Recipe Video: Combine Rajma And Chhole To Make This Delicious And Unique Indian Curry – NDTV Food

Recipe Video: Combine Rajma And Chhole To Make This Delicious And Unique Indian Curry – NDTV Food

Rajma and chhole are combined to make a unique curry Both rajma and chhole are super nutritious foods Here is an easy-to-follow recipe video of the dish
The popularity of Indian cuisine can be pinned up to its versatility. There are various dishes and desserts that make the Indian cuisine what it is – lavish. Among variety of foods, there are some dishes that remain favourites forever. Rajma chawal and chhole chawal are two meals that are enjoyed and relished all across India. These two dishes are usually prepared as ‘special’ meals for ‘special occasions’. Rajma curry and chhole curry are rich and delicious, and bring out the real essence of India with its delectable spices. What if we combine both the ingredients and create a fusion dish out of rajma and chhole?
(Also Read: Classic Rajma Recipes With 4 Variations ) Rajma chawal and choley chawal are popular Indian meals
Intrigued? Both rajma and chhole can be used to make a never-seen-before dish that carries the goodness of both the ingredients. Rajma (kidney beans) and chhole (chickpeas) are super nutritious and loaded with essential minerals and vitamins. They both are rich in high-quality carbohydrates, proteins and soluble fibres. Due to their low calorie content, they also aid in weight loss and boost heart health.
This rajma chhole curry will burst out the twin flavours of rajma and chhole and will win your heart instantly. Pair it with roti, rice or naan. The recipe of this unique dish has been shared by a popular food vlogger, Manjula Jain, on her YouTube channel, ‘Manjula’s Kitchen’. Try this easy recipe of rajma chhole curry at home and impress your family and friends with your newly acquired culinary feat.

Read More…

free rice bowl

the ricebowl challenge freerice com .
free rice the game that fights world hunger the open end .
free rice bowl cliparts download free clip art free clip art on .
rice bowl icon with png and vector format for free unlimited .
white rice bowl food rice png download 1024 680 free .
free rice review for teachers common sense education .
rice bowl chinese food flyer vector free download .
sriracha baked tofu brown rice bowls like a vegan poke bowl .
organic heirloom volcano rice bowl lotus foods sf bay good .
3d model realistic rice bowl turbosquid 1203345 .
rice bowl stock vector illustration of rice indian 29206064 .
rice with bowl 3d model 29 3ds obj fbx max free3d .
100 rice pictures download free images on unsplash .
sticky rice bowl shirt free png images clipart download 2142278 .
vector colorful illustration of a rice bowl and chopstick royalty .
rice bowl stock image image of bowls brown detail 12326147 .
rice bowl vectors photos and psd files free download .
mediterranean rice bowl .
roasted veggie brown rice bowl gluten free vegan veggie inspired .
gluten free korean ground turkey and rice bowl .
a bowl of rice rice clipart rice red rice bowl png transparent .
cooked rice glutinous rice bowl sticky rice png download 1200 .
gluten free recipe chinese chicken vegetables rice bowl with soy .
turmeric rice burrito bowls making thyme for health .
free icon rice bowl icon .
pan seared tuna rice bowl gluten free the wooden skillet .
cauliflower rice burrito bowls minimalist baker recipes .
the ricebowl challenge freerice com .
vegetarian sweet potato brown rice bowl .
edamame bok choy rice bowl vegan gluten free sharon palmer .
rice bowl with chopsticks free food icons .
black rice bowls with crispy tofu from my bowl .
a really good salmon rice bowl gluten dairy free this gal cooks .
pan seared tuna rice bowl gluten free the wooden skillet .
rice bowl gratis rice png download 1024 680 free transparent .
free rice freerice com united nations world food program .
cauliflower rice burrito bowls vegan gluten free grain free .
roasted veggie brown rice bowl gluten free vegan veggie inspired .
gluten free chicken fajita bowls fit as a mama bear .
grain free cauliflower rice buddha bowl tasting page .
quick easy taco rice bowls vegan gluten free delightful adventures .
healthy turkey fajita rice bowls isabel eats easy mexican recipes .
vegan vegetarian friendly gluten free rice bowl youtube .
free my rice bowl korean cooking outside the lines online .
curry chicken brown rice bowl gluten free the honour system .
ginger chilli chicken rice bowls nourish every day .
jerk tofu vegetable and rice bowl emilie eats .
dog diner dog homemade rice bowl low calorie free rice diet trial .
free rice bowl with chicken and salad vector image 1272896 .
pei wei free general tso s rice bowl with entree purchase .
chicken teriyaki rice bowl a sweet pea chef .
rice bowl icon free download png and vector .
edamame masala brown basmati rice bowl vegan gluten free sharon .
sausage and kale rice bowl for one vegan gluten free american cuisine .
kfc shawarma rice bowl buy 1 get 1 free promo september 26 only .
get free stock photos of rice bowl online download latest free .
gluten free korean turkey and rice bowl food fanatic .
sausage and kale rice bowl for one veggie chick .
zongzi cooked food bowl transprent png free rice bowl cartoon .
free rice bowls at roll d melbourne concrete playground melbourne .
gluten free asian rice bowl salad recipe dr heather tick md .
shrimp avocado brown rice bowl urban bliss life .
chicken teriyaki rice bowl a sweet pea chef .
cooked rice rice cereal white rice jasmine rice bowl png clipart .
gluten free korean ground turkey and rice bowl .
mexican rice bowls rachael roehmholdt .
dahi chura yoghurt and flattened rice bowl gluten free .
jerk tofu vegetable and rice bowl emilie eats .
gluten free brown rice bowls with roasted carrots kale and fried .
gluten free rice bowl with sorrel kale lemon radishes .
hearty rice bowl with roasted tomatoes bacon spinach recipe .
donburi revolution japanese rice bowl festival with free admission .
free rice bowl cliparts download free clip art free clip art on .
easy rice bowl recipe with black beans avocado cilantro dressing .
golden star organic jasmine rice bowl 6 35 oz walmart com .
low syn teriyaki chicken and rice bowl slimming eats slimming world .
fish taco rice bowls easy delicious mahi mahi fish taco recipe .
quick easy taco rice bowls vegan gluten free delightful adventures .
rice bowl with cabbage and baked tofu recipes for health nytimes com .
rice bowl free food icons .
spiced chickpeas turmeric cauliflower rice buddha bowl with black .
vegetarian cauliflower rice bowl delish knowledge .
bowl of white rice bowl of sticky rice free transparent png .
gluten free korean turkey and rice bowl food fanatic .
rice bowl vectors photos and psd files free download .
ginger chicken rice bowl gluten soy free the fit cookie .
rice bowl pictures download free images on unsplash .
amazon com annie chun s cooked white sticky rice gluten free .
wholesome salmon rice bowl recipe savory thoughts .
curry chicken brown rice bowl gluten free the honour system .
mango rice bowl vegan gluten free one green planetone green planet .
roasted veggie and cauliflower rice buddha bowl wholesomelicious .
rice bowl chopsticks free vector graphic on pixabay .
scott jon s coconut shrimp frozen rice bowl 8oz target .
slimming eats low syn teriyaki chicken and rice bowl gluten free .
hand drawn vector rice rice bowl illustration elements .
best rice bowl clip art design free vector art images graphics .
easy ginger teriyaki ahi tuna forbidden rice bowls gluten free .
simple rice on a bowl silhouette logo design vector image . Related post for Free Rice Bowl

