized as one of the most popular cuisines, and as a product is also suitable for all day dining. Hence a great opportunity for UpSouth to build a successful QSR format nationwide”, saysKumar Gaurav, Vice President, Billionsmiles Hospitality Pvt Ltd.
Upsouthis committed to bring Indian and South Indian vegetarian cuisine in a modern quick service format – with the highest level of quality in both products and services, at the lowest reasonable prices and in the most hygienic environment. UpSouth makes their food from fresh ingredients, unlike large international chains with their highly processed food at industrial scale.
Corporate Executive Chef – Manu R Nair, continues that “Keeping pace with the modern world, Upsouthredefines the experience of Indian and South Indian Cuisine for you with an upbeat and contemporary touch. We bring healthy, delicious, fresh and wholesome Indian and South Indian vegetarian food in a modern format”,
Beyond these locations, the brand is also looking forward with many more outlets being set up in the city by the year end.
Address: Upsouth, Vitthal Rao Shivarkar Road, Wanowarie, Pune – 411040 Related Posts Mumbalicious Street Food At Novotel Imagica Khopoli Zomato brings the grandest food and entertainment carnival ‘Zomaland’ to Bengaluru! Bandra Hideout celebrates its Launch with an amazing offer

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Reunion Island’s Indian Heritage

Madhya Pradesh Reunion Island’s Indian Heritage The French island on the Indian Ocean is awash in hearty flavours from the homeland, bequeathed by its migrant heritage. Food + Drink France Sudha Pillai | POSTED ON: February 28, 2019 Beaches are at the centre of most social activities in Reunion Island. Photo by: Sudha Pillai
It’s a sunny day at the beach in the French Reunion Islands in the Indian Ocean. Couples are sprawled over large beach towels soaking in the sun. Skimming the sea are kayakers, surfers and parasailers.
I am at a beach picnic hosted by Jacky Aroumougam, a celebrity chef from Reunion Island. Aroumougam is of Indian origin and only speaks French. The spread on the picnic table is authentic pei (local) or Creole cuisine. This is French country, but I see no croissants or baguettes in front of me. Instead, there’s rice, lentils, vegetables, pickles and curry. “Eighty per cent of Creole cuisine is inspired by Indian cuisine,” explains Jacky.
The Beginnings
The five-million-year-old volcanic Reunion Island was first discovered by Arab traders plying the spice route. Then came the Portuguese, English and finally the French who claimed the uninhabited island in 1643. At first, they used the island as a prison site. Then the French decided to move in and make it their paradise. In 1715 the first settlers landed here. Soon others followed. They brought slaves from Africa to work in their sugarcane plantations. When slavery was abolished in 1848, the French brought labourers from Tamil Nadu and the Malabar coast in India.
Since French immigration officers could not pronounce the Indian names, the labourers were registered under French and Christian sounding names. Arumugam became Aroumogam, Vaidyalingam became Vaitiling and so on. The immigrants lost their names, religion, language and even their way of life. But there was something that held steadfast—Indian cuisine.
The seafront Saint Paul market (top) is one of Réunion’s prettiest and busiest; The 19th-century Colosse Temple built by Indian indentured workers is an important landmark. Photos by: byvalet/shutterstock (market), Thierry Grun/agefotostock/Dinodia Photo Library (temple) From Curry to Cari
Earlier during this 10-day trip, I met Mary Theresa Subramaniam at the Saint-Pierre market. Dressed in a skirt and blouse, the only visible Indian marker on her are her dusky South Indian features. She speaks and thinks in French. She knows she might have “few relatives back in India,” but has no clue of their whereabouts. She’s never visited India and has no great desire to do so. It’s a common narrative amongst the Indian community here.
Mary’s grandfather came to the island with his wife and nine children. After a few months, he abandoned his family and returned to Tamil Nadu. His young wife had to raise her brood single-handedly. She was cut off from all that was familiar to her. The only link to her life back home were few hastily written recipes that she had brought with her. It included her mother’s chicken curry.
For numerous Indians in the island, the curry must’ve held warm memories of home. Their solace and comfort. Cooking curry back then must’ve been like Skyping home today.
As Indians began to homogenise, their curries too found diverse expressions. It allowed for the inclusion of local ingredients. Over time, the curry became ‘ cari ,’ a staple of the island’s Creole cuisine.
