Restaurants Archives – Tourism Windsor Essex Pelee Island

Restaurants Archives – Tourism Windsor Essex Pelee Island

RESTAURANTS hip eateries & authentic cuisine When it comes to amazing culinary experiences, you’ll find we offer it all. Whether you’re a serious “foodie” or just love great food, we’ll satisfy your craving. Our menus offer authentic flavors ranging from Italian to Indian, Middle Eastern to Mexican & everything between. #CULINAR YQG

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Travel Guide to London: Gluten-free Restaurant Guide & Itinerary

by livinglovingpaleo | posted in: Travel Tips | 0
London, I ADORE YOU. While I was in there living it up, I was getting so excited to share my travel guide to London with you! So many of you asked about my recommendations, where we ate, what we loved, and so here it all is, wrapped up into this pretty lil blog post. Several of the images in this post, including the one above, are thanks to my talented sister-in-law, Melissa Boehmer! You can follow her travels over on her Instagram .
There was so much to do and see in London, and SO many incredible restaurants to check out, and we could walk (safely), to just about anywhere. Everyone that we came across was kind and welcoming, and I loved soaking up every moment of the experience.
Travel Guide to London: Where we Stayed, Ate & Played! Travel Guide to London – Where we Stayed:
My sister-in-law booked all of our places to stay, and they were seriously EPIC. This location was amazing!
This Airbnb was called the British Museum Penthouse , and it was literally right across from the British Museum (hence the name) and walking distance to just about everything. This home was really interesting and incredibly unique, with all original artwork.
It was one of those places that the more you looked at it, the more pieces came into play. From the wallpaper that I originally thought was flowers (turns out it wasn’t at all ), to the clear glass floors that looked straight down into the kitchen, it was all SO FUN.
From our Airbnb we were able to simply walk to and from really great restaurants, including all of the places that I’ve listed below!
If you’re looking to book a place to stay in London, I’d highly recommend staying in the area surrounding the British Museum.
I was in awe of the view from where we stayed! That’s the British Museum right across the street, and this is the moment that we first arrived…
Covent Garden:
This area reminded me so much of Disneyland! Covent Garden is filled with restaurants, shops, talented musicians and street performers, where you can walk around and grab a bite to eat, shop, or just people watch. This is where we dined at The Ivy on our first day, as well as Le Pain Quotidien for breakfast on our last. I also grabbed hot chocolate from Venchi, which was anything but your average hot chocolate. More on that below!
Borough Market:
My tip – go hungry! We went to this market right after eating breakfast, and I’d only wished that I’d been hungry so that I could have enjoyed some of the treats here. This is a huge, busy, open market with tons of incredible, local options. If you’re staying somewhere with a kitchen, like we were, then this would be a great place to pick up meat, cheese, bread (lots of gf options), fresh produce & eggs.
Tower of London: Image courtesy Melissa Boehmer
Our first full day in London was left completely open for exploring the city, and after wandering around Borough Market, we ended up booking tickets for the Tower of London. I’m someone who never really loved history class in school (snore), but getting to see and experience it in person is a whole different story.
This was the first castle that I’ve ever toured, and we had a great time checking it out! Plus, it’s right next to the Tower Bridge (shown above), which is BEAUTIFUL, and just a quick walk to Sky Garden, which we didn’t get to check out this time, but will during our next visit, for sure! The Tower of London was one of the few Uber rides that we took, as it was raining and about a 10-minute drive from where we were staying.
Roman Baths: Image courtesy Melissa Boehmer
On our third day in London, we spent the entire day out on a tour to see the Roman Baths, La Cock & ended the day at Stonehenge. It was a LONG day (12 hours, including 5.5 hours of driving), on a guided bus tour – both of which I wouldn’t typically seek out, however, this ended up being both me and Mike’s FAVORITE day.
We booked this tour through Premium Tours , which I highly recommend. Carol was our guide, and she did such an amazing job. She kept us in the loop about where we were going, how long it would take to get there, what there was to see, along with the history behind each stop. I’m also not super into history, but she kept it interesting!
Our first stop was to the Roman Baths, where once we were given our tickets and led inside, we were free to roam on our own for 2 hours. The time went by in a blink of an eye, as there was so much to see! It’s pretty incredible to imagine how they built these baths wayyy back when.
LaCock:
For our second visit on this tour, we stopped in LaCock, a small village in England. It’s a TRIP to see how people live in places that are pretty much the exact opposite of where I live. This was a slow, sleepy town, and we stopped at the George Inn for lunch. We’d pre-selected our meals, all of which were homemade, and they had gluten-free options listed on the menu.
Stonehenge: Image courtesy Melissa Boehmer
This was our final stop on the tour, and it was absolutely perfect! Stonehenge is located literally in the middle of nowhere, in Salisbury, England. I didn’t know a much about Stonehenge before visiting, and had no idea just how massive the stones were, until I saw them in person. There’s an undeniable energy here, and it’s also a place where unexplained crop circles have been reported.
In order to be able to tour the inner circle, you currently need to book a tour for sunrise or sunset, which is SO WORTH IT.
In my opinion, this is the only way to really experience Stonehenge. We were in a group of 40, and were the only ones brought to Stonehenge for sunset. We were let into the inner circle in groups of 20, and explored this ancient wonder for about 30 minutes.
Harry Potter Tour at WB Studios:
It’s been a LONG time since I’ve seen the Harry Potter movies, but they’re some of my brother and sister-in-law’s absolute favorites, so we went along for the journey and ended up having a really great time! If you are into the movies, I’d plan to go early so that you have plenty of time. Even if you aren’t, there’s a TON to check out, and I found it super fascinating to see how they put it all together – especially the makeup department!
After spending 4 full days in London, it was time for us to head to Edinburgh, Scotland! We left out of the King’s Cross station (talk about the best station name), where they had great options for food. Image courtesy Melissa Boehmer
I so recommend taking the train to Scotland, as the ride is BEAUTIFUL. We booked first class tickets on the LNER train (formerly Virgin Train), where we traveled along the English countryside and coast for a total of 4 hours 15 minutes. I haven’t traveled on other areas of the train, but in first class you’re given a menu to choose your meal, and it was labeled with what was/wasn’t gluten-free. The food was GOOD, and created with locally-sourced, high-quality ingredients! Mike and I both had the chicken casserole with crispy potatoes. It reminded me so much of my Chicken Pot Pie Soup !
Travel Guide to London – Gluten-free Restaurant Guide:
It was the easiest EVER to eat gluten-free in London, as well as all of the UK! Mike and I are always able to find options anywhere that we go, so I wasn’t worried at all about traveling. I ended up only being so surprised with just how many options there were – FAR more than in the US!
Although I already had a basic understanding of how different the food industry is in the US vs Europe, seeing it in person was still truly eye opening. The food takes time to serve here, as it’s all made from scratch. Organic, whole foods just seemed to be the standard everywhere that we went, and the yolks were so orange (aka coming from healthy chickens), even when we ordered a quick breakfast to go in the train station.
At every restaurant that we went to, the server asked immediately about any allergies. They took gluten-free seriously, and always had tons of options. I was so impressed!
Travel Guide to London – Where we ate:
The Ivy
This was our first stop after checking into our Airbnb and walking around Convent Garden. We had lunch/dinner here, and while it was good, it wasn’t something that I’d seek out again. It could also be that we were so tired and our bodies really didn’t know what time it was – 4pm in London and 8am back home!
What I enjoyed: Asparagus with truffle butter & lobster risotto
Venchi
This little café was located in Covent Garden, which was a quick, 10-minute walk from where we were staying. They serve coffee, gelato & hot chocolate.
What I enjoyed: I ordered the hot chocolate, which ended up being a far cry from what we call hot chocolate in the states! This was a super-rich, dark drinking chocolate topped with whipped cream. It was so so sooo good. Basically, America needs to step up their game and start serving this!
On our second visit I grabbed a latte to-go, which was served with a square of chocolate (genius). One thing to note if you haven’t been to Europe yet is that their serving sizes are MUCH smaller than in the US. A medium latte there is smaller than what we’d consider a small latte here, but it was perfect and I savored every sip. Next time, I’ll definitely be back for the amazing looking gelato!
Beyond Bread Bakery
This restaurant/café/bakery was AMAZING. Everything was 100% gluten-free, and they have the most insane almond croissants. I’m still dreaming of the croissants!
What I enjoyed: We had breakfast here on our first day, where I had charred goat cheese over gf sourdough, along with rocket (aka arugula) & poached eggs, with the most orange yolks ever. We also grabbed a bunch of treats to go on multiple visits – including these croissants & cinnamon rolls.
I MEAN… Dishoom
If you only ever go to one restaurant in London, let it be Dishoom!
This was hands down, the BEST meal of my life! Mike rarely gets super stoked about food, and yet he was just as obsessed with this place as I was. If you asked me what my favorite type of cuisine is, I’d rattle off 10ish different types before I even mentioned Indian, and yet this restaurant was SO good, that it officially tops my list.
Before even hearing about Dishoom (which several of you amazing readers ended up recommending), we passed by the location near Covent Garden on our first day, and the line out the door caught my attention. Especially considering how cold it was. No other restaurant had anything close to a line, so I took note and looked it up.
Mike and I ended up back here a few nights later, and waited about an hour in line for a table. While in line they served us their homemade house chia latte (so good), and asked to be sure that we didn’t have any allergies, as the chia had some dairy in it.
Even waiting in line was a joy, and something that Mike and I will always remember! The entire staff was so friendly and accommodating, going out of their way to make us feel welcome. We loved Dishoom so much that we ended up taking our family back 2 nights later – where we also learned that they do take reservations!
We were also told that they’re opening a location in New York City in the next 1-2 years as well as San Francisco in the next 4-5 years…so I’ll just be over here patiently waiting for that.
What I enjoyed: Dishoom has an entirely gluten-free menu (along with dairy-free & vegan menus as well), where we ordered just about everything. Seriously, from our two visits I learned that you can’t go wrong! The Mattar Paneer, Chicken Ruby, Dishoom Chicken Tikka, Gunpowder Potatoes & East India Gimlet (to drink) were on the top of our list! I’m over here drooling just thinking about it all.
But for reals, go here!
Le Pain Quotidien
This adorable café/restaurant is in Covent Garden (I also noticed a location in the train station – and realized that they have locations in the US as well), and while the majority of the bread that they sell contains gluten, as with everywhere that we ate at, they did have gluten-free options available!
What I enjoyed: My gut was craving a super simple, healthy breakfast, and so I ordered scrambled eggs with roasted mushrooms, bacon, a gluten-free granola yogurt parfait and a delicious green juice.
Pret A Manger
Pret A Manger is a grab-and-go coffee shop & café, with tons of healthy options! They’re as frequent as Starbucks is in the US, and they had great options for meals and snacks. This place is also super allergy-friendly!
What I enjoyed: Coconut yogurt smoothies, green juices, and a Greek salad that I grabbed for our flight home.
Travel Guide to London – Other Recommendations:
We didn’t make it to these spots this time around, but will be hitting them up next time for sure! These came highly recommended from several of my readers:
Sketch: Go for high tea or a cocktail
Shard: Go for a cocktail with amazing views
Sky Garden: FYI, we learned that you need to book a reservation in advance, as this is why we weren’t able to visit.
Byron: Go here for grass-fed burgers & fries! They have a LEGIT gf bun as well, and like every other restaurant that we went to, are super careful with cross-contamination. We actually ate here while in Scotland, and it was awesome! They have tons of locations in London, which you’ll def find me at next time!
You can also get an entire guide to gluten-free restaurants in London HERE .
Travel Guide to London – What I Wore:
I was warned that in London (and really all of the UK), that it can rain in the drop of a hat, and that couldn’t have been more accurate! We were visiting in May, and the weather would go from perfectly sunny skies to dark clouds and a downpour of rain or hail in a matter of moments.
Layers were KEY in London, and really everywhere that we visited while in the UK. While it was never what I would consider even vaguely warm (keep in mind that I live in California), sometimes it wasn’t quite cold enough for my big rain coat, so I pretty much stuck to this outfit that I’m wearing in the photo above, swapping out the pants & shoes.
Travel Guide to London – here’s the basics of the clothing that I packed & wore the most: Long sleeve shirts: I mostly wore flannel button-ups with a down puffer vest over it , although even indoors, it was rarely without a jacket on top, as it was co d. I packed one short sleeve shirt and actually got a chance to wear it on our last day in York, when the temps hit the 60’s – still freezing in California, but so warm compared to what we were now used to! Jackets: I packed 2 jackets for this trip, which I knew would be super versatile. The down jacket was incredibly warm (I couldn’t find the exact one that I have from Mountain hardware (shown above), so I linked a similar one from Patagonia), but I also know that it isn’t waterproof, only slightly water resistant. I also packed a raincoat from Columbia , which I still say was one of the best purchases that I’ve ever made. It was so warm, and had removable layers, as well as a removable faux-fur hood, which was lined with fleece on the inside as well. Beanies Over the knee boots: My Vince Camuto over the knee boots were the BEST for this trip! I wore them nearly every day, simply swapping out jeans & socks. Not only are they super comfortable, but they look great too! Hiking shoes & converse: Once we arrived in the UK, I’d wished that I’d packed my Sorel Hiking Boots , rather than my Salomon hiking shoes . Don’t get me wrong, I LOVE my Salomon’s and wear them just about daily when I hike with my pups back home, they weren’t something that I really needed here…as they truly are for hiking, which we didn’t do much of at all. Jeans: It goes without saying that you need pants while traveling in the UK, and I simply wore jeans throughout the entire trip ( Madewell are my FAVE – they’re all I wear anymore), along with a couple pairs of Lululemon yoga pants that I brought for the days that we were traveling. Socks/base layers: Super warm base layers were KEY for our travels! I wore Smart Wool Socks & Smart Wool long sleeve base layer tops throughout our entire trip, which helped to keep me warm. Just when I thought it was cold in London, Scotland was on an entirely new level of freezing, and I’ll be sharing more about that in my next post! Scarves: I brought along my favorite blanket scarf , which is super warm, and ended up purchasing a cashmere scarf in Scotland, which I’ll talk about more in my next post as well!
Stay tuned for my guides to Scotland and York, coming soon!
Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, meaning that if you purchase something from one of my links, I will receive a small percentage, at no additional cost to you. I will only ever recommend products that I truly believe in, and that I use myself or find to be very valuable. Thanks for helping me to keep my blog up and running! Related