Read More…

Edible Map launches in King’s Cross tomorrow

Edible Map launches in King’s Cross tomorrow 10 hours ago OpenTable Brings the Culinary Capital’s Boroughs to Life With an Edible Map of London
July 2019: With almost 70% of Londoners agreeing that the city is home to the most diverse selection of cuisines and cultures from across the globe, it’s no surprise to see the variety of international dishes regularly consumed at restaurant tables throughout the capital. To champion this, OpenTable, the world’s leading restaurant booking service, is giving Londoners a chance to taste their way through the capital’s boroughs with the first edible map4 of the city.
On Tuesday 2nd July, those visiting King’s Cross between 12pm and 5pm will be able to take a bite into the flavours of London from OpenTable’s interactive edible map billboard. To celebrate London’s vibrant diversity of cuisines from Turkish to Japanese, the map will feature a selection of canapé style dishes from around the world paired with the boroughs in which they’re most associated, for diners to take away5.
Adrian Valeriano, VP EMEA, comments “London is such an exciting city to dine in and explore. The choice of restaurants and cuisines available are ever evolving, constantly delighting diners whether they are local residents or those visiting the city. Our research highlights how this diversity shows itself in every borough, with beloved dishes and world-class restaurants found the length and breadth of London. We are excited to bring this to life with the edible map installation and to ensure that whether you are looking for an award winning restaurant, newly opened hot spot, or a casual dinner with friends, OpenTable can help you find the right restaurant for anything.”
To determine the flavour of each borough, OpenTable conducted exclusive research among two thousand residents and frequent visitors to the city. With the majority of diners in Lambeth dreaming of Turkish delights and Tower Hamlets most associated with the best Bangladeshi biryani, OpenTable’s edible map will share Londoner’s love for global eats.
The foodie favourites across the city show West is best for Greek eats, while those in North West London are most likely to enjoy Indian. Islington in North London is one of the most popular regions for Italian food, giving extra amore to Mediterranean pizza and pasta dishes, with nearly a fifth of the areas’ restaurants dedicated to this cultural cuisine6. South London offers plenty of variety with those researched associating Bromley with Japanese1 and Greenwich enjoying traditional British cuisine1.
Research shows that 18-24 year olds are the most adventurous foodies, with nearly 80% eating a meal from across the globe every week1, London’s love for global cuisines shows no sign of slowing down.
Before foodie fans decide where to head for their next great dining experience, they can visit OpenTable’s edible map in King’s Cross to get a ‘taste’ of the area. EDIBLE MAP – KING’S CROSS, 2nd JULY 2019 London Borough