Today, cari is the most popular dish on the island. Like dal in India, no two caris on Reunion Island are the same. Families have their secret cari recipes. The cari can be vegetarian and non-vegetarian. Chicken, duck, pork, mussels, chouchou, potato and jackfruit (which was originally brought from India) are some of its main ingredients. However, the most famous cari dish here is the cabri massale (goat curry). This spicy cari is similar to the mutton curry made in Tamil Nadu. Cari is usually served with rice, pulao or beans and lentils.
French, with a side of India The island’s creole culture, especially the food has many Indian elements—from the samoussas that Abdel Kader serves in his stall (left) to cari (right). Photos by: Sudha Pillai
Sitting on the beach, watching the white-tipped waves crest and ebb, I feast on the authentic creole spread prepared by Jacky. Vegetable and chicken stuffed samoussas , yellow rice, spicy chicken rougail, achards , and sweet potato pie. Jacky’s forefathers were from Bengal and South India. Jacky himself has never been to India. Some of his unique dishes are inspired by the secret recipes of his mother and grandmother who came from Bengal.
The cuisine of the island is a ghoulash of African, Indian, Chinese and European influences. Jacky sums it up aptly, “In Réunion, you can have a breakfast of croissants, a lunch of cari and rice and a dinner of steak and Rhum arrangé (rum infused with herbs and spices).”
Over the next few days, as I eat my way through the island, I learn more about the Indian influence and infiltration of the local cuisine.
Samoussa is a smaller version of the Indian samosa. Its filling (beef, pork, chicken, cheese, vegetable, pineapple, etc.) is as diverse as the people in the island. The filling depends on the roots of the samoussa-maker: African, Indian or Malagasy? Samoussas and South Indian vada-like bonbons piments are the islanders’ preferred snacks to have, enjoyed with beer or mulled rum.
Curcuma is turmeric which is also known as “local saffron” in the island. Kaloupile is curry leaves or what is known as karuvepile in Tamil. Garam massale or garam masala is used extensively in Creole cuisine. Each family, be it French, Indian or African, have their own secret garam massale recipes. Achards come from the Indian achar and is made with julienned jackfruit, carrot, beans, cabbage or other vegetables mixed with chilli, curcuma, ginger, oil, vinegar and salt. There’s also another version of the evolution of the word achards; I am told it originated from urugua , which came from urugai (pickle) in Tamil.
Brèdes is a side dish made of edible leaves and stems of chouchou, cabbage or pumpkin, fried with ginger, garlic, onion and chilli. Very similar to the porial that one finds in South India.
Rougail is a spicy sauce that’s made using vegetables, meat, or even wasp larvae, which is a speciality here. The use of green tamarind or green mango and curcuma in the preparation of the sauce denotes an Indian connect. The islanders, including Europeans, love their chillies so much that they even add a little chilli to their fruit salads.
Jackfruit, ginger, tamarind, turmeric, mango and even the banyan trees on the island can trace their roots back to India. The islanders’ favourite way of eating mangoes is to cut raw mangoes into thin strips and eat it with a dash of salt and chilli. It reminded me of summers in Chennai, which were incomplete without green mangoes, uppu and molakkaipodi (salt and chilli powder). Celebrity chef Jacky (left), has been inspired by the secret recipes of his grandmother and mother who come from Bengal; Old-world cottages with lush lawns (right) are a common sight when walking through Reunion Island neighbourhoods. Photos by: Sudha Pillai
Before leaving the island, I visit the local Mahakali de Bazaar (Mahakali temple). A tall and lanky man, whose forefathers came from Pondicherry and Tamil Nadu, is the presiding priest. He calls to someone in the inner room and tells them, in fluent French, to bring some prasad—a generous helping of kesari , a traditional dessert from Tamil Nadu, made with rava, sugar and ghee.
Reunion Island is a fine example of why we cook and eat a certain way—it is a reminder of all the bonds that tie us to where we are from. Essentials
Reunion Island, 680 km east of Madagascar and 180 km southwest of Mauritius, is a French overseas territory. Indians don’t need a visa for a stay of up to 15 days. For a longer duration, visitors will have to apply for a visa at the French consulate or embassy (a Schengen visa is not valid). To organise a holiday on the island, travellers have to follow one of two procedures. They can enlist an Indian or local travel agency on the island to organise flights and accommodation packages. Alternately, they can make independent flight bookings but will have to liaise with a local agency for accommodation. Only Air Austral has direct flights to the capital Saint-Denis, departing from Chennai.
Sudha Pillai is an artist, photographer, and writer. She writes about her encounters with people, places, art, and culture.
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Nairobi Restaurant Week 2019 opens with over 70 participating restaurants