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Riaz Haq commented on Riaz Haq’s blog post Pakistan’s $20 Billion Tourism Industry is Booming

Comment by Riaz Haq on January 19, 2018 at 10:35am
#Pakistan keeps #terrorists on the run and #economy on a rollBusinesses’ focus shifts from bombs and kidnappings to taxes and policy. #Taliban #TTP #terrorism #India #Karachi #Rangers
https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Economy/Economy/Pakistan-keeps-ter…
KARACHI — Terrorism, corruption, misrule: Negative perceptions have dogged Pakistan for years. But thanks to sweeping operations by the army and a powerful paramilitary force, those perceptions may be becoming outdated, and businesses are taking notice.
In Karachi, the country’s largest city, motorcycles and elaborately decorated buses weave down dusty roads between colonial-era buildings. Less than a decade ago, these were truly mean streets. “Between 2010 and 2012, we saw one or two terrorist attacks every month and one or two targeted killings and kidnappings for ransom every day,” recalled Army Maj. Gen. Mohammad Saeed. “There were 17 no-go areas which the police could not touch in Karachi.”
At the time, even major hotels had occupancy rates of just 10% to 15%. Hundreds of shops and other businesses closed down.
Then the Rangers began to clean up.
The Pakistan Rangers, a paramilitary law enforcement organization overseen by the military and the Interior Ministry, set out to tackle the violence head-on. In 2013, the Rangers Sindh — which operate in Sindh Province, including Karachi — mobilized 15,000 troops. The provincial legislature granted them broad powers to search homes and make arrests, enabling them to quickly turn the tide. These guns were seized at a hideout in Miranshah — the front line of Pakistan’s anti-terrorism operations. (Photo by Go Yamada)
In 2017, there were zero bombings and only five kidnappings, according to Saeed, who serves as director general of the Rangers Sindh. This is no small feat in a city with a swelling population of 17 million — perhaps even 20 million if migrants from rural areas are factored in. “We destroyed all of the terrorists’ pockets,” he said, adding that hotel occupancy rates are over 90%.
The story is similar in Pakistan’s other major cities. And as the Rangers have made headway, business sentiment has improved and growth has picked up. Mohammad Saeed, director general of the Pakistan Rangers Sindh
Pakistan’s real gross domestic product grew 5.3% in the fiscal year through June 2017, the quickest pace in 10 years. The central bank projects the growth rate for this fiscal year will approach 6%. Inflation has stabilized and exports are brisk.
“Unfortunately, Pakistan is a victim of negative perception,” said Arif Habib, who heads the conglomerate Arif Habib Group. “There is a lot of difference between perception and reality.”
But the rest of the world seems to be catching on to the positive changes, too: Foreign direct investment is estimated to reach a record $5 billion or so in the current fiscal year, up from $3.43 billion last year.
This is not to say Pakistan’s safety problems are a thing of the past. The budget for maintaining security is insufficient, and efforts to shore up the police are still a work in progress. Another major challenge is to prevent militants who have fled to neighboring Afghanistan from coming back.
Treacherous borderlands
Miranshah is a one-hour military flight away from Peshawar, in Pakistan’s northwest. It is the main city in North Waziristan, one of the semi-autonomous Federally Administered Tribal Areas.
This is the front line of Pakistan’s anti-terrorism operations. The Afghan border is just 20km away
Around 2008, insurgents from al-Qaida and Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan controlled some 30% of North Waziristan. But large numbers of militants have fled or been killed since the army began weeding them out in 2014.
More than 300 people died in terrorist attacks in the FATA in 2014, but the number was down to 113 in 2017.
“During the operation, 26,000 rifles, 13,000 submachine guns and explosives for more than 50,000 suicide bombs [were seized],” said Col. Wasi Uddin in a bunker at the heavily guarded headquarters of the army’s 7th Infantry Division. Monitors on the wall showed real-time footage of the border with Afghanistan.
Now that the heavy fighting appears to be over, people are returning and efforts to rebuild houses and public facilities are in full swing. The army is spearheading a drive to reopen hospitals, schools and bazaars in the FATA. Residents have been given 130 sq. km of farmland as well as job training programs.
“Now we are building a 1,400km-long fence along the border to stop the cross-border terror,” the colonel said. But sporadic attacks are still a threat in the mountainous border region. A young military officer and another person were killed in an ambush on the outskirts of Miranshah in mid-December.
Pakistan’s national security adviser, retired Gen. Nasser Khan Janjua, blames the neighbor. There is “no border control in Afghanistan,” said Janjua, who has sparred with the U.S. over security measures. “In 2016, out of 128 terrorist attacks in Pakistan, 125 were cross-border terror from Afghanistan.”
There are 145 monitoring posts on the Afghan side of the border — around one-eighth the number on the Pakistani side — reflecting the capacity constraints of the Afghan military and police.
Police accountability
Over in Peshawar, at the base of the Khyber Pass on the Pakistani-Afghan border, a determined effort to bolster the police is bearing fruit.
The city is a key hub for trucks carrying goods to and from Afghanistan. Freshly slaughtered lamb, mutton and live peafowl can be found at the local bazaars. Men tend to carry rifles — a symbol of masculinity — but violence has decreased significantly, according to the police chief for Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province.
“From 2007 to 2017, [the number of] dead and wounded in the province decreased to one-sixth,” said Inspector General Salahuddin Khan. The police head count has surged to 82,000, from 34,000 in 2001, and the force receives training from the army. A Karachi bazaar bustles with shoppers in December. (Photo by Go Yamada)
Khan and other police leaders are focusing on “depoliticization, digitization and confidence.” They reject politicians’ interference with recruiting, and have created a database of rented houses and vehicles terrorists might use.
“For security, cooperation from the local people is essential,” Khan said. This includes holding the police themselves accountable: The government has established a Dispute Resolution Council, which includes third-party members appointed by a high court, to receive complaints against law enforcement.
Khan is not satisfied. “Support from the government is better than it used to be,” he said. “But the budget is never enough. We are [making requests] all the time.”
In Karachi, there is still a sense of unease despite the obvious improvement. Some government officials and foreign businesspeople still ride around in bulletproof vehicles with their own security details.
For now, the Rangers are keeping the pressure on. If police capabilities improve, Saeed said, “we will pull back.” Comment by Akhtar Hussain on January 20, 2018 at 7:07am Thank you for sharing this wonderful and inspiring news ! Comment by Riaz Haq on January 27, 2018 at 7:33pm
A #British archaeologist named Hugh Trevor Lambrick, who was the Deputy Commissioner of #Larkana in 1940s, called (Shushangi) ‘Toshangi’ the #GrandCanyon of #Sindh . #Tourism #Pakistan on #Vimeo https://vimeo.com/253033673?ref=tw-share A British archaeologist, author and civil servant named Hugh Trevor Lambrick, who was the Deputy Commissioner of Larkana in 1940s, called (Shushangi) ‘Toshangi’ the Grand Canyon of Sindh. It is one of the most dramatic places to visit in the Kirthars. The deep gorge (700ft deep) is formed by the waters of Kenjhi River which has been flowing in the area since time untold.Salman Rashid, Travel writer, Fellow of Royal Geographical Society traveled in 1996 to this place from Ghaibi Dero (Shahdadkot Sindh).We a group of trekkers i.e. Aziz Ahmed Jamali, Abdul Qadir Jamali, Muhammad Yaqoob, Asad Mir, Aqeel Baig & Sufi reached here from Khuzdar Baluchistan side Comment by Riaz Haq on March 1, 2018 at 8:18am
Pakistan aims to revive glory of ancient Mughal city Lahore March 1, 2018 by Khurram Shahzad https://phys.org/news/2018-03-pakistan-aims-revive-glory-ancient.html Perched on scaffolding, restoration experts chip away at decades of grime and repair broken mosaic tiles in a bid to save the colossal murals depicting historic battles and regal ceremonies on the walls of Lahore fort. The painstaking work is part of efforts to preserve Lahore’s crumbling architectural history as officials juggle conserving its diverse heritage with building modern infrastructure in Pakistan’s chaotic second city. The metropolis, which once served as the capital of the Mughal empire that stretched across much of the subcontinent, has been subsumed into a myriad of civilizations across the centuries. This rich past is most visible in the milieu of architecture salted across the Walled City of Lahore—from Hindu temples and Mughal forts to Sikh gurdwaras and administrative office built during the Raj. “You get a history of a thousand years, 500 year-old houses and monuments and mosques, shrines and a very peaceful atmosphere,” says Kamran Lashari, director general of the Walled City of Lahore Authority (WCLA). Prime among them, and dating back to the 11th century, the Lahore fort was first built of mud and was then later reinforced with stone over the centuries by a long cast of Mughal emperors who oversaw its expansion and the accompanying artwork. But periods of conflict along with searing heat, monsoon rains and years of neglect have taken a toll on the fort. Despite the onset of decay, experts suggest the city’s vast Islamic architectural heritage could make it a contender to rival more established Silk Road travel destinations. “Lahore can easily compete with Samarkand. It nearly matches Ispahan,” says Sophie Makariou, president of the Parisian-based National Museum of Asian Arts. Makariou adds that its failure to shine is more to do with safety concerns that have plagued the nation after multiple attacks. “Due to the bad reputation of Pakistan, it remains unknown,” she explains. Pearl of the Punjab But as security across Pakistan continues to improve, officials are hoping to revive Lahore’s lost glory. More than 40 conservationists with the the WCLA—including engineers, architects and ceramists from across the globe—are currently working on restoring the mosaic mural on the fort’s exterior. “It’s one of the largest murals in the world. It contains over 600 tile mosaic panels and frescos,” says Emaan Sheikh from the Agha Khan Trust for Culture. Restoration of the mural is just part of a larger project to refurbish the fort, which includes conservation projects in the royal kitchen, the summer palace and a basement, according to WCLA’s director general Kamran Lashari. Similar work by the WCLA has already been done to revamp the artwork at the historic Wazir Khan mosque and the Shahi Hammam—one of the only surviving Turkish Baths in the subcontinent that is approximately 400 years old. The city’s famed Delhi Gate, which once hosted extravagant Mughal processions arriving in Lahore from the east, has also been fully restored along with dozens of homes in the Walled City. Many of those involved in the project are optimistic. “The cities which are most famous for tourism, you can take London, Madrid, Istanbul, Rome, all the prerequisites which are available in those cities, are available in Lahore,” claims Ahmer Malik, head of Punjab’s tourism corporation, referring to Lahore’s architectural and cultural attractions. Comment by Riaz Haq on March 1, 2018 at 10:22am
Pakistan’s crumbling architectural heritage https://www.reuters.com/article/us-pakistan-architecture/pakistans-…