Read More…

Read an Excerpt from “Edible Memory,” Our Summer Book Club Pick

Today is the first day of our seasonal Twitter book club #ReadUCP. For our first pick, we invite you to join us throughout July and August to read and discuss Edible Memory: The Lure of Heirloom Vegetables and Other Forgotten Foods by Jennifer A. Jordan, while sharing stories and photos from our gardens, markets, kitchens, and plates.
To get things started, here’s a little homegrown taste of what you’ll find inside the pages. Forgetting Turnips No turnips in this garden, alas.
What kinds of changes have vegetables undergone over time? And what are the fates of particular vegetables in this era of heirloom food? When I began my search in mainstream food writing for coverage of forgotten turnips, celery, and other less glamorous vegetables, I found very little. Particular blogs, authors, and chefs zeroed in on particular heirloom vegetables at various moments, but there was no comparison with the coverage of heirloom tomatoes or apples. My initial inclination was to think that this silence reflected forgetting. But in fact these supposedly forgotten vegetables inspire extremes of devotion in some seed savers, gardeners, and farmers, and it is to these people (more than to urban diners and famous chefs) that they owe their survival.
My research into popular food writing yielded almost nothing about leeks, cauliflower, turnips, and a host of other heirloom vegetables. Overall, I found far fewer mentions of all these vegetables combined than of heirloom tomatoes. Some fruits and vegetables are more evocative than others, but I was truly surprised at the dearth of writing about heirloom vegetables overall compared with heirloom tomatoes and apples.
At the same time, every one of these vegetables provokes passionate commitment in at least a handful of gardeners, eaters, or chefs. The history of a given heirloom variety rarely reaches back beyond the eighteenth century (and more frequently the nineteenth), although there are some fundamental exceptions, such as pre-Columbian potatoes, beans, and corn. A very wide range of historical moments and geographic locations can provide the narrative necessary for a given vegetable to qualify as an heirloom. As with tomatoes, the heirloom phase in these vegetables’ careers is just the most recent moment in centuries—even millennia—of changing uses and meanings. For starters, some vegetables that languish in obscurity today were once highly fashionable or essential to the daily nourishment of vast numbers of people. Much vegetable life has moved in and out of fashion. As Guthman and others assert, these fashions—these changing tastes—have direct consequences for fields and bodies, for physical and social landscapes.
I expected the specific memories and stories attached to these vegetables to play a crucial role in public discussions of heirloom vegetables, but they were almost entirely absent from most newspaper food writing. Even those heirloom vegetables that do appear with some frequency often lack deep stories. At least in popular discussions of food, and in venues where much ink is spilled over heirloom tomatoes (and to a lesser extent antique apples), turnips, leeks, beets, and other vegetables are not as charged with connections to the past as tomatoes, apples, or even grain. Even the origins of vegetables that receive relatively extensive coverage—like heirloom beets, beans, squashes, lettuce, pumpkins, and carrots—are rarely part of the tale. Most articles don’t even mention the name of the variety but leave it at “heirloom celery” (on the rare occasion that heirloom celery makes an appearance).
Why, then, are some fruits and vegetables remembered while others are forgotten? And what are the consequences of this forgetting? For starters, something like leek biodiversity is not integrated into the culinary lives of large numbers of people, outside of a few leek-loving regions of the world. There may also be botanical reasons for this—simply the lack of the same biodiversity available with tomatoes, potatoes, and apples. How much has to do with cooking? You don’t have to cook heirloom tomatoes, but turnips and leeks often need some cooking, which may dilute their flavors and texture and color considerably com- pared with raw tomatoes or raw apples. I doubt that any other vegetable, fruit, or grain will experience the same change in fortunes as the tomato. Heirloom tomatoes dominate in part because of their great variety in color, flavor, and texture. Heirloom leeks (forgive me, lovers of leeks attuned to subtleties I have not yet learned to perceive) do not present this same aesthetic variety, nor do a host of other vegetables. That said, taro root, for example, is eaten in vast quantities around the globe cooked rather than raw (raw taro root is toxic), yet consumers can readily distinguish different varieties of taro, even when it is cooked and pulverized.
One farmer offered a useful theory about why lettuce, for example, might spark less interest than tomatoes: “People don’t reminisce about the great red Batavian lettuce they ate when they were kids the way they recall tantalizing tomatoes and mouth-watering melons.” And lettuce clearly does not pack the same nutritional punch as beans, which play a huge role in global eating habits. This comparative lack of media references may also occur because most fruits and vegetables have far fewer heirloom varieties: there simply aren’t as many kinds of leeks or turnips as tomatoes, and the differences are more subtle than the vivid variations in tomato varieties. In addition, non-heirloom tomatoes and apples are also particularly popular, so it makes sense that the heirloom varieties would also be particularly popular. In Forgotten Fruits , Christopher Stocks writes that “of all the vegetables . . . cabbages are perhaps the least glamorous, with the possible exception of turnips. Maybe this explains why the history of individual varieties is so sparse: while the introduction of a delicious new apple might be cause for general rejoicing, the launch of a new type of cabbage is unlikely to generate such widespread celebration. . . . What it isn’t—and what it has probably never been—is fashionable.”
Food writer Jane Black concurs: “What I thought was interesting about heirloom tomatoes is the way most people are only like that about tomatoes. You rarely hear people demanding heirloom radishes or cucumbers, though they certainly exist. (I have seen heirloom beans and beets on menus though. Next big thing?)” Based on my research, yes, they are in line to become fashionable for a tiny segment of the population, but not on anything close to the scale of apples or tomatoes. Not surprisingly (to me, at least), Portlandia captures this phenomenon in a dramatic sketch about the attempts to make heirloom celery the next big thing. As one review of the sketch sets the scene, “Kale is cool, Brussels sprouts are back, heirloom tomatoes are hot, and the head of the
Produce Sales Headquarters is very happy. But there’s one outlier to the up-and-to-the-right sales charts that the organization is seeing with other vegetables: celery.” Despite the comedic and imaginary challenges of marketing heirloom celery in the universe of Portlandia , there is certainly a coattail effect; the popularity of heirloom tomatoes paved the way for “heirloom” to become a meaningful way of describing a host of vegetables.
One article asserts that heirloom iceberg lettuce really is no different in taste and texture from regular iceberg lettuce. This critical approach to heirlooms is not uncommon, and some of the appreciation of heirlooms happens because people learn the story behind these foods. One of the few mentions of the history of lettuce refers to George Washington’s predilection for fresh greens, and Colonial Williamsburg plants colonial lettuces in their demonstration nursery. “Meals back in the days of Gen. George Washington consisted of more than just meat, bread and potatoes. There was a fondness for greens during the 18th century. Each morning, Washington ordered his regimental officer to gather leafy plants growing near the camp and distribute them among the men. Wesley Greene, a garden historian with Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia, likes to share that bit of information when he tells visitors about the heirloom lettuces growing in the demonstration Colonial Nursery on Duke of Gloucester Street.” Washington’s insistence on daily foraging was owing not only to his fondness for greens, but also to the necessity of supplementing the meager provisions avail- able for his soldiers, as well as concerns about scurvy, which had devastated the redcoats in the first winter of the war.
The story of heirloom lettuce is not as crucial to the survival of lettuce, because of the coattails effect and the importance of private preservation. Much of the lettuce coverage has to do with mesclun replacing iceberg, with a strong emphasis on aesthetics and variety over story and origins. Overall, popular writing about lettuce is short on emotional content or cultural narrative, other than an occasional mention of the eighteenth-century taste for salads. But lettuce has had great commercial success. Heirloom lettuce became part of an economic niche, profitable to grow and sell to restaurants or for a premium at farmers’ markets. It is certainly not the only produce lacking emotional narrative in public discourse. Pumpkins, for example, receive frequent mentions but are almost never called by their variety name, and almost no storytelling accompanies their coverage.
I was surprised by the references to heirloom beets, even though they still pale compared with the coverage of tomatoes (a mere ninety-seven mentions of heirloom beets in the same time period, for ex-ample). In 2000, Marian Burros wrote in the New York Times , “Beets are following the fashionable pattern of purple potatoes, heirloom tomatoes and golden raspberries. These heirloom varieties, long lost in the quest for standardized fruits and vegetables, until small farmers began growing them again, have helped make the beets more appealing, and not one of them has ever seen the inside of a can.” Almost all references to beets occur on restaurant menus, and very little in the way of stories is attached to them. Occasionally the names or colors get mentioned: “Italian heirloom beets”; Bull’s Blood; MacGregor’s Favorite (in a gardening context); “some golden, some candy-striped”; “Chioggia beet: An heirloom beet with red and white rings in its interior” (this description appears in an article titled “Food Mysteries Solved,” one of many, many references to heirlooms as something new and exotic rather than traditional and familiar); “Chioggia is an Italian heirloom beet.” Mostly they are simply “heirloom beets,” with all this term seems to promise: flavor, color, rarity, authenticity, exoticism, good taste on the part of the chef and the restaurant patron? A specific name is mentioned only a few times, and there is not a single origin story. In the context of newspapers, the story of beets turns out to be irrelevant, other than the general story contained in the word “heirloom,” which somehow elevates these beets above their (industrial, mass-produced?) brethren. Here “heirloom” both confers cultural cachet and is a tool of advertising, a necessary element for the menu of an upscale restaurant. Discussion of biodiversity was a consistent omission in newspaper writing on heirloom food. The word “heirloom” becomes a resonant stand-in for all kinds of specific history.