THE DISH: On the hunt for great Chinese food The meals will be inclusive of a complimentary drink. The menus will be a variety of Indian, Italian, East Asian and Kenyan cuisine. Additionally, diners who pay for their food using their Visa Card will get a 20 percent off their bill. At the launch on Wednesday, the highlight was a four-course meal. The starter was a choice of Pani Puri Shots, Haandi Hyderabadi Nawabi (Chicken Bityani) and Raiti paired with an 18-month-old Thelema wine. Tiramisu Cups (Square), Dark Chocolate Cake Gateau and Strawberry Tart for dessert, washed down with Ken Forrester wine. PHOTO | HILLARY KIMUYU The second course was Chicken Lollipops in Teriyaki sauce, Sushi Salmon Avacado and Dynamite Veg Roll, paired with Weltervrede Brut Entheos Chardonnay – Pinot Noir. Mediterranean Mezze Platter, Greek Mushroom Cap and Harisa Skewers were served as the third course, paired with Israeli Shiraz wine. For dessert, people enjoyed Tiramisu Cups (Square), Dark Chocolate Cake Gateau and Strawberry Tart and washed it down with Ken Forrester wine. Diners enjoy their meals during the Nairobi Restaurant Week at Urban Eatery, Nairobi. PHOTO | HILLARY KIMUYU Nairobi Restaurant Week allows diners to try out new restaurants they have never been to before on a budget, and it is organised by EatOut. Some of the participating restaurants include, 360 Degrees, Artcaffe, Dari, Eagle Steak House at Ole Sereni, Nyama Mama, Ocean Basket, J’s Fresh Kitchen and Baluba at Mövenpick. Related Stories

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Lunchbox- The Indian Story

Dal Tadka , Kadhi , Lunchbox , Punjabi Chole , The Indian Story
Lunchbox, Tiffin, luncheon!
Be it in school or office, lunch is always looked forward to. Now, Lunch is not a mere food it is a story of culture and traditions packed in a Tupperware or steel utensils! No matter how cool meals you get during the lunch but one is always ready to dig into their friend’s or colleagues’ Tiffin.
As the principal everyday meal in dozens of countries around the globe, lunch holds a place of elemental cultural importance. In 9-to-5 environments, the midday meal isn’t always such a big deal, but making time for a wholesome lunch can pay off both mentally and physically.
What one culture eats as lunch (or any meals) may seem amazing to another. The same goes for what has consumed far back in history as food flavors, menu items and meal spans have evolved considerably over time.
Here is an interesting fact- The word Tiffin came in existence during British Raj, taken from the slang words “tiff”, a tot of diluted liquor/ afternoon tea, “tiffing” meaning to take little drink.
The importance of lunch is immense; here are just a few reasons why-
-Lunch boosts your blood sugar level in the middle of the day, helping you stay focused for the rest of the afternoon.
-It is a proven fact that people who don’t consume lunch tend to gain more weight because you end up overeating during dinner time to compensate for lunch.
-Just like coffee, lunch too is a great conversation starter; you will end up making lunch buddies.
-For kids, lunch is even more crucial because it provides vitamins and nutrients for the rest of the day. If they don’t get the supplements their bodies need, it can hamper their mental and physical developments.
If you are famished and wondering, how to plan a weekly lunch menu let us give you a hand here. Below recipes are easy to cook, healthy, extremely delicious and suits modern lifestyle- Punjabi Chole / Chickpeas Curry
A perfect dish that never goes out of style. The delectable chana needs only a few ingredients – cumin powder, ginger, coriander powder, carom powder and some mango powder, which is what gives the chana its tart and tangy punch.
It tastes great with chapati, rice, and puri! You are in for a delight! Dal Tadka
A Punjabi staple, Dal Tadka is a simple yet quintessential Indian dish with many varieties found in different regions of our country. Boiled first and then a spicy tempering is added to enhance the taste. You can prepare this for lunch with a combination of rice, chapati, and even paranthas. Gatte Ki Sabji
So this one if from the kitchens of Rajasthan.
Gram flour dumplings are cooked in this flavorsome curry. It has a sharp sour flavor that makes your lunch quite a treat packed with earthy texture. Kadhi
Kadhi is a yogurt-based gravy dish that is thickened with gram-flour and tempered and simmered with amazing Indian spices. Every region in India has a unique way of preparing Kadhi –Punjabi, Rajasthani & Maharashtrian as well.
Pack up some rice, some pickle and you are set! Aloo Matar/ Potato & Peas
A simple yet very awesomesauce recipe that is again simple at heart and at preparation. Again it surprisingly tastes great with rice, chapati and paranthas as well. Veg. Tadka Rice
A spicy mix of rice made with veggies and is ready under 30 minutes. It is the best rice to pack for kids and grown-ups. To make it a complete meal, pack it with raita and nothing can beat this terrific combo!
Do make these recipes for to have an amazing afternoon meal!
In an environment where everything is becoming exceedingly fast-paced, people neglect breaks, but breaks are not a waste of time. They are absolutely quintessential for one’s productivity and well-being.
Long Live Lunch!
Author Bio – Siddhi Panchal is a food blogger at CookingwithSiddhi and food aficionado who loves to cook. Her cooking skills cover a range of Indian and international cuisines. Her aim is to enable other food enthusiasts explore their love for food by helping them cook delectable dishes from India and around the world. About The Author