Pakistan (Reuters) – When British colonial rulers hastily left South Asia at Pakistan’s painful birth in 1947, the ensuing chaos and violence meant little attention was paid to the architecture they built or influenced in Pakistan’s biggest city, Karachi. More than 70 years later, architectural gems have been torn down and many are either crumbling or under threat from real estate developers in Pakistan’s commercial capital which is mushrooming into a mega-city. The structures, weathered by the salty air, open the door to Karachi’s colonial scars, researchers say, pointing out that many of the original owners were among millions of Muslim and Hindu refugees who fled their homes amid communal and religious violence that accompanied the end of British rule in India in 1947 and the creation of Pakistan. ”Every brick of the heritage building narrates a story of those who left in 1947,“ said Akthar Baloch, a researcher who has written several books on Karachi’s heritage. ”They built them with love and affection. “When people like me feel bad looking at the neglect of these heritage sites, one wonders how the families of the owners must feel if they ever visit Karachi.” (Click reut.rs/2F03sEg for a picture package of Karachi’s crumbling heritage buildings) Karachi’s population has skyrocketed to nearly 17 million people in 2017 from an estimated 400,000 at independence, and every inch of the city has become a valuable commodity for developers building homes or drafting plans to alter the city’s skyline with new skyscrapers. Jahangir Kothari Parade promenade, once an imposing British heritage site, is now obscured by a maze of overpasses and the shadow of Pakistan’s tallest building. The promenade is part of a handful of buildings, along with the colonial-era Imperial Customs House, which have been restored to their former grandeur, but such projects are rare when the focus is on tearing down old and building new. Rapid urbanization has ensured large-scale destruction, particularly in the old city areas, where more profitable multi-story residential buildings have sprung up. But amid the new concrete, remnants of the colonial legacy can still be seen, often recognizable by their state of neglect. The Saddar neighborhood of Karachi has perhaps the largest concentration of British architectural history, while in the city’s eastern district, the iconic old colonial jail has been declared a heritage site by Sindh province’s antiquities department. So far more than 1,700 premises have been listed as heritage sites by the antiquities department and the process continues. The Sindh Cultural Heritage Preservation Act, introduced in 1994, has helped provide legal protection for structures of historical significance. But courts are also busy with cases of developers trying to circumvent such protection. Comment by Riaz Haq on March 4, 2018 at 7:31pm
Over 92,000 foreigners visit Pakistan since launch of CPEC https://www.thenews.com.pk/print/288568-over-92-000-foreigners-visi… Since the start of ground work on the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), the flagship multi-billion dollar project of “One Belt and One Road Initiative,” more than 39,000 Chinese came to Pakistan in past five years. More than 92,204 visas were issued by the government of Pakistan to foreign nationals in an apparent effort to expand foreign investment, business opportunities and tourism in the country during this period. Over 120 Pakistani missions abroad issued 29,622 visas to foreign nationals in 2013, 10,267 visas in 2014, 22,932 visas in 2015, 13,456 visas in 2016 and over 15,927 foreign nationals came to Pakistan in 2017, revealed official data/documents Geo News has had exclusive access to. As many as 7,859 Chinese were issued visas in 2013, the starting period for the CPEC projects soon after the incumbent government of Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) came into power. Following this development, Pakistani missions in China issued over 7,859 visas to Chinese citizens in 2013, 69 visas in 2014, 13,268 visas in 2015, 6,268 visas in 2016 and according to informed officials at Ministry of Foreign Affairs that estimated 12,287 visas were issued to Chinese nationals by the authorities last year. In addition to it, officials revealed to this correspondent that about 91,000 Chinese nationals visited Pakistan on tourist visas in past five years. Some 27,596 visa extensions were also granted to Chinese on recommendations of ministries of interior, foreign affairs, water and power and planning and development, a 34 percent increase as compare to 2015-16, added the officials. This frequent flow of foreign nationals encouraged foreign direct investment (FDI) which jumped 163 percent to $222.6 million in July 2017 on a year-on-year basis, revealed official data collected from the State Bank of Pakistan (SBP). The main contributor to this foreign net inflows has been China, which is investing around $60 billion under the CPEC’s initiative. Pakistan received $2.4 billion in 2016-17, highest since the PML-N government took the charge of the state’s economic affairs while FDI remained $1.45 billion in previous PPP regime. The government under Prime Minister Youth Programme also trained over 110,000 youth, majority of them as the authorities claimed, would be associated with CPEC projects in coming years. For security of these Chinese workers, the government of Pakistan has also deputed an estimated 37,000 security personnel to guard Chinese workers engaged in some 22 projects directly associated with the CPEC and 214 other small and mega projects in Pakistan. For this purpose, the government has deployed 15,780 military personnel trained under umbrella of the Special Security Division (SSD) and the Maritime Security Force (MSF). Balochistan would get more security, as a few wings (450 personnel) of the MSF for coastal area, six wings (6,700 personnel) of the Frontier Corps, 3,210 police constables and 1,320 Levies personnel would guard all the routes. More than 4,200 policemen, 1,290 Rangers, 5,500 private security guards and 740 Askari Guards would protect various projects linked to the economic corridor in Punjab. Official data continued to reveal that Pakistan issued visas to 1,505 Australian nationals in 2013, 549 visas to Germans in 2013 and 575 visas were issued to German nationals in 2017. The Pakistani Embassy in New Delhi also issued over a thousand visas to Indian nationals in 2013 and 584 Indians were given Pakistani visas in 2015. As many as 786 Iranians were issued visas in 2013 and 945 visas were issued by Pakistani missions in Iran in 2016. Comment by Riaz Haq on March 4, 2018 at 7:46pm
Pakistan has 116 diplomatic missions in other countries. This figure includes 85 embassies, 29 consulates and 2 permanent missions.
Pakistan ranks 27 in the world and 7th in Asia on Lowery diplomacy index.
India has 181 missions including 124 embassies and 48 consulates.
India ranks 12th in the world and 3rd in Asia on Lowery Diplomacy Index.
United States is number 1 and China is number 2 on diplomacy index.
US has 273 diplomatic missions while China has 268.
France ranks 3rd, Russia 4th and Japan 5th in the world.
https://globaldiplomacyindex.lowyinstitute.org/country_rank.html Comment by Riaz Haq on June 19, 2018 at 8:14pm
#Pakistan: #Adventure #travel’s best-kept secret? Alex Reynolds: “Bring an adventurous spirit and an open mind, and you won’t have to find your way off the beaten track in Pakistan. The way will find you.” #tourism https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/pakistan-adventure-travel/index…. … via @CNNTravel When the British Backpacker Society released its list of 20 adventure travel destinations for 2018, the top spot was taken by a somewhat surprising entry: Pakistan. Citing “mountain scenery that is beyond anyone’s wildest imagination” and the friendliness of the locals, the society says the South Asian country will change “every preconception that you ever held about this area of the world.” So is Pakistan ready to step up? Though the country was a tourism hotspot in the 1970s, recent decades have spawned plenty of fears about Pakistan travel, owing to political instability and terrorist attacks. But though threats remain and there are indeed places travelers should avoid — the US State Department still advises its citizens to reconsider traveling there entirely — improved security backed by a government-led push to promote tourism means visitor numbers are on the rise. In 2017, an estimated 1.7 million foreigners visited Pakistan, 200,000 more than the previous year. In January 2018, it was announced that the country would be offering a multiple-entry 30-day visa on arrival to tourists from 24 countries including the US and UK. Bookings are up 100% this year for Wild Frontiers, a tour operator based in the UK and US that have been running trips to Pakistan for 20 years. For founder Jonny Bealby, it’s not difficult to see why the country is appealing to travelers once again. ‘Epic accessible landscapes’ “I call it adventure travel’s best-kept secret,” he says. “For the adventurous traveler it offers so much. More epic accessible landscapes than you will find anywhere else, meaning landscapes you drive to rather than trek for days to. “In Hunza [a mountainous valley in the Gilgit-Baltistan region] for example, you can sit on the rooftop at your hotel having breakfast and you’ve got seven 7,000-meter peaks all around you, which is pretty incredible.” Pakistan adventure travel destination Bealby also points to the country’s interesting cultural allures — both in terms of architecture and people. “The cuisine is of course great and the hotel accommodation is actually a lot better than most people think,” he adds. “Tie all those things together and you’ve got the perfect adventure travel destination.” According to Bealby, tourism in the north of the country has not yet been restored to Pakistan’s heyday during the early to mid-nineties when hotels would need to be booked at least a year in advance, yet he has certainly noticed a change in attitudes in recent years. “I would say that the security situation in Pakistan has improved radically in the last three years and it is now becoming a real possibility for people that previously might have been too wary of going to a place which they felt was unsafe.” Related content 23 ancient cities that have survived more than just time ‘People were utterly delighted to see a foreigner’ For US-born travel blogger Alex Reynolds of lostwithpurpose.com, who has visited the country twice, the things she read were not enough to put her off. Comment by Riaz Haq on August 14, 2018 at 7:40am
‘Emerging #Pakistan’ brand buses hit #Berlin’s roads on #IndependenceDay2018, showing beauty of Pakistan with its highest peaks, majestic landscape, Made in Pakistan FIFA Football, magnificent architecture and vibrant and diverse culture. #Tourism
Berlin’s iconic yellow buses are carrying brand Pakistan on the streets of the city on nation’s 72nd Independence Day.
This branding campaign is running under the theme of ‘Emerging Pakistan’.
The initiative is a part of celebrations planned by the Embassy of Pakistan in Berlin for the 71st Independence Anniversary of Pakistan this year
Berlin caters to hundreds of tourists, especially during the summertime, who will get to see these buses daily. For a brief time, many Berliners will see these buses portraying the diversity and beauty of Pakistan.
Speaking to this correspondent, Jauhar Saleem, Pakistan’s Ambassador to Germany said, “We are endeavouring to showcase beautiful Pakistan, perhaps the best-kept secret in the world of tourism.”
These special buses showcase the natural beauty of Pakistan with its highest peaks, majestic landscape, Made in Pakistan Football used for FIFA World Cup Russia 2018, monuments representing ancient civilisation, magnificent architecture and vibrant and diverse culture.
The banners on buses aim to attract foreign tourists to the wonderful land of Pakistan, for many that still remains unexplored.
Although for many Germans and Europeans, in particular, northern areas of Pakistan offer a mesmerizing adventure, an ancient Indus civilisation of Moen-Jo-Daro have always fascinated German archaeologists and researchers. Also, the culture and the ethnic richness of Pakistan is appreciated all over Europe. Comment by Riaz Haq on September 3, 2018 at 9:09am
Hospitality Management Training Program
http://hashoofoundation.org/thematic-areas/human-capital-developmen…
Hospitality Management Training Program (HMTP) is one of the flagship programs of HF focused to impart knowledge and skills to young men and women giving them opportunities to learn & practice the skills required for the hospitality industry in Pakistan and abroad. HMTP was initiated in 1999 by introducing practical training in Marriott and Pearl Continental Hotels across Pakistan. HMTP has been expanded to Peshawar and Karachi. The qualification under this program offers food preparation, Culinary Art, Front Office, Reception, Operational Services, Food & Beverage Services and Accommodation Operations and Services. Other Technical and Vocational trainings include beautician, tailoring and professional skills training.
Following international vocational qualifications (basic to advanced diploma level) are being offered under this program:
Food Preparation and Culinary ArtFront Office and Reception Operation ServicesFood & Beverage ServicesAccommodation Operations and ServicesHF trained over 5,000 youth since last few years, the program is facilitating youth with various International Vocational Qualifications (IVQs) curriculum/content, approved by City & Guilds UK and National Training Bureau, Islamabad. Comment

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Meet Central Jersey's 2019 Academic All-Stars

