Quiz: Find your Dream Honeymoon Destination! – TravelGround Blog

Quiz: Find your Dream Honeymoon Destination! – TravelGround Blog

8. Adventure to you means … a. Bungee jumping c. Going on a Big 5 safari d. Cheese and wine tasting e. Hot-air ballooning 9. The most romantic view is … a. Fynbos forests on the edge of a lagoon b. Breaking waves along white sandy beaches c. Game roaming among bushes and over endless plains d. Lush vineyards surrounded by mountains e. Snowy peaks and dreamy valleys 10. You’re dreaming about visiting … a. Germany’s Black Forest b. Thailand c. Serengeti National Park in Tanzania d. The French countryside Results Mostly a’s: A Forest Fairyland ─ Garden Route The Garden Route is the perfect honeymoon destination for you! Stretching from Mossel Bay to Storms River , this romantic route includes small coastal towns, game reserves, an array of seafood restaurants, adrenaline-filled activities and gorgeous views of the Indian Ocean and the Outeniqua and Tsitsikamma Mountains ─ ideal for a honeymoon road trip! It’s a magical location with a fairytale-like atmosphere and one of the most beautiful places on earth to start your lives as a married couple. Honeymoon stays along the Garden Route Elephant Hide of Knysna Guest Lodge | C The View | Porcupine Pie Boutique Lodge Mostly b’s: A Subtropical Paradise ─ South Coast For your honeymoon, you’ll be going to the South Coast of KwaZulu-Natal where balmy weather all year round and palm tree-lined beaches await! Whales and dolphins will welcomingly wave their fins at you while frolicking in the azure breakers and you’ll be spoiled with spectacular sunrises. Spending the whole day in your cozzie, sipping cocktails by the pool or scuba diving for the first time ─ the South Coast offers an island-style honeymoon experience like no other! Honeymoon stays on the South Coast Alante Lodge | Umthunzi Hotel & Conference | Umlilo Lodge Mostly c’s: In Mother Nature’s Lap ─ Bushveld You’ll be able to fill your lungs with the freshest of air, be in awe of a lion roaring in the distance, and sleeping beneath a canvas of stars ─ yes, you’re honeymooning in the Bushveld ! There’s nothing more romantic than spending off-the-grid time with your love surrounded by the sounds and smells of nature. Awake to the song of a fish eagle, go on a sunset game drive, or read poetry beside the campfire ─ being away from everyday life has never been more idyllic! Honeymoon stays in the Bushveld Chinaka Game Lodge | Bundox Safari Lodge | Bushveld Terrace Hotel on Kruger Mostly d’s: A Wonderland of Views and Vines ─ Cape Winelands You’re yearning to be close enough to the amenities of the city and the lure of the ocean, yet to simultaneously be surrounded by tranquility ─ your honeymoon should be spent in the Cape Winelands ! Imagine leisure-filled days strolling on a historic wine farm, feasting on gourmet cuisine, and ending off your day with a glass of the best wine the Cape Winelands has to offer. Add to the romance by trying different food and wine pairings and take a round trip along the Southern Peninsula to visit the cute African penguins! Honeymoon stays in the Cape Winelands Basse Provence Country House | La Clé des Montagnes | Grand Dédale Mostly e’s: A Magical Mountain Retreat ─ Drakensberg Mountains Spectacular peaks, vivid green valleys and adventure galore ─ your honeymoon will be in the dreamy Drakensberg Mountains ! During winter months the area transforms into a land of fable with snowy slopes and summits setting the stage for romance. In summertime the lush Champagne Valley and Cathedral Peak offer an abundance of hiking trails, picnic spots and magnificent views that will make your love soar! Honeymoon stays in the Drakensberg Mountains

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Bowing Out?