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Tagliatelle gorgonzola e noci

My sister-in-law, Lakshmi — problem the most in gamba (in English: overall cool) person I know — is, among many things, an excellent cook. Though she only really started to cook when she moved to the U.S back in 2013 — both because she was a student and because cooking for herself was the easiest way to access good Indian food — but she is so very brava that I find it hard to believe she hasn’t been cooking for much longer than that. She has introduced us — her very lucky family — to dishes like chic ken biryani and pappadums, lemon rice and coconut rice, and everything from shrimp to egg to goat curry. She’s taught us that naan bread is redundant (naan already means bread) and the same goes for chai tea (idem) and that, on a non-food related note, the Himalayas are pronounced not him-uh-LAY-uhs but actually him-AHL-yuhs (who knew?!)
Having said this: in the same way that I find Indian cuisine intimidating (what with its many spices, marinades, and unfamiliar ingre dients) my sister-in-law used to find Italian cuisine (what with its characteristic cheese, pasta, and many pork products, from prosciutto to guanciale to pancetta) equally intimidating. This surprised me at first — after all, Italian cooking is known for its simplicity and straightforwardness — but it’s all a matter of what you’re used to, what you’ve grown up with, isn’t it? At the beginning, when she was first expanding her culinary horizons to Italian food, I fielded many a question from her, their arrival announced by the ping! of my cell phone; was it normal that the sauce the meatballs were cooking in was bubbling so very furiously? was she cooking them the right way?! If one was used to cooking with things like curry leaves, fresh ginger, and turmeric, how did western herbs like basil, rosemary, and oregano compare? Why did a recipe for pesto call for just 1 clove of garlic — was that a mistake? After all, an Indian recipe would call for at least 5 or 6!
It would seem that my sister-in-law truly does have a knack for cooking, as she has quickly familiarized herself with and subsequently conquered Italian cuisine just as she once conquered Indian cuisine, learning to, in her own words: season with a lighter hand, discern the differences between Italy’s many cheeses, observe how my mother and I cook, and not be afraid to ask questions. She now makes not only dishes from her own country but also from the one of the family she married in to, mastering dishes like roast lamb with red wine and and a fit-for-Christmas Eve sugo di pesce , adding classic dishes like pasta con le sarde , pasta e ceci and crostata di ricotta to her repertoire, and regularly consulting the cookbooks of Marcella Hazan. All of this has left me positively bursting with pride, and also more aware of the fact that I should really make more of an effort to learn about Indian cuisine, to fully close the culinary circle (late addition to my list of 2019 resolutions!)
So! What does all this have to do with today’s dish, tagliatelle gorgonzola e noci ? Not so long ago Lakshmi was telling us about her newest adventures in Italian cooking, and while I don’t quite remember the details, I do remember that at one point in a conversation about our favorite cheeses, my sister-in-law mentioned my brother’s preferred formaggio , or rather, gor-GAHN-zola , which rolled off her tongue in a very knowledgeable, matter-of-fact sort of way. The correct pronunciation of this cheese is, of course, gor-gon-ZO-la , and the whole thing was so endearing and so very amusing that I can’t help but think of my sister-in-law every time I spot this cheese at the shop — and now every time I prepare this recipe. So! This dish is one of those wonderful rarities that manages to be special and fancy and quick and easy at the same time, and really: does it get any better than pasta tossed in a super luxurious cheese sauce with a hint of warming sage and toasty garlic and crunchy, buttery walnuts to boot?! I didn’t think so. Gor-GAHN-zola for the win.
A couple of notes: You can use any long flat pasta you want here — fettuccine or pappardelle would also be nice. I remember when I was little my mom had a similar dish in her repertoire, where she used penne, which were also delicious. Next time I make this I might up the quantity of sauce and bake it in the oven with a shorter pasta…stay tuned/let me know if you get around to trying this before me!
Looking for other super simple pasta recipes? I’ve got this spaghetti with quick cherry tomato sauce , this cacio e pepe , this rigatoni with eggplant , these three pestos ( almond , basil , pistachio ), this pici with sausage ragu’ , this penne alla vodka , and this f ettuccine with brie, tomatoes, and basil .
TAGLIATELLE GORGONZOLA E NOCI
Recipe from Rachel Roddy via The Guardian
Serves 4
Ingredients:
1 pound (500 grams) dried tagliatelle
2 tablespoons (30 grams) butter
1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
6-8 sage leaves
75 grams (2.5 ounces) gorgonzola dolce
1/2 cup (100ml) heavy cream
A big handful of chopped walnuts
Directions:
Bring a large pan of salted water to a boil, add the pasta and cook as per packet instructions. Have all the ingredients for the sauce ready to go. While the pasta cooks, take a small pan and, over a medium-low flame, melt the butter, and add the sliced garlic and sage leaves, leaving it all to bubble for a minute. Add the cubed gorgonzola, cream and a few grinds of black pepper, then stir until the cheese has melted. Continue cooking for another minute. Taste and add salt, if needed. When ready – tender but with a slight bite – drain the pasta (saving a little of its cooking water) and tip it into a warm bowl. Pour over the cheese sauce, add half the walnuts and toss quickly, adding a little pasta cooking water if it seems at all stiff. Divide between bowls, sprinkle over the remaining walnuts, and immediately serve.

