Ramadan: Hundreds of Muslims break their fast under guard from police

Ramadan: Hundreds of Muslims break their fast under guard from police

On this evening, about 300 people from 30 nationalities descend on the masjid, a palm tree-lined building in Mt Roskill, Auckland. The mosque shootings in March seem to have boosted, rather than reduced, the number of worshippers. Harrison Christian/Stuff The Masjid e Umar in Mt Roskill hosts hundreds of worshippers at sunset. “Still people are comfortable here,” says Hanif Patel, a member of the trust that runs the mosque. “In fact, we find more people come to the mosque than before.” Patel, dressed in white cap and kurta , leads us inside to an ablution block where worshippers wash before prayer. He washes his hands, feet and face, and gargles a little water. He has got to be careful, he points out, not to swallow any – his fast is not over yet. Harrison Christian/Stuff A man arrives at the masjid with his contribution: a bowl of Somali-style food. Before the evening meal, there’s prayer on the mosque’s upper floor. Patel hurries upstairs, faces towards Mecca, and prays. It’s the fourth call to prayer of the day. After dinner, there’s a fifth. Plates of spicy lamb curry, dates and salad are arranged on plastic sheets on the floor. The worshippers sit down, eyeing the food, until the muezzin announces “Allahu Akbar,” signalling the sun has gone down and they can break their fast. The worshippers dig in, starting with the dates, which they wash down with falooda , a pink Persian-style milkshake. The atmosphere is chatty and fraternal. There are no women here, Patel says, because unlike some other mosques in Auckland there is no dedicated section for them. Harrison Christian/Stuff Before prayer, worshippers wash themselves in an ablution block. The food is a mix of Somali, Afghani, Indian and Pakistani cuisine. Even the police officers keeping guard can’t resist coming inside for a meal. “This is probably my threshhold for spiciness,” an officer says cheerfully. “Any more and I’d be in tears.” The officers drift back out to their patrol car, where they’ll be stationed until about 10pm. Harrison Christian/Stuff At the Masjid e Umar in Mt Roskill, hundreds of Muslims break their fast during Ramadan. After the food, the mosque is quickly converted from dining hall back into an open prayer area. A man with a vacuum is already dealing to stray bits of rice. Many of the worshippers wander home to have supper, before coming back to the mosque to pray again at 7pm. There is still a bank of flowers laid by well-wishers on the roadside outside the masjid, after 51 people were shot dead at two mosques in Christchurch in March. Harrison Christian/Stuff Hanif Patel is a member of the trust that runs the Masjid e Umar. “Still people come and put the flowers there,” Patel says in the carpark. “They come and see us and say, ‘Are you OK?'” Not content with giving us a feed, Patel gives us more curry in a takeaway container, a carton of falooda, dates and pamphlets about Islam. “You always wonder what could happen to you when you’re praying,” he adds. “But it cannot stop people to pray. People do more. We won’t let them win.” Harrison Christian/Stuff The meal marks the end of 12 hours of fasting. Stuff

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‘The best chefs in the city want to be here’ – every street food stall at Manchester Arndale Food Market, reviewed