The iconic mix of communities and cultures that is Bowbazar may be lost to posterity if steps are not taken to preserve its rich heritage, writes Zeeshan Jawed
Last month when L Madeira, a 200-year-old mortuary on Bow Street, shut down, it was the metaphorical last nail in the coffin for the fast-vanishing historical and multi-cultural past of Bowbazar .
Bowbazar is not your swank neighbourhood by any stretch of the imagination, with squatters and eateries gnawing into the pavements, a figurative as well as literal veil of dust covering its old buildings and a cacophony of sounds from shops selling anything from spectacles to ply boards. You cannot call it a peaceful neighbourhood, but it can surely dispense a lesson or two in tolerance and peaceful coexistence.
In the early 19th century, Kolkata, the second-most important city of the British Empire, was divided into the British “White Town” and the native “Black Town”. Those who did not belong to neither settled in Bowbazar, turning it into a melting pot of cultures, cuisines and languages.
Bowbazar’s gravestone would bear a rare assortment of Italian, British, Armenian, Buddhist, Portuguese, Chinese, Jewish, Iranian, Parsi and Scottish names.
Behind the veneer of the sarkari offices, which have come up in the past few decades in buildings with unexciting architecture and dull colours, are the memorials, monuments, markets and even a mortuary which bear testimony to the cosmopolitan past of this small pocket.
The Italian connection of Tiretta Bazar , opposite the Poddar Court market, goes beyond the locally made pasta packets sold in some of the shops.
Writer and traveller Giacomo Casanova, more famous for his sex life, is not known to have visited Kolkata, but his assistant and comrade, Eduardo Tiretta, was instrumental in building the Tiretta Market, on what is now known as the New CIT Road, a crucial link connecting Sealdah and Howrah stations.
One of Tiretta’s earliest mentions occur in the Calcutta Gazette of 1788. “Eduardo Tiretta was a fascinating character, frequently running into trouble but somehow landing on his feet,” says Sujan Mukherjee, PhD researcher in the department of English at Jadavpur University. “In Paris, he had befriended the infamous Casanova, before running off to Bengal sometime in the late 1770s. He made his way up the professional ladder in Calcutta to become Civil Architect and Surveyor of Roads. Around 1783, Tiretta was granted permission to construct a ‘pucka bazaar’, which spread over nine bighas and eight cottahs of ground, ‘with convenient shops, surrounded with a colonnade veranda’. In 1788, the marketplace was valued at Sicca Rupees 1,96,000 and given away as first prize in a lottery. Its ownership changed over time but in the popular imagination, the bazaar continues to be referred to as Tiretta’s, or some variant thereof.”
Tiretta lost his wife, Angelique de Carrion, in 1796. When he learnt that the Portuguese burying ground was in the habit of removing remains of corpses every five or six months, he was enraged. He applied to build a monument to his wife, which was refused. In March 1797, he purchased a plot of land on Park Street (where Apeejay School stands today), and reinterred his wife. This came to be known as Tiretta’s or the French burying ground, says Sujan.
Italy and China are in different continents but in central Kolkata, it is only a road which divides the two cultures. Of course, crossing the busy New CIT Road can take forever.
The place, one of the most congested and chaotic, as it connects the office para of Dalhousie with Sealdah station, is a treasure trove of Chinese goodies, though Chinese faces are few and far between. There are shops selling noodles, incense sticks, sauces, pork and strings of Chinese sausage . There is a deluge of people on weekends to savour Chinese breakfast sold in a broad alley behind Poddar Court.
Red is the predominant colour here, with shops bearing names in Chinese. But very few know that there are no less than 12 Chinese temples, or churches, many of them tucked away on second or third floors of residential buildings. According to a guesstimate by the local Chinese, most of them elderly, only a few hundred community members are left here.
“This is the original Chinatown, where the Chinese set up businesses and made it their home. But in the past few decades, there has been a widespread migration of the youth to Canada, Australia and middle-eastern countries in search of a livelihood,” laments Li Han Kuang, secretary of Toong On Church on Black Burn Lane. Nanking Restaurant, which is said to have been the playground of the stars in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, came up in 1924.
Biswarup Ghosh, a professor who has documented the Chinese in Kolkata, said the area adjoining Tiretta Market is one of the most neglected parts of the city.
“The Chinese are struggling to protect their places of worship from real estate sharks,” Ghosh says. “The civic neglect is so severe that the main entrances of many of the temples are encroached by squatters and solid waste dumped from all around the place. The area has a unique heritage aspect and it should be protected and preserved.”
One must cross yet another road, Bipin Behari Ganguly Street, to enter a narrow winding Metcalfe Street to witness bonhomie between two ethnic groups which had been in conflict a few centuries ago.
The Parsis are known to have been in conflict with Shias in Greater Iran between the eighth and 10th centuries. But in Bowbazar, both share space and history. Anjuman Atash Adaran, built by Ervad Dhunjeebhoy Byramjee Mehta in the early 1900s, is a sprawling red and grey building. The holy flame still burns inside the temple since Parsis worship it, but non-Parsis do not have access to that part. The ground hall is used for social gatherings. “There are very few Parsis left in the city, but those who are here come here religiously,” says Darkashah, a community member. Right opposite is the Aga Khan Shia Imami Ismaili Jamat Khana, the worshipping place of a subsect of the Shia community. “It was built in 1912,” says Anwar Ali, a member of the mosque.
A short walk covering half a circle from Metcalfe Street — resisting the aroma of Nehari and paratha and kebabs from two eateries catering low-cost food, mainly to labourers, and locally baked cakes — takes you to Bow Street. The area gets its name from Bow Barracks: British-built military housing. After Independence, the three-storey apartment blocks, green balconies and shutters contrasting with red brick, were taken over by Anglo-Indians, who love to keep their Christmas traditions alive. “Christmas here is a riot of colour, with the aroma of cake and wine wafting in the air. People from across the city come here. I am lucky that I am a resident of this place,” says Mohammad Sarfaraz from one of the very few Muslim households in Bow Barracks.
You are still mulling the Yuletide spirit when you suddenly find yourself in front of Buddha Dharmankur Sabha, another relic tucked away between Bow Barracks and Bowbazar police station. There is a Buddhist temple, along with a school, and a guest house for visiting community members.
A short walk from Buddha Dharmankur Sabha via Bipin Behari Ganguly Street takes you to the 200-year-old St Andrew’s Church. It was built by the Scottish community and opened for worship in 1818. Till 30 years ago, the church was enclosed by beautiful cast-iron railings and gates, but they started to disappear.
The collective whirring of five freezers where dead bodies were preserved at 200-year-old L Madeira ceased to exist last month. The signboard outside L Madeira — against a white backdrop, with austere black lettering — has made way for a banner announcing the new ownership of the building. The place was set up by Henry Joseph and Joe Charles Madeira more than 200 years ago. It has witnessed both world wars. The coffin used for Mother Teresa was made here.
“Only we know the chemicals that are needed to preserve one’s mortal remains for a long period,” claims owner Florence Madeira.
The same magic of chemistry is perhaps needed to preserve the cultural and religious diversity of Bowbazar, too.
HISTORY NUGGETS
Bowbazar was known as a grey area sandwiched between White Town in the south where the British stayed and Black Town in the north, meant for natives. As a result, migrants from China, Iran, Portugal and even Italy made Bowbazar their home
Bowbazar is the main connection between Howrah and Sealdah stations
Most of the streets in Bowbazar — such as Metcalfe Street, Weston Street and Robert Street — are named after members of the migrant communities
There are close to 12 Chinese churches within a radius of half a kilometre
The Anglo-Indian community made Bow Barracks their home after British soldiers moved out after Independence
Members of Aga Khan Jamat Khana say the mosque was built with the money the founders got after selling off Park Circus Maidan. There is, however, no confirmation of this’