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INTERNATIONAL MARKETING 2019

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING 2019
International Marketing is defined as the action of business activities designed to plan, price, promote, and direct the flow of a company’s goods and services to consumers or users in more than one country for a profit.
Ocho chocolate was founded nearly six years ago by Liz Rowe .My task is to research investigate and promote ocho chocolate.As ocho chocolate is a domestic product company’s mission is to promote this product and sell in different country.According to my task i am travelling to Jakarta Indonesia for marketing of ocho chocolate. Jakarta is the largest city and capital of Indonesia.Located on the northwest coast of the world’s most populous island Java , it is the center of economics, culture and politics of Indonesia, with a population of 10,075,310 as of 2014.Currency used in Jakarta is Indonesian Rupiah.One New Zealand Dollar is equivalent to 9,625.82 IDR (Indonesian Rupiah)
Distance for Dunedin to Jakarta is almost 7487KMS flight is the fastest option.My business trip will begin on 17/03/2019 ends on 23/03/2019.Air-ticket cost is $1,828 NZD.
Time 22h45m which include 2stops . Dunedin to Auckland NZ664 Airbus A320 (1h50m) Layover 4h25m. Auckland to Changi SQ286 Airbus A380 (10h25m) Layover 2h00m. Changi to Soekarno-Hatta SQ968 Boeing 777 (1h45m).
Visa Requirement -Indonesia get on Arrival visa for Indian to stay up to 14 Days.Visa application fees is INR 2900 PP (Per Person) which is equivalent to $59.80
Accommodation- It depends upon what hotel you are booking hotels stats form $25 NZD upto $300 per night.Budget hotel begin from $45(4 .06 IDR) upto $100(962962.36 IDR) which include free breakfast parking free wifi.
Food – Indonesia has around 5,350 traditional recipes, with 30 of them considered the most important.Indonesia’s cuisine may include rice, noodle and soup dishes. Some popular Indonesian dishes such as nasi goreng , gado-gado , Satay ,and soto [ are ubiquitous in the country and are considered national dishes. A breakfast for one person cost IDR12000 A dinner for one person cost IDR44000 A bottle of packed drinking water cost IFR6000 A bottle of beer cost IDR22000
Local Transportation Cost – there are different ways of local transport such as taxi BlueBire is well known among all Go jek is also a local transport cost per 1km is IDR3000 Bajay is a short distance transport Bus,Train and Private car.