Turnips are in many ways emblematic of “forgotten” heirlooms. Only a handful of newspaper articles refer to them, including a couple of restaurant reviews, one describing a soup, “served in white espresso cups . . . a puree of hoekurai, an heirloom turnip,” and another mentioning a roasted heirloom turnip and pear gratin. That said, there are people who fervently appreciate turnips. A small town in Vermont organizes an entire festival around a specific turnip variety. Antoine Jacobsohn, an heirloom vegetable expert living in France, recounts how he “really discovered turnips. Turnips are highly variable and very tasty if one doesn’t turn them to mush.” He even has a favorite turnip from a particular farmer in a particular French suburb. We get glimpses into the importance of turnips in the lives and diets of particular chefs, communities, or the characters created by famous authors. Christopher Stocks quotes Mark Twain: “On rainy days he sat and talked hours together with his mother about turnips. When company came, he made it his loving duty to put aside everything else and converse with them all day long of his great joy in the turnip.”
Stocks writes that “without the Spanish Inquisition our carrots might never have been orange, while the French Revolution was at least partly responsible for the triumph of British strawberries in the nineteenth century. Even the humblest root crops have their claims to fame: beetroot, for example, is in part responsible for the abolition of slavery, while swedes [a type of turnip] helped lay the foundations for the Industrial Revolution. “The familiar, homey, even pedestrian carrot has a dramatic history. Carrots appear in considerable numbers in newspaper writing, but with almost no indication of their long journey from their origin in Afghanistan (where they were purple and yellow) and the fact that today’s orange carrots descend from carrots grown by refugee Mennonites goes unmentioned. At a farmers’ market in Vienna I bought ur-Karrotten , supposedly the original carrots, whose blood-red centers turned my soup a disconcerting pink. Much of the carrot story vanishes as heirloom carrots hitch a ride with heirloom tomatoes. The first mention I found of heirloom carrots was in the Boston Globe in 1997, offering suggestions about what to plant in a home garden. Although more popular than the turnip, the carrot, too, has so far failed to really take off as an heirloom in popular culture, nor do its origin stories figure significantly in this popular coverage.
Eggplants are one of the few Asian vegetables that feature as heir- looms, although still almost always without a backstory. Coverage of them in the media, while surprisingly frequent, seemed to be about shape and color rather than either origin or, say, unique heirloom flavor. GQ instructs its gentlemen readers: “That little weedy patch behind your apartment doesn’t have to look like a jungle or junkyard. With as little as 500 square feet, you can grow all sorts of coveted produce- aisle specialties—exotic hot peppers, striped heirloom eggplants, even asparagus.” But despite the occasional article with a title like “Learn More about Fascinating Eggplant!,” there doesn’t seem to be much passion for the heirloom eggplant. Heirloom radishes are mentioned more than other vegetables, but almost always in restaurant reviews, and in one case used as an example of frivolousness: “According to [Alice] Waters and her sprouting acolytes, growing heirloom radishes on the White House lawn will help address issues as diverse as obesity, teen diabetes, and global warming.” Lizzie Collingham’s history of curry recounts how many of the British in the early days of colonialism disliked a lot of Indian vegetables, like eggplant. “The British in India never really took to Indian fruit and vegetables. ‘I have often wished for a few good apples and pears in preference to all the different kinds of fruits that Bengal produces,’ wrote a homesick accountant from Calcutta in 1783. The Anglo-Indians thought that aubergines and okra tasted slimy and unpleasant. Jean-Baptiste Tavernier described how the East India merchants at all the seventeenth-century European factories planted extensive kitchen gardens with vegetables familiar to them from home, such as ‘salads of several kinds, cabbages, asparagus, peas and principally beans, the seed of which comes from Japan.’”
The cucumber’s origins are called out here and there, but it too falls into this B-list of vegetables. There is a very early mention of heirloom cucumbers, in 1988, in an article discussing heirlooms more broadly. Another article describes “some grand heirloom cucumbers with romantic names—Boothby’s Blond from Maine, West India Burr Gherkin, Armenian Yard Long and Crystal Apple White Spine Cucumber.” This article also cites Weaver and the cucumber’s origins in Asia, as well as its popularity among ancient Greeks and Romans. But that’s about it for discussions of the cultural backstory of cucumbers, whose ancestors appear to have been wild cucumbers in the Himalayan foothills. Beets and other heirloom vegetables are also used, here and there, to pillory overly precious trends. By 1998 GQ (which seems to be oddly concerned with heirloom produce) had already listed heirloom vegetables as one of the most overrated concepts of the year. By 2010 another reporter could write that “funky health-food stores evolved into the designer supermarket Whole Foods. Ciabatta trickled down from Chez Panisse to Jack in the Box. And now, everywhere you look, stylish, discerning rebels . . . drink small-batch vodka infused with heirloom beets at underground farmers markets. They wear limited edition blue jeans made in historic North Carolina denim mills using vintage shuttle looms.” These heirlooms become emblematic of tastes that are fancy, and even excessive: “And in an upscale take on the salad bar, diners can build their own. You grab one of the little pencils on the table and mark up to 10 items on a sheet listing 35 ingredients, among them Dungeness crab, toasted pine nuts, Point Reyes blue cheese, heirloom endive, wild arugula and so on.” For vegetable after vegetable, in certain contexts “heirloom” becomes a truncated reference to something desirable or even over the top, only rarely filling in even a particular variety, not to mention a place or a story. There are a host of vegetables that receive almost no mention in the popular press. Garlic’s origins and background, for example, receive little attention despite its immense popularity. As one journalist writes, “Everybody knows about heirloom tomatoes and apples, the historic varieties that have endured for decades or even centuries in garden plots and back yards. But heirloom garlic?”
There is very little on heirloom broccoli, despite the widespread popularity of broccoli in its non-heirloom form. Broccoli’s “origins are lost to history,” according to one article, a statement that applies to much of the vegetable world; but it was grown by the Romans and grown in North America in the eighteenth century. Even vegetables that are comparatively popular in their non-heirloom form garner relatively little media coverage—broccoli, peas, or cauliflower come up short when measured against tomatoes or apples.
Thus most of the world’s vegetables do not appear in popular writing about heirloom vegetables in the United States. There is hardly any discussion of heirloom peas, either dried or fresh—just a handful of articles, mostly about gardening, with very little social or cultural significance attached. Here and there they find their way into the media and into farmers’ markets. The New York Times reported in 2000: “Heirloom tomatoes, apples, beans and potatoes have become almost commonplace in farmers’ markets, but this is the first year in which peas have become consistently available in varieties that were grown de- cades ago, before crossbreeding for long shelf life and truck travel led to vegetables that were more sturdy than sweet and flavorful.”
Despite the widespread popularity of non-heirloom spinach, there is also basically nothing in the media on heirloom spinach, other than a couple of mentions of restaurants. Heirloom collards and okra were each mentioned only a few times, despite the centrality of these foods to soul food, Cajun, Gullah, and other cuisines.
Indeed, what popular food writing, both books and articles, tends to classify as “heirloom” is generally a much narrower range of food than would fit the standard definition (varieties that are open-pollinated, developed before World War II, and possess some kind of meaning and story). Much of this writing targets audiences that are predominantly (though certainly not exclusively) white and relatively affluent. The list in newspaper food writing of vegetables with few or no mentions in their heirloom state is long (and incomplete): Brussels sprouts, cassava, celeriac, celery, chard, chickpeas (one of the first cultivated crops), chicory, Chinese cabbage, cowpeas, endive, fennel, Jerusalem artichokes, kohlrabi, leeks, mâche (as “heirloom mâche”), mustard greens, parsley, parsnips, rutabagas, salsify, scorzonera, tomatillos, and yams received little or no mention as heirlooms. I developed the list of searchable vegetables by looking at heirloom vegetable books and seed catalogs, food encyclopedias, and stacks of garden books and cookbooks about heirloom food. But these sources omit much of the world’s vegetable riches.
Many tropical and Asian vegetables seem to fall outside the language of heirlooms, yet what constitutes heirloom produce for Hmong farmers in Minnesota, for example? The concept of heirloom produce has very specific geographical and historical boundaries, which I think can and should be expanded. Just because a vegetable dates back to the era before industrial agriculture does not mean it will inevitably be labeled an heirloom. The term “heirloom” seems, at least in popular media in the United States, to get attached most frequently to fruits and vegetables associated with European and, to a lesser degree, African American and Native American communities and traditions. Asian and Mexican vegetables rarely receive the label, nor does anything from tropical latitudes, and the limits of the terms help us think about culture, including boundaries and identities. I call this chapter “Forgotten Turnips” not so much because heirloom turnips are at such great risk of disappearing forever, but because the patterns with which they appear in media coverage, restaurants, and markets tell us that the heirloom label alone is not enough to catapult them to popularity.
Follow #ReadUCP and Jennifer Jordan @ ediblememory on Twitter for all the latest. And go ahead and get your copy now! Use the code EDIBLECLUB for 20% from now until September through our website.

