Renowned QSR chain Upsouth launches sixth outlet in Pune

Renowned QSR chain Upsouth launches sixth outlet in Pune

by Priya Jadhav Plans to launch more outlets in the city by year end Pune, 27th February, 2019: Renowned QSR chain UpSouth recently launched its sixth QSR outlet in Pune. Post creating its successful presence in Viman Nagar, Pune Airport, Aundh, Wakad, Phoenix Market City and now Wanowarie , the brand is looking forward to launch more outlets in the city by the year end. UpSouth offers great, authentic, delicious food with lightning speed of service in hygienic and LIVE Kitchen atmosphere. This is a self-service and sit-down restaurant. It is an ideal place to grab a quick bite for students to hover, family to relax and office-goers due to its fast service and tasty food. The menu offers universal favorites like – varieties of Idli and Dosa, MeduWada, Uthappam, Filter Coffee, Paddu, Southindian Combos, meals and many more. It also hosts its patented signature dishes like Uthly, Malabariparota sandwich, Sabudana Cheese Vada, Elaneer Mousse, Mango Moksha and Healthy Super Grain Paratha . All this priced very competitively, the average spends per person ranges between Rs.80-90 only. Truly great value for money combined with supreme quality! UpSouth is the Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) brand of Billion Smiles Hospitality Pvt Ltd, one of India’s leading hospitality chain. “We are here to create convenient, affordable, hygienic and quality driven South Indian QSR chain in upscale environment. We are looking forward to create an impactful presence in pune market through internal investments and franchising options. South Indian cuisine is recognized as one of the most popular cuisine, and as a product is also suitable for all day dining. Hence a great opportunity for UpSouth to build a successful QSR format nationwide”, says Kumar Gaurav, Vice President, Billionsmiles Hospitality Pvt Ltd. Upsouth is committed to bring Indian and South Indian vegetarian cuisine in a modern quick service format – with the highest level of quality in both products and services, at the lowest reasonable prices and in the most hygienic environment. UpSouth makes their food from fresh ingredients, unlike large international chains with their highly processed food at industrial scale. Corporate Executive Chef – Manu R Nair, continues that “Keeping pace with modern world, Upsouth redefines the experience of Indian and South Indian Cuisine for you with an upbeat and contemporary touch. We bring healthy, delicious, fresh and wholesome Indian and South Indian vegetarian food in a modern format”,

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America’s Blackest City: New Orleans, Where Blackness Was Born

Club members and performers march during the Divine Ladies Social Aid and Pleasure Club ‘second line’ parade on May 17, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Traditional second line parades are put on by social aid and pleasure clubs organized by neighborhood in New Orleans. Photo: Mario Tama (Getty Images) America’s Blackest City For Black History Month, we asked writers to explain why they think their hometown, current residence or notable place deserves the title of America’s Blackest City by defining a city’s history, music, cuisine, notable figures, and cultural touchstone/unique black fact. This year, America will commemorate 400 years when the first slaves were forced onto this land in 1619.
When considering the experiences of our people in this country, I can only think of one city that can tie together all our attributes: history, music, cuisine, influential leaders, cultural landmarks and information that is unique to us.
New Orleans.
When you consider that some of the first slaves who came to the region set the tone—from settling America’s oldest black neighborhood , Treme (the real, not the TV show ) in 1783, where black folks bought land and homes on a regular basis, to Congo Square, where, according to city law, blacks could congregate to play music, dance and sell goods in the marketplace to having a place of worship like Saint Augustine Catholic Church, which is the oldest black parish in America when founded in 1841.
Footwork originated from communication-based dances that were performed on Sunday in Congo Square.
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Jazz, second line music, the drum patters in both call-and-response are all original elements of what influenced of the hip-hop sounds of today.
We are the birthplace of jazz and gospel, led by Louie Armstrong and Mahalia Jackson. Their influences along with the traditions learned in Congo Square are still felt today.
As local musician Dion Norman describes, hip-hop started in New York City but used samples from the Meters, also known as the Funk Meters, who formed in 1965. Their signature song, “They Ask’d For You,” became a regional favorite and “Cissy Strut” and “ Look-ka Py Py ” are known funk classics. New Orleans hip-hop implemented both hip-hop and the original New Orleans music created by the slaves and free blacks in Congo square, which led to the creation of bounce music.
You remember bounce went mainstream 20 years ago when we gave the world Juvenile’s “ Back That Azz Up ,” which your momma, baby daddy, the crazy uncles, grandmas and cuzins were backing it up to.
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The city is home to musical legends from the Marsalis family to the Neville Brothers to Fats Domino to Terence Blanchard to today’s influencers: Master P, Birdman, Lil’ Wayne, Manny Fresh and Juvenile. The Miami bass scene of the ’90s and Dirty South music formed in Atlanta have deep influences from the sounds created from New Orleans musicians. Remember, it originated from the music created in the 504 back in Congo Square, located in what is now Louis Armstrong Park.
Hey, what other city can pull off taking Anita Baker’s ballad “No One In the World” and turning it into a line dance for all of us to get our grove on?
Speaking of Atlanta, every thing from Tyler Perry basically showcases that city in his movies. You better recognize—those skills came from where? I will let you guess, hmmm.
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Yes, Atlanta is the adoptive home of former Mayor Andrew Young, but he was born and raised in our fair city.
When you visit New Orleans, the vibrant arts and architecture scene is something you can’t miss. Walk down historic O.C. Haley Boulevard to see the colorful murals. Also, you should travel to Old Bayou Road, where in the 1800s free people of color were inspired to gather. Today, its an area filled with black-owned businesses.
As of this writing, it is Mardi Gras season and droves of people are flocking to the city to party and just lettin’ loose to the music supplied by our marching bands.
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But if you really want to learn more about how influential blacks are during this period of revelry, stop by The Backstreet Cultural Museum to check out the collections of American societal traditions such as jazz funerals, the Mardi Gras Indians and social aid and pleasure clubs.
When you’re tired of walking, you need to experience the best food in the land, where places such as Dooky Chase continues the traditions of creole and soul food inspired from our past. Since 1946, the establishment has been a place where civil rights leaders such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mahalia Jackson and James Baldwin would strategize to help push the movement. Leah Chase is still cooking in the kitchen, so you better be hungry. You can also eat at spots such as the Praline Connection, Dunbar’s and Lil Dizzy’s Café, which is owned by the Baquet family, who have been a fixture in the community. Oh, by the way, we have influence in the media as a family member, Dean Baquet , is the first African-American executive editor at the New York Times.
New Orleans also boasts the only black and Catholic institution in the nation—Xavier University of Louisiana. (Full disclosure, I am an alum and Dion Norman and I were classmates). If you go to a pharmacy in the city, most likely that pharmacist is an XU grad. And we have the tradition of being at the top for preparing black undergraduates for medical school.
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You talk about festivals and celebrations: How many black people you see coming to the Crescent City in the middle of the summer, sweating out their hair in the humidity so they can recharge, get inspired and then listen to some of the best musicians in the world at Essence Fest, which is celebrating its 25 th year ?
You talk about the combination of sports, music and culture; since 1974, the Bayou Classic between Southern University and Grambling State University has been a crown jewel of black college football with its Battle of the Bands and since 1990, has become a Thanksgiving weekend tradition in the city.
We love, love our New Orleans Saints. Who Dat Nation is passionate and dedicated to their team.
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It is the tradition of our black communities to share with our fellow man after Saints games, win or lose; we will feed our opponents red beans and rice and gumbo at tail gates and send them home with a smile. Oh, and we love to troll our NFC rival Atlanta Falcons, too.
“New Orleans is the blackest city because it’s the Mecca that led to the Harlem Renaissance, is the birth place of jazz, the chitlin circuit and the creative birth of bounce music starting with DJ Jimi and all of the New Orleans natives to follow,” Norman said.
I can’t say it any better.
Oh yeah, we have a sister who became the first woman ever elected mayor in its 300-year history and her name is LaToya Cantrell .
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Can’t get any blacker than that . Right, 28 to 3 ? Oops, I mean Atlanta.
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Neighbourhood Guide: The Underrated Charm of North Point