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DUBAI FOOD FESTIVAL2019: THE FOODIE FUN CONTINUES

28 Feb Eataly – The Dubai Mall Italian Masterclasses : Hone your cooking skills at Eatalyand attend special masterclasses to make traditional Italian Pasta. 28 Feb miX by Alain Ducasse – The Emerald Palace Kempinski Dubai Chef’s Table: Enjoy an exclusive, exquisite dinner with a view as you take in the 360-degree views of the ocean and the Dubai skyline from the Chef’s room. 28 Feb Atlantis, The Palm Dubai (various restaurants) Cirque du Cuisine : Embark on a culinary adventure through Atlantis, The Palm Dubai with professional entertainers, decorations and an array of sumptuous food and beverage throughout award-winning restaurants. 28 Feb – 2 Mar Studio by Tresind Tresind Studio Gourmet Table: Prepare your appetite for this 16-course culinary experience, led by Chef Himanshu Saini, which captures Tresind’s culinary journey since inception. 28 Feb – 2 Mar Beef Wellington Masterclass : Don an apron and learn how to create this classic British dish. 28 Feb – 9 Mar Zhen Wei – Caesar’s Palace Zhen Wei Dim Sum & Noodle Masterclass : It’s a foodie dream – make your own dim sum and noodles, and then tuck into a three-course meal. 28 Feb – 9 Mar The Terrace, Burj Al Arab Tacos on the Terrace: The humble taco comes in all shapes and forms – whether you prefer them al pastor, as carnitas, longaniza, cochinita, with barbacoa, or a classic chile; you can enjoy them on the terrace of the Burj Al Arab, while in the shade of its iconic sail. 1 Mar Armani/Deli Gourmet Italian Fest – Armani Hotel, Burj Khalifa Gourmet Italian Food Fest: Take a gastronomic tour around Italy and Europe, exploring more than 50 types of cheeses along with antipasti, live pasta and risotto stations, traditional cheese and cold cut rooms, and sharing style fresh meat and seafood served to your table. 1 Mar The Backyard Urban Big BBQ: Enjoy cool vibes and sumptuous grills, while watching a live graffiti session featuring the artistic talents at Mawaheb from Beautiful People. 1 – 2 Mar Queen Elizabeth 2 Afternoon Team on the QE2 Bow: Lovers of food and history can now enjoy anAfternoon Teaon board a world-famous vessel unlocked and ready to receive passengers exclusively for Dubai Food Festival. 1 – 6 Mar Sushi Master Class : Learn the art of making, rolling, cutting and serving up sushi. 2 Mar miX by Alain Ducasse – The Emerald Palace Kempinski Dubai Pastry master class: Create classic French desserts like Paris-Brest, Fruit Vacherin and a Chocolate Tart, followed by a delicious 3-course lunch. 2 Mar Craft Café Ceviche master class: Learn why Chef Roberto Segura is one of Dubai’s most awarded chefs as he takes you through an authentic Peruvian Ceviche master class. 2 Mar GalvinBistrot & Bar, Toro, Lima City Walk’s longest dinner table ever : It’s the perfect mix of food and vibes from three restaurants at Citywalk – all on one giant, long table! 2, 5, 9 Mar Mohalla – D3 Cocktail Samosa making experience : Enjoy a soulful experience with real street Indian food, followed by a 3-course set menu. 3, 6 Mar Cova, The Dubai Mall Gourmand Experience at Cova by Chef Andrea Tarini: Learn how to prepare an unforgettable Italian risotto. 3 – 5 Mar SLAB, La Mer The World in Five Dishes: Set off on a 5-course world-inspired culinary tour – from Asia’s finest fish selection, through Europe’s fine French culinary arts, warm dishes from the Middle Eastern, and ending with South America’s finest Peruvian sweet spot. 3 – 9 Mar Casa deTapas The Ultimate Spanish Fiesta Experience : Join Chef Paco at a special Chef’s table event featuring unlimited tapas and paella – and join in an introductory Flamenca dance lesson with their resident dancer. 4 Mar Gulf Photo Plus Foodie & Photo Tour Naif by Night | Dubai Food Festival Edition : Click a picture of your food and eat it too on this special tour, as you take in the colourful Naif neighbourhood in Old Dubai. 4, 6 Mar The Meat Co – Madinat Jumeirah The Ultimate Beef Masterclass : Meat-lovers can sink their teeth into this gourmand experience, tasting steaks from all over the world. 6 – 7 Mar Studio by Tresind NADODI X TRESIND STUDIO: Chef Himanshu Saini teams up with Chef Sricharan Venkatesh to bring to life this 14-course tasting menu, Four Hands Pop-Up that pushes the envelope on Indian Cuisine
Limited Edition Coffee
Coffee lovers will be sure to love the new limited-edition coffee drinks and offers at locations across the city – make sure you visit and try out creations like the Superfood Charcoal Latte at Costa Coffee, Saffron Latte at Cupagahwa, Pistachio Latte at Saddle located in swyp Beach Canteen, or a Smoked Botanical Latte at Andes.
Coffee purists can try out Qiso’s in-house single-origin organic coffee, while those looking for a twist can try Emirati coffee with 90+ coffee blends at Emirati Coffee Co., a Bounty Latte at Doh, or Es Kurma (which blends dates, freshly roasted coffee, baby coconut and milk)!
If you’re looking to pair your coffee with a snack, then look no further than Boston Lane’s Doughnut Latte series that combines doughnut flavours with their signature Columbian coffee, or head to the nearest Tim Hortons outlet to grab coffee and a doughnut for only AED10. Dine & Win