Share By Emily Heward Daisy Jackson Rebecca Day 07:00, 25 MAY 2019 Updated 08:09, 25 MAY 2019 What’s On Arndale Food Market is home to a variety of different food stalls Get the biggest What’s On A crisis in the casual dining market has been blamed for the closure of chains like Jamie's Italian, which went under this week.
But that assessment ignores the increasing popularity of food halls in the UK – and is there any more distinctly Mancunian than the Arndale Food Market?
Long before Alty Market House and the Mackie Mayor were a twinkle in Nick Johnson's eye, the shopping centre's modest market has been quietly slinging out some of the best value lunches in the city.
Squeezed in between the twinkling LEDs of mobile phone shops and glint of gold jewellery stalls, you'll find a cornucopia of world cuisine whisking you from China to Canada and everywhere in between, all in one lunch hour.
And that's more or less what we did – albeit over a couple of days – to bring you the ultimate guide to what's inside.
Holy Crab Who could ever have imagined an oyster bar in the Arndale?
After pop-ups at Kosmonaut (RIP) and Hatch, shellfish slingers Holy Crab have opened a permanent seafood shack at the shopping centre.
There are three main choices on the menu: fish-filled brioche buns, crab balls and fritters, and oysters. The latter, which are three for £7, come with a choice of shallot vinegar, soy and ginger or bloody mary hot sauce.
Crayfish tail brioche The small, meaty pieces of crayfish in a crayfish tail sandwich (£6) taste like they've been plucked straight from the water and come doused with a lightly smoky chipotle mayonnaise, and topped with lettuce and tomato cubes. It's all nestled perfectly into a sweet, puffy brioche bun and makes a refreshing, summery antidote to this stuffy corner of the Arndale.
Rebecca
Blue Caribou Blue Caribou are relative newcomers to the Arndale (Image: Manchester Evening News) Poutine is essentially a Canadian take on everyone's favourite end-of-night-out feast of chips, cheese and gravy, and no one on this side of the pond does it better than Blue Caribou.
“I wish I was drunk,” I mutter through a mouthful of slim chips. I'd certainly be better-equipped to plough through the weighty portion of potato if I had a few pints in me.
La Classique poutine from Blue Caribou (Image: Manchester Evening News) The La Classique (£5.50) features skin-on chips fried to a golden perfection, then loaded with a glossy gravy (vegetarian and vegan gravies are available) and a hearty handful of cheese curds which don't quite melt despite the molten meat juice piled on top.
For an extra price, you can have your poutine loaded with the likes of tempura seaweed, pastrami, or roast chicken, and there are hot dogs and maple butter fries to tackle too.
Daisy
Wholesome Junkies Wholesome Junkies are the newest arrivals at the Arndale Market (Image: Manchester Evening News) Though the menu here is strictly vegan, no one could tar Wholesome Junkies with the 'clean eating' brush – not when burgers and loaded tater tots are championed so proudly.
After an appearance on BBC Two's My Million Pound Menu last year, founder Chelsea Campbell has built herself one of the best-looking stands in the entire market. It's been open only a few days, but has hit its stride quickly with a steady flow of customers.
Thai Tots from Wholesome Junkies (Image: Manchester Evening News) From inside the teal-painted, plant-covered countertop comes a pot (an eco-friendly Vegware pot, naturally) piled high with Thai Tots (£4.25) – perfect discs of potato fried to a deep golden colour, drizzled in tangy sweet chilli and spicy sriracha mayo.
Sauce distribution is good – not a naked tot in sight – and the service so friendly I want to stand and natter all day.
Daisy
Intoku Intoku (Image: Manchester Evening News) 'Good food, done in secret', is the slightly unsettling strapline for this Japanese sushi and bento stall.
Rest assured, they don't seem to have anything to hide here, but I can confirm it fulfils the first part of its promise.
Behind the charmingly ramshackle wooden frontage, two chefs are busy whipping up bowls of katsudon, donburi and karaage, next to a counter stacked with takeaway sushi boxes.
The spicy chicken karaage (£5.50) is fresh from the fryer with a tongue-strippingly hot batter. If you have any tastebuds left, the punchy chilli and garlic sauce it's drenched in will see them off. It's rounded out by a lacing of sesame and a scattering of sweet slaw and crisped kale, on a plump bed of sticky rice.
This vibrant bowl is a world away from the boxes of beige slop being hawked by the chains populating the food court at the opposite end of the Arndale – and cheaper to boot.
And it's dished up by lovely staff who don't mind navigating the maze of stalls to locate me at a table around the corner so I don't have to stand and wait.
Emily
Wing's The original Wing's, in Lincoln Square, is best-known as the Chinese restaurant of choice for Manchester's footballers.
Sadly, this offshoot isn't scoring many goals.
I ask for rice to accompany my portion of Szechuan beef (£6.90), but am served a pile of noodles.
When I clarify that I've ordered rice, I'm asked if 'half and half' would do, as the cashier begrudgingly spoons the noodles back into the bain marie. Customer preferences be damned.
The beef, which most closely resembles a withered, grey ear, comes swimming in an indistinguishable Chinese sauce with the odd bamboo shoot for company.
It's one of the worst dishes we encounter in the whole market -and among the most expensive.
Rebecca
Pancho's Burritos Pancho's Burritos in Manchester's Arndale market (Image: Manchester Evening News) Mexican chef Enrique Martinez and his Mancunian wife Colette started out with a tiny burrito stall they took to festivals before opening their Arndale food market outlet in 2010.
Burritos are still their speciality, alongside tacos, tostadas, quesadillas, enchiladas and nachos.
There's a dizzying choice of fillings fighting like luchadores for your attention with shouty fluorescent stickers plastered across the counter.
Fillings at Pancho's Burritos in Manchester's Arndale market (Image: Manchester Evening News) Between £6.30 and £7.70 gets you a fat bundle of fillings including slow-cooked beef, picante lamb, chilli con carne, chicken or pulled pork wrapped inside a tortilla.
It's all wrapped up so snugly that I'm three bites in before I hit my choice of pulled chicken, which has collapsed into feathery shreds in its subtly spicy marinade. You can take the heat up or down a notch with a choice of salsas and cooling guac, all included in the price.
(Image: Manchester Evening News) Bonus points for plenty of vegan options too, including a vegetable chilli, tofu fajita and a veggie 'chorizo' with potato.
Emily
Heaven Italian Cafe 1982 called – it wants its prices back. That's right, this creamy, comforting bowl of funghi pasta costs just £2.99.
Heaven also serves baguettes (£2.50), toasties (from £1.50), and wraps (from £2.50)
The pasta is a touch overcooked and it's quite an assault on the senses – as I open the box I'm confronted with a strong stench of garlic and the lovely stall holder free-pours a heavy dose of parmesan on the food. It's enough to ward away even the most persistent vampire.
But it's a satisfying lunch nonetheless – and topped with meaty, buttery mushrooms. For this price, you'd be mad to complain.
Rebecca
Viet Shack Viet Shack (Image: Manchester Evening News) “Get the Quack Fries,” my friend commands me as I head in the direction of Viet Shack.
“I'm working my way through the menu and the best thing I've had so far is the Quack Fries,” the woman in front of me in the queue advises.
“You must have the Quack Fries,” the guy behind the counter insists as I deliberate a different dish.
I order the Quack Fries.
Quack fries The generous box of chips comes topped with shredded duck, doused in a sweet, tangy sriracha jam and a pile of crunchy fried shallots. They're utterly addictive and I can see why they inspire such cult-like devotion in all who consume them.
Consider me converted.
Emily
Fusion Lab (Image: Manchester Evening News) Across the counter from Viet Shack is its sister stall Fusion Lab.
She's a sister who's been around the world on a gap year jaunt and come home with only a blurry recollection of where she's been and what she's eaten, then tried to retrace her steps via a menu.
Think Cubano sandwiches crossed with Vietnamese bánh mì, Canadian poutine topped with Korean fried chicken, and Asian tacos.
The Ninja Noodles (£6.50) are a turbo-charged salad built around a bed of slippery, steamed noodles and topped with a choice of chicken, duck or tofu.
(Image: Manchester Evening News) Sweet, tender slabs of duck are piled up generously along with lettuce leaves, shredded carrot, cucumber and sweet red onion, and a sprinkling of red chilli and sesame.
For a couple of quid more than an M&S or Pret pre-packaged salad, it's well worth the upgrade.
Emily
Salt & Pepper Smoothielicious (Image: Manchester Evening News) Another recent incomer to the south side of the market, Salt & Pepper opened just last week in the spot vacated by La Bandera.
It's been opened by artist Chloe Pu, fusing her love of food and art behind a bold black frontage marked out by a graphic of a Manchester bee entwined with a snarling Chinese dragon.
Pretty much everything gets the Cantonese salt and pepper treatment here: chicken strips and wings, shredded beef, king prawns, tofu, on their own, with jasmine rice or chips, or stuffed inside flatbreads, with squeezy bottles of soy, canton or sweet and sour sauce and chilli or lemon mayo on standby.
Salt and pepper king prawn flatbreads (Image: Manchester Evening News) The salt and pepper king prawns are big, fat curlicues cocooned inside the lightest batter, and swaddled inside two flatbreads like giant tacos. There's a gentle hum of peppery heat, kindled by a scattering of sliced red chilli, and rounded out by a lightly pickled salad and a dribble of sweet and sour sauce.
At £7 it's a steal – and a strong contender for the best meal at the market.
Emily
Lotus Food From pizzas to salmon and rice, to chicken stew, to wraps, this stall serves them all.
Unable to discern what their speciality, their pride and joy, could be, I order a spicy chicken wrap for £3.70.
The tortilla casing is burnt, and inside it's no better.
A claggy mess of pizza sauce, meat, mozzarella and vegetables lies within though none of them are plentiful enough to impart any real flavour. A few bites and I'm done.
Rebecca
Onje Onje (Image: Manchester Evening News) Simply meaning 'food' in Yoruba, Onje serves up hearty African-Caribbean meals from its tiny canteen on the edge of the main market.
Jerk chicken, curry goat and escovitch sit side by side with jollof rice, patties and dumplings behind the counter.
Portions are piled high and squashed into takeaway boxes. The small portion of rice and peas, beef and plantain (£7 – one of a handful of 'meals on the go' options) I ask for is anything but; the lid can barely contain the bulky beef stew heaped on top of the mound of rice.
Onje (Image: Manchester Evening News) Some of the meat's a bit sinewy but the tomato sauce has a rich, fruity heat to it, and the sweet, sticky slabs of plantain are good enough to eat by the boxful.
Emily
The Market Point (Image: Manchester Evening News) Occupying a commanding position in the centre of the original food market is this vast pizzeria with a sideline of burgers and grill dishes.
Staff are so attentive they bark 'yes please' as soon as you're within a five metre range of the counter, and hold out forks loaded with free samples to indecisive (read: already very full) customers like me.
I'm not sure what possesses me to order a mixed grill (£6.50) this far into our culinary marathon, except maybe the promise of some salad in place of bread or rice, but I find myself panic-ordering a gigantic box of chicken doner with a kobide laid down on top of it like a meaty sword.
(Image: Manchester Evening News) It's not a pretty sight – drizzled with hot chilli sauce it looks a bit like a massacre – but the chicken is nicely spiced, although a bit jaded by perhaps a few too many whirls around the doner carousel. I leave most of the rubbery kobide in favour of the crunchy pickled chillis and salad buried underneath it.
This is a meal probably best saved for after a few too many pints at the Micro Bar.
Emily
Eat 2 Treat Eat2Treat (Image: Manchester Evening News) My expectations are low when approaching Eat 2 Treat (what does that name even mean?), a small stall on the fringes of the market with a logo that looks very much like WordArt.
Still, as the old adage goes, never judge a market stall by its signage, and the vegetable pakora wrap I'm handed for a mere £3 is one of the best-value and most filling meals you can buy here.
The pakoras are gently spicy and packed with cubes of potato, all drizzled in a peppery chilli sauce.
Daisy
Zorbas The stuffed-to-bursting falafel pitta from Zorba's (Image: Manchester Evening News) It's hard to imagine the Arndale market without Zorbas. These food court veterans have been slinging their Greek dishes – pittas, gyros, stifado, salads and meze – for more than a decade.
Service is efficient and competent, a falafel pitta (£4.50) stuffed to bursting presented to me in a matter of minutes.
The fillings aren't particularly imaginative, but the mixture of lettuce, cucumber, tomato and red onion are at least perfectly fresh and drowning in a crisp cucumber yoghurt.
It's not an easy eat but it is a delicious one, with crisp and earthy falafels hugged by some of the best hummus you'll find in the city.
Daisy
Hong Thai Perhaps the most popular stall in the Arndale Market, judging by the queues, Hong Thai knocks out tasty Thai food at rock bottom prices.
There's A LOT on the menu, which ticks off all the Thai classics from lamb massaman curry (£5.99) to lemongrass chicken (£5.99).
A mere £5 for a vegetable pad Thai gets you piles and piles of sticky, sweet, spicy noodles fresh from a sizzling wok, served alongside big chunks of stir fried vegetables. This is a no fuss, quick dish – a satisfying snack for anyone popping in during a trip to town.
Rebecca
Smoke Shed Smoke Shed This little shack specialises in American comfort food with an Asian twist. Think buttermilk chicken burgers and loaded fries, served alongside sushi burgers and beet and avocado salad.
The buffalo wings and chips (£5.50) looks like a pretty unappetising pile of limbs, but appearances are deceiving in this case.
The tender, barbecued chicken is smothered in a buttery, salty sauce – the type that's guaranteed to drip down your face, stick to your fingers and leave a mess. But you won't care, honestly. Plus, it's an absolute bargain for a fiver.
Kudos too for the thoughtful if slightly startling customer service. As I walk away with my food, the stallholder chases me down to tuck in my bra strap, which is poking through the backless section of my dress. It's a relief that I can tuck into my chicken wings safe in the knowledge that my dignity is intact.
Rebecca
Cafe Greco Signature Baguette A halloumi and pesto panini from Cafe Greco (Image: Manchester Evening News) Do you remember when paninis suddenly soared in popularity, became the very height of lunchtime sophistication? We miss you, 2002.
They're ubiquitous in the UK these days, but here in the Arndale they're significantly cheaper – and larger – than the sort you find in a big-name chain.
An incredibly salty combination of halloumi and pesto for £3.20 is tasty enough, though the fresh tomato inside withers away to a pink pulp under the pressure of the panini press.
Other fillings include meatballs, bolognese, fried chicken, German salami, and bacon, with none costing more than £3.80.
Daisy
Cafe Issanoz Something's not right at Cafe Issanoz (Image: Manchester Evening News) Cafe Issanoz seems to be distant cousin of every other stall in the Arndale market, boasting both pale baguettes to be crushed in a panini press and enough ingredients to cobble together a mezze.
For £3.50 you can get a long baguette with a choice of fillings, most of which are chicken in some sort of mayo-based sauce.
I order a falafel and hummus wholemeal baguette for £3.50 – and two bites in realise something's not quite right.
The baguette is passed around the group to inspect but no one can quite put their finger on where the sour tang is coming from – is it the hummus? Is the salad ruined by the act of being toasted in a sandwich press?
We open it up to dissect it but we still can't suss out what's amiss. Whatever it is, this is the only inedible thing we find in a sea of street food.
Daisy
Pancake Cafe Pancake Cafe This stall serves up a little bit of everything, from baked potatoes to toasties and wraps.
But it's the namesake pancakes we're here for, with fillings ranging from lemon and sugar (£2.99) to Oreo and caramel (£3.99) and white chocolate (£3.99).
A sweet, light crepe folded around a generous slathering of Nutella (£3.75) is like a heavenly hug after a hard day at work. In fact, I'd quite like to crawl inside it and watch a documentary on Netflix. It's just that kind of pancake.
Rebecca
Frosty Licks The eskimo pie from Frosty Licks (Image: Manchester Evening News) I've eaten so much starchy carb by the time I get to Frosty Licks that if you cut me, I'd bleed potato.
Gagging for something sweet I dive in on an eskimo pie (£3.50), a scoop of ice cream sandwiched between two freshly-baked chocolate chip cookies.
Service is excellent here. The girl behind the counter is happy to hand over tasters of the ice creams, and is so smiley I can only assume she makes it through the day dosed up on sugar and E-numbers.
The eskimo pie is a simple, childish joy. Eat it fast – the cookies toughen up quite quickly when snuggled up to their icy cold filling – and prepare to leave with a dairy goatee.
Daisy
Hansfords (Image: Manchester Evening News) Hansfords has been in the bakery biz for more than a century, and has seen the Arndale Market progress to the buzzing food and drink hotspot it is today.
Although their surrounds have changed drastically over the years, their offering has barely budged.
Half-bakery, half-delicatessen, its counters are piled high with pies, pastries, cakes and cheeses – and its carvery rolls are the stuff of lunchtime legend.
There's a choice of beef, pork or gammon, sliced straight from the joint and stuffed into a barm slathered with stuffing and gravy.
My only regret is telling the lady behind the counter to go easy on the gravy on a regular beef barm (£3.70, large £5.30). It's basically a roast dinner sandwich, and who can argue with that?
Emily
Bollywood Dhaba (Image: Manchester Evening News) One of the market's longest-standing residents, Bollywood Dhaba has expanded its classic curry offering in recent years to include a small Indian street food menu.
Alongside the bain marie tubs of chicken tikka masala, lamb jalfrezi and saag aloo you'll now find snacks such as papri chaat and gol gappay.
Their bhel puri (£3.80) is a tamarind-sticky hillock of puffed rice, crispy sev, red onion, tomato and peanuts.
Chole puri at Bollywood Dhaba (Image: Manchester Evening News) Chole puri (£4) is generously portioned too, with three of the feather-light, flaky flatbreads to scoop up the richly-spiced chickpea curry.
Emily
Micro Bar Landlord Mark Dade share a laugh with regulars at the MicroBar (Image: Manchester Evening News) The vast majority of liquids sold in the Arndale Market come devoid of any sort of ABV.
With that in mind, it would be so easy for Micro Bar – the only bar – to half-arse its offering and know that people would still pay a visit.
But the owners have thankfully gone far beyond that. The shelves in this tiny pub are stocked high with bottles and cans of craft lagers, ciders and ales, to drink in or take away, as well as a few offerings on tap and a growler station.
Local breweries are well-represented – they're pulling Wander Beyond's Peak pale ale when we visit – but you'll find a decent selection of continental pints too.
Arndale Market food review (Image: Manchester Evening News) Grab something off the shelf or the fridges and the staff will hand you an ice-cold glass from their freezer – then you can pull up a sturdy leather stool at the bar or retreat back to the market's standard-issue plastic seats nearby.
Daisy
Smoothielicious (Image: Manchester Evening News) If you prefer wheatgrass to wheat beer, step away from Micro Bar and head in the direction of Smoothielicious for freshly blended juices and smoothies.
Craving some vitamins by now, I order a freshly-pressed '100% carrot juice (with fresh ginger)'. Now I'm not a mathematician, but…
I don't see any ginger go into the juicer and I can't taste any in the drink, but it more or less does what it says on the tin and it's pretty refreshing.
The less said about the giant vat of Vaseline I spy behind the counter, the better, though. I don't think I'm ready for that jelly.
Smoothielicious (Image: Manchester Evening News) The verdict If you'd told us a few years ago that some of Greater Manchester's best cooks would be clamouring for a spot in the Arndale Market – where their neighbours would be nail bars and fake leather bag salesmen – we'd have thought you were mad.
But the market truly has become a vital stepping stone for so many independent businesses. It bridges the gap from street food events to full-blown restaurant (Viet Shack has a popular restaurant in Ancoats these days) and nurtures a loyal customer following along the way.
Standards are high here and continuously improving. The pressure from the newest arrivals is leaving some of the old-timers clinging on by the skin of their teeth – though the quality, and the value-for-money, remains leaps and bounds ahead of the food court upstairs.
If you are to trust our word on anything, let it be this. Put down the Maccies value meal, step away from Spudulike, and take the short trip across the shopping centre to the far superior lunch deals of the Arndale Food Market.
Read More Manchester cheap eats reviews That's Thai, Cheetham Hill Lily's, Ashton-under-Lyne Mi & Pho, Northenden Siam Smiles, city centre Cafe Marhaba, city centre Frankie's Toasties, city centre Amma's Canteen, Chorlton Blue Nile Cafe, Stretford