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Why women are the future of Bangladeshi |

LIFE > EATS Why women are the future of Bangladeshi food
Traditional food from Bangladesh has long been masked as Indian food in British curry houses, cooked and served solely by men. But Dina Begum is changing these false perceptions of this misunderstood cuisine Saturday 6 April 2019 05:09 Click to followIndy/Life Scientist turned entrepreneur Shelly Nuruzzam, co-founder of Bang Curry kits, offers the Bangladeshi cooking novice a quick an easy route to classic fare ( Bang Curry )
A s a Bangladeshi woman growing up in London in a fairly conservative family I rarely visited restaurants.
Bangladeshi or “Indian restaurants” as they were known, were owned and run by men, for foreign clientele and the home kitchen was considered the domain of women.
“Restaurant food” translated to tandoori chicken smothered in a red hued paste and nondescript curries in sauces cooked according to varying levels of heat tolerance. Subscribe now
Words such as vindaloo, pathia, phaal and madras did not feature in my culinary vocabulary and nothing in the restaurants was representative of the delicious and varied food my mother prepared at mealtimes at home.
At the heart of Bangladeshi food is rice and fish, but there is also a rich vegetarian core which accompanies and also steps in as the hero of many meals. Read more Ugly vegetables are a major cause of food waste
Regional specialities spanning centuries old recipes from the Moghul era, to southeast Asian flavours from neighbouring Myanmar sets it apart from the Bengali food of West Bengal. I’ve recently highlighted an appetite for this often misunderstood cuisine.
Unique ingredients such as shatkora – a bitter and fragrant cooking citrus, Naga chilli, molasses, dried fish and mustard oil informs the basis of everyday eating.
Food can be as hot or as mild as you like; simple golden turmeric infused vegetables, mellow dals, light fish stews and fragrant kormas – cooked with yoghurt instead of cream. This gender imbalance is not surprising in the British Bangladeshi family, and neither is it in the general food world, where men are considered ‘chefs’ and women relegated to the everyday running of the home kitchen
Food traditions such as pitha – rice based sweets and savouries, pay homage to Bangladesh’s winter harvest, with festivals being key to the country’s gastronomy.
Bangladeshis are the pioneers of what became known as “Indian” food and own the majority of Indian restaurants in the UK, however this food is not authentic Indian food and a far cry from Bangladeshi cooking.
The home kitchen is where the real (and unfamiliar) flavours of Bangladesh can be found and restaurants are not addressing this issue. Menus are still long litanies, almost identical in appearance – with the token Bangladeshi dish forgotten in the mix.
Dishes such as the infamous chicken tikka masala, balti and cream-heavy korma do not appear on Bangladeshi dining tables. Sweet vermicelli pudding is a dish Dina grew up eating and says needs to break free from the Indian food umbrella (Peter Watson)
Once upon a time, east London’s Brick Lane – famed for one of the largest concentrations of Bangladeshis in the UK – used to house around 50 Bangladeshi run curry houses.
Now these restaurants are closing at a rapid rate with only about a dozen or so remaining. Businesses which started in the 70’s and 80’s have passed from one generation to the next: from father to son, or nephew – never a daughter, or niece. Businesses such as Nasrin Begum’s, Bangladeshi Food, set up mainly by housewives and mothers are feeding into the demand for home cooked food for busy families and local events (Bangladeshi Food)
This gender imbalance is not surprising in the British Bangladeshi family, and neither is it in the general food world, where men are considered “chefs” and women relegated to the everyday running of the home kitchen.
On a recent trip to Whitechapel in east London I was heartened to spot women working in a Bangladeshi sweet shop-cum café. This quiet revolution is all about celebrating and reclaiming the cuisine of generations of mothers, aunts and grandmothers, many who were homemaker
Conversations flowed amid the clatter of trays of handmade chom chom being replenished – a milk-based syrup-soaked delicacy and clearly a bestseller.
The women working here enthusiastically described the provenance of some of the less familiar sweets, confidently interchanging their speech from English to Bengali in order to accommodate various customers.
Trays of freshly fried moghlai porotas, fried pastry parcels encasing egg, chillies and onions were carried in from the basement kitchen in large silver trays, deftly balanced by the chef, their aroma transporting me back to Bangladesh. Brick Lane is famed as being one of the largest concentrations of Bangladeshis in the UK and used to house around 50 Bangladeshi run curry houses (Peter Watson)
Where men tend to be reluctant to change the status quo, women are confidently stepping in and proving that it’s time to take Bangladeshi food seriously. This quiet revolution is all about celebrating and reclaiming the cuisine of generations of mothers, aunts and grandmothers, many who were homemakers, trying their best to bloom the immigrant dream for their children and create the taste of home through the food they cooked.
Nur-E Gulshan and Nur-E Farhana, the mother daughter team behind Jersey City’s Korai Kitchen restaurant was brought to the forefront last year by acclaimed food writer Mayukh Sen for The New York Times . The feature introduced Bangladeshi food, and most importantly Bangladeshi women and caused a sensation.
In England, Scientist turned entrepreneur Shelly Nuruzzam, co-founder of Bang Curry kits, has created the perfect recipes for success, offering the Bangladeshi cooking novice a quick an easy route to classic fare.
Shelly introduces Bangladeshi flavours in enticingly named curry kits, such as warm Moghul and dhaka dal and has been featured in magazines and is stocked in Whole Foods and Morrisons.
I remember feeling amazed at the entrepreneurial spirit of Bangladeshi women when a cousin magically presented delicious platters of snacks, despite not having time to cook. She admitted her secret weapon – buying homemade food from another mum from her children’s school.
These women’s client bases stem from contacts with schools and parent networks, with a desire to taste food from the Bangladeshi community. Popular caterer, Nasrin Begum of Bangladeshi Food , enjoyed cooking daily for her large family and decided to take her love of preparing big batches of food further. In recent years micro businesses such as Nasrin’s, set up by mainly by housewives and mothers are feeding into the demand for home cooked food for busy families and local events. Unique ingredients such as shatkora – a bitter and fragrant cooking citrus, Naga chilli, molasses, dried fish and mustard oil informs the basis of everyday eating (Peter Watson)
People are more curious than ever about the differences in and within cuisines and there’s a desire to learn how to cook Bangladeshi food, how to shop for ingredients and most importantly – how it tastes.
On Instagram Afelia’s Kitchen has built up a loyal fan following of over 68k, who look to Afia for recipe ideas, incorporating both traditional and modern dishes and watch her cooking videos and stories.
When I wrote my Brick Lane Cookbook and hosted supper clubs I wanted to present a selection of Bangladeshi recipes inspired by women like my mother and grandmother and bring them to the forefront.
Like these women I wanted to not only showcase recipes, but also share the delicious flavours I had grown up enjoying. Simple fried fish with onions and rice, delicate fish and mangetout curries, sautéed bitter gourd and shemai – sweet vermicelli pudding. These are dishes that need to be shared and break out from the umbrella of Indian food.