Meet Central Jersey’s 2019 Academic All-Stars A look at Central Jersey’s best and brightest graduating high school seniors Post to Facebook Meet Central Jersey’s 2019 Academic All-Stars A look at Central Jersey’s best and brightest graduating high school seniors //www.mycentraljersey.com/story/news/education/in-our-schools/2019/06/09/meet-central-jerseys-2019-academic-all-stars/1189977001/ To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Comments
This conversation is moderated according to USA TODAY’s community rules . Please read the rules before joining the discussion. Meet Central Jersey’s 2019 Academic All-Stars Alexander Lewis , Bridgewater Courier News Published 5:00 a.m. ET June 9, 2019 CLOSE School No. 4 in Linden lost a young student to tragedy last November, but Sofia Thomas left a lasting impression on the hearts of students, staff and community. ~Courtesy of Linden Public Schools, Bridgewater Courier News CONNECT COMMENT EMAIL MORE For the past three decades, the Courier News, Home News Tribune and MyCentralJersey.com has sponsored the Central Jersey Academic All-Stars program, which gives graduating high school seniors in the region a chance to show off their achievements and talents. After a rigorous selection process, 10 students were hand-picked from a pool of applicants. According to an independent panel of judges, they displayed the best academic performance, the most activities in and outside of school and a drive to succeed, among this year’s applicants. Here’s a look at each student and their accomplishments, as well as what their mentors had to say about these bright young men and women. For the top 10, we have also included excerpts of their essay entries. Meet the Top 10
(Photo: Alexander Lewis / Staff photo) School: Voorhees High School School Activities: Class Office, president; Model UN, youth secretariat; Hebrew Culture Club, founder and president; National Honors Society, officer; Math Honors Society, president; World Language Honors Society, president; National English Honors Society, officer and member; National Science Honors Society, officer. Outside Activities: Art of Dance, company member, faculty, and choreographer; Chabad Teen Network of Hunterdon County, president and social media director; Volunteer.im website, founder and CEO; wish2wish app, founder and CEO. Awards and Achievements: National Honors Society, officer; Math Honors Society, president; World Language Honors Society, president; National English Honors Society, officer and member; National Science Honors Society, officer; 2019 Conference on National Affairs (CONA), delegate; 2018 Hunterdon County Chamber of Commerce “Amazing Kid in Business;” National Merit Scholarship Program, commendation (2018); 2018 President’s Volunteer Service Award, bronze; AP National Scholar (2018); AP Scholar with Distinction (2018); National and Regional Outstanding Dancer Awards (2010-2018); National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT), New Jersey Regional Affiliate Winner for Women in Computing (2018); 2017 Chabad Teen Initiative Award. Nominator Comment: “Naomi Benson, a current senior at Vorhees High School, currently ranks one out of 294 students. Her GPA is a 4.33 on a 4.0 scale. Naomi is a senior in good standing and will be graduating from Vorhees High School on June 13.” — Beth Nemeth, school counselor. Essay Excerpt: “I used to be timid, afraid to talk, to raise my hand. That changed in fourth grade when I read a book about Helen Keller. I thought she was the most courageous girl ever, and I wanted to be like her. I decided to go after everything that I was afraid of: math problems, dancing on stage, speaking in class, and meeting new people. If you could spy on me for an hour, here is what you may see me doing: tutoring my classmates in math and physics; dancing at national dance competitions and sometimes even on Broadway; sitting in a split in my room writing code in the middle of the night; and on Sunday you may catch me hanging out in the mall with my friends.” NEWSLETTERS Get the newsletter delivered to your inbox We’re sorry, but something went wrong Please try again soon, or contact Customer Service at 1-800-675-8645. Delivery: Thank you! You’re almost signed up for Keep an eye out for an email to confirm your newsletter registration.
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Neelay Trivedi) School: Watchung Hills Regional High School School Activities: Computer Science Club, founder and president; Varsity Tennis, captain; Arrowhead Newspaper, politics editor; TedXYouthWHRHS, founder and organizer. Outside Activities: MIT/NASA Zero Robotics, co-captain; Independent Research, researcher. Awards and Achievements: 2018 Simons Summer Research Fellowship at Stony Brook University; 2017 HOPP Summer Research Fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering; 2016 Program in Algorithmic and Combinatorial Thinking at Princeton University; 2017 Intel ISEF Grand Award – Translational Medical Science, 4th place; 2018 Conrad Innovation Challenge, grand prize; 2018 TechCrunch Disrupt SF Hackathon, finalist; 2018 USA Chemistry Olympiad, national semifinalist; Scholastic Art+ Writing Awards, gold key (1), silver key (6); Nominator Comment: “Neelay seems to be an entrepreneur at heart … and displays boundless energy, enthusiasm, curiosity, intellect, a slightly disheveled nature, quick wit, sensitivity and an amazing ability to see patterns and trends. Neelay wants to use his intelligence, talent and gifts to find ways to positively impact people’s lives using emerging technologies, robotics, virtual reality and artificial intelligence. He takes pride in his original work … and has already created four award-winning medical tools. Neelay is also working on two EdTech tools to aid in teaching technology and coding in the classroom. I believe Neelay is the type of student who could one day be the recipient of a Nobel Peace Prize.” — Robert Carmenini, school counselor. Essay Excerpt: “Every weekend, I spend 30 minutes talking to my grandmother in India. Our debates on a variety of topics frequently introduce me to new perspectives. Through our interactions, I realized that the digital world doesn’t exist in a vacuum and that for (medical) technology to be truly effective, it must respect the historical and political context of the societies it operates in. We also love to discuss my vision for human health. From her, I’ve learned to appreciate the deeply human side of medicine; instead of mindlessly writing code to replace doctors, I’ve learned to think with more nuance. It’s for reasons like this that I view our conversations as recalibrations of sorts, reminding me to keep an open mind, think big-picture and continuously strive to maximize my impact.” Kylie Brown
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Kylie Brown) School: Union County Academy for Information Technology (AIT) School Activities: Multicultural Club, design, vice president and president; Future Business Leaders of America, state and national competitor; National Honors Society, secretary; Cranford Girls’ Varsity Tennis, co-captain; Student Government and Council, design and special events. Outside Activities: Liberty Science Center, senior volunteer; Keys 2 Success, co-coordinator; Rutgers High School Research Internship, intern. Awards and Achievements: Honor Roll, four years; Student of the Month, four years; AP Scholar with Honor; New Jersey Leadership Conference, delegate; Future Business Leaders of America, regional, state and national candidate; Microsoft Office Certifications; IC3 Certification; CompTIA IT Fundamentals Certification; Freeholder’s Recognition. Nominator Comment: “Kylie’s life motto — ‘Put your best foot forward, and if that’s not enough, then that’s all you got and you shouldn’t regret what you did’ — which she developed at a young age, fosters her self-starter attitude and her search for new and challenging opportunities. Kylie’s ability to self-reflect on her experience helps her to improve her knowledge, and skills, for future use. Her curious nature and her disciplined mind have set her apart from her peers. However, it is Kylie’s warm and giving personality that sets her above her peers. She is often the first student to put her needs on hold to assist her classmates.” — DeAnna Kroschinski, school counselor. Essay Excerpt: “The exploration of cultures is the one thing I love more than helping others. I go to a high school with 1,500 students from 21 towns, bringing a total of 60 unique cultures with them onto campus. I immediately fell in love with this diversity, leading me to my school’s Multicultural Club, where I eventually became President. Students wanted a more fun American Heritage Awareness Day, while the administration wanted a more educational event. Compromising between the two sides, we were able to improve the event by inviting professional performers and creating a commemorative project. I want to use the skills and lessons I’ve learned throughout high school to reach patients no matter where they are. As a biomedical engineer, I want to create cheaper, easy-to-use medical devices to help underdeveloped regions of the world. Disease does not discriminate and it has no boundaries, so why should treatment?” Anisha Patel
(Photo: Alexander Lewis / Staff photo) School: Middlesex County Academy for Allied Health & Biomedical Sciences School Activities: Student Council, president; Ethics Debate, president; UNICEF Club, president, Robert Wood Johnson Safety Ambassadors, member; Boys’ Varsity Soccer, member. Outside Activities: Stelton Rescue Squad, EMT cadet; NJ Scholars Program, class representative; Columbia Science Honors Program, member; JFK Hospital volunteer; Swadhyay Parivar, member. Awards and Achievements: Columbia Science Honors Program, member; National Merit Scholarship, finalist; NJ 2019 HOSA State Conference, 1st place; 2017 Rutgers Oncology Olympiad, 3rd place; National Honor Society, member; Spanish Honor Society, member; NJ Environmental Science League, member; College Board AP Scholar With Distinction; College Board AP + PLTW Achievement in Biomedical Science. Nominator Comment: “Anisha considers issues carefully, entertains multiple points of view and always strives to make the ethical decision … not just an easy one or a popular one. She is a tremendously efficient and effective leader and has done so much to advance the role of students voice as the Student Council president.” — Terry Ann Sullivan, principal. Essay Excerpt: “My mother doesn’t have a single musical bone in her body, yet she steps into the kitchen and becomes a seasoned conductor of an orchestra. Her palms compose harmonies of aromatic crescendos, cut by sharp notes and accents of spice. Though I was eager to add to her ensemble as I grew of age, I often butchered the skills she boasted. From reading about spices to washing pans before my mother came home, I worked to refine the dish without her instruction. The comfort I found in cooking has helped me form timeless and intimate relationships with both my Indian roots and the people I eat with. Following in my mother’s footsteps, I am no longer afraid of Indian cuisine – bring on the spice.” Madeline Branthover
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Madeline Branthover) School: Mount Saint Mary Academy School Activities: Peer Facilitators, head of poster committee; Model UN, delegate; Varsity Spring Track, member; JV Girls Soccer, member; Euro Challenge, researcher; National Honor Society, member; Spanish National Honor Society, president; Math National Honor Society, member; Cum Laude Honor Society, member; Cum Laude (grade 12); Student Accreditation Board, member; Math League, competitor; Chemistry Club, member; International Club, member. Outside Activities: Overlook Medical Hospital, junior volunteer; Hillside Food Pantry, volunteer. Awards and Achievements: National Honor Society, member; Spanish National Honor Society, president; Math National Honor Society, member; Cum Laude Honor Society, member; Class Valedictorian; AP Scholar With Distinction; Honor Roll (four years); George Washington University School of Engineering and Applied Science Medal for Consecutive Excellence in Math and Science, recipient; Outstanding Award for Highest Grade in AP Chemistry, Pre-Calculus Honors, Global Studies Honors, Spanish III Honors; AP Chemistry; Honors Award for 2nd Overall Highest Grade in AP Statistics, AP Macroeconomics, Biology Honors, Geometry Honors; Cum Laude (grade 12); National Spanish Exam, honorable mention; Nominator Comment: “Maddy is known and cherished for her independence, her sense of community and her genuine and thoughtful nature. Always wearing a smile, Maddy is well loved by her peers for she is very sensitive and has an empathy that is genuine. Maddy has a general curiosity for life and is a consummate student who learns for the sheer joy of it. It is obvious that she loves the subject matter which makes her reading, writing, and studying for exams seem effortless. Simply put, she is a conscientious and dependable student who has a true passion and eagerness to learn.” — Sofia Santos, director of student services. Essay Excerpt: “I want to lead by example, using the skills I’ve developed from cultivating personal connections to help others. This past year, one of my friends lost two of her grandparents with whom she was very close. As a result, she missed a lot of school and began to struggle with the workload. I lost my grandmother sophomore year, so I felt compelled to help her, aware of her rigorous schedule as an athlete taking the same challenging courses I was. I voluntarily decided to give her in-depth help, from reteaching a lesson from APUSH, or explaining step-by­step homework problems in AP Chemistry. By dedicating my time to help a classmate in need, while still balancing my heavy workload, I not only strengthened my own skills but also gained a stronger friendship.” Peter Gallo
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Peter Gallo) School: Immaculata High School School Activities: Baseball Team, captain; National Honor Society, president; Spanish Honor Society, member; Marian Scholars, member; Math League Competitions, competitor; Model United Nations, lea youth secretariat. Outside Activities: Campus Ministry, member; Summer Appalachia Service Trip. Awards and Achievements: National Honor Society, president; Spanish Honor Society, member; Marian Scholars, member; National Merit Scholars, finalist; AP Scholar With Honor; St. Josephs University Presidential Scholarship, recipient; AMC 12 Math Competition, school winner; Mathwork Math Modeling Competition, competitor. Nominator Comment: “Peter is highly motivated and extremely capable. He chooses and excels int he most rigorous classes available to him. What sets Peter apart is his genuine love of learning and a deep intellectual curiosity that drive him to pursue knowledge beyond the classroom. Since freshman year, Peter has availed himself to the opportunities to explore topics of interest outside the curriculum and undertake individual faculty-mentored research projects. Peter has thrived in and made the most of this opportunity.” — Colleen White, school counselor. Essay Excerpt: “If someone were to receive only one piece of information to best understand who I am as a person and who I want to be, I would share with them the importance I place on being a student-athlete. This aspect of my life best defines me because of the discipline and work ethic that comes with this title. Because of the large time commitments that each activity requires, I have developed the ability to prioritize my life based on what I need to accomplish to achieve success. As such, I focus on studying, getting extra baseball practice, asking a teacher for extra help, or anything else that will help better myself before I spend leisure time. Thus, being a student-athlete is very important to my life in that it guides me to maximize my time and effort.” Bailey Gold
(Photo: Alexander Lewis / Staff photo) School: Governor Livingston High School School Activities: National Honor Society, president; Link Crew, commissioner; Varsity Swim Team, captain; Interact, member; Student Auxilary, member. Outside Activities: Adaptive Aquatics, volunteer swim instructor; Relay For Life, volunteer. Awards and Achievements: National Honor Society, president; Athletic Honor Society, member; Math Honor Society, member; Spanish Honor Society, member; four school swimming records; 500 free and 100 butterfly swimming, county champion; Coaches Golden Award; Highest Career Points Ever in Swimming. Nominator Comment: “Her humble personality coupled with her drive, intensity, empathy and motivation make her an excellent student (who) leaves a lasting impression. A person’s real depth, ability to lead in new situations and the ability to solve problems … are the marks of a true achiever. It is in this deeper realm of substance that Bailey shines. Bailey has succeeded as a top student, natural leader and a gifted athlete because of her tenacity, focus and discipline, in combination with her natural athletic and intellectual gifts. She is very comfortable with the person that she is, and her confidence has led to even more success. Her discipline in combination with natural ability has allowed her to do so well in her academic, athletic and community endeavors. She is rarely idle nor does she spend time with frivolity. Bailey truly leads by serving. She is charitable, engaging and strives for self-improvement. Bailey excels because she has a love of learning and is curious about everything. She wants to understand the makeup of the human body, especially the mind, researching why humans think and act the way they do. With hopes of studying this, Bailey may purse behavioral neuroscience or something in the medical field.” — Michelle Morin, school counselor. Essay Excerpt: “I am the girl who volunteers to teach children with disabilities how to swim. I teach one boy aged six in particular named James. Hand in hand, I helped James overcome his fear of entering the pool by jumping in together. As I watched James’ mother gleefully film us jump into the pool, I realize how happy teaching James makes me. I am the helpful helped. I am typically a rule follower. However, I recognize the need to stand up for what is right, especially when no one else is standing. I am the activist who creates and sells t-shirts to my entire school to raise awareness surrounding gun control, bringing in over $700 for the victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas school shooting. I am a peaceful protester.” Brian Jiang
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Brian Jiang) School: J.P. Stevens High School School Activities: Marching Band, section leader and soloist; Jazz Band, 2nd trumpet, soloist; Science Olympiad, event leader and fundraising captain; Tri-M Honor Society, recording secretary; Chemistry Club, member. Outside Activities: Chinese School, teacher-assistant and fundraiser; All-Eastern Band, 1st trumpet; All-State Wind Ensemble, principal trumpet; Region Wind Ensemble/Band, principal trumpet; National Astrophysics Olympiad, finalist. Awards and Achievements: Tri-M Honor Society, recording secretary; National AP Scholar; National Merit Scholarship, finalist; National Astrophysics Olympiad, finalist; Walter F. Blaine Scholarship Award; NJ Scholars Program, finalist; four-year Central Jersey Region Band, member; State Jazz Soloist Award (2016); States Astronomy Science Olympiad, 1st place; Astronomy Science Olympiad Princeton Nationals, 3rd place. Nominator Comment: “Brian’s determination and pure drive and thirst for success are amongst the many strengths that he has. He is an extremely intelligent young man. Brian is a true leader amongst his peers. Brian is beautifully unique and one of the best students our school has to offer.” — Shaheda Hail, school counselor. Essay Excerpt: “What if it works? Ah, that wonderful uplifting excitement! Invariably, however, these happy emotions are rudely interrupted by another question: What if it doesn’t work? I stare at the chessboard, pondering my next move. If l sacrifice a piece now, I lose material – a disadvantage in the long run. But with my opponent’s pieces poorly developed and his king trapped in the center, I seize something infinitely more valuable: the initiative. The risk – very high. I’d have to press the attack, checkmate him before he can properly develop. But a cautious move would be boring – a risky move is art. I don’t play chess because it’s boring. To keep my center amid the struggle, to calculate and strategize until my head spins, to lose graciously and humbly, to enjoy the game not just for the win but for the beauty, to praise, learn from, and admire the brilliance of others – that’s why I love chess. Sincerity, optimism, ardor, spirit: these are the emblems of embracing risk. What if it works? Glory. What if it doesn’t? Style.” Arianna Minassian