Christie Lee February 27, 2019
Not as trendy as Causeway Bay, not as glamorous as Central, not as quirky as Wan Chai. North Point is not the kind of neighbourhood you fall in love with at first sight, but don’t dismiss it out of hand – give it a chance and its unpretentious, eclectic charm will soon win you over.
North Point has always been known as a magnet for immigrants, especially the Shanghainese who came in droves during the instability of the Chinese civil war, which ended with a Communist victory in 1949. They brought with them a love of entertaining, turning North Point into one of the city’s main leisure destinations. But the area has also been known as a military base and site for large scale infrastructure projects. The North Point Battery, built in 1879, was followed by the Royal Yacht Club in 1900. In 1919, Hong Kong ’ s second power station was built in North Point, servicing Hong Kong Island until it was decommissioned in 1978.
In recent years, gentrification has swooped down on North Point. Boutique hotels and luxury micro-apartments now sit next to ageing apartment blocks, decades-old street markets and shabby malls. Will the two continue to co-exist, or will the new completely push away the old? That remains to be seen. For now, there’s plenty to explore.
Heritage
1/ Electric Road, Power Street, Tong Shui Street, Fort Street The clue to North Point’s history is in its street names. The North Point Battery was built as part of Hong Kong’s coastal defence network, and it was located on Fort Street. Hong Kong ’ s second power station lay at the intersection of Electric Road and Power Street. Tong Shui Road, referring to Chinese dessert soup (tong 4 seoi 2 糖水, literally “sugar water”) was where businessman Kwok Chung-yeung intended his sugar factory to be – more on that below.
2/ Tin Hau Temple 10 Tin Hau Temple Road, Tin Hau. Open daily, 7:00-17:00. Like many of its contemporaries, the Tin Hau Temple in the neighbourhood of the same name is dedicated to the Sea Goddess (tin 1 hau 6 天后 ), whom local seafarers believe safeguards them while on the water. This one was built in the 18th century by the Tai Family, who were Hakkas from Guangdong who first settled in Kowloon in a village that was lost to the former Kai Tak Airport. Legend has it that they used to gather grass in the area and found a washed-up statue of Tin Hau in the rocks near the shore one day. Taking this as a sign, the family erected a shelter for the sacred statue. After that, many boat people came with offerings to worship at this shrine. Today, this protected heritage monument looks much as it always had, despite some renovations through the years.
3/ Chun Yeung Street / North Point Wet Market 160 Tsat Tsz Mui Road, North Point. Open daily, 6:00-20:00. Tel. +851 2564 1381; +852 2563 4340. The best way to arrive in Chun Yeung Street is by “ ding ding ,” which runs straight through this lively neighbourhood market. It ’ s a thrill to see shoppers disperse to either side of the street as the tram swings its way into the street and runs between busy stalls. Chun Yeung Street is where you will find fruits, veggies, meat and seafood – but also knock-off bags and belts, and hawkers selling corn on the cob, meat skewers and candy floss. The street is named after Kwok Chun-yeung, a Fujian-born businessman who intended to build a sugar factory on the site. He abandoned his plan due to increasing competition from sugar factories in China and Japan, and the subsequent lowering of sugar prices, and decided to turn it into apartment blocks instead.
4/ State Theatre 279-291 King’s Road, North Point. The State Theatre is easy to miss as you walk past it. On the street level, it looks just like any other shabby, run-down mall. But look up and you ’ ll find yourself squinting at a relief painting adorning the building’s curved façade. The mural depicts Diaochan, one of ancient China ’ s “ Four Beauties ,” which was until recently covered by a massive billboard. It’s just a hint at the overlooked history of this postwar gem.
In a way, the history of the State Theatre epitomises the rise and fall of North Point as a centre of entertainment. Built by impresario Harry Odell as the Empire Theatre in 1952, the place was as glamorous as movie theatres could get back in those days, with a 56-foot cinema screen, a diamond-shaped ceiling and 1,400 seats. An adjacent shopping mall and block of flats were built in 1958, and the following year it was renamed State Theatre. In the years that followed, it played host to legendary Taiwanese singer Teresa Teng, among other celebrity performers.
The theatre is also known for its unique architecture: a listed Grade I historic site, it is the only Hong Kong building in possession of a an arch bridge roof structure, which created a column-free auditorium for the theatre. In 1997, the State Theatre shut down after 45 years of service. Walking into the theatre’s rundown mall on a weekday evening reveals a strong musky aroma with a distinct mix of old leather and incense. There is dust everywhere, and half the shop gates have relocation notices stuck on them.
Being conferred Grade I status hasn ’ t shielded the State Theatre from threat of development. When New World Development, a majority owner of the whole State Theatre site, which includes the former theatre space, shops in the arcade and the residential block, declared that it ’ d redevelop the building, the city ’ s heritage buffs got to work. The result was a full-blown public awareness and advocacy campaign that included videos about Odell and testimonies from well-known Hong Kong actor Kenneth Tsang Kong. It was only then did New World changed its tune, saying that it woul d consider measures to conserve the theatre.
5/ Sunbeam Theatre 423 King’s Road, North Point. Hours vary according to performances; see website . Tel. +852 2856 0162. Set up by mainland Chinese immigrants in 1972, Sunbeam Theatre was dedicated to Cantonese opera. With a prominent neon sign at the junction of Shu Kuk Street and King ’ s Road, it ’ s hard to miss. Behind the grandiose reception hall, the building contains a cinema and a second, larger theatre for stage performances. In the past four and a half decades, Sunbeam has played host to a bevy of Cantonese opera stars, including Lam Kar-sing. Recently, the cinema has been upgraded to the three-screen Super 3 theatre.
6/ Tsat Tsz Mui Road Many a child have been haunted by the backstory to Tsat Tsz Mui Road, whose name translates as “Seven Sisters Road.” According to urban legend, there were seven women who lived in North Point during the 19th century. Though not related by blood, they pledged their lives to each other. When one was forced into marriage, they decided to commit suicide by jumping into the sea together. Once a tranquil beach, Tsat Tsz Mui Road is now a humble artery that runs through the eastern part of North Point, best known for restaurants of all types and sizes, from Cantonese to Indian.
7/ Model Housing Estate / North Point Housing Estate 740-748 King’s Road, Quarry Bay. North Point was home to glamorous theatres, but it was also known for its pioneering public housing estates. The Model Housing Estate, built by the private, non-profit Model Housing Association, was Hong Kong’s first social housing project when it opened in 1951. It featured five walk-up apartment blocks, plenty of public spaces, and easy access to bus and tram lines. Each unit was equipped with a kitchen, bathroom and balcony – luxuries at a time when many families lived in tenements without toilets. North Point Estate followed in 1957. Built by the government-run Housing Authority, it was located on an even more enviable site near the North Point Ferry Pier, and its housing blocks had the added bonus of lifts. Today, Model Housing Estate still stands out for its distinct light pink exteriors, but North Point Estate has been demolished, with the site now developed into luxury residences, hotels and malls.
8/ Ritz Ballroom 885-939 King’s Road, Quarry Bay. One of the most glamorous entertaining parlours of its time, the Ritz Ballroom was founded by a Li Choi-fat in 1941. Located along Tsat Tsz Mui beach, the Ritz was equipped with a swimming pool, miniature golf, Chinese gardens. Featuring opulent surrounds, where patrons dined on French food and fine wine, it hosted a few editions of Miss Hong Kong, charity and sporting events. During World War II, it was used a base for the British air force. According to records, entrance tickets cost HK$3 in 1947 – no small sum at the time. The Ritz rose to fame quickly, but fell from grace even faster. In 1952, Lee, accused of drug smuggling by the Hong Kong government, fled to Taiwan. In the absence of a chief, the Ritz fell into disarray and was eventually redeveloped into a residential building.
Art Exploration
9/ Oi! Art Space 12 Oil Street, North Point. Open Monday, 14:00-20:00; Tuesday to Sunday, 10:00-20:00. Tel. +852 2512 3000. Like many buildings in North Point, the site of present-day Oi! Art Space underwent multiple transformations. A Grade II historic building known for its Arts and Crafts architectural style, it was originally built in 1908 the headquarters for the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club. When the RHKYC packed up in 1938, it was handed over to the government. In 1998, the adjacent government storage depot became an arts colony home to groups like 1a Space and Videotage , but it proved short-lived, as the artists were evicted a year later. The site was eventually sold off for redevelopment, with the old yacht club preserved and turned into Oi!, a non-profit art space managed by the government’s Leisure and Cultural Services Department. Today, the space plays host to an ever-changing programme of exhibitions and events.
10/ Para Site Art Space 22/F, Wing Wah Industrial Building, 677 King’s Road, Quarry Bay. Open Wednesday-Sunday, 12:00-19:00; closed on Monday, Tuesday and public holidays. Tel. +852 2517 4620. Hong Kong’s first artist-run space, Para Site was established in 1996 in Kennedy Town. It later moved to Sheung Wan, where it eventually become a curator-led organisation known. It has enjoyed its largest-ever space in Quarry Bay since 2016, and it continues to blaze a trail with thought-provoking exhibitions by local and international artists.
Secret shopping
11/ Sam Kee bookstore Shop 19, B/F, King’s Centre, 193-209 King’s Road, North Point. Open Monday-Saturday, 12:30-22:00. Tel. +852 2578 5956. Hidden in the basement of a nondescript mall, Sam Kee bookstore is known for its wide-ranging book collection, but its real fame comes from the cats that wander along, atop and beneath the shelves. Owner Caroline Chan makes it clear that Sam Kee isn’t a petting zoo – there is a sign at door to ward off inquisitive fingers. But the cats provide ample entertainment as you peruse the vast collection of books arranged by genre; Japanese and Nordic psychological thrillers are near the entrance, Japanese manga is near the back. Outside the bookstore is an in incongruous mix of shops that serve as a microcosm of North Point.
12/ Chinese Goods Centre 395 King’s Road, North Point. Open daily, 10:30-21:30. Tel. +852 2856 0333. Often regarded as ground zero for the 1967 leftist riots in Hong Kong, the Chinese Goods Centre — known by locals simply as Wah Fung — was Hong Kong ’ s largest department store when it opened in 1963. For the next few decades, many Chinese immigrants, particularly those from Fujian and Shanghai, shopped and worked in the emporium. The apartment block that rises above the store, Kiu Kwan Mansion, became a stronghold for Communist supporters in 1967, and it was the site of a spectacular helicopter invasion by police. Today, the store is still filled with all sorts of fashion and household items, from men ’ s striped shirts and ladies ’ silk slippers to traditional Chinese tea sets and plastic dish racks, but it is long past its heyday.
Café life and eateries
13/ MOM Livehouse B39, 7 Seas Shopping Centre, 113-121 King’s Road, North Point. Open for performances; see website . Tel. +852 9770 0200. Hong Kong’s independent music scene has long been stifled by a shortage of venues, which makes places like MOM all the more important. Opened in 2016 in the basement of an unassuming shopping centre, MOM plays host to an eclectic mix of artists from around the world. Past shows have features lo-fi pop darlings Japanese Breakfast, punk rocker Evan Dando and up-and-coming local post-punk group David Boring.
14/ Brew Note Roaster 19 Fort Street, North Point. Open Monday-Friday, 8:30-19:00; Saturday-Sunday, 8:30-20:00. Tel. +852 2562 9990. If Chun Yeung Street epitomises a kind of grassroots entrepreneurship that harks back to the mid-20th century, Brew Note Roaster might be its modern day equivalent. Set up by twentysomething coffee lover Vincent Hung in 2015, Brew Note is at once a coffee shop — try its single-origin brews — and a studio that plays host to mini-concerts and cultural salons; the name is a pun on Blue Note, the legendary jazz label. Despite being slightly off the beaten path, the coffee shop is usually packed to the gills during the weekends.
15/ Coffee 101 Shop 12, G/F, Braemar Hill Shopping Centre, 45 Braemar Hill Road. Open Monday-Friday, 8:00-18:00; Saturday-Sunday, 10:00-18:00. Tel. +852 2338 2521. Another hidden gem in the neighbourhood is this minimalist coffee house with big glass doors tucked away into the peaceful slopes of Braemar Hill. Serving pasta, burgers and English all-day breakfasts, as well as a selection of coffee and tea, the warm and brightly-lit café is frequented by students from nearby Shue Yan University in need of inspiration and caffeine. It even boasts a rare terrace with outdoor seating that makes for a good spot to spent a relaxing afternoon away from the bustle of North Point.
16/ Kam Ping Street Located just off Shu Kuk Street, Kam Ping Street is home to a mix of local and international eateries. Pop into Qinghai Tibetan Noodles for a sizzling bowl of beef or mutton noodles, Villa Villa for cakes and Bar + Grill for hookah afterwards. In the past, when North Point was a magnet for new Chinese immigrants, small-scale or family-run shops opened in this narrow lane, serving quick and easy local or even family dishes. Today, as more international cuisines have been introduced to the neighbourhood, locals come here for cheap-eats and late-night snacks.
Outdoor exploration
17/ Aroma Walk Tin Hau Fragrant Flower Pathway, Tin Hau Temple Road, North Point. Rising above Kam Ping Street is Tin Hau Fragrant Flower Pathway, also called Aroma Walk, a 310-metre hiking trail that leads to Tin Hau Temple Road and the North Point Reservoir Park. In the spring, the trail is filled with blooming jasmine, osmanthus and many other fragrant flowers. Athletic types can continue up to Choi Sai Wo Park, originally a reservoir built by the Taikoo Sugar Refinery . It was redeveloped into the Braemar Hill Mansions and a park in the 1970s.
Don’t get lost