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Chef De Cuisine – All Day Dining (Pre-Opening) | Hyatt

Expand all Description: * As a Chef De Cuisine of “The Locale”, you will have an opportunity to run The All Day Dining hall inspired by International Style food i.e. Western, Arabic, Indian and Asian. * Live Cooking restaurant counters using Fresh and local Ingredients served in a modern way yet simple but tasty and healthy food prepared by authentic cooking methods using seasonal produce along the side of some classic dishes inspired by the flavors of Dubai. * Create your own seasonal menus with the ingredients of the local market, and always thrives to find new unique local artisan product for retail. * Drive F&B activities for marketing and social media, increase customer awareness and built loyalty with the local customer and be up to date on latest culinary trends in the industry. * Role will involve to look after the Kitchens of Room Service and Knox Bar. REQUIREMENTS Qualifications: * Someone who lives his hobby and is passionate about cooking and food. * Someone who is creative, artistic with ingredients on hand and enjoys working in a lively, fast paced, high stress environment. * Someone who can inspire his brigade of Chefs to be their best while assuring a close attention to details and quality does not compromise on safe and hygiene practices. * Someone who loves to create memorable experiences, someone who loves being around people and is not shy to interact. * Someone who is a natural leader and enjoys the unpredictable milieu of managing the restaurant as an owner. Primary Location: AE-DU-Dubai Job Level: Full-time Job: Administrative Hyatt is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, marital status, pregnancy, national origin, ancestry, age, religion, disability, veteran status, genetic information, citizenship status or any other group protected by law. ABOUT THE COMPANY
Hyatt was founded by Jay Pritzker in 1957 when he purchased the Hyatt House motel adjacent to the Los Angeles International Airport. Over the following decade, Jay Pritzker and his brother, Donald Pritzker, working together with other Pritzker family business interests, grew the company into a North American management and hotel ownership company, which became a public company in 1962. In 1968, Hyatt International was formed and subsequently became a separate public company. Hyatt Corporation and Hyatt International Corporation were taken private by the Pritzker family business interests in 1979 and 1982, respectively. On December 31, 2004, substantially all of the hospitality assets owned by Pritzker family business interests, including Hyatt Corporation and Hyatt International Corporation, were consolidated under a single entity, now Hyatt Hotels Corporation.

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The ultimate guide to Niseko