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Qatar- Ramadan Market at DECC a huge hit

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(MENAFN – The Peninsula) The Peninsula
Doha:An array of food and household items related to Ramadan are being showcased at ‘Ramadan Market’ having over 150 shops from 25 different countries including Oman, Kuwait, India, Pakistan, Turkey, Iran, China and Serbia at Doha Exhibition & Convention Center (DECC).
The market offers traditional clothing fabric, jewellery, spices, Iranian pure saffron, organic beauty products, utensils, carpets, perfumes among many more. Ramadan Market which opens from 2pm to 1am will conclude on May 30. A short break for Iftar is taken from 5:30pm to 7pm.
‘The market has a dedicated play area for children offering largest bounce castle which is extremely popular among the kids and skill games where the winners get gifts, Qazi Yousri, Media Manager of Qsports told The Peninsula.
Ramadan Market is being organised by QSports in collaboration with United Expo WLL. Yousri said that a wide range of items which are very popular among local community including perfumes, luxuries, carpets, art pieces, decoration pieces are being sold at the market. ‘The food court of the market is serving delicious food and beverages, said Yousri adding that the market under single roof is fulfilling the need of all members of the family.
Speaking about the targeted customers, he said that the market targets all residents including citizens and expatriates as it offers beautiful Arabic dresses like ‘Abaya’ unstitched traditional cloths from different countries, Arabic sweets, perfumes, Bukhor Oud, carpets, shoes. ‘The most selling items are unstitched clothes for ladies and sweets as Eid Al Fitr is approaching, said Yousri adding that over 25 shops are selling clothing fabric from Pakistan, India, Kuwait, Iran and Bangladesh. Rovie Paver, a saleswoman at a cosmetic shop at the market said: ‘We offer skin care products from Korea which are organic, free from any type of chemicals.
She said that the products are made by famous Korean brand which are not available in Qatari market. Another vendor from Iran said that he was offering Iranian products including pure Zafaran (saffron) and sweets. ‘We are offering two types of Zafaran; the pure Zafaran ‘Naqi Al Safi’ has the highest demand, said the vendor.
A customer, Nadim Maher, an Indian expatriate, said that the good aspect of Ramadan Market is that it showcases many things related to holy Ramadan and Eid Al Fitr at one place which saved time and efforts of customers.
‘My children bought some clothes and shoes for Eid Al Fitr. Now we are going to buy some more items, said Maher.
A wide-variety of products and brands from over 150 exhibitors from around 20 countries are on display at the market. Top restaurants and cafes are also there to dish out mouth-watering light cuisine while kids can enjoy in a purpose-built kids area featuring the world’s largest bounce castle.
‘It has been a great journey for Ramadan Market which has the potential to grow even bigger next season, said Aya Kassab, Business Development Manager, QSports. She said that Ramadan Market is more than just a shopping extravaganza; it is an opportunity to simply relax, eat some good food, get an adrenaline rush while playing exciting games and basically spend some good family time.
‘The market has been designed to offer a complete family package and a fun night-out entertainment, said Kassab.
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Wednesday night dinner at Swagat Indian Cuisine

Creating Cleavage Wednesday night dinner at Swagat Indian Cuisine
It is Wednesday and we are doing dinner at Swagat Indian Cuisine , we ate here once before back in January after the place we were going was not open. They have really good food and treated us wonderful so we decided to go back tonight. Now I get off work later which makes it harder to make it to dinner but I get to sleep a little later in the morning. I got home at 5:30 so it was a rush to get ready so I won’t have the time to enjoy my getting ready but I will get to see my friends and that makes it special. Now as I know I have limited time I pick out my outfit the night before and I stick with it. I was ready by 6:15 and on my way which I figure is pretty good, from male to Susana in 45 minutes.
Now parking is not really easy in this part of town and I figured it would take some work to find a parking spot. Now as I got close a car pulled out right in front of me, they didn’t even look and I had to slam on my breaks and almost hit them, I was a little upset but then realized it left a parking spot right across the street from Swagat. I parked and walk in and Melissa was already there. Now we only had 4 of us post we would be here tonight. It wasn’t long and Julie and Barb showed up. I really do love getting together with my awesome friends. We talked a little about the Red Dress Part Julie, Trixie and I went to. It was so much fun. It really is hard to believe all the things I do as Susan as I can still remember how scared I was when I tried to go out. I really have come a long way the last 10 years with the help of my friends.
We finally ordered and kept talking, shortly after we ordered Sophia showed up. She was in the area for a class and it got canceled so she came and joined us. It was great to see her also so we had 5 of us tonight. A little smaller group but still fun and it gave us a good chance to talk as with a smaller group everyone is involved in the conversation. It is a hard balance, I really do like it when we get a lot of girls out and have a big turnout, the only problem is it is hard to talk with everyone and you can feel like you left some out. Our waiter tonight was awesome, he treated us incredible but then again the lady we had last time we were here was also awesome. I will say Portland in general is awesome, we pretty much go where ever we want and always get treated well.
After dinner we sat and talked for a while. It really was a wonderful evening out. It was sad to call it a night and say goodbye to my friends, they really are an important part of my life and who I am. Now when I got here it was nice so I left my coat in the car but now it was about 9:30 and a little cold and just a light rain. I was lucky as I was parked just across the street. I got to my car and started it and was waiting for a couple cars to go by when it really started raining hard, I hoped the other girls had made it to their cars before the rain really hit. The drive home was slow as it was really raining, but it was a wonderful night. Now I am looking forward to Saturday night when I get to go out again with my friends to the Escape.
I will get some good Susan time the next week or so. I am also going out on Sunday as we are having an administrator meeting for our group the Rose City T-girls on Sunday so I will see Barb, Melissa, Julie and Cassandra again. It starts at 2 so I am hoping after our meeting we will get dinner. I also have Monday off as it is Memorial Day so I am planning on getting out at least for a little while as Susan. Now I am not sure what I will do but I am thinking about going to the nail salon if they are open. When I got back from Diva Las Vegas I had my nails shortened and the acrylic thinned out on April 12 th and I have had them that way since. I have had to file them shorter a couple times and my nails have grown out to where about the top 3 rd of my nail is natural so it doesn’t look really good any more plus I am getting lifting. My original plan was to just let them grow out as the nail under the acrylic will be weak and break easy. So now I have to decide if I remove it and just have really weak, brittle and short nails till they grow all the way out or do I get acrylic on them again and have nice nails, if I do that it would mean going to the nail salon every 2 to 3 weeks for fills with I love but it is also $30 to $40 each time I go. I really do love getting my nails done and having nice pretty nails and yes if I could I would have nails like this all the time, my nails from my Diva Las Vegas vacation , how awesome would it be to have these all the time. I have a few days to think about it. I also have Tuesday June 4 th off and that will also most likely be a Susan day, maybe a little shopping.
Thanks for reading and be sure and read my most recent blog to see what is new and I will try to get them posted quicker. Advertisements