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Outlook on the Cheese Market in India, 2019 to 2024 – The Market Grew at 25.5% CAGR During 2011-2018 – ResearchAndMarkets.com

The “Cheese Market in India: Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2019-2024” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.
The cheese market in India exhibited a CAGR of around 25.5% during 2011-2018. India is currently the world’s largest producer of milk owing to which the cheese market holds significant growth potential.
With the rising influence of western cuisines and inflating disposable incomes, consumers are now shifting from paneer towards cheese, thereby increasing its demand in the country.
In addition to this, manufacturers are introducing a number of flavored cheese products including pepper, garlic, red chili flakes, and oregano pickle, which cater to the different tastes and preferences of consumers in India.
Market Drivers
Although cheese is extensively used in fast food items like pasta, pizzas, burgers, sandwiches, wraps, tacos, cakes, garlic bread, etc., it is also being included in traditional Indian recipes such as dosa, uttapam and parathas.
With the growing working population and their altering food patterns, the fast food industry is experiencing a healthy growth which, in turn, is augmenting the demand for cheese.
Apart from this, with an increase in the number of organized retail outlets, numerous global players are now investing in the Indian cheese market.
Moreover, several manufacturers are engaging in marketing campaigns through different advertising media like newspapers, televisions and social media platforms to increase awareness among consumers about the benefits of cheese. These factors are anticipated to boost the consumption of cheese in the upcoming years.
Breakup by Type
On the basis of types, the market has been divided into processed cheese, mozzarella, cheddar, Emmental, ricotta and others. At present, processed cheese represents the most popular product type in India.
Breakup by Format
Based on formats, the market has been classified into slices, diced/cubes, shredded, blocks, liquid, crme and cheese spreads. Amongst these, cheese slices hold the dominant share as they are widely used in homes and restaurants for preparing sandwiches and burgers.
Breakup by Application
On the basis of applications, the market has been segregated as pizzas, burgers, sandwiches, wraps, cakes, and others. Currently, pizza represents the leading application area of cheese, accounting for the majority of the market share.
Breakup by Retail/Institutional
The cheese market in India has been bifurcated into retail and institutional channels, wherein retail sales exhibit a clear dominance in the market. Cheese is supplied to supermarkets/hypermarkets, department stores, malls and retail shops for further distribution to consumers.
Regional Insights
On a geographical front, Maharashtra enjoys the leading position in the cheese market in India. Other regions include Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Delhi, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal, Kerala, Haryana, Punjab, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Bihar and Orissa.
Competitive Landscape
The cheese market in India is highly concentrated in nature with the presence of only a few large manufacturers, such as GCMMF, Parag Milk Foods, Britannia and Mother Dairy. These players compete against one another in terms of prices and quality.
Key Topics Covered
1 Preface
2 Scope and Methodology
2.1 Objectives of the Study
2.2 Stakeholders
2.3 Data Sources
2.4 Market Estimation
2.5 Forecasting Methodology
3 Executive Summary
4 Introduction
4.1 Overview
4.2 Key Industry Trends
5 Indian Dairy Industry
5.1 Market Overview
5.2 Market Performance
5.3 Market Breakup by Organised and Unorganised Segment
5.4 Milk Production and Consumption Trends
5.5 Milk Production by State
5.6 Milk Production by Cattle
5.7 Milk Utilization Patterns in India
5.8 Market Forecast
6 Indian Cheese Industry
6.1 Market Overview
6.2 Market Performance
6.3 Price Trends
6.4 Market Breakup by Region
6.5 Market Breakup by Type
6.6 Market Breakup by Format
6.7 Market Breakup by Application
6.8 Market Breakup by Retail/Institutional
6.9 Market Forecast
7 Indian Cheese Market
7.1 SWOT Analysis
7.2 Value Chain Analysis
7.3 Porter’s Five Forces Analysis
7.4 Key Market Drivers and Success Factors
8 Performance of Key Regions
8.1 Karnataka
8.2 Maharashtra
8.3 Tamil Nadu
8.4 Delhi
8.5 Gujarat
8.6 Andhra Pradesh and Telangana
8.7 Uttar Pradesh
8.8 West Bengal
8.9 Kerala
8.10 Haryana
8.11 Punjab
8.12 Rajasthan
8.13 Madhya Pradesh
8.14 Bihar
8.15 Orissa
9 Competitive Landscape
9.1 Competitive Structure
9.2 Market Share of Key Players
10 Performance by Type
10.1 Processed Cheese
10.2 Mozzarella
10.3 Cheddar
10.4 Emmental
10.5 Ricotta
10.6 Others
11 Performance by Format
11.1 Slices
11.2 Diced/Cubes
11.3 Shredded
11.4 Blocks
11.5 Liquid
11.6 Creme
11.7 Cheese Spreads
12 Performance by Application
12.1 Pizzas
12.2 Burgers
12.3 Sandwiches
12.4 Wraps
12.5 Cakes
12.6 Others
13 Performance by Retail/Institutional
13.1 Retail
13.2 Institutional
14 Cheese Manufacturing Process
14.1 Product Overview
14.2 Detailed Process Flow
14.3 Various Types of Unit Operations Involved
14.4 Mass Balance and Raw Material Requirements
15 Project Details, Requirements and Costs Involved
15.1 Land Requirements and Expenditures
15.2 Construction Requirements and Expenditures
15.3 Plant Machinery
15.4 Machinery Pictures
15.5 Raw Material Requirements and Expenditures
15.6 Raw Material and Final Product Pictures
15.7 Packaging Requirements and Expenditures
15.8 Transportation Requirements and Expenditures
15.9 Utility Requirements and Expenditures
15.10 Manpower Requirements and Expenditures
15.11 Other Capital Investments
16 Loans and Financial Assistance
17 Project Economics
17.1 Capital Cost of the Project
17.2 Techno-Economic Parameters
17.3 Product Pricing and Margins Across Various Levels of the Supply Chain
17.4 Income Projections
17.5 Expenditure Projections
17.6 Taxation and Depreciation
17.7 Financial Analysis
17.8 Profit Analysis
18 Profiles of Key Players
Companies Mentioned
GCMMF Parag Milk Foods Britannia Mother Dairy For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/ggmhpt/outlook_on_the?w=4