The ‘Dine & Win’ promotion is in full swing, in partnership with Zomato and Dubai Shopping Malls Group (DSMG). Spend AED50 while diningat participating restaurants across the city, and be in the running to win incredible prizes, including a Nissan Patrol 50 Diamond Pendants from Jawhara and 1 million prizes and promotion codes from Zomato when ordering food online. Citywide Celebrations
There are plenty more foodie activities and events across the city including: Enjoy the pink Miami Vibes: Head down to Last Exit Al Khawaneej daily throughout the festival from 3pm to 12am to enjoy delicious food, fun activities and a wonderful vibe for the entire family to enjoy. Taste your way around the World at The Pointe: From 28 February to 2 March, pick up your Pointe Passport and go on a taste journey around The Pointe, Palm Jumeirah to experience diverse flavours from a variety of restaurants and cuisines. “Dining + Show” package at La Perle: Hurry and buy your tickets now to Dubai’s best live show along with a meal before and after the performance. Starting from just AED500 for a Gold ticket and meal, guests can choose from one of the restaurants located within the three hotels at Al Habtoor City, including Babiole, The Market, Zoco, The City Grill, Namu and BQ – French Kitchen. Vibrant flavours from the east to west at Club Vista Mare: Enjoy a culinary feast at Club Vista Mare, Palm Jumeirah, with delightful waterfront dining offers including 1kg Mussels for AED250 at Breeze Beach Grill, a Caribbean BBQ package at RAS Beach Vibes Lounge for AED150 per person, afour-course Peruvian-Japanese menu for AED195 per person at Aji, and a three-course set menu for AED150 per person at Simply Italian. #WOWJBR Cravings: Head to JBR from 28 February to 2 March, and witness singing and juggling chefs, as well as roaming candy and popcorn characters along the destination’s 12km long promenade. Kids and grown-ups can also attend master carving sessions and learn how to cut fruits and vegetables into decorative shapes. Experience The Art at The Beach: Check out the art of culinary at The Beach, JBR from 28 February to 11 March for a first-hand experience at decorating your food and styling your plate. Enjoy activities for adult like the plating competition on 1 & 2 March and activities for children like Sketch Your Lunch on 1 & 2 March. The Beach will also set off a wonderful display of fireworks at 9pm on 1 March. Battle of the Chefs at City Walk: Each Friday evening during the festival, the centre of City Walk will transform into a high-energy cook-off! Head down to cheer on your favourite chefs as they battle it out for the title of ‘City Walk Best Chef 2019’. A feast of fun with a side of laughs: Be amazed by the great feats of the juggling chefs, and chuckle at the antics in ‘Comedy Chefs by Aron White’ – a magical comedy show – at Mercato, from 28 February to 2 March. Fun workshops are another treat for kids, as they learn how to bake create and roll their own cinnamon buns, and drawings out of pasta and rice. Cooking sessions at Children’s City : Little chefs can learn how to make their own food in a fun way in Children’s City in Creek Park with DFF’s special weekly menu through a variety of workshops and activities. Exciting (and delicious!) visits to the mall Take your little ones to the Organic farm workshop at Boxpark from 4pm to 9pm daily throughout DFF, or get active with Bootcamp and yoga sessions at Kite Beach from 28 February to 2 March. Shopping and dining are more fun with the opportunity to win two instant Novo Cinema tickets when spending AED250 at any of the restaurants at Dubai Festival City Mall , AED5,000 daily at Mall of the Emirates , and AED1,000 worth of Meraas Gift Cards to dine at Al Seef for every AED200 spent at F&B outlets in the area. In addition, The Dubai Mall rewards families with the Kids Eat for Free offer when they dine at participating restaurants. Mirdif City Centre and City Center Me’aisem are set to transform their outdoor area for DFF, featuring a variety of F&B kiosks and activities for the entire family. Deira City Centre is also set to inspire a sense of giving back to those in need during DFF through its partnership with the Red Crescent, asking people to donate canned food bought at Carrefour. Unleash your imagination and learn to express yourself at Mall of the Emirates Mini Club House from 27 February to 9 March. Children will get to experience fun activities such as plant pot painting, cupcake decorating and wooden frame making. For all movie lovers, DFF has special treats for you from now until the end of the festival on 9 March. THEATRE by Rhodes at VOX Cinemas in Mall of the Emirates and Mirdif City Centre is offering a limited time promotion of 2 courses for AED80 only. If you enjoy watching your movie in a Platinum Suite, get your hands on the exclusive and specially curated menu at The Dubai Mall’s Reel Cinemas for a delicious taste of luxury.
For more information and a full update on DFF activities, visit http://www.dubaifoodfestival.com/ or @DubaiFoodFest and #DubaiFoodFest Share