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Cultural appropriation

Cultural appropriation From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Wearing a Native American war bonnet as a “fashion accessory”, especially when done by a non- Native , is commonly cited as an example of cultural appropriation. Cultural appropriation , at times also phrased cultural misappropriation , is the adoption of elements of one culture by members of another culture. This can be controversial when members of a dominant culture appropriate from disadvantaged minority cultures . Cultural appropriation is considered harmful by many, and to be a violation of the collective intellectual property rights of the originating, minority cultures, notably indigenous cultures and those living under colonial rule. Often unavoidable when multiple cultures come together, cultural appropriation can include using other cultures’ cultural and religious traditions, fashion, symbols, language, and music. According to critics of the practice, cultural appropriation differs from acculturation , assimilation , or cultural exchange in that this appropriation is a form of colonialism : cultural elements are copied from a minority culture by members of a dominant culture, and these elements are used outside of their original cultural context—sometimes even against the expressly stated wishes of members of the originating culture. Often, the original meaning of these cultural elements is lost or distorted, and such displays are often viewed as disrespectful, or even as a form of desecration, by members of the originating culture. Cultural elements which may have deep meaning to the original culture may be reduced to ” exotic ” fashion or toys by those from the dominant culture. Kjerstin Johnson has written that, when this is done, the imitator, “who does not experience that oppression is able to ‘play’, temporarily, an ‘exotic’ other, without experiencing any of the daily discriminations faced by other cultures.” The African-American academic, musician and journalist Greg Tate argues that appropriation and the “fetishising” of cultures, in fact, alienates those whose culture is being appropriated. The concept of cultural appropriation has also been widely criticized. Some writers on the topic note that the concept is often misunderstood or misapplied by the general public, and that charges of “cultural appropriation” are at times misapplied to situations such as eating food from a variety of cultures, or learning about different cultures. Commentators who criticize the concept believe that the act of cultural appropriation does not meaningfully constitute a social harm, or that the term lacks conceptual coherence. Some argue that the term sets arbitrary limits on intellectual freedom and artists’ self-expression, reinforces group divisions, or itself promotes a feeling of enmity or grievance, rather than liberation. Overview Cultural appropriation can involve the use of ideas, symbols, artifacts, or other aspects of human-made visual or non-visual culture. As a concept that is controversial in its applications, the propriety of cultural appropriation has been the subject of much debate. Opponents of cultural appropriation view many instances as wrongful appropriation when the subject culture is a minority culture or is subordinated in social, political, economic, or military status to the dominant culture or when there are other issues involved, such as a history of ethnic or racial conflict. Linda Martín Alcoff writes that this is often seen in cultural outsiders’ use of an oppressed culture’s symbols or other cultural elements, such as music, dance, spiritual ceremonies, modes of dress, speech, and social behaviour when these elements are trivialized and used for fashion, rather than respected within their original cultural context. Opponents view the issues of colonialism, context, and the difference between appropriation and mutual exchange as central to analyzing cultural appropriation. They argue that mutual exchange happens on an “even playing field”, whereas appropriation involves pieces of an oppressed culture being taken out of context by a people who have historically oppressed those they are taking from, and who lack the cultural context to properly understand, respect, or utilize these elements. A different view of cultural appropriation states the practice is “a deeply conservative project”, despite progressive roots. The goal is “to preserve in formaldehyde the content of an established culture and second tries prevent others from interacting with that culture.” Proponents view it as often benign or mutually beneficial, citing mutation, product diversity, technological diffusion, and cultural empathy as among its benefits. For example, the film Star Wars used elements from Akira Kurosawa ‘s The Hidden Fortress , which itself used elements from Shakespeare ; culture in the aggregate is arguably better off for each instance of appropriation. Fusion between cultures has produced such foods as American Chinese cuisine , modern Japanese sushi , and bánh mì , each of which is sometimes argued to reflect part of its respective culture’s identity. Academic study Cultural appropriation is a relatively recent subject of academic study. The term emerged in the 1980s, in discussions of post-colonial critiques of Western expansionism, though the concept had been explored earlier, such as in “Some General Observations on the Problems of Cultural Colonialism” by Kenneth Coutts‐Smith in 1976. Cultural and racial theorist George Lipsitz has used the term “strategic anti-essentialism” to refer to the calculated use of a cultural form, outside of one’s own, to define oneself or one’s group. Strategic anti-essentialism can be seen in both minority cultures and majority cultures, and is not confined only to the use of the other. However, Lipsitz argues, when the majority culture attempts to strategically anti-essentialize itself by appropriating a minority culture, it must take great care to recognize the specific socio-historical circumstances and significance of these cultural forms so as not to perpetuate the already existing majority vs. minority unequal power relations. Examples Art, literature, iconography, and adornment A common example of cultural appropriation is the adoption of the iconography of another culture, and using it for purposes that are unintended by the original culture or even offensive to that culture’s mores . Examples include sports teams using Native American tribal names or images as mascots; wearing jewelry or fashion with religious symbols such as the war bonnet , medicine wheel , or cross without any belief in those religions; and copying iconography from another culture’s history such as Polynesian tribal tattoos, Chinese characters , or Celtic art worn without regard to their original cultural significance. Critics of the practice of cultural appropriation contend that divorcing this iconography from its cultural context or treating it as kitsch risks offending people who venerate and wish to preserve their cultural traditions. In Australia, Aboriginal artists have discussed an “authenticity brand” to ensure consumers are aware of artworks claiming false Aboriginal significance. The movement for such a measure gained momentum after the 1999 conviction of John O’Loughlin for the fraudulent sale of works described as Aboriginal but painted by non-indigenous artists. In Europe and North America a common example of cultural appropriation is the misrepresentation of East Indian symbols, mythology and religious ideas as typified in Rudyard Kipling’s stories and Talbot Mundy’s Jimgrim book series including the highly discussed Nine Unknown and King of the Khyber Rifles . Movements to undo the biases, misrepresentations, and cultural inaccuracies made popular by authors like Kipling and Mundy have gained significant momentum since Kipling’s poem ” If— ” was scrubbed off Manchester University walls by student leaders. AAJA, a watchdog organization for fair and respectful cultural representation, works to point out and prevent these cultural inaccuracies in the media. Historically, some of the most hotly debated cases of cultural appropriation have occurred in places where cultural exchange is the highest, such as along the trade routes in southwestern Asia and southeastern Europe. Some scholars of the Ottoman Empire and ancient Egypt argue that Ottoman and Egyptian architectural traditions have long been falsely claimed and praised as Persian or Arab. Religion and spirituality Many Native Americans have criticized what they deem to be cultural appropriation of their sweat lodge and vision quest ceremonies by non-Natives, and even by tribes who have not traditionally had these ceremonies. They contend that there are serious safety risks whenever these events are conducted by those who lack the many years of training and cultural immersion required to lead them safely, pointing to the deaths or injuries in 1996, 2002, 2004, and several high-profile deaths in 2009 . Fashion Claude Monet ‘s wife, Camille Doncieux wearing a kimono , 1875. Cultural appropriation is controversial in the fashion industry due to the belief that some trends commercialise and cheapen the ancient heritage of indigenous cultures. There is debate about whether designers and fashion houses understand the history behind the clothing they are taking from different cultures, besides the ethical issues of using these cultures’ shared intellectual property without consent, acknowledgement, or compensation. In response to this criticism, many fashion experts claim that this occurrence is in fact “culture appreciation”, rather than cultural appropriation. Companies and designers claim the use of unique cultural symbols is an effort to recognize and pay homage to that specific culture. 17th century to Victorian era George IV of the United Kingdom wearing highland dress , 1822. During the 17th century, the forerunner to the three piece suit was appropriated from the traditional dress of diverse Eastern European and Islamic countries. The Justacorps frock coat was copied from the long zupans worn in Poland and Ukraine, the necktie or cravat was derived from a scarf worn by Croatian mercenaries fighting for Louis XIII , and the brightly colored silk waistcoats popularised by Charles II of England were inspired by exotic Turkish, Indian and Persian attire acquired by wealthy English travellers. During the Highland Clearances , the British aristocracy appropriated traditional Scottish clothing . Tartan was given spurious association with specific Highland clans after publications such as James Logan ‘s romanticised work The Scottish Gael (1831) led the Scottish tartan industry to invent clan tartans and tartan became a desirable material for dresses, waistcoats and cravats. In America, plaid flannel had become workwear by the time of Westward expansion , and was widely worn by Old West pioneers and cowboys who were not of Scottish descent. In the 21st century, tartan remains ubiquitous in mainstream fashion. By the 19th century the fascination had shifted to Asian culture. English Regency era dandies adapted the Indian churidars into slim fitting pantaloons , and frequently wore turbans within their own houses. Later, Victorian gentlemen wore smoking caps based on the Islamic fez , and fashionable turn of the century ladies wore Orientalist Japanese inspired kimono dresses. During the tiki culture fad of the 1950s, white women frequently donned the qipao to give the impression that they had visited Hong Kong , although the dresses were frequently made by seamstresses in America using rayon rather than genuine silk. At the same time, teenage British Teddy Girls wore Chinese coolie hats due to their exotic connotations. In Mexico, the sombrero associated with the mestizo peasant class was appropriated from an earlier hat introduced by the Spanish colonials during the 18th century. This, in turn, was adapted into the cowboy hat worn by American cowboys after the US Civil War . In 2016, the University of East Anglia prohibited the wearing of sombreros to parties on campus, in the belief that these could offend Mexican students. American Western wear was copied from the work attire of 19th century Mexican Vaqueros , especially the pointed cowboy boots and the guayabera which was adapted into the embroidered Western shirt . The China poblana dress associated with Mexican women was appropriated from the choli and lehenga worn by Indian maidservants like Catarina de San Juan who arrived from Asia from the 17th century onwards. Modern era In Britain, the rough tweed cloth clothing of the Irish, English and Scottish peasantry, including the flat cap and Irish hat were appropriated by the upper classes as the British country clothing worn for sports such as hunting or fishing, in imitation of the then Prince of Wales . The country clothing, in turn, was appropriated by the wealthy American soc and later preppy subcultures during the 1950s and 1980s due to both its practicality and its association with the English elite. During the same period the British comedian Tommy Cooper was known for wearing a Fez throughout his performances. When keffiyehs became popular in the late 2000s , experts made a clear distinction between the wearing of a genuine scarf, and a fake made in China. Palestinian independence activists and socialists denounced the wearing of scarves not made in Palestine as a form of cultural appropriation, but encouraged young white people and fellow Muslims to buy shemaghs made in the Herbawi factory to demonstrate solidarity with the Palestinian people and improve the economy of the West Bank . In 2017, Topshop caused controversy by selling Chinese-made playsuits that imitated the pattern of the keffiyeh. Several fashion designers and models have featured imitations of Native American warbonnets in their fashion shows, such as Victoria’s Secret in 2012, when model Karlie Kloss wore one during her walk on the runway; a Navajo Nation spokesman called it a “mockery”. Cherokee academic Adrienne Keene wrote in The New York Times : For the [Native American] communities that wear these headdresses, they represent respect, power and responsibility. The headdress has to be earned, gifted to a leader in whom the community has placed their trust. When it becomes a cheap commodity anyone can buy and wear to a party, that meaning is erased and disrespected, and Native peoples are reminded that our cultures are still seen as something of the past, as unimportant in contemporary society, and unworthy of respect. Both Victoria’s Secret and Kloss issued apologies stating that they had no intentions of offending anyone. Archbishop Justin Welby of the Anglican Church has claimed that the crucifix is “now just a fashion statement and has lost its religious meaning.”