Read More…

Dosa Hut, Mt Gravatt, Celebrates 2nd

Dosa Hut, widely acknowledged for bringing authentic South Indian food culture to Australia, beginning at Melbourne, celebrated the 2nd anniversary of their Mt Gravatt store on June 9. To mark the occasion, the managers decided to bring down the prices of around 20 hot-selling items in their store.
Established in 2007, Dosa Hut was born out of a passion for food. Praveen Indukuri and Anil Kumar Karpurapu both came to Australia to study telecommunications. Being the foodies they were, they decided to bring alive their love for South Indian food with Dosa Hut, as there weren’t many places where one could get authentic South Indian food at that time. What started off as a foodie venture has now become an increasingly successful brand of quality Indian cuisine in Melbourne and Brisbane.

Read More…

Top 5 Restaurants to visit in Budapest – Traveller’s Guide

Mail 0
While the Hungarians have not abandoned their traditional roots of its 1000 years old goulash soup, new ingredients and cuisines have entered the culinary mainstream. Although the traditional Hungarian cuisines reflect the ethnic and regional influences of the country, other international cuisines have won the hearts of millions of Hungarians around the country, especially Budapest. From updated takes on classics to entirely new cultural cuisines, we have listed some of the best, rib-sticking restaurants of Budapest. Don’t miss them out if you are looking for a savoury gastronomical roller coaster adventure! Gundel
Location: 1146 Budapest, Gundel Károly út 4, Hungary
Károly Gundel has redefined the entire Hungarian cuisine with a different take on the traditional direction.
With an in-depth history of the Hungarian cuisines and compiling different recipes from the Carpathian basin, Gundel has enchanted thousands of food lovers with its sophisticated, century-old dishes. Besides its impeccable standards of service from its staff and high customer satisfaction rate, the traditional atmosphere is blended with international and Hungarian approach. Photo: facebook.com/gundelrestaurant/
With its handpicked wine collection and famous paintings from renowned Hungarian artists, this restaurant has cemented its legacy as one of the leading restaurants of the country. Tropicana
Location: Budapest, Vigadó u. 2, 1051 Hungary
Ever seen charming professional dealers in suits playing casino games? If not, check out live dealers in casino sites like Monster Casino . That is the same atmosphere that the Tropicana restaurant offers you with! If you are a fan of casino culture, then, this is the go-to place for you! Besides spending your time at the gaming floor (which is bigger than the Las Vegas counterpart), the Tropicana hosts a Bamboo bar that serves delicious snacks and cocktails. Tired of playing the classic traditional games? Head over to the restaurant section to avail delicious food & great live music entertainments. From Contemporary Fresh Seafood, Pre-Colombian Aztec Soup to imported steaks (internationally), the menu is infused with different global cuisine to nudge your inner desires. With exceptional quality service and a remarkable Mexican Colonial Hacienda-style atmosphere, this is the ideal place to hang out if you are simultaneously looking for entertainment as well as an unforgettable dine out. Onyx Restaurant
Location : Budapest, Vörösmarty tér 7, 1051 Hungary
If you are looking for a gastronomic adventure with Hungarian cuisine and international flavours, then the Onyx restaurant is the best bet for you in the country!
This Hungarian restaurant is known for its exceptional emphasis on the country’s wine selection and domestic quality products. The restaurant opened in March 2007 and easily became one of the top visited restaurants in the country with its top-notch services. facebook.com/OnyxRestaurantBudapest
Besides, the restaurant won two Michelin star in 2018 which is the first in Central Eastern Europe, thanks to their progressive attitude and respect for traditions. Chef Ádám Mészáros is the mastermind behind its popularity. To cater to international visitors, the restaurant also has a ‘BEYOND OUR BORDERS’ menu. It is positioned near Vörösmarty Square. This is a must visit for every food lover! Taj Mahal
Location: Budapest, Szondi u. 40, 1067 Hungary
Love Indian cuisine? From soups, tandoori specialities, chicken dishes, fish & prawn, lamb dishes to Indian bread, salads & yoghurts, Indian drinks and South Indian dishes, you can virtually get anything with respect to India here at Taj Mahal Restaurant. Considered as one of the top restaurants in Budapest, this is the perfect place to pamper your taste buds to the maximum. facebook.com/Taj-Mahal-Restaurant-1403288073234288/
With elegant Asian art and wood decor and carvings, this place will definitely satisfy your inner authentic food-loving soul. The restaurant boasts of an unrivalled reputation, thanks to its traditional recipes and market fresh ingredients. The friendly and informed service staff will guide you properly through the menu offerings and compliment you with the perfect drink if you are new to Indian cuisine. The mouth-watering new delicacies and an irresistible selection of Indian flavours make this an apt contender for the top spot in the best restaurants of Budapest. Costes Restaurant
Location: Budapest, Ráday u. 4, 1092 Hungary
In the summer of 2008, the Costes restaurant was opened. It received the first ever Michelin star in Hungary and has maintained that ever since then.
It was ranked 14th best in Europe and 25th best restaurant in the world by Tripadvisor in 2014. The restaurant has managed to keep up the high self-esteem with its no-compromise food quality, exceptional services and finest dishes of Hungarian cuisine. Before opening the restaurant, the owners scoured entire Europe to find the best food suppliers of the continent and trained its staffs rigorously. Head chef Eszter Palágyi took over in 2015 and transformed the pace into an elegant and stylish accommodation. The restaurant offers a relaxing atmosphere which does not include any dress code. Gault & Millau ranked the restaurant as the best Restaurant of Hungary and was regarded Restaurant of the Year by the Dining Guide. With friendly and flawless service and proper guest satisfaction, it is the number 1 go-to place if you are in Budapest for a food adventure. Related Posts

Read More…

Best Things to Do in Bologna ~ Welcome to “La Grassa” (The Fat)