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‘Bangladeshi food has so much to offer’ says former Masterchef finalist Saira Hamilton

‘Bangladeshi food has so much to offer’ says former Masterchef finalist Saira Hamilton Show caption 0 comment In her new book, My Bangladesh Cookbook, the chef and food writer shares recipes from her childhood. Ella Walker finds out more.
When Saira Hamilton talks about Bangladesh, it makes no sense that it’s not more of a travel destination, because if you’re seeking beauty, culture and good food, apparently it’s a-buzz with all three.
“A lot of people go to [neighbouring] India,” says Hamilton, “but Bangladesh looks different, it feels different. Visually, it’s much more like Thailand, it’s very lush and green and jungly.”
And while mega-city capital Dhaka is a rush of colour, throbbing with people and the crush of traffic (“I go mad for shopping when I get there, lots of saris and lovely textiles”), if you venture out into the countryside, the city hum subsides, and it’s like “nothing’s changed, ever since I was a kid”, says Hamilton.
King prawn and tomato chilli curry from My Bangladesh Kitchen by Saira Hamilton.
Although she grew up in Britain, Hamilton and her family spent their summer holidays in her father’s home village, Dampara, where the landscape floods every year, leaving behind fertile land for paddy fields. “It’s incredibly peaceful. You have these wonderful vistas of water and palm trees and very low-rise buildings, it’s very beautiful,” she says. “I feel really privileged that I got to spend so much time there.”
Her memories, and the gratitude threaded through them, mingle with Hamilton’s love of cooking. Hence why she has steadily been bringing Bangladeshi food to a wider audience since becoming a MasterChef finalist in 2013, when she impressed judges John Torode and Gregg Wallace with recipes and spicing from her heritage.
“I grew up around really good food – my mum was a great cook, my dad was a great eater,” says Hamilton, and her new cookbook, My Bangladesh Kitchen, reflects a desire to write “a comprehensive collection of what Bangladeshi food is”.
“I wanted to show people what was different about it,” she says. “Indian cuisine sometimes gets all lumped together, but the sub-continent is as big as the whole of Europe. It’s like trying to talk about Norwegian cuisine as the same as Greek.”
Aloo bortha from My Bangladesh Kitchen by Saira Hamilton
Although, funnily enough, she notes, particularly in the south and southeast of Britain, the majority of Indian restaurants are run by people from the Bangladeshi community – spotting shatkora (a cross between a lemon and grapefruit) on the menu is a good indication.
For those entirely new to Bangladeshi cuisine, seafood is a staple – Bangladesh has a huge coastline – particularly prawns, as well as lentils, rice and lots of vegetables.
Hamilton calls it a “light and bright palette of flavours”, where things are cooked speedily to keep their crunchiness and colour. “It’s not really rich and heavy and covered in sauce.”
Store cupboard essentials include the likes of panch phoran, or Bengali five spice, a “fragrant and aromatic” blend of whole fennel, cumin, mustard, nigella and fenugreek seeds.
Then there’s heat: “You’re probably going to get through a lot of chillies,” says Hamilton with a laugh, recommending you stock up on little green hot ones.
In Bangladeshi cooking though, instead of being chopped, they tend to be chucked into curries whole. “It keeps it much fresher, it infuses the flavour as well as the heat,” she explains. “[You get a] gentle flavour, rather than really, really hot chilli – unless you mistakenly eat one.”
There’s a way of cooking, but there’s also a way of eating, that is central to Bangladesh’s “culture of hospitality”. Hamilton recalls there being a “lot of parties” while she was growing up.
The house would be full of ‘aunties’ and ‘uncles’ and music. “Bangladeshi people are very proud of their culture, arts and literature,” says Hamilton – and there would always be food, swathes of it, with every guest bringing a little something to add to the table.
“[You have] lots of different things on your plate at the same time, you don’t have masses of anything,” she says of Bangladeshi buffet etiquette.
“You’d have a bit of fried fish, a bit of the curry, always some kind of chutney, salad, and always little slices of lime or shallots on the side, to zhuzh things up.”
In the book, she covers the gamut of Bangladeshi eating, from food suitable for a Wednesday-night family supper (vegetable, rice, dal), to celebration dishes you’d see at a Bangladeshi wedding (biryanis, lamb rezala, Bengali ‘roast’ chicken), and snacky street-foody bits too.
“There’s a lot of outdoor eating,” says Hamilton, describing grabbing a samosa and eating puris (“Like a savoury doughnut”) from newspaper parcels stapled in the corners. “That’s super-duper Bengali.”
Aside from writing a food column in her local paper and running food demos and catering (smallaubergine.com), Hamilton is also a senior strategy advisor for Defra, and still, of course, watches MasterChef (“Thank goodness for iPlayer!”).
“I love it. I particularly like the amateur one because the opportunities that it gives you are just amazing. I would never have dreamed of doing the things I did. Working in professional kitchens, having input and classes from some of the best chefs in the country, and the world in fact, was just wonderful,” she recalls. “I didn’t realise I could smile that much.”
As she did on MasterChef, and now with the cookbook, she says she feels “a great responsibility” for sharing Bangladeshi cooking: “I want people to ‘get’ it, and to love it.” With Hamilton, we’re in safe hands.
My Bangladesh Kitchen: Recipes And food memories From A Family Table by Saira Hamilton, photography by Ian Garlick, is published by Lorenz Books, priced £20. Available now.

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Food variety could be more in Indian cuisine No view from the rooms
Comfortable stay Great location
Stayed in February 2019

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