. Crucifixes have been incorporated into Japanese lolita fashion by non-Christians in a cultural context that is distinct from its original meaning as a Christian religious symbol. Hairstyles, makeup and body modifications The leaders of ancient Israel strongly condemned the adoption of Egyptian and Canaanite practises, especially cutting the hair short or shaving the beard. At the same time, the Old Testament distinguishes the religious circumcision of the Hebrews , from cultures such as the Egyptians where the practise had aesthetic or practical purposes. During the early 16th century, European men imitated the short regular haircuts and beards on rediscovered Ancient Greek and Roman statues. The curled hair favoured by the Regency era dandy Beau Brummel was also inspired by the classical era. During the 17th century, Louis XIV began wearing wigs to conceal his baldness. Like many other French fashions, these were quickly appropriated by baroque era courtiers in England and the rest of Europe to the extent that men often shaved their heads to ensure their wig fitted properly. American soldiers during World War II appropriated the Mohawk hairstyle of the Native American tribe of the same name to intimidate their enemies. These were later worn by 1950s jazz musicians like Sonny Rollins , and the 1980s punk subculture . During the early 2000s , it was popular in the west to get tribal tattoos appropriated from African and Polynesian culture , as well as earlobe piercings known as plugs , famously associated with the Buddha . Sports The Washington Redskins logo in Maryland While the history of colonization and marginalization is not unique to the Americas, the practice of non-Native sports teams deriving team names, imagery, and mascots from indigenous peoples is still common in the United States and Canada, and has persisted to some extent despite protests from Indigenous groups. Cornel Pewewardy, Professor and Director of Indigenous Nations Studies at Portland State University , cites indigenous mascots as an example of dysconscious racism which, by placing images of Native American or First Nations people into an invented media context, continues to maintain the superiority of the dominant culture. It is argued that such practices maintain the power relationship between the dominant culture and the indigenous culture, and can be seen as a form of cultural imperialism . Such practices may be seen as particularly harmful in schools and universities which have a stated purpose of promoting ethnic diversity and inclusion. In recognition of the responsibility of higher education to eliminate behaviors that create a hostile environment for education, in 2005 the NCAA initiated a policy against “hostile and abusive” names and mascots that led to the change of many derived from Native American culture, with the exception of those that established an agreement with particular tribes for the use of their specific names. Other schools retain their names because they were founded for the education of Native Americans, and continue to have a significant number of indigenous students. The trend towards the elimination of indigenous names and mascots in local schools has been steady, with two thirds having been eliminated over the past 50 years according to the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI). While the leadership of nearly all Native American tribes object to their depictions as sports mascots, only one tribe explicitly approves of such representations. The Florida State Seminoles use the iconography of the Seminole tribe. Their mascots are Osceola and Renegade , depictions of the Seminole chief Osceola and his Appaloosa horse. After the NCAA attempted to ban the use of Native American names and iconography in college sports in 2005, the Seminole Tribe of Florida passed a resolution offering explicit support for FSU’s use of Seminole culture and Osceola as a mascot; the university was granted a waiver, citing the close relationship with and consultation between the team and the tribe. In 2013, the tribe’s chairman objected to outsiders meddling in tribal approval, stating that the FSU mascot and use of Seminole iconography “represents the courage of the people who were here and are still here, known as the Unconquered Seminoles.” Conversely, in 2013, the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma expressed disapproval of “the use of all American Indian sports-team mascots in the public school system, by college and university level and by professional sports teams”, and not all members of the tribe’s Florida branch are supportive of its stance. In other former colonies in Asia, Africa, and South America, the adoption of indigenous names for majority indigenous teams is also found. There are also ethnicity-related team names derived from prominent immigrant populations in the area, such as the Boston Celtics , the Notre Dame Fighting Irish , and the Minnesota Vikings . The 2018 Commonwealth Games to be held on the Gold Coast in Australia from 4 April 2018 has named its mascot Borobi , the local Yugambeh word for “koala,” and has sought to trademark the word through IP Australia . The application is being opposed by a Yugambeh cultural heritage organisation, which argues that the Games organising committee used the word without proper consultation with the Yugambeh people. African-American culture Example of hip hop fashion ( Paul Wall wearing grills .) The term wigger (common spelling “wigga”) is a slang term for a white person who adopts the mannerisms, language , and fashions associated with African-American culture , particularly hip hop , and, in Britain, the grime scene, often implying the imitation is being done badly, although usually with sincerity rather than mocking intent. Wigger is a portmanteau of white and nigger or nigga , and the related term wangsta is a mashup of wannabe or white , and gangsta . Among black hip-hop fans, the word “nigga” can sometimes be considered a friendly greeting, but when used by whites, it is usually viewed as offensive. “Wigger” may be derogatory, reflecting stereotypes of African-American, black British , and white culture (when used as synonym of white trash ). The term is sometimes used in a racist manner, by other white people to belittle the person perceived as “acting black”, but it is also widely used by African Americans like 50 Cent offended by the wigga or wanksta ‘s demeaning of black people and culture. The phenomenon of white people adopting elements of black culture has been prevalent at least since slavery was abolished in the Western world . The concept has been documented in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, and other white-majority countries. An early form of this was the white negro in the jazz and swing music scenes of the 1920s and 1930s, as examined in the 1957 Norman Mailer essay ” The White Negro “. It was later seen in the zoot suiter of the 1930s and 1940s, the hipster of the 1940s, the beatnik of the 1950s–1960s, the blue-eyed soul of the 1970s, and the hip hop of the 1980s and 1990s. In 1993, an article in the UK newspaper The Independent described the phenomenon of white, middle-class kids who were “wannabe Blacks”. 2005 saw the publication of Why White Kids Love Hip Hop: Wangstas, Wiggers, Wannabes, and the New Reality of Race in America by Bakari Kitwana, “a culture critic who’s been tracking American hip hop for years” . Robert A. Clift’s documentary Blacking Up: Hip-Hop’s Remix of Race and Identity questions white enthusiasts of black hip-hop culture. Clift’s documentary examines “racial and cultural ownership and authenticity — a path that begins with the stolen blackness seen in the success of Stephen Foster , Al Jolson , Benny Goodman , Elvis Presley , the Rolling Stones — all the way up to Vanilla Ice (popular music’s ur-wigger…) and Eminem .” [106] A review of the documentary refers to the wiggers as “white poseurs “, and states that the term wigger “is used both proudly and derisively to describe white enthusiasts of black hip-hop culture”. The term “blackfishing” was popularised in 2018 by writer Wanna Thompson, describing female white social media influencers who adopt a look perceived to be black or mixed race – including braided hair, dark skin from tanning or make-up, full lips, and large thighs. Critics argue they take attention and opportunities from black influencers by appropriating their aesthetic and have likened the trend to blackface . Indigenous cultures Among critics, the misuse and misrepresentation of indigenous culture is seen as an exploitative form of colonialism, and one step in the destruction of indigenous cultures. The results of this use of indigenous knowledge have led some tribes, and the United Nations General Assembly , to issue several declarations on the subject. The Declaration of War Against Exploiters of Lakota Spirituality includes the passage: We assert a posture of zero-tolerance for any “white man’s shaman” who rises from within our own communities to “authorize” the expropriation of our ceremonial ways by non-Indians; all such ” plastic medicine men ” are enemies of the Lakota, Dakota and Nakota people. Article 31 1 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples states: Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their cultural heritage, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions, as well as the manifestations of their sciences, technologies and cultures, including human and genetic resources, seeds, medicines, knowledge of the properties of fauna and flora, oral traditions, literatures, designs, sports and traditional games and visual and performing arts. They also have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their intellectual property over such cultural heritage, traditional knowledge, and traditional cultural expressions. In 2015, a group of Native American academics and writers issued a statement against the Rainbow Family members whose acts of “cultural exploitation… dehumanize us as an indigenous Nation because they imply our culture and humanity, like our land, is anyone’s for the taking.” In writing about Indigenous intellectual property for the Native American Rights Fund (NARF), board member Professor Rebecca Tsosie stresses the importance of these property rights being held collectively, not by individuals: The long-term goal is to actually have a legal system, and certainly a treaty could do that, that acknowledges two things. Number one, it acknowledges that indigenous peoples are peoples with a right to self-determination that includes governance rights over all property belonging to the indigenous people. And, number two, it acknowledges that indigenous cultural expressions are a form of intellectual property and that traditional knowledge is a form of intellectual property, but they are collective resources – so not any one individual can give away the rights to those resources. The tribal nations actually own them collectively. Minority languages Use of minority languages is also cited as cultural appropriation when non-speakers of Scottish Gaelic or Irish get tattoos in those languages. Likewise, the use of incorrect Scottish Gaelic in a tokenistic fashion aimed at non-Gaelic speakers on signage and announcements has been criticized as disrespectful to fluent speakers of the language. Since the early 2000s, it has become increasingly popular for people not of Asian descent, to get tattoos of Indian devanagari , Korean letters or Han characters ( traditional , simplified or Japanese ), often without knowing the actual meaning of the symbols being used. Film and television According to last US Census (2010), Asian-Americans make up 4.8 percent of the population. [116] According to a study by the University of Southern California Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism in 2016, only one out of 20 (which corresponds to 5 percent) speaking roles go to Asian-Americans. However, they are given only one percent of lead roles in film. White actors account for 76.2 percent of lead roles, while representing 72.4 percent of the population according to the last US census. In 2017, Ghost in the Shell , which is based on the seinen manga Ghost in the Shell by Masamune Shirow , provoked disputes over whitewashing. Scarlett Johansson , a white actress, took the role of Motoko Kusanagi , a Japanese character. This was seen as cultural appropriation by some fans of the original manga who expected the role to be taken by an Asian or Asian-American actor. Costumes During Halloween , some people buy, wear, and sell Halloween costumes based on cultural or racial stereotypes . Costumes that depict cultural stereotypes, like “Indian Warrior” or “Pocahottie” are sometimes worn by people who do not belong to the cultural group being stereotyped. These costumes have been criticized as being in poor taste at best and, at worst, blatantly racist and dehumanizing. There have been public protests calling for the end to the manufacture and sales of these costumes and connecting their “degrading” portrayals of Indigenous women to the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW) crisis . In some cases, theme parties have been held where attendees are encouraged to dress up as stereotypes of a certain racial group. A number of these parties have been held at colleges, and at times other than Halloween, including Martin Luther King Jr. Day and Black History Month . BSA-associated dance teams In chapter four of his book Playing Indian , Native American historian Philip J. Deloria refers to the Koshare Indian Museum and Dancers as an example of “object hobbyists” who adopt the material culture of indigenous peoples of the past (“the vanishing Indian”) while failing to engage with contemporary native peoples or acknowledge the history of conquest and dispossession. In the 1950s, the head councilman of the Zuni Pueblo saw a performance and said: “We know your hearts are good, but even with good hearts you have done a bad thing.” In Zuni culture, religious object and practices are only for those that have earned the right to participate, following techniques and prayers that have been handed down for generations. In 2015, the Koshare’s Winter Night dances were canceled after a late request was received from Cultural Preservation Office (CPO) of the Hopi Nation asking that the troop discontinue their interpretation of the dances of the Hopi and Pueblo Native Americans. Director of the CPO Leigh Kuwanwisiwma saw video of the performances online, and said the performers were “mimicking our dances, but they were insensitive, as far as I’m concerned.” In both instances, unable to satisfy the concerns of the tribes and out of respect for the Native Americans, the Koshare Dance Team complied with the requests, removed dances found to be objectionable, and even went so far as to give items deemed culturally significant to the tribes. The objections from some Native Americans towards such dance teams center on the idea that the dance performances are a form of cultural appropriation which place dance and costumes in inappropriate contexts devoid of their true meaning, sometimes mixing elements from different tribes. In contrast, the dance teams state that “[their] goal is to preserve Native American dance and heritage through the creation of dance regalia, dancing, and teaching others about the Native American culture.” Gender and sexuality Some people in the transgender community have protested against the casting of straight, cis-gender actors in trans acting roles, such as when Eddie Redmayne played the role of artist Lili Elbe in the film The Danish Girl and when Jared Leto played the role of a trans woman named Rayon in Dallas Buyers Club . The gay community has expressed concerns about the use of straight actors to play gay characters; this occurs in films such as Call Me by Your Name (straight actors Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet), Brokeback Mountain ( Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal ), Philadelphia (starring Tom Hanks ), Capote (starring Philip Seymour Hoffman ) and Milk (with Sean Penn playing the role of the real-life gay rights activist, Harvey Milk ). Jay Caruso calls these controversies “wholly manufactured”, on the grounds that the actors “are playing a role” using the “art of acting”. Other uses Costume of Saint Patrick (left) In some cases, a culture usually viewed as the target of cultural appropriation can be accused of appropriation, particularly after colonization and an extensive period re-organization of that culture under the nation-state system. For example, the government of Ghana has been accused of cultural appropriation in adopting the Caribbean Emancipation Day and marketing it to African American tourists as an “African festival”. For some members of the South-Asian community, the wearing of a bindi dot as a decorative item, by a non- Hindu , or by a woman who is not South Asian, is considered cultural appropriation. A common term among Irish people for someone who imitates or misrepresents Irish culture is Plastic Paddy . Celebrity controversies In 2003, Prince Harry of the British royal family used Indigenous Australian art motifs in a painting for a school project. One Aboriginal group labelled it “misappropriation of our culture”, saying that to Aboriginal people, the motifs have symbolic meanings “indicative of our spiritualism”, whereas when non-Aborigines use the motifs they are simply “painting a pretty picture”. In the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show 2012 , former Victoria’s Secret model Karlie Kloss donned a Native American -style feathered headdress with leather bra and panties and high-heeled moccasins . This was said to be an example of cultural appropriation because the fashion show is showcasing the company’s lingerie and image as a global fashion giant. The outfit was supposed to represent November, and thus “Thanksgiving”, in the “Calendar Girls” segment. The outfit met with backlash and criticism as an appropriation of Native American culture and tradition. Victoria’s Secret pulled it from the broadcast and apologized for its use. Kloss also commented on the decision by tweeting “I am deeply sorry if what I wore during the VS Show offended anyone. I support VS’s decision to remove the outfit from the broadcast.” Avril Lavigne with Hello Kitty outfit Avril Lavigne was cited by some as appropriating Japanese culture in her song ” Hello Kitty “. The song and music video depict Asian women dressed up in matching outfits and Lavigne eating Asian food while dressed in a pink tutu. Lavigne responded by stating “I love Japanese culture and I spend half of my time in Japan. I flew to Tokyo to shoot this video … specifically for my Japanese fans, with my Japanese label, Japanese choreographers and a Japanese director in Japan.” Feedback for Lavigne’s song was favorable in Japan, but “[the] people who are blaming the artist for racism [were] non-Japanese.” When Selena Gomez wore the bindi during a performance, there was debate on her reasoning behind wearing the culture specific piece. Some viewed this as “casting her vote for Team India” but it was also viewed as misuse of the symbol as Selena was seen as not supporting or relating the Bindi to its origin of Hinduism, but furthering her own self-expression. In 2014, Pharrell Williams posed in a Native American war bonnet on the cover of Elle UK magazine, after much controversy and media surrounding the photo Williams apologized. Actress Amandla Stenberg made a school-related video called “Don’t Cash Crop on My Cornrows” about the use of black hairstyles and black culture by non-black people, accusing Katy Perry and Iggy Azalea of using “black culture as a way of being edgy and gaining attention”. Stenberg later criticized Kylie Jenner for allegedly embracing African-American aesthetic values without addressing the issues that affect the community. The African-American hip hop artist Azealia Banks has also criticized Iggy Azalea “for failing to comment on ‘black issues’ despite capitalising on the appropriation of African American culture in her music.” Banks has called Azalea a “wigger” and there have been “accusations of racism against Azalea” focused on her alleged “insensitivity to the complexities of race relations and cultural appropriation.” Rachel Dolezal made headlines in 2015 when it was discovered that she was not African-American , as she had claimed. She is an American former civil rights activist known for being exposed as Caucasian while falsely claiming to be a black woman . Dolezal was president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) chapter in Spokane, Washington , from February 7, 2014 until June 15, 2015 when she resigned amid suspicion she had lied about nine alleged hate crimes against her. She received further public scrutiny when her white parents publicly stated that Doležal was a white woman passing as black . In 2017, in an interview with Billboard magazine regarding her new image, Miley Cyrus criticized what she considered to be overly vulgar aspects of Hip Hop culture while expressing her admiration for the song ” Humble ” by Kendrick Lamar . This was met with backlash from people who felt Cyrus has a history of appropriating hip hop culture. Responses Bindi In 2011, a group of students at Ohio University started a poster campaign denouncing the use of cultural stereotypes as costumes. The campaign features people of color alongside their respective stereotypes with slogans such as “This is not who I am and this is not okay.” The goal of the movement was to raise awareness around racism during Halloween in the university and the surrounding community, but the images also circulated online. “Reclaim the Bindi ” has become a hashtag used by some people of South Asian descent who wear traditional garb, and object to its use by people not of their culture. At the 2014 Coachella festival one of the most noted fashion trends was the bindi , a traditional Hindu head mark. As pictures of the festival surfaced online there was public controversy over the casual wearing of the bindi by non-Indian individuals who did not understand the meaning behind it. #CoachellaShutdown has been used in conjunction with #ReclaimtheBindi in order to protest against the use of the bindi at music festivals, most notably the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival . Reclaim the Bindi Week is an event which seeks to promote the traditional cultural significance of the bindi and combat its use as a fashion statement. Criticism of the concept John McWhorter , a professor at Columbia University , has criticized the concept, arguing that cultural borrowing and cross-fertilization is a generally positive thing, and is something which is usually done out of admiration, and with no intent to harm, the cultures being imitated; he also argued that the specific term “appropriation,” which can mean theft, is misleading when applied to something like culture that is not seen by all as a limited resource: unlike appropriating a physical object, others imitating an idea taken from one group’s culture don’t inherently deprive that originating group of its use. In 2016, author Lionel Shriver gave a speech at the Brisbane Writers Festival, asserting the right of authors to write from any point of view, including that of characters from cultural backgrounds other than their own – as writers “should be seeking to push beyond the constraining categories into which we have been arbitrarily dropped by birth. If we embrace narrow group-based identities too fiercely, we cling to the very cages in which others would seek to trap us.” She also asserted the right of authors from a cultural majority to write in the voice of someone from a cultural minority, attacking the idea that this constitutes unethical “cultural appropriation”. Referring to a case in which U.S. college students were facing disciplinary action for wearing sombreros to a ‘tequila party’, she said “The moral of the sombrero scandals is clear: you’re not supposed to try on other people’s hats . Yet that’s what we’re paid to do, isn’t it? Step into other people’s shoes, and try on their hats.” In 2017, Canadian clinical psychologist , author, and professor of psychology at the University of Toronto Jordan Peterson stated in a Q&A session from a speech entitled Strengthen the Individual , “The idea of cultural appropriation is nonsense, and that’s that. There’s no difference between cultural appropriation and learning from each other. They’re the same thing. Now, that doesn’t mean that there’s no theft between people; there is. And it doesn’t mean that once you encounter someone else’s ideas, you have an absolute right to those ideas as if they’re your own. But the idea that manifesting some element of another culture in your own behavior is immoral is insane. It’s actually one of the bases of peace.” Posted by