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Arianna Minassian) School: Ridge High School School Activities: Varsity Fencing, captain; Education For All, secretary and founding member; Health Occupation Students of America, secretary; Epee Squad, captain. Outside Activities: Girl Scouts, ambassador; Far Hills First Aid Squad, EMT; Medeo Fencing Club, member; USA Fencing, member; Somerset County Youth Leadership, member; Armenian Youth Federation, member; Bernards Township Library, volunteer; Bernards Township Charter Day, volunteer; Saint Peter’s University Hospital, junior volunteer; St. Leon Armenian Church, volunteer. Awards and Achievements: Honor Roll (four years); National Honor Society, member; National Science Honor Society, member; NJ State Seal of Biliteracy in Spanish, Girl Scout Gold Award, recipient (2019); Girl Scout Silver Award, recipient (2015); Girl Scout Armenian Ararat Religion Award, recipient; Project Fabricland, 1st place (2015, 2016, 2017). Nominator Comment: “Arianna’s self-awareness is one of her greatest strengths because it is the driving force behind how she approaches everything. Academically she realizes that her hard work may not get the results she expected but it is the journey and ability to overcome challenges and frustration. She thinks about whether or not her choices would be something she would want others to repeat. She is a passionate and ambitious individual who has sought out opportunities to further her learning and be a valuable member of the community.” — Stephanie Smith, director of school counseling (on behalf of Peggy Wu, school counselor). Essay Excerpt: “Through my experience as an EMT, I have discovered not only the strength, diligence, and dedication that is required of a first responder, but also the joy of arriving on a scene and being able to provide immediate care to a patient during their time of distress. Serving as a first responder has taught me the difference that I can make in my community, as I am equipped with the knowledge and expertise to ease a patient’s discomfort. Service work is so important because it is a way to engage yourself in your community through a different perspective than you are used to. Living in my town as a resident is much different than living in my town as a first responder. This new viewpoint has allowed me to evaluate the overall health of my town and benefit my community with emergency care.” Jonathan Shoung
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Jonathan Shoung) School: East Brunswick High School School Activities: Math Team, president; Science Olympiad, president; Academic Team, tournament director; Science Bowl, co-captain; Mu Alpha Theta, president; East Brunswick High School-Middlesex County Academy Inter-School Mathematics Tournament, co-founder; East Brunswick High School Chamber Orchestra, member. Outside Activities: Piano Studio, member; East Brunswick Soccer Club, member; Mid-Jersey Chinese School, student and volunteer; Violin Studio, member; Central Jersey American Regional Math League team, captain; Central Jersey Regional Orchestra, member. Awards and Achievements: American Invitational Mathematics Examination, four-time qualifier; American Mathematics Competition, multiple honors and distinguished honors; Harvard-MIT Mathematics Tournament, top-40 sweepstakes qualifier; 2018 American Mathematics Foundation “Who Wants to be a Mathematician?”, 2nd round qualifier; B Division of 2018 American Regional Math League Competition, 5th place team; JV Division of 2017 American Regional Math League Competition, 2nd place team; Science Olympiad State and Regional, 1st place; Science Olympiad State and Regional, top six individual placements; 2019 NJ Department of Energy Science Bowl Competition, 5th place; 2017 New Jersey High School Physics League, 9th place; New Jersey Music Teacher Association Spring Auditions for piano, 13 years of honors; 2017 Crescendo International Piano Competition, 2nd place; Worldstrides Heritage Festival March 2017, best orchestral group; Rutgers String Day 2018, 2nd place; Class Valedictorian; NAQT High School National Championship Tournament Quiz Bowl, qualifier; National Merit Scholarship, commendation; AP Scholar with Distinction; NJ Seal of Biliteracy. Nominator Comment: “Jonathan has immersed himself into an array of extracurricular activities pertaining to academics, the arts, athletics and his community. Jonathan is more than an academic. He is compassionate, caring, a team player, selfless and charismatic. When he learned that the school would not be able to sponsor the Harvard-MIT math tournament, Jonathan stepped up for his team and organized the entire trip. He prides himself on preserving his culture, spreading awareness and facilitating the blend of Chinese­American culture. Jonathan’s eagerness to help and teach others is also evident in his part time job with the Kumon Learning Center. Jonathan encompasses all of the qualities of a future leader. He is ingenious, innovative, empathetic, optimistic, and a team player.” — Lauren Rice, school counselor. Essay Excerpt: “From my inner mathematician whose fingers itch at the mere thought of unsolved equations to the physicist who sees parabolic paths in punted soccer balls and force diagrams while driving, every aspect of me has a burning desire to reach a conclusion, find an answer, or just to make things right. And that extends beyond my own academic interests and curiosity. The desire to do the right thing – help a struggling classmate keep up, a young boy choose manga at the library, or to stop a joke from going too far – is always with me. In my mind, if you ‘re able to make something better or stop something from going wrong, you have a responsibility to do so. Every change we make adds up. What would be the point of learning and experiencing so much if that knowledge and capability isn’t put to use?” Meet the Runners-Up
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Josephine Basch) School: Middlesex High School School Activities: Cross Country, captain; Track and Field, captain; National Honor Society, secretary; Student Council, secretary; Environmental Club, member. Outside Activities: Elks Youth Organization, member. Awards and Achievements: National Honor Society, secretary; Class of 2019, salutatorian; Student of the Month (April 2018); National Merit Scholar, commendation. Nominator Comment: “Josephine is an intelligent and well-rounded student. She is able to balance her schoolwork, actively participate in after-school clubs and hold a job. She manages her time well, which is essential to her being successful. Josephine also holds multiple leadership positions within the school.” — Karin Blumetti, school counselor. Sarah Cladek
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Sarah Cladek) School: New Brunswick Health Sciences Technology High School School Activities: National Honors Society, vice president and historian; Culture Club, member; Varsity Gold, member; We Share Solar, member; Debate Club, member. Outside Activities: Congressman Frank Pallone Jr’s Youth Advisory Council, member; Karma Cat and Zen Dog, volunteer; The Beez Foundation, volunteer; Woodrow Wilson PTA Kid Care, volunteer. Awards and Achievements: National Honors Society, vice president and historian; President’s Education Award, two years; Principal’s Honor Roll, two years; Honor Roll, four years; Varsity Gold Coach’s Award (spring 2017). Nominator Comment: “Sarah is a bright young woman who always challenges herself academically. SHe actively seeks out additional learning opportunities. She is determined and will not take ‘no’ for an answer, she will continuously seek out an answer or a solution to a problem. She has completed over 136 hours of community service. She is an extraordinary woman who will excel in all that she faces.” — Colleen White, school counselor. Kunal Bhatt
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Kunal Bhatt) School: North Brunswick Township High School School Activities: Model UN, president. Outside Activities: Waxman Student Scholars, president. Awards and Achievements: NJ Governor’s Scool of Science at Drew University, scholar (2018); North Brunswick Township High School Science Symposium, 1st place (2018); Columbia Model UN, delegate. Nominator Comment: “Kunal has a deep love for the sciences, last year he came in first place at the NBTHS science symposium. Kunal is constantly working hard to better himself, he is always willing to help out when needed, and his level of maturity is far beyond his years. Outside of the classroom, Kunal is an FAA private pilot. Kunal has worked extremely hard to become a pilot and enjoys flying.” — Kevin Farrell, director of guidance. Kamryn Chaudry
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Kamryn Chaudry) School: Metuchen High School School Activities: Varsity Field Hockey, goalie; Italian Club, president; Student Council, treasurer; National Honors Society, member; Spanish Club, member. Outside Activities: Metuchen EMS, cadet; First Baptist Church of Metuchen, volunteer. Awards and Achievements: National Honors Society, member; Spanish Honor Society, member; GMC Field Hockey Champion (2017, 2018). Nominator Comment: “Kamryn is truly the quintessential, well-rounded high school student. She is talented academically, artistically and athletically, all while remaining very humble. On Thanksgiving day, there was a major house fire at Kamryn’s house. She and her family have been living at a hotel since then. Despite this major disruption and long commute to school, Kamryn has kept up her grades and has taken everything in stride.” — Traci Grauer, school counselor. Emily Cleary
(Photo: ~Courtesy of) School: Somerville High School School Activities: Varsity Soccer, captain; Unified Bowling, member; Peer 2 Peer, member; National Honor Society, member; By Kids For Kids, member; Varsity Track, member. Outside Activities: Flemington Veterinary Hospital, volunteer; NJ Elite Soccer Club, member; STA Soccer Club, member. Awards and Achievements: National Honor Society, member; National Merit Scholar, commendation; Honor Roll, four years; All Conference Soccer, 1st team (2017, 2018); at All Conference Soccer, 2nd team (2016); All Conference 400mH, 1st team (2016); All Conference 400mH, 2nd team (2017); AA, liberal arts from Raritan Valley Community College (RVCC) (May 2019). Nominator Comment: “Emily is a fantastic student but an even better human being. Emily takes all of her senior courses at RVCC, yet still finds time to return to SHS to work with our Life Skills students (MR, ASD, or traumatic brain injury students). She serves as a role model that exhibits positive social behaviors and mentors these students.” — Jeremy Hudson, college and career counselor. William DeMilt
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Will Demitt) School: Oratory Prep School School Activities: Omega Newspaper, staff writer; Fishing Club, co-founder and president; Carlton Fellows, mentor; Campus Ministry, member; Varsity Baseball, member. Outside Activities: Club Baseball, member; Our Lady of Perpetual Help Youth Ministry, senior leader. Awards and Achievements: Honor Roll, four years. Nominator Comment: “Will’s greatest strength is his diligence. He has 3 AP classes this year, is involved on campus and still is able to maintain an active baseball schedule and A average. He was determined to qualify for AP’s in his senior year and to do well” — Ann Geissler, director of guidance. Carter Freeman
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Carter Freeman) School: Piscataway High School School Activities: Student Government, president; World Language Honors Society, president. Outside Activities: North Stelton AME Church, member; Church Food Pantry, volunteer. Awards and Achievements: World Language Honors Society, president. Nominator Comment: “Carter’s greatest strength is his willingness and potential to grow. Through his involvement in student council, he saw a need for improvement and he took bold steps to make positive changes in our student government association. I am extremely confident that he will have a memorable career in education.” — Kelly Chilakos, school counselor. David Guevara
(Photo: ~Courtesy of David Guevera) School: South Plainfield High School School Activities: Student Council, treasurer; Spanish Honor Society, president; Jerseyan History Club, executive member; Heroes & Cool Vitas, veteran; National Honor Society, member. Outside Activities: Plainfield Area Humane Society, volunteer; Middlesex County Spring Food Drive, volunteer. Awards and Achievements: National Honor Society, member; Spanish Honor Society, president; Student of the Month (January); Gold Card, recipient; 2019 Peer Leadership, representative; Accepted into first Hispanic Student College Institute at Montclair State Univesity (2017). Nominator Comment: “What is most impressive about David is the way he quietly and privately takes action when he sees a need throughout his days. Whether it is offering to ‘buddy’ with a new student or to translate for others who don’t speak English, David makes it clear that he is always available. This is exemplary of that which I think is unique and dynamic about him, his truly altruistic nature, giving of himself with no expectation of recognition.” — Mylissa Bauman, school counselor. Keshav Kalia
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Keshav Kalia) School: J.F. Kennedy Memorial High School School Activities: Varsity Cross Country, member; Varsity Indoor Track, member; Varsity Spring Track, member; National Honor Society, member; Science National Honor Society, vice president. Outside Activities: Rutgers University SMART Program, member; Hackensack Meridian Health, volunteer; Judy Travis Health Careers, member; JFK Medical Center, volunteer. Awards and Achievements: National Honor Society, member; Science National Honor Society, vice president; Honor Roll, four years; Top 20 in class; Class Valedictorian; AP Scholar with Distinction; John F. Kennedy Memorial High Schol Athlete of the Month (November 2017); Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide, vice president. Nominator Comment: “I love that Kehav was devoted to classes like AP History, and subjects outside of his comfort zone, showing him to be the intellectually gifted student he is; his one B as a freshman in this subject did not deter him from displaying outstanding work ethic and maintaining his usual optimistic, easygoing disposition. This six-time Varsity letter winner is a devout runner and dedicated team player. He has enjoyed the mentoring process immensely as a senior member of the track team; he is an excellent role model for our underclassmen. This young man recognizes his call for service in both medicine and mental health, understands the mind/body connection, assuring me he is fully prepared for a major in cellular biology as a pre-med student.” — Alison Kirk, school counselor. Brian Kelly
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Brian Kelly) School: New Providence High School School Activities: Varsity Basketball, captain; Varsity Tennis, member; Varsity Soccer, member; Math Club, member; Future Business Leaders of America, member; National Honors Society, member; World Language Honor Society, member. Outside Activities: TryCAN, volunteer; Community Supported Agriculture, volunteer; New Providence PAL, volunteer. Awards and Achievements: National Honors Society, member; World Language Honor Society, member; Honor Roll, four years; Group 1 State Championship; 1,000 point scorers, All Conference Basketball, 1st team; Union County Basketball, Player of the Week; All-Group 1 Doubles, 2nd team; County Tournament for 1st and 2nd Doubles, 3rd place. Nominator Comment: “Brian Kellly’s determination in the classroom, sportsmanship on the court and work ethic make him a true role model. Brian is an extremely active member of both the school and the local community.” — Kristy McCauley, school counselor and scholarship coordinator. Sydney Muhando
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Sydney Muhando) School: North Plainfield High School School Activities: National Honor Society, vice president; North Plainfield High School Mentor Program, mentor leader; Spring Track, captain; Winter Track, captain; Tunlaw Newspaper, member; French Honor Society, member. Outside Activities: St. Luke’s Religious Education Program, teacher; Summer School Program, teacher’s aide. Awards and Achievements: National Honor Society, vice president; AP Scholar; Optimist Athlete of the Year, Honor Roll, four years; National Honor Society, member; French Honor Society, member; Optimist International Essay Contest, 2nd place; Optimist International Oratorical Contest, 3rd place; Outstanding Achievement in Algebra II; Outstanding Achievement in English 9 Honors; Outstanding Achievement in AP US History; Achieved Recognition for French 3 Honors. Nominator Comment: “Sydney has many great strengths that make her different than usual high schoolers. Sydney is exceptionally skilled in math and science as well as extremely punctual, organized, and trustworthy. She is always dedicated in what she puts her energy towards whether it is being captain of the track team or a prestigious student. Sydney’s family migrated from Kenya. She does anything and everything to do what is needed to achieve her goals. She is very disciplined.” — Jacquelyn Fields, director of school counseling. Katherine Reim
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Katherine Reim) School: The Pennington School School Activities: Varsity Field Hockey, captain; Spring Play, member; Poetry Club, co-founder and president; Junior Procter, member; Student Government, president; Ad Hoc Committee for Race, member; National Latin Honors Society, member. Outside Activities: Youth Group, service leader. Awards and Achievements: Freshman Excellence in Theater; Junior Excellence in English; Junior Excellence in Religion; Cum Laude Society; National Latin Honors Society, member. Nominator Comment: “Passionate and principled, Kate’s election to serve as student body president this year reflects her excellent executive leadership skills and her principled citizenship. Kate co-founded the school’s poetry club. She made poetry a high-profile school activity, organizing field trips and open-mic nights.” — Scott Peeler, dean of academic affairs. Evelyn Smith
(Photo: ~Courtesy of Evelyn Smith) School: Spotswood High School School Activities: Spring Track and Field, captain; Winter Track and Field, captain; National Honors Society, president. Outside Activities: Crescent Park, volunteer; Spotswood PTA, volunteer. Awards and Achievements: National Honors Society, president; Coaches Award for Spring Track and Field (2018); Student of the Month (March 2019); Spotswood High School, morning announcer. Nominator Comment: “Evelyn is an exceptionally motivated student who consistently selects and excels in academically rigorous courses. Her motivation extends beyond the classroom and she consistently seeks opportunities to learn, including enrolling in summer programs at Kean and Stockton Universities. She is a bright and responsible young lady who is a leader among her peers. She has been chosen to serve as a lab assistant in our science department, a privilege reserved for students who display a high level of responsibility and organization.” — Amy Willuski, school counselor. Alexander Lewis has been a reporter for one year, covering breaking news, human interest, technology, education, business, local events and politics. Previously, he wrote for the Middlesex County College Newspaper, Quo Vadis. He currently attends Rutgers University. Contact him at 732-991-9567; ; @alexlewismedia; alexlewismedia.com . Nearing your monthly article limit? Download the MyCentralJersey.com app for 25 free articles a month, or subscribe today for unlimited digital access to all our content.