The ultimate guide to Niseko Apr 03, 2019
Hong Kongers that enjoy snow and winter sports know that to secure the optimal winter vacation in Niseko, the bookings need to happen now.
To help plan future trips, we enlisted the taste and expertise of Sandy Ip, the founder of Ski Project , the retail concept for the ski-set lifestyle. Sounds familiar? Ski Project had three pop-up locations this winter at Pacific Place, Hirafu and Ichiseko in Niseko. Hong Kong’s favorite fashionistas come to Ski Project to get their Fulsap, Toni Sailor, Moonboots, Goldbergh, and Lacroix looks.
Wanting to look chic on the slopes was the driving factor for Ip to start Ski Project and she has found fans in style icons like Fei Fei Ping, Alison Chan, Antonia Li and Lindsay Jang just to name a few.
Their Instagram feed is also a convincing argument to wear these brands off the slopes too. Ip spends so much time in Niseko that we talked to her about everything you know to know to plan the perfect stay. Where to stay Skye Niseko
One of the newest ski in/ski out resorts at the top of Hirafu Village, Skye Niseko’s design is a mix of minimal modern style and traditional Japanese touches. There are various sizes of accommodations: from studio rooms to four bedroom suites and some penthouse options (3-4 bedrooms).
The condo style set ups for the accommodations are great for families or a big group of friends. With a full service kitchen and ample place to entertain, staying in and enjoying the comforts of the space is a wonderful option. There are many restaurants in town that have take-out menus or private chefs that will come and cook selected meals.
Skye Niseko has its own onsen in the resort, both a private one and public one. Other facilities include a spa for any aching muscle or for a facial to combat the weather exposure, an outdoor kids club right outside the hotel with an actual igloo, a 24 Hour Concierge always ready to help with anything (ski lessons, cars, medical needs) and restaurant and bar Kumo.
One of the best aspects of the Skye Niseko is the Ski Valet service. The pros were super friendly and knowledgeable. They were great with kids and fitting out new snowboarders and skiers. The system was organised, efficient, and incredibly easy. The Ski Valet was spacious and comfortable to manoeuvre around. While this might seem like a lot of praise for the service, when on a ski vacation this makes for a huge difference in the experience of getting set up, not getting hurt on the slopes or wasting time getting ready and checking out.
Skye Niseko is kid friendly and family friendly but fabulous. A pro tip is to book a room with a view of Mount Yotei.
Book now through The Luxe Nomad
Skye Niseko, 204-7 Yamada, Kutchan, Abuta District, Hokkaido 044-0081, Japan, +81 136-55-5123, www.skyeniseko.com Where to eat Sushi shin
Hands down the best sushi in Niseko. Sushi Shin boosts the same menu served at Chef Masaki Miyakawa’s three Michelin starred Sushi Miyakawa in Sapporo. Expect to be served Edomae sushi with fresh seafood ingredients sourced daily from Hokkaido and Tokyo’s famous fish market.
Open for lunch and dinner. Omakase set for dinner. Nigiri course available for lunch only.
Sushi shin , 430-25 Niseko, Abuta District, Hokkaido 048-1511, Japan, +81 136-59-2808, www.sushishin.jp Sessa
Traditional Japanese Nabe Hotpot and sukiyaki restaurant. If feeling extra, order the A5 Kagoshima Wagyu or the A5 Hokkaido beef sukiyaki. Vegetarian options also available. Open for lunch and dinner.
Sessa, 133-14 Aza Yamada Kutchan, Hokkaido, Japan, +81 136-23-2799, www.Niseko-sessa.com Rin Izakaya
Cozy Izakaya restaurant in the centre of Lower Hirafu Area with cosy atmosphere. In fact, dining here will feel like eating in a traditional Japanese house. The menu is not extensive but everything is done extremely well. Pricey for an Izakaya but definitely worth it.
Advance Reservations needed. Dinner only.
Rin Izakaya , 163-88 Yamada, Kutcha, Abuta District, Hokkaido 044-0081, Japan, +81 136 22 1444, www.niseko-rin.com Tsubara Tsubara
Soup curry is a must-try dish especially while in its birthplace of Hokkaido. Different from the most ubiquitous Japanese curry, it’s a fusion of Japanese broth and Indian spices. Also, soup Curry makes for the perfect post ski fuel. Casual atmosphere. Good for kids. Good value.
Open for lunch and dinner.
Tsubara Tsubara, 132-14 Yamada, Kutchan, Abuta District, Hokkaido 044-0081, Japan, +81 136 23-1116, www.kiniseko.com L’ocanda
A little bit off the village but best Italian in the area cooked by Japanese chef brothers in Niseko. Save room for dessert: the cakes and dessert are their own draw.
Open for lunch and dinner.
L’ocanda, 76-12 Yamada, Kutchan, Abuta District, Hokkaido 044-0081, Japan, +81 136 55 8625, www.winedineniseko.com Sobadokoro Rakuichi
Led by chef Tatsuru Rai and huis wife Midori, the place is a small twelve-seater bar serving the best soba kaiseki dining. Tatsuru Rai mixes, kneads, and cuts all of the buckwheat to order. Every strand of soba noodle is made of the spring water from Mount Yotei. Dinner is a multi-course omakase with small plates of seafood and seasonal vegetables.
Booking six months in advance is your best shot to get seats for the omekase dinner
Sobadokoro Rakuichi, 431 Niseko Nisekotyo, Niseko-cho Abuta-Gun-gun 048-1511, Hokkaido, Japan, +81 136-58-3170, www.rakuichisoba.com Bakery and Café Guzu Guzu
Other than Milk Kobo, this is one of the region’s most popular spots for dessert serving cream puffs full of fresh vanilla cream. Guzu Guzu has the best hot chocolate and Dutch babies (food blog material here), but don’t miss out on the freshly baked bread and coffee as well.
Bakery and Café Guzu Guzu, 68-5 Aza Yamada, Kutchan-cho, Hokkaido, Japan, www.guzuguzu.com Food trucks
Unlike in Hong Kong, food trucks have become an actual thing in Niseko. There are tons of options, from Indian curries to fish and chips and pizza rolls.
Most notably, PIZZA BAN has a real stone grill and offers customizable pizzas. Onsens
The Japanese tradition of onsen is one that is really easy to embrace in Niseko. What’s better than a thot mineral springs bath post slope workout to rejuvenate? Nothing! The onsens in Niseko are typically located in hotels or resorts. Yugokorotei
Traditional outdoor onsen area that lets you sit in hot natural spring water under a wood pergola surrounded by pine trees and fresh air.
Yugokorotei, 438 Niseko, Abuta District, Hokkaido 048-1511, Japan, +81 136 582500, www.niseko-annupurionsen.com Mokunosho
One of the more luxurious onsens in Niseko, it also serves high-end kaiseki cuisine. The facilities were designed in a traditional Japanese style but with dramatic lighting. It is easy to spend hours here. The spa is also a favorite amongst locals for massages.
Mokunosho, 393 Niseko, Niseko-cho, Abuta-gun, Hokkaido, 048-151, Japan , +81 136 59 2323, www.mokunosho.com Kanronomori
Kanronomori is a modern addition to the Konbu Onsen area. It is one of the few onsens that lets you rent the space privately by the hour. The hotel itself is super basic but the onsen is great.
Kanronomori, 415 Niseko, Abuta District, Hokkaido 048-1511, Japan, +81 136 58 3800, www.kanronomori.com Best Coffee Mountain Kiosk Coffee
Right outside Hirafu Welcome Centre. From its balcony you can see Mt Yotei on a clear day. They have great coffe, ice cream and a bar….Something for everyone! Hana 1 cafe In This Story: #travel / destinations Story Told by