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Why Do Governments Recommend This Toxic Food Today When They Didn’t A Decade Ago?

wakeup-world.com
February 26th, 2019
By Marco Torres
Guest writer for Wake Up World
If we analyze the food guide and government advice on nutrition over a decade ago and compare those advisements to what is recommended today, there is one big difference–one specific food crept up onto the radar of public health officials as if it had some kind of miraculous nutritional benefit for the public. The problem is, 80 percent of this food is genetically modified, contains toxic phytochemicals and is linked to digestive distress, immune system breakdown, allergies, ADD and ADHD, higher risk of heart disease and cancer, malnutrition, and loss of libido. Yet, governments seem to think that’s not a problem.
You’ve probably already figured out that the food is soy.
I’ll get to how deadly soy is shortly, but first let’s backtrack to the year 2000 and analyze the food guides of two countries, namely Canada and The United States.
The waybackmachine is a beautiful tool that can show us exactly what a website looked like in the past. So if we plug in both the USDA and Health Canada websites in the year 2000 at about the same period, we can see exactly how each publicly funded message translated to each respective food guide or pyramid.
In the Year 2000
On the Health Canada website, there was absolutely no mention of soy at all. Under milk products, the main message was to choose lower-fat milk products more often. Most people had no idea back then how toxic pasteurized milk was, so it was heavily consumed, much more than it is today. There are currently huge debates throughout the internet as to why humans are drinking milk at all.
On the USDA website on either the Milk, Yogurt & Cheese page or the main page illustrating the Food Guide Pyramid, there is again no mention of soy. The recommendation was also low dairy.
So what happened?
In the Year 2013
Today, Health Canada promotes fortified soy beverages on their website for those who don’t drink milk. So we go out of the frying pan and into the fire. We go from the recommendation of a dead liquid, namely pasteurized milk to a beverage that may be even more harmful to public health.
“Have milk or fortified soy beverages by the glass or use them in recipes.”
“Use milk or fortified soy beverages when preparing scrambled eggs, hot cereal, casseroles and soups.”
“Create smoothies by blending lower fat milk or fortified soy beverage with a combination of fresh or frozen fruits.”
“Try a latte made with low fat milk or fortified soy beverage.”
“Use milk or fortified soy beverages to replace some or all of the water when reconstituting canned tomato or cream soups.”
The USDA’s Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion (CNPP), kicked their message into high gear in 2002 when they started heavily promoting soy across the United States. Their key message is still to switch to fat-free or low-fat milk, however consume calcium-fortified soy milk is a main heading.
“For those who are lactose intolerant… include lactose-reduced or lactose-free milk, yogurt, and cheese, and calcium-fortified soymilk (soy beverage).”
Under Tips For Vegetarians
“Sources of protein for vegetarians and vegans include beans, nuts, nut butters, peas, and soy products (tofu, tempeh, veggie burgers).”
“Sources of calcium for vegetarians and vegans include calcium-fortified soymilk”
“Calcium-fortified soymilk provides calcium in amounts similar to milk. It is usually low in fat and does not contain cholesterol.”
“For breakfast, try soy-based sausage patties or links.”
“try veggie burgers, soy hot dogs, marinated tofu or tempeh, and veggie kabobs.”
The site is littered with soy recommendations not only for vegetarians, but also in the promotion of protein foods.
How did this happen? When soy industry lobbyists get together and decide to change the framework of nutrition for the masses, it happens. It’s really that simple.
It’s not only soy. If you care to investigate further, you’ll also notice how three of the most toxic genetically modified oils in the world, canola, corn and soyabean oil are heavily promoted today on both the Health Canada website and the CNPP website (on behalf of the USDA), and neither agency had those recommendations in 2000.
The USDA had absolutely no mention of any of these oils in 2000.
Health Canada also has no mention of these oils in 2000.
How Deadly is Soy?
With Monsanto’s patented genes being inserted into roughly 95 percent of all soybeans and 80 percent of all corn grown in the U.S., the company used its wide reach to control the ability of new biotech firms to get wide distribution for their products, according to a review of several Monsanto licensing agreements and dozens of interviews with seed industry participants, agriculture and legal experts.
Soy protein is not an effective alternative to any other protein. It is high in allergens (some 28 different proteins present in soy have been found to bind to IgE antibodies). It’s also worth noting that the more soy protein you eat, the more likely you are to develop allergies to it — and the more severe those allergies are likely to become.
As Dr. Spreen has pointed out, phytates in unfermented soy products actually obstruct absorption of protein and four key minerals: calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc.
Even so, the public’s perception of soy as health food got a boost from the FDA with a rule that permits soy beverages, soy-based cheese substitutes, and soy-based butter substitutes to be fortified with vitamin D.
In their natural form, soybeans contain phytochemicals with toxic effects on the human body. The three major anti-nutrients are phytates, enzyme inhibitors and goitrogens.
These anti-nutrients are the way nature protects the soybean plant so that it can live long enough to effectively reproduce. They function as the immune system of the plant, offering protection from the radiation of the sun, and from invasion by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. They make the soybean plant unappetizing to foraging animals. All plants have some anti-nutrient properties, but the soybean plant is especially rich in these chemicals. If they are not removed by extensive preparation such as fermentation or soaking, soybeans are one of the worst foods a person can eat.
The most common soy (99%) sold at major grocery retailers in soy milks and processed foods is unfermented soy. It is deadly. Unfermented soy has been linked to digestive distress, immune system breakdown, PMS, endometriosis, reproductive problems for men and women, allergies, ADD and ADHD, higher risk of heart disease and cancer, malnutrition, and loss of libido.
The dangers of soy for men are a result of the high levels of the female hormone estrogen that soy and soy-based products contain. Primarily, soy affects the quality and concentration of a male’s sperm, especially if taken in large quantities or if the subject was exposed to high levels in the womb. A study at Harvard University showed that there was a definite correlation between men with low sperm counts and a high intake of soy foods. The study revealed that the average sperm concentration of 80 to 120 million per millimeter of an adult male was more than halved when soy formed part of the diet. The case is more compelling in the study of obese males whose sperm levels are even lower owing to the estrogen making properties of fat tissue.
When food is eaten, digestive enzymes such as amylase lipase and protease are secreted into the digestive tract to help break it down and free nutrients for assimilation into the body. The high content of enzyme inhibitors in unfermented soybeans interferes with this process and makes carbohydrates and proteins from soybeans impossible to completely digest. When foods are not completely digested because of enzyme inhibitors, bacteria in the large intestine try to do the job, and this can cause discomfort, bloating, and embarrassment. Anyone with naturally low levels of digestive enzymes such as elderly people would suffer the most from the enzyme inhibiting action of soy.
Groups most at risk of experiencing negative effects from the anti-nutrient properties of soy are infants taking soy baby formula, vegetarians eating a high soy diet, and mid-life women going heavy on the soy foods thinking they will help with symptoms of menopause.
Soybeans have a high content of goitrogens, substances that can block the production of thyroid hormone as well as cause goiter formation. Low thyroid activity plagues women in America, particularly middle-aged women. Thyroid hormone stokes the cellular furnaces, known as mitochondria. When thyroid production is low, energy levels as well as body heat are also low. Low thyroid level is what makes old people move so slowly and seem like every action is a huge chore. Low thyroid means the action of the heart is reduced, resulting in lack of oxygen to the cells, a prime condition for cancer.
Genistein, an isoflavone found in soybeans, can also block thyroid production. Phytate can accentuate these effects because it binds up zinc and copper, leaving little of these important minerals available to make thyroid hormone.
People filling up their shopping carts with raw or cooked soybeans, soy milk, and other non-fermented soybean products do not realize that the isoflavones they contain will not be available to their bodies. Most of the isoflavones in soy products are bound to carbohydrate molecules called glucosides. In this form genistein is actually called genistin. It is fermentation that transforms genistin into genistein. Many products in the U.S. do not distinguish between genistin and genistein on their labels.
Even with fermented soy foods, a little goes a long way. The nutrients found in miso, tempeh, and natto can be beneficial in the moderate amounts found in the typical Asian diet, but have the potential to do harm in higher amounts. In China and Japan, about an ounce of fermented soy food is eaten on a daily basis.
When fermented soy foods are used in small amounts they help build the inner ecosystem, providing a wealth of friendly microflora to the intestinal tract that can help with digestion and assimilation of nutrients, and boost immunity.
A study in an issue of Indian Journal of Medical Research suggests that eating soybean oil may boost cancer risk compared to eating a type of butter called cow ghee, a type of butter used in South Asian cuisine.
Soy Lecithin has been lingering around our food supply for over a century. It is an ingredient in literally hundreds of processed foods, and also sold as an over the counter health food supplement. Scientists claim it benefits our cardiovascular health, metabolism, memory, cognitive function, liver function, and even physical and athletic performance. However, most people don’t realize what soy lecithin actually is, and why the dangers of ingesting this additive far exceed its benefits.
Soybean lecithin comes from sludge left after crude soy oil goes through a “degumming” process. It is a waste product containing solvents and pesticides and has a consistency ranging from a gummy fluid to a plastic solid. Before being bleached to a more appealing light yellow, the color of lecithin ranges from a dirty tan to reddish brown. The hexane extraction process commonly used in soybean oil manufacture today yields less lecithin than the older ethanol-benzol process, but produces a more marketable lecithin with better color, reduced odor and less bitter flavor.
In theory, lecithin manufacture eliminates all soy proteins, making it hypoallergenic. In reality, minute amounts of soy protein always remain in lecithin as well as in soy oil. Three components of soy protein have been identified in soy lecithin, including the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor, which has a track record of triggering severe allergic reactions even in the most minuscule quantities. The presence of lecithin in so many food and cosmetic products poses a special danger for people with soy allergies.
If you eat soy in any form, unless it’s fermented and organic, you are risking your immediate and long-term health. Check your labels, check your ingredients and most of all stay away from anything that is heavily advertised with soy as being a health food.
If you haven’t already figured it out, your government in not your ally when it comes to your health, so do as much research as possible, and cross reference every detail that comes out of public health education.
https://wakeup-world.com/2019/02/26/why-do-governments-recommend-this-toxic-food-today-when-they-didnt-a-decade-ago/
Sources:
metrofarm.com
mercola.com
preventdisease.com
biophile.co.za
wisegeek.com
ndmnutrition.com