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Farzi Café opens in Mall of the Emirates – Future of retail business in middle east

RetailME Bureau Jun 9, 2019
Indian restaurant Farzi Café, by restauranteur Zorawar Kalra, recently opened the doors of its second outlet in Dubai, at Mall of the Emirates. The modern spice bistro is strategically located on the second floor of the mall, adjacent to VOX Cinemas and very close to the parking.
Farzi Café first arrived in the UAE in 2016, opening at City Walk. In the past three years, the restaurant has built a great reputation with its chic, contemporary take on the Indian cuisine. True to its name, which means “creating an illusion,” Farzi Café is today known for its unique culinary philosophy. It offers guests a sensory, high-energy gourmet experience, amalgamating traditional global and Indian classics and infusing dishes using innovative techniques, molecular alchemy and creative presentations.
“We are delighted with the ongoing success of Farzi Café in the UAE. Dubai is a strategic growth market for us, being one of the key centres of international trade, leisure and a growing hub for gourmet cuisine. Dubai is the perfect melting pot of culture and traditions and we are constantly inspired by the synergies between the culinary culture of Arabia and India,” said Kalra, founder & managing director, Massive Restaurants Pvt. Ltd. (India).
“We are constantly innovating and evolving as a brand through extensive research & development to incorporate cutting edge cooking techniques, including molecular gastronomy and creative culinary art, using the best and most fresh ingredients. The result is food that is global in nature but with a progressive Indian and Arabic approach, something we feel has never been done before. We’re excited to see how UAE diners will respond to our second venue, at the new location within Mall of the Emirates, Dubai,” he added.
Offering a playful interpretation of ingredients and an immersive dining experience rich with Indian references, Farzi Café draws influence from the prolific work of the late Jiggs Kalra, the creative talent behind some of the top restaurants in India. Share this:

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Glasgow, Gateway to Scotland- 11 of the best food experiences