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DWWA judge profile: Laurent Chaniac

Laurent Chaniac is a judge at the at the 2019 (DWWA). Laurent Chaniac
Wine consultant in London, Laurent Chaniac has become very popular offering the ultimate wine and food experience, with a particular focus on cuisine where spices are the drive. With his expertise, Chaniac has created an unprecedented taste revolution through matching wines to high end Indian cuisine.
Results of his contribution to the renovation of the London Cinnamon Club wine lists have been listing high-end wines that used to be the territory of classic European cuisine, which can work and sell within the spice world. Wine List Confidential Magazine has rated Chaniac’s 2017 wine list for Cinnamon Club, no 6 over a list of 350 top London restaurants.
Chaniac is constantly researching and exploring on how to create new wine-and-food experiences for very aware high-end clientele, where he develops matching spices, regional flavours, contemporary cuisine, and wines through contrast, harmony and natural perspectives. Also Chaniac works alongside the Chef to design ad-hoc dishes to be matched with specific wines in order for the wine to become the seasoning element of the food.
As well as understanding conventional wines he appreciates wines with a natural character, as he has developed a deep knowledge of organic and biodynamic productions. Chaniac is also a sake sommelier.
Laurent has previously worked as general manager with some of London’s finest dining experiences for over 20 years, including L’Atelier de Joel Robuchon, part of the group holding 25 Michelin stars, The Square, Harrods, The Stafford Hotel, The Cinnamon Club and The Cinnamon Kitchen.
Laurent Chaniac was first a DWWA judge in 2006.
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Jazz Fest Insider’s Guide