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A family tree, through recipes

It is 1920s Kolhapur. Ratanlal and Shanta have been on the run for many days and finally find boarding for the night at the home of a flower vendor. Their meal at night is a simple misal-matki (stew of moth beans) cooked down with onions and spices redolent with the heat of black pepper, the nuttiness of dried coconut and the meaty aroma of dagad-phool (lichen) and bhakri (flatbread made of millets). There’s buttermilk and jaggery to wash down the spice.
It’s a simple meal, but, in the lives of the two lovers, it conveys the warmth of their hosts and gives them the strength to move forward in their journey. It is but one of many momentous, if simple, meals scattered through the novel Ten Thousand Tongues: Secrets Of A Layered Kitchen (Turmeric Press).
‘Jackfruit Sabzi’. In it, Atlanta-based author and home chef Nandita Godbole traces her family’s history, from 1899 to the present. It was released along with a companion cookbook in December. “The books are best enjoyed together, especially if the reader loves easy old-fashioned food and regional delicacies. Many readers will read a chapter or two, and then cook a recipe or two from the companion cookbook,” she says.
For Godbole, food and family memories are intertwined, a part and parcel of her life. “I was the child who burnt her play stove trying to cook on it, who got hungry during religious fasts, who struggled with undiagnosed food allergies from an early age, and who lamented the lost privilege of having home-made food when she moved away abroad,” she says.
It all started with a dream featuring her late paternal grandmother. Curiosity piqued, Godbole started researching her grandmother’s Bene Israeli heritage, eager to learn about the Jewish dishes that had lingered in her late father’s memory. This search for family recipes led her to the stories that accompanied them.
This large tapestry of recipes and cuisines is on offer in Ten Thousand Tongues. Writing the book was no easy task, from choosing what to include and leave out. Added to it was her extensive research—first-person stories from her parents, historical records, political and railway maps as well as “Gazetteers”, and the sole surviving copy of her freedom-fighter grandfather Dattataray Shankar Godbole’s biography Bandilki-chi-waatchaal (Path Of Duty). Her novel is based on eight matriarchs of her family. In terms of scope, it spans five generations, three time periods (pre-independence India, post-independence and industrialized India, and post-immigration), moving across Alibaug and Pezari, Kolhapur, Indore, Lunwa, Goa and Mumbai, and, finally, Atlanta. It starts with her great-grandmother in Rajasthan, who fled her village as a teenager, escaping communal violence, and ends with Ana (a character based on Godbole), who leaves India by choice to settle down abroad. Godbole chose to focus on women as “they were the keepers of traditions (foods and customs)”.
Through the stories, she highlights the discrimination they faced and how they overcame challenges. The novel also touches upon life as an immigrant woman. Godbole reflects on her experience growing up in India and living in the US. The stories also feature a fair amount of food, and the role it played in their homes.
Godbole newest book focuses on rotis and is called Roti: 40 Classic Indian Breads And Sides.
“Even after living abroad for two decades now, a package from my mother will likely include thepla, or a portion of thalipeeth flour, and my first meal when I return to my parents’ home is cha with freshly made rotli (chapati). No matter where I am, when hungry, my fastest go-to is either rotli, sweet ghaawan/malpua, or bread and butter if nothing else. There is also something about rotli that simply keeps me ‘grounded’,” she says.
The books aren’t connected but there are avatars of rotis spread through Ten Thousand Tongues too: a farmer’s rustic jowar or bajra bhakri from Johari’s kitchen, Sumati Atya’s (based on the life of her paternal aunt) gul-poli (a preparation that was good for local travel), Shaku’s (based on the life of Godbole’s mother) bread rolls, signalling the inclusion of sliced bread in an urban kitchen, and Ana’s aloo paratha. “These roti versions are not new to those eras, women, or kitchens—instead, they represent an intuitive response to the sociopolitical and cultural climate, and are popular even today, symbolizing their ‘staying power’, ones that have endured the passage of time and food-fashion,” she says.
As a food writer, Godbole is often questioned about her background, professional pedigree and why she eats/cooks a certain food. “I never seemed to have the right answers for them—it seemed I was not enough of an expert or purist in a particular cuisine that would ‘validate’ my place in the food space,” she says. Now, her answers fill up books.

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Cookbook: Selina Periampillai’s Mauritian food

The self-taught cook chats to Lauren Taylor about her Mauritian heritage, slowing down in the kitchen, and eating bat curry.
Think of Mauritius, the Maldives and Seychelles, and chances are you imagine white sandy beaches, tropical heat and honeymooning couples. And you’d be right – but what about the food?
“People don’t really know much about that part of the world,” says Selina Periampillai – yet the incredible multiculturalism of this pocket of the Indian Ocean has created a unique cuisine made up of seemingly disparate culinary influences and styles that work in mysterious harmony.
Born and raised in Croydon, South London, Periampillai calls Mauritius her second home – her parents are from there and moved to the UK in the Seventies for work – but as a child, she spent long summers every year back on the island.
“I remember my nan cooking outside, she had a massive rock slab and used to crush spices on it with a cylinder tool – fresh spices, garlic, chilli – she would roll it and crush them every morning and cook with them that evening,” says the 37-year-old. “You can see from her arms and build today that’s what she was doing for all those years – it’s not that easy!”
So how did Mauritian cuisine come to be what it is today? “It was colonised by the Dutch, then the British came, and Chinese came over, all these people from all different cultures settled on the island,” says Periampillai. Throw Indian, French and African influences into the mix and it’s considered one of the great Creole cuisines of the world.
“We’ve ended up with biryani and curry from India and fiery hot, chilli chutneys. The Chinese set up as merchants near Port Louis [the capital] and they’re still selling dumplings on street corners, you’ll find dumpling soup and noodles in Mauritian restaurants too.”
It surprises first-timer diners, she says; it’s lighter and more fragrant than people anticipate. “People expect an Indian-style curry but we might use cinnamon to make it sweet or thyme leaves and parsley.”
In her first cookbook, The Island Kitchen, Periampillai takes you on journey, not only around the fascinatingly diverse Mauritian cuisine – think fish biryani, slow-cooked duck with cinnamon and cloves, and potato and pea samosas – but Madagascar, Maldives, Seychelles, and the lesser known Reunion, Comoros and Mayotte, and Rodrigues.
Reunion – where three-quarters of the population is said to be of mixed origin – is a seafood lover’s paradise. A speciality on the tiny volcanic Rodrigues island is a thick-crusted coconut and papaya pie, and a French horticulturalist and botanist once smuggled plants into the Seychelles that are still a huge part of the country’s cuisine today.
You might not want to eat bat curry (“A bit like chicken, quite bony but really nice”) or shark chutney (“Tangy with a squeeze of lime”) from the Seychelles, but Periampillai has drawn the line at including those recipes in the book anyway.
What’s most surprising though, is that the classic dishes of these islands, and Periampillai’s take on them (like the pineapple upside-down cake her supper club-goers rave about), are all pretty simple. It’s stews you chuck everything into and leave, curry that doesn’t take hours, and vibrant salads with sweet notes of coconut, lime or mango. “I’m all for really down-to-earth, nothing fancy, really good comfort food,” she says.
“All the family would get together for dinner and it would never be one of two dishes, the table would be full every night, bowls of curry, fresh chapatis, and lots of pickles and chutneys – the condiments of Mauritius,” Periampillai adds.
That’s the thing about this kind of food; it’s generous, comforting and, most importantly, laid-back. “It’s about enjoying the moment and taking that time out. They take it a bit slower, especially with cooking – no stress, enjoy yourself, enjoy the whole process and enjoy the food.”
And there’s a lot of outdoor cooking: “It’s a hot country, doors are wide open in kitchens, they have wood fires and get a big pot of curry or fricassee on there – it changes the flavour because you’ve got smokiness. Everyone barbecues on the beach, they’ll be a grill with fish caught that morning, with some lemon and herbs, straight on the grill – that’s the freshest thing you can eat.
“On the beach, they also sell pineapple covered in chilli salt as a refreshing snack,” Periampillai adds – a traditional dish she took inspiration from to create her tamarind pineapple chilli salt salad recipe.
Impressively, the mum-of-one hasn’t done any professional training. “Everything I’ve done with Mauritian food, I learned from my mum. She’d say, ‘This is what I used to watch my mum do in the kitchen’, so it’s been passed on like that.
“I remember Gateau Pataes – sweet potato dough, filled with fresh coconut and sugar and fried – the childhood treat. I remember watching her and waiting for that first one.”
Six years ago, it dawned on Periampillai that it was difficult to find Mauritian home-cooked food in London, and she started to host supper clubs – four years after quitting her nine-to-five desk job to follow her passion for food in “one of those life-changing, risky moments”. It’s paid off though – she was named runner-up of the prestigious Jane Grigson Trust prize in March.
Now, more than anything, she wants to “spread the word” about Mauritian cuisine and maybe even inspire people to visit that part of the world too – woven between the recipes in the book are passages about each place, taking you right to bustling fishing ports or the sweet fruit of roadside stalls. “But if you can’t make it to the Islands, it’s like bringing these islands to your own home, and being able to cook it on a daily basis or on the weekend.
“It can be a bit intimidating,” Periampillai concedes,”because it’s this part of the world [that you might not know] – how do you find these ingredients?
“But I was brought up in London. You can do it in your home.”
The Island Kitchen: Recipes From Mauritius And The Indian Ocean by Selina Periampillai is published by Bloomsbury, priced £26.00. Available now.