5 comments Forget the tired clichés about deep-fried Mars bars, which were actually invented 130 miles away. Over the last few years Glasgow has forged one of the coolest and most creative dining scenes in the UK and whether it’s brunch, lunch or dinner you’re after, with or without meat, the depth and breadth of options is dizzying.
Within two hours of the city, meanwhile, you can enjoy an exciting and diverse array of bucketlist food experiences showcasing Scottish produce, from seafood on the pier at Oban to hand-picking the sweetest raspberries in Angus. These days we often travel the world in search of great food. The truth is, we can also find it right on the doorstep.
Brunch in Glasgow’s south side
When it comes to brunch, the south side of Glasgow, particularly around the Strathbungo neighbourhood, is the place to be. Already drawing comparisons with Brooklyn in New York, brunchers in this neck of the woods are spoiled for choice. Gnom, on Pollokshaws Road, serves a small but perfectly formed menu of globally-inspired savoury and sweet dishes, from Turkish eggs and Chinese baos, to German spaetzle and Indian rotis. And the French toast ice-cream sandwiches are to die for.
Just around the corner on vibrant Nithsdale Road, The Bungo, Pot Luck and Nivens also offer deliciously exciting and creative all-day breakfast options. All these places fill up quickly at weekends, so don’t sleep in.
A fish supper in Anstruther
The queues are invariably long, but it’s always worth the wait. A fish supper from Anstruther Fish Bar, eaten straight from the cardboard box as you watch the colourful boats bobbing in the harbour, is surely one of life’s simple pleasures. The freshly-landed haddock, fried to perfection in light, airy batter melts in the mouth, while the chips (with a generous soaking of vinegar, but no sauce, of course) never seem to disappoint.
Glasgow, Gateway to Scotland: The Best Whisky and Burns
Afternoon Tea at Cromlix
Arriving at Cromlix, the luxury country house hotel owned by Andy Murray just north of Dunblane, is a relaxing experience in itself. The house is set in stunning grounds – complete with tennis court – and the welcome is friendly and informal. Then there’s the afternoon tea. From the delicious finger sandwiches and fluffy scones, to the delectable mini fruit tarts, macarons and desserts, piled high on stands and served with Ronnefeldt teas of your choice, everything is just right. Treat your mum. Or your best friend. Or yourself.
Pizza at Paesano, Glasgow
When your customers say your pizza tastes as good as it is in Milan, you’re probably getting something right. And Paesano, which has branches in Miller Street, Merchant City, and on Great Western Road in the west end, is the business. Using simple, good-quality ingredients – creamily authentic mozzarella, the most zingy and intense tomato sauce – all cooked in an authentic Neopolitan wood-fired oven, produces dazzling results. And all the pizzas on the menu come in at under a tenner. No wonder the place is packed.
Seafood on the pier at Oban
OK, this one is pushing the two hours from Glasgow challenge. But for an extra 40 minutes in the car you’ll get one of the best food experiences on the planet. Indeed, it’s hard to appreciate just how fresh the catch on offer at Oban Seafood Hut – lobster, langoustine, crab, mussels – is, or how simply and beautifully cooked, until you’ve eaten your way through the menu. Based right next to the ferry terminal, this place is an institution with locals and visitors alike; it can be heaving, and you have to be prepared to stand and eat with plastic fork. But nobody minds when the produce is this fresh, plump and moreish.
Scotland’s 15 best gastropubs
Pick your own berries in Angus
It’s little wonder top chefs such as Raymond Blanc rate Scottish raspberries as the best in the world. Our wet climate creates a sweetness and intensity of flavour other berries simply cannot reach, apparently (the strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and gooseberries aren’t bad, either). And there’s one sure way to get the best produce while having a healthy and fun day out with the family: pick your own. The fertile lands of Angus and Fife are renowned for the soft summer fruit they produce, and both have plenty of pick-your-own options, including Balhungie Farm near Monifieth, and Cairnie Farm near Cupar. Just don’t eat all the fruits of your labour as you go along.
Platform Glasgow
At weekends, Platform reinvents former club, bar and theatre space The Arches as a vibrant city centre food hall, bringing together the most exciting street food traders in the country for new type of dining experience. And what a fabulous experience it is. With a changing roster of food trucks, reasonable prices and a friendly canteen vibe (benches at shared tables) this is the perfect place to share plates and try new flavours. Recommendations? The tempura shrimp buns from Shrimpwreck are a triumph, while you’ll struggle to resist the crème brulee from Crema Van. Open Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Check www.argylearches.com for opening hours.
Glasgow, Gateway to Scotland: The Best Whisky and Burns
Picnic by Loch Lomond
When the sun shines it can feel like the whole of the west Scotland flocks to Loch Lomond, as the roads and best-known spots – such as Balloch and Luss – fill up. With all that stunning scenery just 40 minutes from Glasgow, you can understand the attraction. Thankfully, the vastness of Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park means you can always find a quiet spot if you try hard enough. With a shoreline that seems to go on forever, there’s enough hill, glen and forest to go round. And there’s no tastier way to soak up the splendour than with a picnic on the bonnie banks. If you’re heading out west via Great Western Road, in Glasgow, pick up some treats on the way at the array of great delis. Pay a visit to renowned artisan cheese emporium IJ Mellis, then pop over the road to Cottonrake Bakery for cakes and pasties. The dream picnic awaits.
Ice cream at Nardinis
Speaking of sweet treats, Nardinis, 50 minutes down the coast in Largs, knows a thing or two about how to satisfy customers, having been the unofficial home of Scottish ice cream for more than a century. The lovely seafront café, complete with traditionally styled interior, offers 32 flavours and a quite breathtaking choice of sundaes and desserts. Indulge yourself – you can always work it off by jumping on the ferry and cycling round Cumbrae.
The 15 best places to go for brunch in Scotland
Eat vegan in Glasgow city centre
A centre of vegan food for more than a decade, Glasgow has been at the forefront of the push to transform non-meat cuisine from worthy to wonderful. Cool café-bars such as Mono, Stereo, the CCA and the Flying Duck pioneered the move, serving flavour-filled, sophisticated dishes from around the world that attract off-duty carnivores as well as their vegan pals. Newcomers such as Picnic, in the Merchant City, and GlasVegan are adding colour and texture to an increasingly vibrant scene.
Dine out in Finnieston
We wouldn’t want the carnivores to feel left out, of course, and trendy Finnieston serves up the best of Scotland’s larder – including lamb, beef and game – in style. It can be hard to bag a table at the likes of The Gannet, Ox and Finch and Porter and Rye, since diners come from far and wide – and return again and again – for the exciting, creative cooking. The west end neighbourhood also has its own seafood favourite in Crabshackk, while Alchemilla has been wowing Glaswegians with its sophisticated Mediterranean sharing plates.
Glasgow, Gateway to Scotland, a partnership between People Make Glasgow and Glasgow Airport, in association with The Herald, aims to attract more US visitors and capitalise on a recent growth in overseas tourists by highlighting the city’s position as both a must-see destination in itself, and the ideal base for accessing Scotland’s landscapes, history and culture.
It’s easy to fly from the US to Glasgow:
Delta – direct to and from JFK www.delta.com
United – direct to and from Newark www.united.com
British Airways – multiple US airports to and from Glasgow via London Heathrow and London Gatwick www.ba.com
Icelandair – multiple US airports to and from Glasgow via Reykjavik www.icelandair.com
Aer Lingus – multiple US airports to and from Glasgow via Dublin www.aerlingus.com
KLM – multiple US airports to and from Glasgow via Amsterdam Schipol www.klm.com

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Chef Manish Mehrotra and my experience at Indian Accent New Delhi

by Madhushree Basu Roy | Jun 9, 2019 | Eating Out , Food , Uncategorized | 0 comments I just ate from the hand of God- That was my thought at the end of the Chef’s tasting menu at Indian Accent New Delhi. I was numb for quite sometime.
I have to agree, I had never had the opportunity to eat food cooked by a Michelin Star chef. I vividly remember Mr. Vir Sanghvi telling me that I do not want to miss out on this opportunity to eat food at Indian Accent when Chef Manish Mehrotra will himself be cooking. I had to find a way to ensure that I could take that trip to New Delhi, for Food Superstars meet and a chance to eat at Indian Accent and to hear from the man himself about his food. With a 17 month old baby, traveling has become quite a thing of the past now for me.
Let me begin by saying that I was taken aback by the humility of Chef Manish Mehrotra. A chef of his stature, someone who creates extraordinary food and someone, who can safely be called the father of Modern Indian Cuisine, was outright down to earth. He almost had a halo around his head. He explained his food mantra and went into details of what he was going to serve us at the tasting menu. It was a nine course lunch but eventually ended at perhaps more than 15 dishes. I slowly lost the count somewhere in between. At Indian accent, he believes at seasonality and creating food with local and seasonal produce. This was a summer tasting menu, hence a lot of dishes were summer fruits and vegetables. The presentation is top notch and every dish is visualy stunning and when I tasted, every dish had one unique feature- multiple layers of flavour and texture and yet, it was familiar. Every dish also came with a pairing of premium wine.
Indian Accent is an attempt at changing the way the world looks at Indian food, said chef Manish. Worldwide, Indian food has been bastardised and only the tikkas and ‘curry’ have become popular. There is so much more to Indian food than just that. From North to South and East to West, the palate changes and every region has its own spices, spice mix and ingredients to work with. At Indian Accent, they celebrate Indian food in all its entirety. Chef Manish Mehrotra believes that chaat is a complete food and it is his favourite too.
A chaat has a variety of texture and layers and he loves playing with flavours while creating his kind of chaat without losing out the core essence. When Dahi wada with spicy chili potato was served, he personally came down to explain the various elements of the dish. The wada itself sat on a bed of mashed potatoes, which he said was his take on the alu in Kolkata phuckha. Then there were sweet and tangy mulberry along with some fresh melon balls, cucumber, roasted cashew and the wada with dahi and tamarind chutney. A perfect dish for the summers, it was hot, sweet, spicy, sour and everything together in the mouth. Another chaat we had was Banaras tamatar ki chaat, which had a taste similar to the bhaji in pav bhaji and came with a sharp yet cooling parmesan foam and a crunchy namkeen/ biscuit. I am personally averse to spicy food but these chaats were mildly spicy and did not overpower any other flavour. I remember he said, that at home, we do not eat spicy food everyday. So why do we have to create spicy food in restaurants? Dahi wada with spicy potato, melons, kakdi and mulbery Avocado papdi Blue cheese naan and corn shorba
Apparently, a long time back when blue cheese was still unheard of in India, an elderly lady had pointed out to the Chef personally and with an intention of care, that the cheese was spoilt and that he should not serve it to other customers. This story has become a folklore with Indian Accent. Today, restaurants all over the country are doing blue cheese naan but it was Chef Manish Mehrotra, who had first created this genius dish. One bite into the naan and the piping hot blue cheese literally spills out. Another dish which is wildly celebrated in Indian Accent is the kulcha. You will get to taste a variety of kulchas, each one sensational. We had hoisin duck kulcha, sweet pumpkin kulcha, butter chicken kulcha, wild mushroom kulcha and more but it was the duck kulcha that won all our hearts at the table. Shredded duck which was sweet and salty along with the buttery kulcha was so lush and delicious that we couldn’t stop at one. Hoisin duck kulcha A la Carte menu will always be there but Indian Accent will now focus more on seasonal and festival based tasting menus
Navrati will see dishes focused on the festival, so will a Ramadan or any other festival. The menu will be driven by local and seasonal produce. Being in Delhi, how could we escape from a kadhai chicken or a kadhai paneer. Having said that, Chef Manish has completely changed the way kadhai chicken looks like and he has broken down the dish to its basic elements without losing out on the soul of the dish. The flavours simply exploded in the mouth. A sweet chili pepper was stuffed with small pieces of kadhai chicken and it sat on a bed of the smooth velvet sauce. Roasted and pounded coriander seeds were additionally sprinkled which gave the necessary oomph to the dish. Kadhai chicken
From north, we went down to extreme south at Kanyakumari crab. Sweet crab meat chunks came with a sagoo pongal, crushed peanuts and a kurry leaf oil. It was dressed with a sagoo crisp and some edible flowers. What is important about all of these dishes is to bring together the various elements and have them. One spoon of this sweet tasting crab dish and it transported my mind to the backwaters of Kerala. It was a unique flavour experience and you will have to try it to fully understand what I am saying. Kanyakumari Crabs in sagoo pongal Varanasi tamatar chaat with parmesan foam Chef Manish Mehrotra does not believe in molecular gastronomy and uses such techniques rarely
Sour pork with Goan chorizo rice was also another winner of a dish at our table. Yes, we were all Bengalis at our table (it just happened by chance) and we love our paturi. But this was a different paturi. The sour pork and the chorizo rice was wrapped in a banana leaf parcel and cooked. It was a little over the top sourness but the aroma of that smoky chorizo was intense. I can still smell it in my head. Sour pork with Goan chorizo rice
Before the final course came in, suddenly there were small pressure cookers with phalsa popsicle being served. These pressure cookers have been there in the kitchen from day 1 and they have been serving something or the other in them. Every year, they plan to discard them, but some dish creeps up in the kitchen which becomes worthy of being served in the pressure cooker. Not a big fan of phalsa itself, I wasn’t impressed but there were many who thought it was sublime and the perfect palate cleaner between dishes. Phalsa popsicle- the palate cleanser mid way
Final three dishes were the best and I was already stuffed till my throat. Black dairy dal was much like the dal makhni but so creamy and had a full bodied flavour. Grilled Sea Bass (having grown up by the sea at Port Blair, it is my favourite fish) with a crispy skin and a sweet and sour sauce which was enlivened by green mango and there were small pieces of soft sweet potato hiding under the sea bass was a glorious dish. The fish was flaky and what I loved the most was the crispy skin with some rava (typically Goan). It reminded me of my time in Goa and I couldn’t be happier. We also went right up to North with Kashmiri milk lamb, lotus stems and morel. The lamb itself was incredibly tender, fell apart just with a spoon and there was a nadru (lotus stem) kebab with a crisp lotus stem too. It was however, the stuffed morel (meaty and a pickled taste) that did the magic in this dish, especially when mixed with the sultry brown sauce. The beautiful grilled sea bass- can you see how crispy the skin looks like? Kashmiri milk lamb with morel Black dairy dal- the best you can get! As Anindya said, it was good food karma hitting back at us and we started our dessert journey
Did you know that Chef Manish has re created the famous North Indian delicacy called Daulat ki Chaat or the Varanasi Malaiyo to be served round the year and not just restricted to winters. Well, the tasting menu did not have this but we had rabdi and jalebi and not just any rabdi and jalebi. Rabdi on top of jalebi and covered in pistachio dust, so superior in taste and so irresistible that I did not leave one crumb of even the pistachio dust on the plate. I never knew that any dessert, which was not chocolate based could have that much appeal. Aamras with crisp sewai with a host of other small tit bits in it and finally Nagpur orange sorbet completed the dessert plate. Vibrant and almost with a brain freeze kind of quality, the orange sorbet hit all my senses in the most beautiful way that I could imagine. I was dazed but I was happy. The dessert platter