Jazz Fest Insider’s Guide
All you need to know from a Jazz Fest pro. April 5, 2019 The crowd at Jazz Fest. (Photo: Paul Broussard)
Every day of the last weekend in April and the first weekend in May for most of the past twenty years, I’ve thrown a hat on my head, put a wide grin on my face, and biked towards the Fair Grounds. After hundreds of sunburns, missing some amazing music because I walked the wrong way, and one or two (or five) times failing to remember the importance of hydration – I’ve learned some lessons about how to make the most of Jazz Fest. So, gather ’round, y’all. I’m here to share ’em with ya. Trombone Shorty at Jazz Fest. (Photo: Paul Broussard) New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival Tips Have a music plan of attack
First things first: Get on the Jazz Fest website and figure out what you’re seeing, and when. You’ve heard of – and heard – the big-name acts at the Acura , Congo Square , and Gentilly stages. But before you nail down your plans, find out who’s on small stages like the Native American Village and Alison Miner Heritage stages.
Don’t sleep on the “heritage” aspect of the festival, either. The Jazz and Heritage Stage is a mecca for local brass bands, Mardi Gras Indians, and funk, while the Fais Do-Do Stage features Cajun and Creole music all day, every day. The festival website and app have tons of info on all the acts. Eat dat: Pro tips for fest food
Jazz Fest has almost as many food options as it has music options, so you won’t go hungry. And while dishes like Crawfish Monica are crowd favorites, you may find yourself wishing for a shorter line, a healthier option, or even just a lesser-known treat that wasn’t on your radar.
Healthy-ish options: Bennachin Restaurant: Their jama jama dish featuring spinach, chicken on a stick, and fried plantains is a must. Straight-up jama jama (that’s the spinach) is awesome, too. The booth is way in the back behind the Congo Square field. Try the hot sauce. Jamila’s: This Mediterranean Riverbend staple often has short lines. It offers has a satisfyingly light salad and a great bisque. The booth is along the main strip of food booths running along the inner track between the Acura and Congo Square stages. Fried oyster spinach salad: Well, OK, it’s not exactly healthy food, but it’s delicious and involves veggies. If you’re facing the Jazz and Heritage stage, head left. It’s one of the first food booths you’ll hit. Vietnamese food: Delicious and healthy, find it by the Jazz Tent.
Shorter lines and food you may have overlooked: Shrimp maque-choux in the Native American Village : There’s rarely a line, it’s light and yummy, and it represents a key connection between our cuisine and the indigenous people of the region. Stuffed mushrooms from Prejean’s: For reasons I will never understand, this booth line is often short and it’s one of the best seafood treats out there. If you find yourself in need of a near-meal between the Jazz and Blues Tents, Li’l Dizzy’s Trout Baquet with crabmeat is where it’s at. Unless, of course, you don’t like butter. In which case, you may be at the wrong festival. Bonus: Most vendors will give you tin foil if you want to stock up and take something delicious home with you. It’s a better plan than pretending you’re gonna make that fancy dinner reservation after leaving the Fest.
Cold dranks, we got ‘em:
I highly recommend starting your day with a large rose-mint iced tea , ordered sweet or unsweet. Our sun is for real, y’all. Chances are your inclination for imbibing the night before was for real too. As you navigate towards sugar territory, the fresh-squeezed lemonade, strawberry or otherwise, is another tasty, booze-free option.
Here are some things to keep in mind for adult beverages: Red wine is usually served cold like the white wine and champagne to keep it from turning. Bloody Mary is also an option if beer, wine, margaritas, and daiquiris aren’t your thing. Remember, the folks serving beverages are working hard in the sun all day. Tips are good for the old karma boomerang. The streets surrounding the Fairgrounds become packed with artists, musicians, and fans following the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, creating impromptu street parties. (Photo: Katie Sikora) Getting there and getting around
It’s Jazz Fest. You’re gonna walk a minute, so make sure you have comfy shoes on your feet. Here are your options for getting to an fro: Before and after the Fest: Cabs, Lyfts, and Ubers: United Cab (504-522-9771) has an Uber-like app you can use for your way there. To cab back, just head to the taxi stand on Esplanade Avenue just outside the Fest. Buses conveniently pick up from a block away if you don’t have luck with a cab. Bicycles: Biking is a great way to get to the Fest, and if you plan on hanging around the parties and shenanigans that happen beyond the gates after 7 p.m., make sure your bike has lights on it. Esplanade Avenue has a bike lane that will take you to the top of Decatur Street if you’re headed downtown. Uptown-bound? Check out the protected bike path along S. Jefferson Davis Parkway. You’ll have to ride on Moss Street or another bike lane-free road for a few blocks, but Jefferson Davis will take you to Fountainbleu Drive. Cross the neutral ground, hang a left, and you’ll hit Napoleon Avenue. Hang a right and you can head toward the Riverbend via Nashville street and St. Charles avenue Driving: When looking for parking, bear in mind you can always go around to the lakeside or Gentilly side of the Fair Grounds. Plan some extra car time in both directions, though, and remember you will be sharing the road with cyclists, pedestrians, and police sobriety checkpoints.
Social aid and pleasure clubs have a centuries-long history in New Orleans. (Photo courtesy of New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival presented by Shell) At the Fest: Use the outside track on days like the second Saturday, which is always notoriously crowded. That said, on days when there are huge acts at Acura, Congo Square and Gentilly stages simultaneously, don’t be afraid to cut through the grass. Your best bet for breakin’ on through to the other side is often to veer from Acura past the food booths and towards the statues of New Orleans music community legends behind the Congo Square crowd. There’s usually a cozy spot with decent sound in the grass back there if you’re feeling whatever’s playing at Congo Square. To get from Jazz, Blues, Economy Hall, or Gospel to Gentilly, go with the track. Bear right, and you won’t get caught in the human traffic jam that often materializes in front of the Big Chief passholders’ Grand Stand at the Gentilly Stage. Chairs and blankets are commonplace at the Fest. (Photo: Paul Broussard) What to bring and other essentials: You know that smell you keep noticing? Especially when it rains? You’re on a horse racetrack . Guess why the mud smells that way and proceed accordingly. Your skin loves sunblock . When rain is in the forecast, boots (and socks!) are preferred over flip-flops. Maybe rethink those flip-flops no matter what the weather. If you are a sitter at Jazz Fest, blankets are a great option that won’t bonk the faces of folks behind you as you move from stage to stage. The Interwebs sell lots of water-resistant outdoor blankets that fold up and can be a nice alternative to metal fold-up chairs . The bathrooms with A/C generally have crazy long lines, but sometimes that’s your only option. They’re located in the Grand Stand (the ones upstairs on the Esplanade Avenue end of the building tend to have shorter lines than the ones downstairs) and on the track between the Blues and Jazz Tents. Bringing your own TP and hand sanitizer is never a bad idea for the rest of the day, when you’re bound to use a regular ol’ port-o-let. The Fais Do-Do stage. (Photo: Cheryl Gerber) Lagniappe: The Watermelon Sacrifice
I can’t tell you much about this sacred, secret ritual in the interest of honoring the tradition’s clandestine power. I can tell you that it’s weird and lovely, like New Orleans herself, and that it involves a watermelon. If you’re near Fais Do-Do in the afternoon on the Thursday of Jazz Fest, keep your ear ready for a chant that starts with “Watermelon, watermelon,” and ends with, “Sell it to the rich, sell it to the poor, sell it to tha lady standin’ in that do-o-o-or.” You can work out the rest. I believe in you. Happy Festing, y’all! Jennifer Odell Jennifer Odell is a freelance music writer. Her work appears regularly in DownBeat, Jazz Times, Offbeat and the Gambit, among other publications, and she leads the New Orleans chapter of the Jazz Journalists Association. In her spare time, she enjoys second lining to the Hot 8 or TBC, costuming, and eating all of the crawfish.