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Exeter Cookery School reveals the secret to making perfect pancakes – Devon Live

Exeter Cookery School reveals the secret to making perfect pancakes Follow these simple steps and pair delicious pancakes with flippin’ amazing fillings and toppings Share Andy Pyle Commercial Editor, Trinity Mirror South West 12:10, 27 FEB 2019 There’s no better way to celebrate Shrove Tuesday than with a batch of delicious pancakes
Everyone loves pancakes, and Shrove Tuesday is the one day of the year when it’s obligatory to stack up as many as you can and scoff the lot – accompanied by your favourite toppings and fillings, of course.
To save you trawling the internet AGAIN this year, trying to find a method for the “perfect” pancake, we’ve teamed up with the experts from Exeter Cookery School to give you the only recipe you’ll ever need, together with some top tips to make your treats extra tasty.
Jim and Lucy Fisher, co-owners of Exeter Cookery School , are firm fans all year round and, on Shrove Tuesday, the humble pancake is an essential food tradition in their household. Jim and Lucy Fisher from Exeter Cookery School
As it’s the last day before the penitential season of Lent, pancakes were traditionally eaten as a way of using up the eggs, fats and flour that were forbidden for the following 40 days.
Pancakes, or crêpes, come in many different forms, shapes and sizes, and of course with many different possible toppings. Forget the spongy American-style cakes, though… as the classic pancake should be thin and crepe-like.
And when it comes to what to put on or in your pancakes, Lucy says: “That’s up to you. Jim and I like to opt for a classic lemon and sugar – and don’t skimp on either! Or maybe some maple syrup and clotted cream? Delicious!”
Now Lucy’s helped you brush up on the basics, here’s the only recipe you’ll ever need to create the perfect pancakes – time and time again! Video Loading Click to play Tap to play The video will start in 8 Cancel Play now Makes four to six pancakes 100g plain or self-raising flour Large pinch of salt Follow Exeter Cookery School’s recipe to create golden brown pancakes Method Mix the flour and salt with the unbeaten egg, half the milk and the melted butter until the mix is smooth and creamy. Stir in the remaining milk to a smooth consistency about the same as single cream. Heat a 20cm frying pan to medium-high and brush lightly with vegetable oil. Pour in about 100-150ml (two to three tbsp) of the batter mixture and swirl around so the base of the pan is thinly and evenly covered. Leave it alone until the edges just start to curl up and come away from the pan (this takes more patience than you might expect, especially for the first pancake). Using the edge of a silicone spatula, lift an edge and take a peek underneath. You are looking for an even golden-brown colour. You should be able to slide the pancake around the frying pan with a gentle shake. If it gets stuck, just slide your spatula gently underneath to loosen. Once this is achieved, flip or toss the pancake onto its other side. Leave for about 30 seconds and then take another peek underneath. This time it will be mottled medium to dark brown. Turn out onto a plate. Lightly oil the pan again and repeat. Take care not to use too much oil or the pancake will fry and be greasy, instead of dry to the touch. You might find that you need to adjust the heat up or down as you go, as the pan will heat and cool when you put the batter in. You can either serve hot immediately or re-heat in the oven at about 100°C for about 10 minutes, covered with tin foil or another plate to avoid them drying out.
Exeter Cookery School is located in a beautiful 1830s warehouse renovation on Exeter Quayside. The sophisticated setting plays host to a fabulous array of fun and friendly cookery classes to suit every ability and taste. New for 2019 are new and vibrant courses inspired by world cuisines – including Indian Thali (vegetarian), Mexican Street Food, Spanish Tapas, Vietnamese Street Food and Sushi Making. A series of one-day authentic Italian courses with a renowned TV chef is also planned over the next six months, so watch this space!
You’ll find Exeter Cookery School at 60a Haven Road Quayside, Exeter, Devon, EX2 8DP. For more recipes or information on the full range of cookery courses, visit the website at www.exetercookeryschool.co.uk Like us on Facebook

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Int’l “Street” Food Start-Ups Ready To Roll