July 1, 2019 Best Things to Do in Bologna ~ Welcome to “La Grassa” (The Fat)
The ancient porticoed city of Bologna in Italy’s bountiful Emilia-Romagna region is a utopia for those of us who travel to eat and drink ourselves silly.
From tips on where to eat in the city nicknamed “La Grassa” (The Fat One) to advice on what see between meals, this is your guide to the very best things to do in Bologna. All words & photos by your glutenous guide, Ben Holbrook. Understand
Bologna is a medieval city. The remnants of its ancient ramparts can still be seen at the gates of Porta Saragozza, Porta Maggiore, Porta San Felice.
It’s also the capital of the wealthy Emilia Romagna region, which is one of Italy’s most important food producing regions.
Even the Romans regard Bologna as one of the world’s greatest gastro destinations.
But Bologna’s main claim to fame is that it’s home to the oldest university in the world (founded 1088), which gives the city the edge that makes it such a great place to visit.
One minute you’re walking through the seemingly endless porticoed arcades, peering in through ritzy fashion boutiques and jewellery stores, and the next you’re lost in a maze of burnt mustard and russet-roofed backstreets, in student-ladened piazzas.
Andiamo! Best Things to Do in Bologna 1. Orientate Yourself in Piazza Maggiore
Wander up the thronging artery of Via dell’Indipendenza and you’ll arrive at Piazza Maggiore , Bologna’s main square and cultural heart.
This is where you can see the iconic Basilica of San Petronio, which is the 7th largest church in Europe, and get into the swing of things with an espresso at one of the many cafes that fringe the square.
Just around the corner from here, in Piazza Nettuno , you’ll also find the Neptune Fountain, where the lord of the seas looms over four ocean nymphs who jet spouts of watery pearls from their perky bronze breasts.
You have arrived. 2. Get Lost in Roman Bologna’s Quadrilatero
The grid of narrow streets and alleys jutting off Piazza Maggiore, including Via Clavature (Street of Locksmiths) and Via Pescherie Vecchie (Old Fishmongers Way), is known as the Quadrilatero and occupies what was once Roman Bologna.
Today this charming little district is a labyrinth of colourful market stalls, bars and delis, and the perfect place to begin your culinary exploration of Bologna.
Via Clavature leads to the art-filled Santa Maria della Vita church , which also happens to sit next to the Mercato di Mezzo – a great spot for sipping wine and tucking into fresh tortellini. 3. Hang with Bologna’s Thriving Student Population
Via Zamboni is one of the oldest roads in Bologna and carves its way through the historic university district , all the way from the two wonky towers of Garisenda and Asinelli to Porta San Donato (more on these below).
You’ll also find many makeshift bookshops housed under the porticoes, with poems and pages of political ideology plastered on the walls.
Stop at one of the busy cafe terraces for an Aperol spritz and a chance to eavesdrop. 4. Get Lost in the Ghetto Ebraico (Jewish Quarter)
We were fortunate to end up staying right next to Bologna’s Ghetto, which turned out to be our favourite part of the city.
It’s the sort of area where students hang out in the streets, smoking and eating pizza between classes. You’ll find countless cool cafes and trattorias to explore here.
Apparently, back in the day, the gateways into the Jewish Quarter were opened in the morning and closed at night. The main entrance can still be seen on Via de’ Giudei, while the second located between Via del Carro and Via Zamboni, and the third on Via Oberdan.
The Ghetto is built over a series of hidden canals and characterised by its colourful but heavily-graffitied streets and artisan workshops, offering a very real glimpse of local life in Bologna.
Things to Do and See in Bologna’s Jewish Ghetto
Visit Buratti House : The area’s most important religious building and the historic seat of the synagogue.
Stroll Through Piazzetta Marco Biagi : Hidden between Via dell’Inferno and Piazza San Martino.
Drop in at the MEB, Museo Ebraico di Bologna (Jewish Museum of Bologna): Preserving and celebrating Bologna’s Jewish heritage. 5. Eat Like a Local
Let’s not put it off any longer.
Italy’s Emilia Romagna region is responsible for producing Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, balsamic vinegar (Modena), Prosciutto di Parma, Culatello di Zibello, mortadella (sausage) and a whole lot more.
And this being Italy and all, it’s also a paradise for us pasta lovers.
Tortellini – Bologna’s famous tortellini – fresh little pasta parcels stuffed with pork, diced mortadella sausage and Parmigiano-Reggiano – is one of those heart and wholesome dishes that you just can’t get enough of. Grate giant flakes of Parmigiano-Reggiano over the top and see it away with a bottle or two of Pinot Grigio and spend the rest of the day in a warm and fuzzy state of bliss. That’s breakfast sorted.
Tagliatelle al Ragù and Lasagne alla Bolognese – Us Brits who grew up on spaghetti bolognese (aka “spag bol”) might be surprised to hear that the dish doesn’t actually exist in Bologna, and it never did. As with our creamy “Indian” curries, it seems spaghetti bolognese is a dish of our very own creation. No, in Bologna it’s all about tagliatelle al ragù (and lasagne alla bolognese), which is similar but a whole lot better. It’s rich and meaty, served with flat strands of fresh tagliatelle pasta. Goes down a dream with a bottle of Chianti, or indeed a few frosty jars of Peroni.
Where to Eat in Bologna: This being a region that’s long been defined by its food culture, you’ll struggle to find a “bad” place to eat in Bologna. And because this is a university town, you’ll also find plenty of affordable places to eat and drink.
My advice is simply to follow the crowds. You’ll spot the popular trattorias and pizzerias a mile off – they the places that look like they’ve been there for a hundred years and are generally graced by people dressed significantly better than your average tourist.
Start by exploring the many restaurants on and around streets like Via del Pratello and Via Zamboni, Via Saragozza and Via Indipendenza.
See a few great restaurants in Bologna here . 6. Join a Food Tour and Eat All the Right Things in All the Right Places
If you’re particularly interested in learning about, and eating, Bologna’s famous cuisine then I would highly recommend taking a food tour such as this one.
I also like the look of this half-day Parmigiano Reggiano cheese tour , which takes you out to some of region’s famous producers.
I almost always try to take a food tour when I’m exploring a new city/country as I believe you can get a quicker and more solid understanding of a place by studying its cuisine. Plus it’s the sort of “study” you never tire of. 7. Drink Like a Local
Being the gastronomically-minded city it is, you’ll find countless Italian craft beers and wines to try in Bologna, but be sure to try the local Pignoletto sparkling white that the Emilia Romagna wine region is famous for. It’s not so different from Prosecco, but don’t let the locals hear you saying so!
You’ll also find various varieties of Lambrusco all over Bologna. Don’t let your adolescent transgressions put you off tipping back a glass or two – it’s perfect on a sunny a day and goes down lovely with a bowl of piping hot pasta (or at breakfast with fresh croissants and a glass of OJ).
Where to Drink in Bologna: Follow the crowds and hop around the many bars in and around Piazza Verdi, Piazza Maggiore and Via Zamboni.
Osteria del Sole Bologna is a great place to begin your enological adventures.
Tamburini is tucked away in the thick of the Quadrilatero and is a great place for aperitivos, as is the more elegant Caffè Zanarini (located just behind the cathedral).
Squirrelled away in the shadows of the wonky towers, Café Gamberini is actually a historic pastry/coffee shop but they’re highly regarded for their cocktails and savoury tidbits, making it an ideal place for a few pre-dinner aperitivos. Or of course you could pop in for breakfast and just… well, hang around until it’s time for a Negroni. 8. Climb the Wonkiest Tower in Italy
Dating back to 1109, the ancient Garisenda and Asinelli towers date back to Bologna’s medieval beginnings and are the wonkiest towers in Italy (yes, even more so than Pisa) and offer the very best views over the city.
You can climb up the 498 steps of the Asinelli tower (the tallest of the two towers), which as we came to learn is much taller than it looks from ground level.
The rickety wooden staircase was really quite terrifying and both Rosana and I were trembling from fear as much as exhaustion by the time we reached the top.
No joke. I honestly can’t understand how it’s still standing.
Entry is €5 (€3 for kids) but there’s only one time slot per hour so be sure to book your visit on the website ahead of time and work your day around it.
Tip: If you’re anything like us then you’ll need a drink or two after your knee-trembling ascent (not that the descent was much better). In which case you may prefer to join this short tour that includes entry to the tower as well as a visit to a nearby wine bar for cold cuts and a few nerve-calming glasses of the good stuff. 9. Explore the Porticoes
Bologna is famous for its 666 terracotta arcades, or ‘portici’ as the locals call them, which stretch out for almost 50km.
They make it possible to stroll the entire city while avoiding the rain or blistering heat, but that wasn’t exactly what they were always intended to do.
They were actually built as Bologna’s student population was exploding, when there was an increased demand for housing.
The porticoes allowed the city to build vertically, quite literally, over the existing city streets.
The idea was to make them high enough to allow horse and carriages to travel beneath.
But today they harbour cafe terraces, outdoor book stalls, pastry shops, gelaterias and those who have no other place to call their own. 10. Nibble Your Way Through Bologna’s Famous Markets
Mercato di Mezz o is the oldest and most famous market in Bologna and is conveniently located just off Piazza Maggiore. A little overpriced, but still worth a visit.
Mercato della Terra is a fantastic open air market organised by Slow Food Italy.
Mercato delle Erbe is a sort of food court-cum cultural space. A fantastic place to eat, hear live music and take part in various local celebrations. 11. Fill Up on Art
As a 3,000-year-old city, it’s no surprise that Bologna is packed with world-class museums and galleries. Here are a few of the best:
Pinacoteca Nazionale is overflowing with paintings created between the thirteenth and eighteenth centuries.
Collezioni Comunali d’Arte is a spectacular space housing art from the 14th century to today.
Galleria D’Arte Maggiore is a heavyweight gallery exhibiting masterpieces from artists new and old.
MAMbo is a world-renowned contemporary art museum.
Museo del Patrimonio Industriale is housed in an old brick factor and celebrates the region’s industrial prowess. Explore everything from antique power plant machinery to Ducati motorcycles and Maserati sports cars. 12. Pizza, Pizza, Pizza (for Dinner) Proper Italian pizza is cooked in wood-fired ovens that take a long time to heat up. For this reason, many Italians choose to eat pasta for lunch and pizza for dinner. This being one of Italy’s leading gastro cities, it’s really not difficult to find quality pizza (at anytime of day or night). Snag a table at Ranzani 13 Bologna , Pizzeria Altero Bologna or Scalinatella .
But really, don’t be afraid to explore any little places that look good to you. The more I travel, the less inclined I am to go to the “essential foodie spots” listed in blog posts like this. They’re quite often overrun and managed by tired staff. I enjoy finding the authentic places that are happy or even surprised to have tourists dining with them. 13. Take a Day Trip to Modena
Located just 20 minutes away from Bologna by train, we stayed in Modena by accident but completely fell in love with the place.
In a way, it’s sort of like a miniature version of Bologna, with all of its best bits distilled into a smaller, cleaner and less touristy package.
Although I should that it does have its own claims to fame, including being the birthplace of Luciano Pavarotti, Modena balsamic vinegar, Ferrari, Maserati, Lamborghini and Ducati motorcycles. Our new friend in Modena. I thought he was telling me to stop taking photos, but he was actually asking for advice on what camera he should buy. I think this says everything about Modena.
If you have time then definitely go for the day or, better yet, stay over night.
Things to Do in Modena
1. Amble around the main square of Piazza Grande and gaze at the gorgeous Duomo di Modena.
2. Stop for drinks in Piazza XX Settembre.
3. Visit the flower market in Piazza Roma and explore the many cafes and patisseries nearby.
4. Explore the lively 100-year-old Albinelli Market.
5. Hop from bar to bar, restaurant to restaurant. Make it Happen How to Get to Bologna
Bologna’s main airport is Guglielmo Marconi Airport, which is served by all the usual suspects. From the airport you can hop on the Aerobus shuttle , which departs every 11 minutes and costs €6. When to Go to Bologna
I’d say Bologna is the sort of place you could enjoy at any time of year, especially as it’s not a major tourist destination. How to Get Around Bologna
Just walk. It’s small and compact and the porticoes make it a particularly easy city to explore on foot. Where to Stay in Bologna
We stayed at the excellent L’8 Boutique Design Apartments , which are housed in a historic palazzo within strolling distance of the city centre.
The eight apartments feature modern furnishings and facilities with pristine kitchens and bathrooms, but with elegant touches that remind you that you are staying in an old Italian palace.
We loved starting our day with coffee on the leafy terrace, where we also relaxed with a bottle of Lambrusco before heading out for dinner each night.
It’s a family business and the friendly staff have an office on the ground floor of the building, which is convenient when you have questions or want to ask for advice.
Highly recommended.
Check availability and book your L8 Boutique apartment in Bologna here – from €90 a night, which is excellent value.
Note: Our stay at the L8 Apartments was gifted but these opinions and photos are 100% my own. Like it? Pin it!