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The Future is Now, Says Indian American Founder Vipin Jain of ‘Blendid’: Serving Up Smoothies Made by Robots | Business | indiawest.com

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Chalk one up for the robots.
From the brain of an Indian American human, a new service provided by a robot will deliver a nutritious smoothie in moments.
Sunnyvale, California-based 6d Bytes was founded in 2015 by Vipin Jain, a hands-on executive whose passion is to solve tough problems by building new products that significantly improve consumer experience, reduce complexity or save money, according to his bio.
6d Bytes, a food robotics company, is home to Blendid, which offers a combination of real food and artificial intelligence to serve up healthy and delicious food created with culinary excellence, according to the company’s website.
Blendid smoothies are delivered with precision and consistency to anyone, anywhere, anytime, the company site boasts.
The robotic smoothie chef works around the clock, remembers everyone’s smoothie preferences and needs only about two minutes to blend a 12-ounce smoothie order — placed via the Blendid app or on the smoothie kiosk’s tablet.
Blendid is a way to offer up on-the-go food that is healthier than the traditional vendor options – combining nutrition and AI.
“They (nutrition and AI) are both necessary for a good experience when it comes to food,” Jain stressed in an email interview with India-West.
“Using robotics and AI, Blendid is able to provide the right nutrition to consumers based on their taste, allergies and nutrition needs,” he added. “It also allows Blendid to be precise and consistent. You can’t imagine this happening with the current way of operating food service.”
A video explaining the Blendid chef-robot hybrid says the smoothie-machine is part of a revolution changing food preparation for good.
Some of the smoothie options — created by chef Kristen Rasmussen, a culinary nutrition and food sustainability expert with a passion for real food — include Strawberry&Cream, made with strawberries, coconut water, agave, chia seeds and kefir; GreenWarrior, made with kefir, kale, blueberries, bananas, apple juice and chia seeds; and BlueberryCacao, made with blueberry, cocoa, bananas, chia seeds and apple juice, among others.
Each smoothie can be adjusted to fit a person’s unique preferences and allergy restrictions.
The company is not Jain’s first entrepreneurial venture. Prior to 6d Bytes, the Indian American executive, who has both big company and startup experience in product development and service delivery, co-founded Retrevo, a consumer product discovery and e-commerce company.
Retrevo, which eventually was acquired by Barnes & Noble, was recognized by TIME Magazine in 2011 as the Best Shopping Website. After the acquisition by B&N, Jain led sales and merchandising for Nook.
Earlier in his career, Jain co-founded Telseon, a metro broadband service provider that offered services at 1/10th of the cost compared to then incumbent service offerings. The company was later acquired by OnFiber/Qwest Communications.
“Building a company is like raising a child. It requires commitment, resources, patience and hard work. But you still do it because there is nothing more satisfying than this,” Jain told India-West.
Retrevo was born out of frustration with Google that did a poor job of product search back in the 2005-2006 timeframe, Jain explained.
“We built a product search, recommendation and e-commerce product so consumers could buy the right products with confidence,” he said, adding that the plan wasn’t to scale up and sell. “Entrepreneurs should focus on building a product that customers would fall in love with and tackle things along the way,” he advised.
In moving on to create Blendid, Jain said the founders of the venture were intrigued with the vision of a future where consumers would have access to food that they like, prepared the way they like it, any time of the day, anywhere.
“We thought robotics and AI could help us create that future. One thing led to another and, as they say, ‘the rest is history,’” he recalled.
In the long run, Jain noted, the leadership wants Blendid to be the first step towards the future they envisioned before the 2015 launch.
“We foresee Blendid kiosks to be available everywhere and are encouraged by this initial surge of excitement and support all around,” Jain said, noting that more locations will become available at various companies and colleges in the coming months.
While not disclosing any funding the company has received, Jain did divulge that it has “high quality venture investors and access to plenty of capital to do what we want to do.”
Part of that plan is to provide the smoothie-making robot kiosk in all kinds of food service and retail environments in the U.S. and abroad.
Blendid brings a perfect blend of fresh and healthy ingredients, delicious and affordable recipes, intrigue of the advanced technology, and convenience which, Jain said, “makes it a perfect fit in corporate cafeterias, universities, health clubs, airports and more.”
The company’s mission is to make healthy and delicious food accessible and affordable for everyone.
“To that end, we intend to deploy Blendid in all types of food service environments, commercial and retail. Beyond the first application of making blends, Blendid has an advanced food operating system that will adapt to other formats and cuisines over time including soups, bowls, sushi and more.
Right now, in the San Francisco Bay Area, anyone interested in a Blendid smoothie can head to Market Cafe at the University of San Francisco or by vising the Plug and Play Tech Center in Sunnyvale.

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WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#202)

Yummly WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#202) – A delicious collection of dinner, side dish and dessert recipes to help you plan your weekly menu and make life easier for you! In these menu plans, we will be sharing some of our favorite recipe ideas for you to use as you are planning out your meals for the week. Just click any of the recipe titles or pictures to get the recipe. A little about how we plan our week and our menu plan: Mondays are soup and salad. Tuesdays we are bringing you delicious Mexican cuisine. Wednesdays are a taste of Italy. Thursdays are designed around yummy sandwiches, burgers, and wraps. Fridays are a no cook day around here. Going out with friends and loved ones is something that we think is important. It’s your night off from cooking- enjoy! Saturdays are an exotic food night, it’s a great night to try something new, from cooking with seafood, to trying Indian or Thai dishes. Sundays are a traditional old fashioned all American family dinner- think meat and potatoes. 🙂 There will also always be a couple of delectable desserts to use any day you wish. A new weekly menu plan will be posted every SUNDAY morning so be sure to check back each week! CLICK ON THE LINKED RECIPE TITLES OR PHOTOS TO GET THE FULL RECIPE WEEK #202

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Regent Seven Seas Cruises Debuts over 200 Gourmet Plant-Based Dishes Fleetwide

Πέμπτη, 23 Μαΐου 2019 Regent Seven Seas Cruises Debuts over 200 Gourmet Plant-Based Dishes Fleetwide Beginning October 1, 2019, more than 200 gourmet plant-based selections will be offered at breakfast, lunch and dinner to meet the evolving tastes of luxury travelers aboard the Regent Seven Seas Cruises. New dishes like Wild Mushroom Tart with Brittle Pie Crust, Mushroom Duxelles and Red Pepper Coulis; Falafel Fritters with Harissa Mayo, Cucumber, Mint, and Capers; Spiced Potato & Green Pea Samosas with Tamarind Chutney; and Summer Berry Pudding Chantilly showcase a range of cuisines including Italian, Greek, Middle Eastern, Korean, Thai, Vietnamese, Mexican, Italian, Malaysian, and more. Other menu highlights include nourishing Power Bowls and Poke Bowls, hearty pastas and noodles, light and refreshing salads and soups and decadent items like an Impossible ™ Cheeseburger, and a Peach and Blueberry Cobbler with Cornmeal-Almond Topping. “For luxury travelers who are increasingly adding more plant-based cuisine to their meals, we’re offering even more imaginative selections of bold, flavorful appetizers, entrees and desserts, with craveable tastes and mouth-watering presentations,” said Jason Montague, Regent Seven Seas Cruises president and chief executive officer. “Our expanded plant-based cuisine sets the highest benchmark in luxury cruising.” Luxury travelers are increasingly interested in enjoying plant-based fare. Worldwide, more than 9 of 10 plant-based meals are consumed by people who are not vegans. Regent’s 200 plant-based selections will be fully integrated into the daily menus on Regent ships, instead of being offered on a separate menu. The new offerings were developed by Regent’s culinary leadership team under the direction of Bernhard Klotz, Regent’s vice president of Food and Beverage, in concert with world-renowned chef, culinary instructor, and author Christophe Berg. “Plant-based cuisine appeals to a broad audience of luxury travelers,” Klotz explained. “This is an emerging, modern specialty cuisine that allows our guests to enjoy more flavorful foods that are in harmony with their current tastes and pushes the boundaries on Regent’s acclaimed culinary creativity and imagination.” Selected Plant-Based Menu Highlights Chia Cashew Yogurt with Carrot-Hazelnut Granola, Mixed Berries and Tropical Fruits Chickpea Pancake with Spinach, Cherry Tomatoes, Mushrooms and Harissa Sauce, Just Like Feta Banana-Oatmeal Pancakes with Berries and Maple Syrup Avocado Toast on Rustic Farmers Bread Lunch Sweet Potato Soup with Miso & Ginger Tomato Bisque with Dill Roasted Almond and Vegetable Soup Vietnamese Summer Rolls with Vegetables, Grapefruit, Coconut, Boston Lettuce, Rice Paper, Roasted Peanut Dip Tajin Spiced Hummus & Avocado Wrap with Boston Lettuce, Carrots, Cherry Tomatoes, Cucumber, Fruit Skewer Osaka Power Bowl with Soba Noodles, Eggplant, Tofu, Sweet Potatoes, Edamame, Wakame Salad, Nori, Miso Sesame Dressing Mediterranean Bowl with Brown Rice, Beluga Lentils, Green Peas, Cauliflower, Tomato, Homemade Tzatziki, Kalamata Olives, Pita Bread, Roasted Almond-Orange Dressing Falafel Power Bowl with Roasted Carrots, Cucumber, Cherry Tomatoes, Assorted Greens, Olives, Capers, Mint, Parsley, Lemon-Tahini dressing Green Lentil Penne Pasta, Wild Mushroom Bolognese with Cashew Nuts “Impossible Burger” Sesame Bun, Just Like Cheddar, Lettuce, Tomato, Onion, Skinny Fries Dinner Caramelized Apple Tart with Fresh Feta-Cashew Cheese, Balsamic Caramel Wild Mushroom Tart with Brittle Pie Crust, Mushroom Duxelles, Red Pepper Coulis Mulligatawny, Traditional Indian Red Lentil & Coconut Soup Spiced Potato & Green Pea Samosas with Tamarind Chutney Baked Porcini & Spinach Cannelloni, with Toasted Hazelnuts, Tomato Sauce, Béchamel Mushroom & Spinach Crepes, with Béchamel and Tomato Sauce Roasted Mushroom Stuffed Zucchini with Quinoa-Olive Salad, Pine Nut Dressing, Yellow Pepper Coulis Singapore Noodles, with Stir Fried Vegetables, Turmeric, Ginger, Garlic, Soy Sauce, Rice Vermicelli Green Curry Vegetable Stir Fry, with Eggplant, Oyster Mushrooms, Cauliflower, Green Peas, Jasmine Rice Crispy Sweet & Sour Vegetables with Tofu, Cashew and Sesame Seeds Desserts Basil Scented Fruit Minestrone, Lemon Sorbet Peach and Blueberry Cobbler with Cornmeal-Almond Topping Pear Williams & Rosemary Sorbet

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