Int’l “Street” Food Start-Ups Ready To Roll by Thomas Breen | Feb 27, 2019 7:55 am Posted to: Arts & Culture , Business/ Economic Development , Food , Immigrants , Ninth Square
Loosen your belt and get ready to eat.
A cornucopia of fried, spicy, savory, and eminently portable international street food is about to hit New Haven, courtesy of a host of new food startups run by local immigrants with fare ranging from Dominican Republic-style spinach-and-feta empanadas, chutney from Mauritius, and social justice-flavored Salvadoran pupusas.
Those aspiring immigrant food entrepreneurs and their culinary concoctions were at the center of Tuesday night’s Food Business Accelerator pitch day at The State House at 310 State St.
The two-hour event featured 14 local food business startups that have recently completed a 10-week business training course run by the local entrepreneurship incubator Collab and the local farmers market operator CitySeed .
As at Collab’s most recent pitch day for its inedible startups , dozens of New Haveners packed the Downtown performance venue to cheer, support, and learn more about a slate of new local small businesses, most of which were founded by local women, immigrants, and people of color.
Unlike at Collab’s pitch day, attendees got to taste the goods produced by the aspiring business owners, who lined the side walls of the venue with bountiful, colorful trays of Syrian hummus, Filipino pancet, vegan fried “chicken,” and handmade tortellini. Republic Of Empanadas
Eduardo De Lara, the founder and owner of Republic of Empanadas, was one such participant to pitch the crowd on a street food he hopes to lay claim to in this already teeming culinary capital of Connecticut.
De Lara, a 30-year-old coffee roaster at the Chapel Street cafe Jojo’s, was born and raised in Santiago de los Caballeros, the second largest city in the Dominican Republic.
And in the D.R., he said on Tuesday night, one cannot turn a corner without finding an empanada.
There are plenty of empanadas in the Elm City, he admitted, but the fried, stuffed Latin American pastries in town are almost exclusively filled with chicken, beef, or cheese, and are often relegated to the appetizer section of the menu.
De Lara seels to change all of that with a business that will show off the flavorful diversity his native handheld treats are capable of.
“My intention is to bring the versatility of empanadas to New Haven,” he said.
He had brought two such examples with him on Tuesday night: His Greek-inspired, spinach-and-feta-cheese empanadas, and his heartier, creamier chicken-and-bechamel empanadas.
But those aren’t the only flavors he has planned.
Sweet-spicy pulled port. Pumpkin spice. Lobster roll. Turkey and gravy. Apple pie.
“We will experiment with empanadas,” he said with a twinkle in his eye.
De Lara said he plans on selling his empanadas at CitySeed farmers market starting this spring. Eventually, he would like to open his own brick-and-mortart shop in town.
Contact Eduardo at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) and watch his pitch in the Facebook Live video below.
Parvine’s Place
Parvine Toorawa also plans on bringing street food from her native country to the taste buds of New Haven neighbors. The food she makes, however, is a little less fried. And the island country she hails from is a few thousand miles away from the D.R.
Toorawa is from Mauritius, a small island nation in the Indian Ocean a few hundred miles away from Madagascar.
In her native cuisine, which sits at the intersection of Middle Eastern and South Asian cultures, any meal is nigh inconceivable without an accompanying chutney, which is an all-purpose condiment made with fruits or vegetables that can be sweet, tangy, spicy, or all three at the same time.
“Mauritius is very far away,” she said, “but I can bring it much closer to Connecticut with my delicious chutneys.”
Toorawa moved to the United States two decades ago with her husband, who is now an Arabic Literature professor at Yale. She said that she has a refrigerator in her Hamden home that is dedicated entirely to condiments, relishes, and chutneys.
On Tuesday night, she brought with her dozens of small plastic cups with samples of her date and jalapeno chutneys. She also had jars of her vegetable relish, made with cabbage, carrots, and green beans.
She said that in Mauritius, one of the more popular ways to eat chutneys is on a plain, crispy roll purchased from a street vendor, who cuts the roll in half and stuffs it with chutney.
“Imagine eating chips without salsa,” she said, “or hot dogs without ketchup. In Mauritius, this is how we feel about chutneys.”
In the U.S., she said, the spreads go well with everything from cheese platters to open-face sandwiches to steaks to chips and vegetables.
She plans to broaden out her chutney offerings from date and jalapeno to mango, coconut, cranberry, and apricot. First she plans to sell her chutneys at CitySeed farmers markets starting this spring, and then eventually sell her condiments through local stores and online.
Contact Parvine at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) and watch her pitch in the Facebook Live video below.
Pupuseria Co-op
The founders of the Pupuseria Co-op also have their eyes set on sharing street food from their native countries with New Haveners eager for a tasty, fried, hand-held lunch.
They have something more on their minds than just culinary satisfaction and cultural diversity. Their startup strives for economic justice for immigrants, women, and other populations most vulnerable to low pay, poor treatment, and workplace exploitation.
Founded and owned by six women and one man who work for and volunteer with the local immigrant rights organization Unidad Latina en Acción (ULA) , the Pupuseria Co-op plans to make and sell traditional El Salvadoran corn tortillas stuffed with chicken, pork, beans, cheese, or loroco .
The business will also be worker-owned, sharing all profits and managerial responsibilities between its various Central and South American immigrant owners.
“We work our asses off working for other people,” said Vanesa Suarez, a 22-year-old ULA organizer, Peruvian immigrant, and part-time pizza chef who is also one of the co-founders of the pupseria.
With the pupuseria co-op, she said, there will be no middle men. There will be no wage theft. There will be no exploitation of workers forced to craft their lives around bosses more interested in profits than in good food and worker welfare. For the employees will own the business, she said, and all responsibilities will be even distributed.
Ana Benitez, a recent El Salvadoran immigrant who is also an ULA member and a co-op founder, has provided the pupusa recipe that will form the foundation of the new food business.
“I want to work in a community,” Benitez said when asked about the co-op set up.
“We want to stop exploitation in our communities,” said Suarez. “This is one way we can do it.”
Reach out to Suarez at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) .
And click here to learn more about all of the other participants in this first cohort of the Food Business Accelerator program.

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Nestled in the heart of vibrant Mumbai – Review

The 5-star Trident Nariman Point is located in Mumbai, overlooking the beautiful Arabian Sea from Marine Drive.Mediterranean cuisine is served at Frangipani restaurant, while Southeast-Asian flavours and Japanese food are available at Indian Jones restaurant. Other dining options include buffet breakfast at Veranda and cocktails at Opium Den. The location was excellent the staff were friendly helpful and courteous especially the waiter in India jones restaurant . Breakfast was very good with a large variety.

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£49 — 2-AA-Rosette 5-course Indian meal for 2 near Bradford