Read More…

11 Excellent Things to Eat, Drink, and Do in New York City This July

11 Excellent Things to Eat, Drink, and Do in New York City This July By 0 Mission Ceviche has opened a brick-and-mortar just in time for summer. Photo: Melissa Hom Every month in New York, there are a bewildering number of new dishes to eat, drinks to imbibe, and food-themed events to attend. Often, the hardest part is just figuring out what’s really worth your limited time. So Grub Street kicks off each month with a curated selection of dishes, drinks, and events that should absolutely be on your agenda. Make your plans now. 1. Stop for ceviche before going to Central Park. The Upper East Side has a new spot for raw fish in Mission Ceviche , the market vendor that now has its first brick-and-mortar location (1400 Second Ave., nr. 72nd St.). While chef José Luis Chavez’s spot specializes in its namesake dish, he dives deeper into Peruvian cuisine. Along with several kinds of ceviche, including the nikkei (tuna, watermelon, ponzu, ginger, and rice crackers; $15) and a vegetarian shiitake-mushroom version (cucumber, artichoke, and fruit “caviar”; $16), there are anticuchos including heart and shrimp, and two entrées to share: the chicken dish called aji de gallina ($24) and a seafood rice ($38). There are also cocktails, including a classic Pisco Sour and a Maracuya Sour with pisco, lime juice, passion fruit, and egg white. 2. Eat Mexican-style rotisserie chicken at the Fly and go to a Fourth of July party at Achilles Heel. The owners of Mexico City’s New York–style spot Cicatriz are in town, bringing a dose of Mexican cooking to a few restaurants run by old friends. Chef-owner Scarlett Lindeman, who made pasta and bartended at places like Roman ’s, and her brother and co-owner Jake have been serving al pastor sausages at the Meathook and pouring mezcal at Claro . Tonight, they’ll pop by the “chicken bar” the Fly to serve Mexican-style rotisserie chicken. If you’re still figuring out what to do for July 4, you’ll find them celebrating the holiday at Achilles Heel . Whichever event you go to, you’ll eat well. 3. Have a goat samosa and potato pancakes at Bombay Bread Bar. Bombay Bread Bar has a new executive chef and some new dishes. Chef de cuisine Jai Lakwhani will move into the head-honcho role as Floyd Cardoz, who will stay on as owner, assumes a new role at the Estiatorio Milos group. Lakwhani has worked for Cardoz going back to the Tabla days, his first job (as an extern) after culinary school, as well as at North End Grill, and as the chef de cuisine of BBB for the past year. The menu’s bones won’t change, but the Sint Maarten–raised Lakwhani is adding some of his own touches that reflect his Indian-Caribbean heritage, as in the goat jerk curry samosa with pigeon peas. The Kerala fried chicken will be replaced with an Indian fried chicken dredged in a coconut curry and served with a waffle made from chickpea-flour-based dhokla, and Cardoz’s egg kejriwal will be replaced with aloo tikki, an Indian potato-cake snack. 4. Drop by Dominique Ansel for dessertified “pretzels” and diner coffee. To celebrate his 15th year in New York, Dominique Ansel is turning his Soho bakery ’s pastry case into a tribute to the city. From July 4 through Labor Day, the nine whimsical desserts masquerade as iconic New York foods and drinks. There’s the “Bodega Coffee Tiramisu,” a classic blue coffee cup layered with dark-chocolate mousse, mascarpone ganache, and an espresso and amaretto-soaked almond biscuit. The “Everything Bagel & Schmear” is a honey-graham-cracker meringue filled with cheese mousse and sour-cherry jam and finished with an “everything seasoning” of sesame, poppy seeds, and toasted coconut. Of course, the “New York slice” gets an homage of a thinly veiled strawberry tart with fromage-blanc mousse, sliced strawberries, strawberry-basil jam, and a crust of vanilla sablé. There’s no chicken and rice, but there is a “Pretzel,” made from pretzel bavaroise, peanut-butter feuilletine, and soft caramel; and a “haute dog” with a bun of coconut-soaked ladyfingers with toasted coconut, a raspberry-crémeux sausage, and a “mustard” of passion-fruit curd. Other desserts commemorate NYC-specific experiences, like the apple-gelée based “Bite of the Big Apple” and the “Stroll in the Park Chocolate Hazelnut Acorn,” full of hazelnut mousse, dacquoise, and feuilletine, all paired with blackberry crème de cassis. Finally, there are two éclairs — the “Yellow Taxi Salted Caramel Éclair” and the “Spring Street Chocolate Éclair” — that look, well, like éclairs. But even these feature classic New York imagery along the ganache. — Bindu Bansinath 5. Get a shrimp burger for brunch at Wayan on Saturday … Add the Indonesian-ish Wayan to your brunch agenda. On both Saturday and Sunday, Cedric and Ochi Vongerichten’s restaurant will serve dishes like chicken wings with eggs ballado, the classic salad gado gado mashed up with avocado toast, and nasi goreng with kecap-manis-glazed bacon. There are also, take note, a pair of burgers: one made with shrimp and topped with green chile, Gruyère, and Thai basil, the other chicken with sambal-oelek sauce and calamansi pickles. 6. … Then get a pork burger for brunch on Sunday. Speaking of burgers, the West Village’s popular pasta destination L’Artusi will now be a place to get your weekend burger, too. A collaboration with Murray’s Cheese , the nontraditional (and, at $24, pricey) burger is made with a pork patty, Brooklyn Cured’ s bresaola, Gouda, pimentón aïoli, and pepper mostarda. It’s still served on a Martin’s potato roll, though. And in proper trophy-burger fashion, only 20 will be sold on Sundays only. In other important sandwich news, Bushwick general store Foster Sundry has added a rather good gyro (“Spiro’s Gyro”) to its menu. Served on Hot Bread Kitchen ’s fantastically flaky, buttery msemen, a Moroccan flatbread, it’s made with beef, mint hummus, fresh herbs, red and white sauce, pickles, and peppery arugula and bitter radicchio. The big reveal for Bombay Bread Bar’s new goat jerk curry samosa. Photos: Melissa Hom. The big reveal for Bombay Bread Bar’s new goat jerk curry samosa. Photos: Melissa Hom. 7. Snack on banana bread and vegan doughnuts in Chelsea. Carroll Gardens’ East One is one of the better places in New York to eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner at in one day. On Saturday, it expanded with a 1,700-square-foot restaurant in Chelsea. There are new coffees plus beer and wine, and executive chef Will Ono, who spent time at such world-class establishments as Noma and Mugaritz, keeps it simple but smart with his menu: bowls like a chocolate chia pot with coconut pudding, grilled spelt-flour banana bread topped with whipped espresso butter, a duck bánh mì, and pastries including lemon polenta loaf cake, vegan baked doughnuts, and an apricot-Madeira loaf. For now, this location is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eventually, it’ll stay open until 11 p.m. 8. Head to Long Island City for Greek-style hot dogs. Not going to the Hamptons or upstate? Want to try those new sausages from J&E Small Goods ? You’re in luck. Every Saturday from July 6 to August 31, Mina’s, the new restaurant opening in MoMA PS1 this fall, will serve J&E’s hot dogs on toasted sesame buns, complete with appropriate condiments like cucumber salad and tzatziki, along with a few other dishes like braised chickpeas, and natural wines, batched cocktails, and beer. 9. Get some Middle Eastern ice cream for Fort Greene Park. It’s frozen-sweets season, so the Republic of Booza is bringing its stretchy Middle Eastern ice cream to another part of Brooklyn. The company is popping up for the summer (at 45 Willoughby Avenue) just a couple blocks from Fort Greene Park, a perfect place to hang out and eat ice cream. Even better is that booza doesn’t melt as fast as American ice cream. The best part, though, are flavors like candied cream, sour-cherry mahlab, and salted Oreo. 10. Ring in the summer with an all-pork feast. Celebrating this summer? Starting today, the Nomad will offer a four-course menu called “the year of the pig” (at a cool $120 per person) that’s available only during the summer in the dining room and Elephant Bar. There are snacks like pork belly and avocado wraps; carbs in the form of spaghetti with guanciale, chile, and Parmesan; a porcelet loin with peaches, peppers, and charred corn; and a pork-free dessert of blueberry buckle with an oat crumble and lemon-ricotta ice cream. It’s not whole hog, but it’s a lot of hog. 11. Learn how to make fresh tofu in Williamsburg. Can’t get enough tofu in your life? Want to wake up to it every day? Head to the Museum of Food and Drink on July 25, when from 7 to 9 p.m. the author Hiroko Shimbo will talk about the food’s history and give a demonstration on preparing fresh tofu. ( Tickets are $25.) You’ll learn how to use the coagulant nigari and get tips on how to make a tofu dressing for all your salad needs. Eat like the experts. Sign up for the Grub Street newsletter. Terms & Privacy Notice By submitting your email, you agree to our Terms and Privacy Notice and to receive email correspondence from us.