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Culinary hedonism

Sunday, 9 June 2019 Culinary hedonism There are few things as memorable as the aroma of home cooking.Summer for me says buxom, sweet beef steak tomatoes in a panzanella salad , the original home for leftovers. They leak sweet juices over your lips and into the golden-brown croutons of fried bread and across huge, breathy basil leaves that are so fragrant they’re practically narcotic. Just a hint of perfume and food can become powerfully alluring. Just a few drops of a fragrant essence can make commonplace dishes memorable and good dishes great.Vanilla, citric flavours,yuzu, saffron, ginger,and and a spray of cucumber mist or tomato water from an atomiser. How about rose-infused steamed bass,or a peach-jasmine sorbet, Autumn quinces steeping in wine and bay leaves Aroma permeates every cuisine, from ancient to modern, in every culture and at every level.Aroma, not taste, is our primary experience of food. Without aroma there is no flavour. By focusing on aroma, we intensify all aspects of food, and immeasurably enhance the experience of cooking and eating. Lavender takes creme fraiche to another level, while white truffle makes for a haunting perfume.I love a cumin vinaigrette or an orange blossom custard. I am a firm believer that a dish should deliver on the flavour of its featured said ingredient.If I am perusing a menu and the dish I have chosen says Chilli,ginger or lemon,I expect those flavours to come shining through loud and clear.Nobody wants to be on the receiving end of a scantily clad bowl of pasta or a half dressed salad. A Caesar salad should have the strongly defining taste of anchovies and parmesan,not just a coating of a drab mayo. One of the reasons I enjoy cooking so much is because the result often transports me to another happy time in my life. The taste of homemade raspberry ice cream reminds me of hot summer days as a child picking and eating raspberries and coming home with blood-red hands and not a care in the world.There is a certain joy to peeling beetroot, getting purple hands and spilling turmeric on your jeans while currying flavour.And while on the subject of culinary stigmata, even carrots leave their mark. Travelling in foreign countries brings with it distinctive smells. The smell of a Portuguese market is completely different to that which you would experience in Borough market, London. Pass by an Italian market with a whole lot of gabbing going on, and you not only get an entertainment reminiscent of a Fellini film, but the air is rich with exotic and alluring culinary aromas,celery in particular.Vai passagare beneath the window of an Italian kitchen in Florence and a flurry of nonna´s soffrito hits you.Brush past a pot of basil on a terrace or crush the fragrant leaves for a waft of the Med. People cook their kind of foods in their homes so indian homes are permeated with the aroma of spices , such as curry.The Italians literally reek of garlic,its in their bloodstream for life.No vampires there mother. You can tell where you are in the world by the smell of food.Sardines grilling outdoors in Portugal.The heady aroma as you walk into a store specialising in Jamon in Spain.The smell of spices emanating from a souk, if its Monday it must be Morocco.There is nothing quite like the smell you get as you enter a French fromagerie or the smell of mint or coriander wafting off a market stall. One of the best scent experiences happens when you walk into a home where the kitchen has been in full use — dinner’s almost ready and the aromas of the ingredients are lingering in every corner of the house. fresh from the vine with a distinctive aroma Lets put it to the test,shall we? I found it quite difficult to choose a particular recipe that would deliver on hedonistic aroma and flavour.Onions sautéeing in butter and olive oil came to mind,curry,coconut and tomatoes fresh from the vine.It was not until yesterday when I made a prawn risotto that it came to me.This Thai inspired recipe is for me definitive.It fills the kitchen with a heady aroma while you make the stock.It answers the head to tail philosophy of using all parts of the shell fish,and delivers on strong independent flavours shining through the finished dish. Chilli,lemon,coriander,garlic,shallot and of course prawn,represented both in the stock and the shelled meat. Stirring can be strangely soothing, as you’ll find when preparing this summery seafood risotto. Lemon infused prawn risotto with chilli, peas and coriander 400g raw prawns,in their shells, de-frosted if frozen3 tbsp olive oil1 red chilli, deseeded, half sliced and half finely chopped 1½ l fish stock, preferably home made 50g butter 2 cloves garlic grated on amicroplane handful coriander including stalks 1 small glass white wine 200g frozen peas juice 1 lemon, and zest ( optional ) Peel the prawns, keeping the heads and shells. Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a large saucepan and fry the prawn shells and heads with the sliced chilli until they have toasted and changed colour. Pour in the stock and bring to the boil, then turn down to a simmer.Bring the stock to the boil and keep on a low simmer. In a separate pan, melt half heat. Stir in the onions and sweat gently for 8-10 mins until soft but not coloured, stirring occasionally. Stir the rice into the onions until completely coated in the butter, then stir continuously until the rice is shiny and the edges of the grain start to look transparent.Pour in the wine and simmer until totally evaporated. Add the stock, a ladleful at a time, stirring with each addition until absorbed. Stir through the prawns and peas. Continue adding stock a ladleful at a time and stirring the rice over a low heat for 25-30 mins, until the rice is cooked al dente (with a slightly firm, starchy bite in the middle). The risotto should be creamy and slightly soupy. When you draw a wooden spoon through it, there should be a wake that holds for a few moments but not longer. Cook until the prawns change colour. Stir through the chopped chilli, lemon juice and remaining olive oil. Let the risotto rest for a few mins, then serve, topped with the lemon zest. Posted by

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Mumbai Mouthful

Meditative portraits of a small business in a big city
Days of My China Dragon | Chandrahas Choudhury | Simon & Schuster | 224 Pages | Rs 399
CHINESE FOOD MIGHT as well be considered one of India’s many regional cuisines. Chicken manchurian and hakka noodles are beloved staples (if not sources of national pride), while street carts lettered with the Hindi chayniss provide a lifeline to many. In this culture dedicated to its own version of food from across the border, Chandrahas Choudhury’s Days of My China Dragon is about a restaurant that refuses to be just another Indian Chinese joint. Somewhere between a novel and a set of interconnected short stories, the book goes behind the kitchen door of Bombay’s gritty restaurant life, narrating the everyday chaos of owners, chefs, waiters and hard- to-please customers.
Each story follows a character or incident in the life of Jigar Pala’s restaurant, China Dragon, to present a quirky, often philosophical, portrait of a small business in a big city. Although the book’s premise is amusing, and the stories are endearing in pockets, the different vignettes soon begin to seem as though they are repeating themselves, at least in the small insights they wish to elevate.
Jigar Pala, an enterprising Sinophile trades in his father’s popular Udupi restaurant (in the Prabhadevi neighbourhood of Bombay) for a Chinese one. Given the tastes of a fast-gentrifying city, a made- in-China version of the family business, Pala believes, holds better economic prospects. ‘Chinese is big business,’ he says, ‘Virtually the second cuisine of India.’ But unlike its counterparts, Pala’s restaurant boasts of authentic, well-researched Chinese recipes, some even collected from Bombay’s Chinese migrant families. He wants his customers to ‘walk out feeling as if they’ve just been to China’. Enthusiastic as Pala is about his new gastronomic vision, his restaurant struggles for clientele. Of course, when ‘the bestselling item in all Indian Chinese restaurants is paneer’, he must convert a population that believes Chinese food tastes better in India.
Told in Pala’s voice, the stories affirm the dream of the restaurant. In one, he scouts for a real dragon to bring luck to the fledgling venture. In another, he remembers how he battled legacy and familial expectations to forge his own path. The eccentric staff from different parts of India and Nepal grow tighter knit into a family. These different episodes reveal that a restaurant is always more than a restaurant—it is a journey, of both pilgrimage and exile, and a microcosm of the world it feeds.
‘A restauranteur’s job,’ Pala says, ‘is to make not just food but time warm, alive, nourishing.’ His ontological musings about Tao intersperse his recollections, as if to imbue everyday quirk with a higher purpose. A plate of small dim sum or green tea chicken— authentic samplings imported into a quintessential Indian Chinese restaurant— unravel into crises of identity and politics. They become a metaphor for Bombay itself. For its confluence of people, their hopes and their struggle to thrive amidst big development.
The project of addressing gentrification and class aspirations through the aromas of food and the sagas of empty tables and property sharks often feels lofty. Pala, rather than being a multifaceted character in his own right, is left more as a narrative device. At one point, he even becomes a mouthpiece for anti-Shiv Sena ideology when he reprimands— at length—one of his young workers for joining the activities of a local xenophobic Hindu party. The history lesson on Shivaji that follows seems all too forced.
Choudhury’s writing is light. Many of his characters and scenes are colourful. And it is a relief to read an Indian restaurant story that doesn’t labour on needlessly with overwrought descriptions of food. Deft as the sentences are, though, the interactions between characters are not complex enough to sustain the philosophy. Nor is the philosophising diverse enough to work as first-person lecture. The restaurant—such a concentrated setting—is unable to deliver morsels meaty enough to make a meal. SHARE

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Sheraton Grand Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway appoints F&B Director – Abhishek Mishra

Sheraton Grand Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway appoints F&B Director – Abhishek Mishra 06/06/2019 Sheraton Grand Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway Appoints Abhishek Mishra as the new F&B Director
Bangalore 06 June 2019: Sheraton Grand Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway has named Abhishek Mishra as the new Food and Beverage Director of the property. Abhishek will be responsible to carry out overall culinary operations, which includes financial, managerial and operational aspects of the hotel’s F&B endeavors. He comes with exemplary knowledge and experience in the hospitality industry especially food and beverage, which will enable him to establish a formidable brand presence in the market.
Abhishek Mishra has an overall experience of over 13 years that includes managing restaurants, banquet operations and events planning. His excellent managerial and leadership skills in the aforementioned domains have proved to be an asset at his previous assignments. He has been part of renowned 5-star properties throughout his career, which made him a highly result driven individual with seamless track record.
Abhishek began his career in 2005 as a Management Trainee and then moved on to Taj Connemara, Chennai and started his career as a catering assistant, Restaurant Supervisor and then worked as a Restaurant Manager at their South Indian Specialty and all-day Dining from 2006 to 2010. He later moved to The Taj Mahal Palace, Mumbai in 2010 and worked as Manager In Room and later got promoted as Assistant Director Food and Beverage at the hotel. In his tenure with The Taj Mahal Palace, he was also a part of the opening of their all-day dining. In 2016, Abhishek moved to Le Meridien Mahabaleshwar Resort and Spa as Manager of Food and Beverage before joining Sheraton Grand Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway.
Sujeet Kumar, General Manager, Sheraton Grand Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway said, “We are known for curating some of the best dining experiences at our hotel across multiple restaurants. Abhishek’s strong sense of aesthetics and leadership skills will further add value to the brand and we are happy to have him on board. As the F&B Director, Abhishek will enable us to take our food and beverage offerings to an all new level and continue serving our guests with best in class hospitality services”.
Abhishek holds a degree in Bachelor in Science for Hospitality and Hotel Administration. From the many, Abhishek has also added feathers to his hat by receiving awards like Wasabi Ranking In 50 Best Restaurant in Asia is improved from 47 to 43 in 2016-17; Times Food Award for Wasabi, Golden Dragon for 2015-16,2016-17; In Beverage Sale & APC incremental revenue, IRD rank number one in all the Food and beverage outlets for 2013-14; Judged as Best Restaurant Manager in the Hotel for Increasing the Beverage sales of IRD by 35% and Beverage APC by 48% for Financial Year 2012-13, highest number of engagement stories by the department and 5% increase in the Guest Satisfaction scores of the department. His work has also been selected as “Beyond Story” for the month of July-08 in Taj Upper upscale Hotels.
He loves writing, driving and exploring new places when not at work.
About Sheraton Grand Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway
Sheraton Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway is located in the 43 acre self-sustained campus called Brigade Gateway, which also houses the World Trade Centre, Orion Mall and a beautiful man-made lake. Our location focuses on offering the crème de la crème attractions of the city along with maximum benefits for business & leisure travelers. Whatever entices your palette or tantalizes your taste buds you’ll find it here. The hotel features an array of comprehensive and exciting
eateries. The nine F&B outlets provide authentic cuisine, innovative experiences, warm service, and great value. The signature Shine Spa at Sheraton consists of ten treatment rooms of contemporary splendor, dedicated wholly to uplifting the senses and presents you with a luxuriously soothing environment.
About Marriott International:
Marriott International, Inc. (NASDAQ: MAR) is based in Bethesda, Maryland, USA, and encompasses a portfolio of more than 6,900 properties in 30 leading hotel brands spanning 130 countries and territories. Marriott operates and franchises hotels and licenses vacation ownership resorts all around the world. The company now offers one travel program, Marriott BonvoyTM, replacing Marriott Rewards®, The Ritz-Carlton Rewards®, and Starwood Preferred Guest®(SPG). Related Posts Sheraton Grand Bangalore Hotel at Brigade Gateway appoints Front Office Manager – Varun Babbar The Westin Chennai Velachery appoints Director of Sales & Marketing – Mr. Suman Kumar Hyatt Regency Pune appoints Spa Manager – Mr. Gautum Singh

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