Tap here to search deals Drighlington £49 – 2-AA-Rosette 5-course Indian meal for 2 near Bradford Prashad Share this Deal Why We Love This Deal
You can now get a 5-course Indian vegetarian meal for two at the 2-AA-Rosette Prashad, near Bradford, for under £25 a head — that’s 37% less than the regular price . What’s Included
A 5-course tasting-menu meal for two A voucher for four is £95 You can also get a 7-course tasting-menu meal for £59 for two, £115 for four Valid Tuesday-Thursday 5-11pm; Sunday 12-10pm until 29 March 96% See All 111 Member Ratings Why We Love It The Michelin Guide 2019 praises the vegetarian restaurant’s “authentic” but “original creations” , which have roots in southern India and Gujarat “There is strong competition in Bradford when it comes to authentic Indian cooking , but Prashad’s meat-free repertoire ensures a loyal local following ,” says The AA, which awards the restaurant two Rosettes for culinary excellence 96% of Travelzoo members who have visited this venue on a previous deal and rated it said they loved it The regular value stated above is based on the maximum combined cost of the items included in this experience at the time of publication (23 October, 2018). Subject to availability. Vouchers are limited and may therefore sell out at any time. A 48-hour cancellation policy applies. Any additional items ordered will be charged at their full value. Menu subject to change. Reservations are required. A discretionary 10% service charge based on the full value of the experience will be added to the final bill. Final food service is 10pm, Sunday 9pm.
There is no maximum number of vouchers per table. Must be used in one visit. No limit to the number of vouchers that can be purchased per person or as gifts. Cannot be combined with any other offer. No cash value or cash back. The photos displayed are for illustration purposes only and may not be an exact representation of the package. If you experience any difficulties booking, please contact our Customer Service team for assistance at support_uk@travelzoo.com. 37% off
Sun; Tue-Thu until 29 Mar How to Book Click “Continue” to purchase your voucher(s). Then contact Prashad directly for information on availability and to complete your reservation/booking. Getting There Ratings & reviews reflect verified member feedback for Prashad over the past 15 months. 4.4 Ambiance 4.3 Value for the Money 4.8 Ease of Booking Anne 22. Feb 2019 Harrogate, UK Enjoyed Most Mark 19. Feb 2019 Huddersfield, UK Enjoyed Most Peter 14. Feb 2019 Leeds, UK Enjoyed Most The food was superb, such a variety of tastes colin 11. Feb 2019 Sedbergh, UK Enjoyed Most The tasting menu was excellent, beautifully presented with great flavours. Maggie 02. Feb 2019 Shipley, UK Enjoyed Most Unusual food and stunning presentation ADRIAN 19. Jan 2019 BINGLEY, UK Enjoyed Most very creative food with excellent flavours Richard 28. Dec 2018 Wakefield, UK Enjoyed Most The food is good Other Comments the meal was ok on the deal we had but no way would you be happy at the so called full price .You felt like we had a meal and service and were you were put to sit to fit the meal deal . michael 30. Jun 2018 Dewsbury, UK Enjoyed Most Good food but dfinks very pricey joy 28. Jun 2018 leeds, UK Enjoyed Most Quality of food Other Comments This experience was faultless, from the quality and presentation of the food to the service we received. Dorthy 20. Jun 2018 LeedsLeeds, UK Enjoyed Most All vegetarian, beautifully presented, a wide variety of dishes, the food was both amazing and delicious. Loves the plates, bowls, slate and wood the dishes were served on too. Thank you Roger 15. Jun 2018 Wakefield, UK Enjoyed Most Absolutely delicious and looked stunning too. SJ 12. Jun 2018 Leeds, UK Enjoyed Most Diana 21. May 2018 HUDDERSFIELD, UK Enjoyed Most Best Indian food ever – presented beautifully with amazing flavours. Will definitely be going again even though it is 65 miles away from home. Peter 21. May 2018 Leyburn, UK Enjoyed Most £10 service charge for 2 people was excessive Deborah 14. May 2018 Hull, UK Enjoyed Most Delicious taste. I never realised just how tasty vegetarian food could be. I am usually a meat eater but this meal changed my perception of vegetarian cookery. Well done to the chef. Veronica 04. May 2018 Liversedge, UK Enjoyed Most Excellent, unusual vegetarian food. Well presented. Helpful and professional staff. Gill 23. Apr 2018 Keighley, UK Enjoyed Most Emma 09. Apr 2018 Huddersfield, UK Enjoyed Most the difference to normal “indian” meals. Other Comments a bit noisy ( I am deaf and my hearing aids amplify noise from hard surfaces), seemed to be a lot of corriander in the first 3 dishes, all a bit too hot for my wife. I trust that they will soon be dropping the use of plastic straws. R 07. Apr 2018 Shipley, UK Enjoyed Most A real delight of flavours Kevin 19. Mar 2018 Alnwick, UK Enjoyed Most The food was deliciously different to the standard fare found at the local Indian restaurant or take away – Indian haute cuisine!! Other Comments Using the travelzoo offered allowed us to try this restaurant at a reasonable cost but did think that generally the cost of dishes were quite pricey, that said the food was delicious so a great treat but probably not affordable on a regular basis Julia 28. Feb 2018 Wakefield, UK Enjoyed Most Lovely atmosphere & meals that are that but different from the main stream Sarah 27. Feb 2018 Dewsbury, UK Enjoyed Most The very different dishes- all beautifully presented Rosie 26. Feb 2018 Nr Matlock, UK Enjoyed Most A nice variety and leisurely dining experience. Amanda 23. Feb 2018 Huddersfield, UK Enjoyed Most The very finely balanced spicing of the food. Delicious pickles made on the premises Other Comments Staff very knowledgeable about the food Susan Wadsworth 23. Feb 2018 Via Goole, UK Enjoyed Most Charlotte 16. Feb 2018 Mirfield, UK Enjoyed Most Vegetarian food never tasted so good, recommend everyone tries it, even the meat eaters! Kerry 16. Feb 2018 PUDSEY, UK Enjoyed Most Richard 12. Feb 2018 Shipley, UK Other Comments Dishes artistic but lacking any special flavour Peter 12. Feb 2018 York, UK Enjoyed Most All the food is delicious whatever the dish. Expert spicing and beautifully presented. Carol 06. Feb 2018 Barnsleybarnsley, UK Enjoyed Most Best meal ever in this really nice restaurant . Carol 05. Feb 2018 Wakefield, UK Enjoyed Most Service and atmosphere was fantastic. Food was amazing!!! Will be definitely going back!!! Mandy 05. Feb 2018 Huddersfielders, UK Enjoyed Most The flavour combinations achieved in this vegetarian restaurant are quite outstanding. The service is faultless and the presentation of dishes adds to the enjoyment of the food. Highly recommended Joyce 05. Feb 2018 Leeds, UK Enjoyed Most The food was superb and the service excellent Other Comments Highly recommend this restaurant the staff are superb the food is exceptional it was our first visit and it certainly won’t be our last Norah 02. Feb 2018 Bradford, UK Enjoyed Most Attentive staff. Would ask to be seated upstairs next time we go. Danica 31. Jan 2018 Bingley, UK Enjoyed Most Michael 30. Jan 2018 Bradford, UK Enjoyed Most Very clean with excellent service Jacqueline 30. Jan 2018 Huddersfield, UK Enjoyed Most Superb tasty food beautifully presented. Paul 29. Jan 2018 Leeds, UK Enjoyed Most The food is so flavoursome you don’t miss the meat. Quynh 29. Jan 2018 Leeds, UK Enjoyed Most The ease of knowing that my wheat and gluten free diet was well catered for Other Comments Would return, everything was excellent Hilary 29. Jan 2018 West Yorkshire, UK Enjoyed Most Lovely food and service and chef came out to chat to us after the meal. We will definitely be going back David 27. Jan 2018 Cleckheaton, UK Other Comments Very nice indeed and would highly recommend, however I do feel it is over priced compared to other equally as good Indian restaurants. Chris 22. Jan 2018 LEEDS, UK Enjoyed Most Janet 22. Jan 2018 HolmfirthHolmfirth, UK Enjoyed Most Neil 22. Jan 2018 Liverpool, UK Other Comments Anne 17. Jan 2018 Huddersfield, UK Enjoyed Most Delicious food and excellent service Shirley 13. Jan 2018 Morley, UK Enjoyed Most Gavin 03. Jan 2018 Sale, UK Enjoyed Most Friendly and helpful staff.Never any need to prompt or remind them of any request made at any time during our visit.Quality of food and brilliant wide choice of dishes on the menu. Other Comments Give it a try – even you carnivores out there – you will see how food should really taste. Pauline 01. Jan 2018 Liversedge, UK Enjoyed Most The variety and presentation of a great selection of vegetarian dishes Gillian 29. Dec 2017 Bradford, UK Enjoyed Most Vegetarian food with a difference Sarah 24. Dec 2017 West Yorkshire, UK Load More

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Ospreys’ Recovery From Pollution and Shooting Is a Global Conservation Success Story