Read More…

Graphic Designer – Req# 6738 – USA-NM-Albuquerque

upload resume:
Profile Graphic DesignerRequisition IDreq6738Working TitleGraphic DesignerPosition Grade09Position SummaryThe UNM Early Childhood Services Center, Training and Consultation HUB team is seeking a Graphic Designer to support the UNM Early Childhood Services Center with all graphic design needs. The Graphic Designer will work alongside other HUB team members to design print and assist with the design of web-based promotional materials. Duties will include, but are not limited to the following:Conceptualizes, designs, and produces curriculum, training, and/or promotional materials such as flyers, ads, brochures, logos, office signage, exhibits, and/or displays.Designs and produces camera-ready art including graphs, charts, clip art, posters, digitization of graphics, line-art, and/or photos.The selected candidate must have strong communication and networking skills, and must meet contract deliverables, Computer skills are essential with documented skills in Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint, along with graphic design experience using multiple design applications. This is a term Appointment: Funding available through 6/30/2019; continuance beyond that date is subject to department’s operational needs as outlined in UBPPM #3200.See the Position Description for additional information.Conditions of EmploymentMinimum QualificationsHigh school diploma or GED; at least 3 years of experience directly related to the duties and responsibilities specified.Completed degree(s) from an accredited institution that are above the minimum education requirement may be substituted for experience on a year for year basis.Preferred Qualifications* Design and production of print materials, such as ads, flyers brochures, etc.Ability to write and edit basic marketing copy* Public relations support for press releases and event calendars* Support for marketing email messages and blog* Social media and online community communication* Social media posting & content gathering* Updates to websites, creation of web content including graphics, copy & basic layout* Photography & basic videography & video editingAdditional RequirementsCandidates selected for interview must bring samples of work completed.CampusMain – Albuquerque, NMDepartmentCE Restricted Operations (373A)Employment TypeStaffStaff TypeTerm End Date6/30/2019StatusNon-ExemptPay12.38 – 15.47Benefits EligibleThis is a benefits eligible position. The University of New Mexico provides a comprehensive package of benefits including medical, dental, vision, and life insurance. In addition, UNM offers educational benefits through the tuition remission and dependent education programs. See the Benefits home page for a more information.ERB StatementTemporary and on-call employees working an appointment percentage of 26 (.26 FTE) or greater, per quarter, will be eligible to earn retirement service credits and thus are required to make New Mexico Educational Retirement Board (NMERB) contributions. More information pertaining to your FTE and NMERB contributions can be reviewed on the NMERB Guidelines Clarified webpage.Background Check RequiredNoFor Best Consideration Date10/8/2018Application InstructionsResume and Cover Letter. In your Cover Letter, document web graphic design experience.Positions posted with a Staff Type of Regular or Term are eligible for the Veteran Preference Program. See the Veteran Preference Program webpage for additional details. The University of New Mexico is committed to hiring and retaining a diverse workforce. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer, making decisions without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, veteran status, disability, or any other protected class. Company info Sign Up Now – EmploymentCrossing.com
Company Profile Founded in 1889 as New Mexico’s flagship institution, the University of New Mexico now occupies nearly 800 acres along old Route 66 in the heart of Albuquerque, a metropolitan area of more than 900,000 people. From the magnificent mesas to the west, past the banks of the historic Rio Grande to the Sandia Mountains to the east, Albuquerque is a blend of culture and cuisine, styles and stories, people, pursuits and panoramas. Offering a distinctive campus environment with a Pueblo Revival architectural theme, the campus buildings echo nearby Pueblo Indian villages. The nationally recognized campus arboretum and the popular duck pond offer an outstanding botanical experience in the midst of one of New Mexico’s great public open spaces. Similar Jobs: Sr Motion Graphics Designer Location : Albuquerque, NM With more than 300 days of sunshine, stunning sunsets, endless outdoor activities, home to the International Balloon Fiesta and a wonderfully varied art and food scene, Albuquerque, New Mexico is home and headquarters for REELZ—on… Graphic Designer Location : Albuquerque, NM Sagebrush Church is a multisite church based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sagebrush offers a casual environment where people can experience contemporary worship and teaching from the Bible. The mission of Sagebrush is to know Chris…

Read More…

I saw the LA Times article right before an I-5/Oregon road trip this weekend! So far, Oregon is currently the northernmost site west of the Mississippi on this Punjabi Trucking food map .
Was going to stop at Cottage Grove, OR’s Spice of India (off exit 174) yesterday, but we got hungry earlier and hit Roseburg’s “Shanti’s Indian Cuisine” off exit 125. Amazing naan. Randevs run it according to their business cards, so there’s a chance that it’s Punjabi-run.

Read More…