Ospreys’ Recovery From Pollution and Shooting Is a Global Conservation Success Story 2. Buckwheat Flour
Buckwheat may contain the word « wheat, » but it is not a wheat grain and is gluten-free. It belongs to the family of pseudocereals, a group of grains that are eaten like cereals but don’t belong to the grass family.
Buckwheat flour provides a rich, earthy flavor and is good for baking quick and yeast breads.
Due to its lack of gluten, it tends to be crumbly in nature. To make a quality product, it can be combined with other gluten-free flours like brown rice flour.
It contains a variety of B-vitamins and is rich in the minerals iron, folate, magnesium, zinc, manganese and fiber. Buckwheat flour is also high in antioxidants, specifically the polyphenol rutin, which has anti-inflammatory properties ( 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ).
Buckwheat can be cross-contaminated with gluten-containing foods during processing, transportation or when used as a rotational crop with wheat. Be sure to look for certified gluten-free on the label to be safe.
Summary
Buckwheat flour is rich in fiber and nutrients and contains antioxidants that help the body fight inflammation. 3. Sorghum Flour
Sorghum flour is made from an ancient cereal grain that has been grown for more than 5,000 years. The grain is naturally gluten-free and considered the fifth most important cereal grain in the world ( 8 ).
It has a light color and texture, as well as a mild, sweet flavor. Considered a heavy or dense flour, it’s often mixed with other gluten-free flours or used in recipes requiring small amounts of flour.
The sorghum grain is high in fiber and protein, which can help slow sugar absorption. It also contains an abundance of the mineral iron, as well as antioxidants that help you fight inflammation ( 9 , 10 , 11 ).
Sorghum flour may be contaminated with gluten during processing. Look for the certified gluten-free label.
Summary
Research suggests that sorghum flour contains nutrients that may help reduce inflammation and balance blood sugar levels. 4. Amaranth Flour
Like buckwheat, amaranth is considered a pseudocereal. It’s a group of more than 60 grains that were once considered a staple food in the Inca, Maya and Aztec civilizations.
Amaranth has an earthy, nutty flavor and tends to take on the flavor of other ingredients. It can replace 25% of wheat flour but should be combined with other flours when baking. The best use of this type of flour is for making tortillas, pie crusts and bread.
It’s rich in fiber , protein and the micronutrients manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, iron and selenium. These nutrients aid brain function, bone health and DNA synthesis ( 12 , 13 , 14 , 15 ).
If you have a gluten intolerance, make sure to read labels. Amaranth processed in the same facilities as wheat may contain traces of gluten.
Summary
Amaranth flour is rich in nutrients that play a role in brain health, bone health and DNA synthesis. 5. Teff Flour
Teff is the world’s smallest grain and is 1/100 the size of a kernel of wheat.
It comes in a variety of colors, ranging from white to red to dark brown. Light colors have a mild flavor, while darker shades are more earthy in taste.
Teff flour has traditionally been used to make injera, a fermented, sourdough-like Ethiopian bread. It’s now also used for other foods like pancakes, cereals, breads and snacks. It can be substituted for 25–50% of wheat or all-purpose flour.
Teff flour is high in protein, which promotes a feeling of fullness and can help reduce cravings ( 16 , 17 ).
Its high fiber content can help manage blood sugar, decrease appetite and aid weight loss ( 18 , 19 ).
What’s more, it contains more calcium than any other grain and is the only ancient grain containing vitamin C ( 20 , 21 ).
As with any grain, to ensure your teff flour is 100% gluten-free, look at where it was processed.
Summary
Teff is the smallest grain in the world. Nonetheless, its flour is packed with a nutritional punch. 6. Arrowroot Flour
Arrowroot flour is a less common gluten- and grain-free powder. It’s made from a starchy substance extracted from a tropical plant known as Maranta arundinacea .
It’s a versatile flour and can be used as a thickener or mixed with almond, coconut or tapioca flours for bread and dessert recipes. If you want a crispy, crunchy product, use it on its own.
This flour is rich in potassium , B-vitamins and iron. Studies have shown it may stimulate immune cells and boost immune function ( 22 , 23 ).
Summary
Starch-based arrowroot flour can be a good thickener or mixed with other flours to create bread products. It might even provide an immune boost. 7. Brown Rice Flour
Brown rice flour is made from ground brown rice . It’s considered a whole-grain flour and contains the bran, germ and endosperm.
It has a nutty flavor and can be used to make a roux, thicken sauces or prepare breaded foods, such as fish and chicken. Brown rice flour is often used to make noodles and can be combined with other gluten-free flours for bread, cookie and cake recipes.
This flour is high in protein and fiber, both of which can help lower blood sugar levels and reduce body weight ( 24 , 25 , 26 , 27 ).
It’s also rich in iron, B vitamins, magnesium and manganese, as well as plant compounds called lignans. Research suggests that lignans help protect against heart disease ( 28 , 29 , 30 ).
To avoid contamination with gluten, look for brown rice flours that were not produced in a facility that also processes wheat.
Summary
Flour made from brown rice offers a variety of health benefits. It can help lower blood sugar levels, reduce body weight and protect against heart disease. 8. Oat Flour
Oat flour is made by grinding whole-grain oats . It gives baked goods more flavor than all-purpose flour and results in a chewier, crumblier texture.
Baking with oat flour will likely make your end product more moist. Due to its lack of gluten, some ingredients will need to be adjusted to create light and fluffy baked goods.
Oats contain a type of soluble fiber called beta-glucan, which has numerous health benefits. This fiber can help lower « bad » LDL cholesterol, as well as blood sugar and insulin levels ( 31 , 32 , 33 ).
They’re also rich in other nutrients like protein, magnesium, phosphorus, B-vitamins and the antioxidant group avenanthramides ( 34 , 35 , 36 , 37 ).
Oats and oat flour are often subject to contamination , depending on how they were grown and where they were processed. If you cannot eat gluten, be sure to look for products that have been certified gluten-free.
Summary
Oat flour provides soluble fiber and antioxidants that can help protect against heart disease and lower blood sugar levels. Note that it may be contaminated with gluten. 9. Corn Flour
Corn flour is a very finely ground version of cornmeal. Cornmeal is made from the whole kernel, including the bran, germ and endosperm.
It’s commonly used as a thickener for liquids and can be used to make tortillas and breads.
Corn flour comes in white and yellow varieties and can be combined with other gluten-free flours to make pizza crust.
It’s high in fiber and a good source of the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin. These two plant compounds act as antioxidants and can benefit eye health by decreasing age-related macular degeneration and reducing the risk of cataracts ( 38 , 39 , 40 ).
It’s also high in vitamin B6, thiamine, manganese, magnesium and the antioxidant selenium ( 41 ).
Corn is from a different branch of the grass family than gluten-rich wheat, barley and rye. Cross-contamination is typically more likely in processed foods made with corn flour. Even cornbread can contain regular flour.
Summary
Corn flour is a whole-grain flour, providing fiber and antioxidants that can benefit eye health. 10. Chickpea Flour
Chickpeas are part of the legume family. Chickpea flour is made from dry chickpeas and is also known as garbanzo flour, gram flour and besan.
Chickpeas have a nutty taste and grainy texture and are popular in Middle Eastern and Indian cuisine. Chickpea flour is used to make falafel, hummus and the flatbread socca.
It’s a good source of fiber and plant-based protein . These nutrients work together to slow digestion, promote fullness and manage body weight ( 42 , 43 , 44 , 45 ).
Chickpea flour is also high in the minerals magnesium and potassium, both of which play a positive role in boosting heart health ( 46 , 47 , 48 ).
Cross contamination may occur with certain manufactured foods made with other gluten-containing flours.
Summary
As a legume, chickpea flour offers plant-based protein, fiber and other nutrients that may protect against heart disease. 11. Coconut Flour
Coconut flour is made from dried coconut meat and offers a mild coconut flavor.
Its light texture yields similar results to regular flour and is good for baking breads and desserts. Note that coconut flour absorbs a lot more water than regular or almond flour.
It’s high in the saturated fat lauric acid. This medium-chain triglyceride can provide energy for your body and may help lower « bad » LDL cholesterol in combination with the flour’s fiber content ( 49 , 50 ).
Research suggests its fiber content may help maintain healthy blood sugar levels, as it does not cause them to spike ( 51 ).
Coconut flour is a good option for those with nut and gluten allergies. It can be contaminated in the processing phase, so be sure to look at where your flour was produced.
Summary
Full of fiber and healthy saturated fat, coconut flour is a good option for those with food allergies. 12. Tapioca Flour
Tapioca flour is made from the starchy liquid extracted from the South American cassava root.
This flour is used as a thickener in soups, sauces and pies and has no discernable flavor or taste. It can also be used in combination with other gluten-free flours in bread recipes.
Aside from carbohydrates, tapioca flour provides little nutritional value in the form of fiber, protein or micronutrients. In fact, it’s considered inferior to other whole-grain, gluten-free flours and often thought of as empty calories ( 52 , 53 ).
One health benefit of tapioca flour is its resistant starch content, which functions like fiber. Resistant to digestion, this starch is linked to improved insulin sensitivity, lower blood sugar levels, reduced appetite and other digestive benefits ( 54 , 55 , 56 , 57 ).
If you’re on a gluten-free diet, ensure that tapioca flour is not combined with another gluten-containing flour.
Summary
Low in overall nutrients, tapioca flour is a good grain-, gluten- and nut-free flour option to thicken liquids and use in bread products. It may also offer digestive benefits. 13. Cassava Flour
Cassava is a starchy root vegetable or tuber native to South America. It’s also known as yuca.
In contrast to tapioca flour, which is made from a starchy liquid extracted from the cassava root, cassava flour is made by grating and drying the whole root.
This flour is gluten-, grain- and nut-free.
It’s most similar to white flour and can easily be used in recipes calling for all-purpose flour. It has a neutral flavor and is easily digestible. It’s also lower in calories than coconut or almond flours.
Cassava flour consists of mostly carbohydrates. Similar to tapioca flour, it also provides resistant starch , which has a variety of digestive system benefits ( 54 , 55 , 56 , 57 ).
Some research suggests that the resistant starch content in this type of flour may help lower blood sugar levels and improve insulin sensitivity. Note that processing the cassava root may decrease the levels of resistant starch present in the flour ( 58 , 59 , 60 ).
Because cassava flour can be used alone in food products, it’s less likely to be contaminated. However, it’s always important to look at where the product was processed.
Summary
Gluten-, grain- and nut-free, cassava flour is a good choice for those with food allergies. Its resistant starch content may also offer some digestive benefits. 14. Tigernut Flour
Despite its name, tigernut flour is not made from nuts. Tigernuts are small root vegetables that grow in North Africa and the Mediterranean.
Tigernut flour has a sweet and nutty flavor that works well in baked goods. Its sweetness allows you to cut back on the sugar quantity in your recipe.
Note that it’s slightly coarser than white flour and likely results in products with more texture.
One-fourth cup packs 10 grams of fiber , which can help lower cholesterol. Tigernut flour is also rich in healthy monounsaturated fat, iron, phosphorus, potassium and vitamins E and C ( 44 , 61 , 62 , 63 ).
Newer on the gluten-free market, few companies produce this flour. The risk of gluten contamination is low, as tigernuts are not grain based.
Summary
Rich in nutrients, tigernut flour offers an easy white flour alternative in baked goods. The Bottom Line
A variety of healthy, gluten-free alternatives to regular or wheat flour exist for people with celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity or those avoiding gluten for other reasons.
Some gluten-free flours have more nutrients than others, making them healthier choices to include in your diet.
Many gluten-free flours require recipe adjustments or combinations of different types of gluten-free flours to create a tasty end product. Be sure to evaluate your recipe.
If you choose or require gluten-free flour, be sure to compare the nutrients, taste and recipe composition before making your flour choice. Reposted with permission from our media associate Healthline. Related Articles Around the Web

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