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The Best Keto Diet Recipes from all around the World: Your Complete Guide for High Fat Diet – More than 130 recipes, 21 days of Keto Specific Goals + BONUS Aldi & Walmart Shopping List

Ad Network The Best Keto Diet Recipes from all around the World: Your Complete Guide for High Fat Diet – More than 130 recipes, 21 days of Keto Specific Goals + BONUS Aldi & Walmart Shopping List
About The Best Keto Diet Recipes from all around the World: Your Complete Guide for High Fat Diet – More than 130 recipes, 21 days of Keto Specific Goals + BONUS Aldi & Walmart Shopping List
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Author Bio: Barbara Sabo is the author behind The Best Keto Diet recipes from all around the World. She lives as a full and healthy life in Ireland and she is a passionate advocate for the ketogenic diet and the health benefits of the low-carb lifestyle. Most of her recipes were inspired by her travels, recipes from all over the world – from Italy, Greece, Spain, Portugal, Asia, Thailand, India, etc. Her areas of expertise include recipe development and medically restricted diets. Her keto approach is worldwide cuisine, with full of fresh, clean, nutrient-dense fats, proteins and vegetables AND 100% FREE of processed foods and artificial ingredients. Reader Interactions

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What food films teach us about cuisine, culture and society

April 05, 2019 14:07 14:07 IST more-in The Hindu Weekend A recent spate of food films, including ‘Ramen Shop’ and ‘Jimami Tofu’, go beyond cuisine to talk about how food affects our lives, and vice versa. But the ultimate ramen film will always be the 1985 classic ‘Tampopo’, says the columnist
Despite the peripatetic nature of this column, it keeps returning to the subject of food in cinema, simply because as long as the two exist, they are destined to be together. The films I watched recently on the subject have a Japanese connect, touch upon the political impact that Japan has had on her South East Asian neighbours, and are a quest for roots. In Mitsuhito Shiraha’s What’s For Dinner, Mom? (2016), based on the memoir by Tae Hitoto, a pair of sisters visit their late mother’s home and come across a box of letters and recipes written by her.
The film flashes back to how their mother, a Japanese woman married to a Taiwanese man, shifts base to Taiwan, becomes adept at cooking the local cuisine, moves back to Japan after her husband’s death, but keeps preparing Taiwanese food for her daughters. The protagonist, Tae, is somewhat overshadowed by her sister, who is a popular singer, and is concerned with exploring her Taiwanese identity. While warm and affectionate — sometimes stomach-growlingly so while looking at Taiwanese food — the film soars when it explores the complex history between Taiwan and Japan, with the latter nation occupying the former for a number of years, thus elevating it from being a mere food porn movie.
Singaporean auteur Eric Khoo returns with Ramen Shop (2018), his second film with a food theme after Wanton Mee (2016). His debut Mee Pok Man (1985) had the protagonist running a noodle shop, but it was anything but a foodie film. The protagonist of Ramen Shop is a young man, who after the deaths of his Japanese father and Singaporean mother, decides to visit the island city-state in search of his uncle who makes a legendary bak kut teh (pork rib soup). The film celebrates the rich diversity of Singaporean cuisine, with its Indian, Chinese and Malay antecedents, and also examines the Chinese roots of ramen. Khoo also touches upon the scars left on Singapore by the Japanese occupation of it during World War II, after the capitulation of the British colonisers. The film will leave you feeling warm, fuzzy and hungry.
While on the subject, it would be churlish not to mention Jason Chan and Christian Lee’s Jimami Tofu (2017). The protagonist here is a Chinese-Singaporean chef who used to work in Tokyo, and is now in Okinawa learning to prepare traditional delicacies. Meanwhile, a sharp-tongued food critic finds herself eating her way through Singapore. The two have previous, as they say. The focus here is food and romance, with no politics at all.
Finally, if you want to abandon yourself to the elemental seduction of ramen, look no further than Koki Shigeno’s documentary that has the no nonsense title Ramen Heads (2017). The film documents Japan’s top ramen establishments and lovingly inspects the near-obsessive ways in which the dish is fashioned, with dollops of history, culture and even some philosophy en route. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to watch, yet again, the ultimate ramen film, Juzo Itami’s Tampopo (1985).
The author is a journalist and author of Rajinikanth: The Definitive Biography, and tweets @namanrs

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Experience Bali’s Longest Easter Sunday Brunch at Sundara in Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay

by admin / 5 April 2019
Enjoy Bali’s Longest Easter Sunday Brunch this coming holiday at Sundara, with special desserts from World’s #1 Chocolate Chef, Chef Yusuke.
At Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay, Sundara’s beachfront location is just one of those things that makes it a dexterous restaurant, which is already evident by the fact that it’s a sultry beach club by day and an iconic restaurant by night. Boasting a gorgeous view of the ocean and luscious food selection that’s bound to beguile diners, Sundara makes for an attractive dining destination in Jimbaran Bay.
For the upcoming Easter holiday, Sundara is set to host Bali’s Longest Easter Sunday Brunch, beginning from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., where diners can laze and graze and enjoy six hours of unlimited tapas served à la carte with live music on the open-air terrace and the island’s best cocktails. Not to mention the 57-metre pool accessible to refresh in between orders! Four Seasons Resort Bali is sheltered in a calm bay with three miles of sand, with their breezy villas channeling authentic Balinese village. One of their dining options, Sundara, is an all-day beachfront destination featuring tapas-style lunches and candlelit, Asian-inspired dinners.
Guests are invited to order as many plates as they’d like, with dishes coming from five different chefs taking turns in Sundara’s kitchen throughout the day. The Modern Australian selection will be coming from Executive Chef Phillip Taylor himself, while Modern Indian will be prepared by Specialty Chef Anil Naudiyal.
Modern Indonesian is set to complement your palate for Easter Sunday, with dishes prepared by Executive Sous Chef Made Widana, while Modern Asian dishes will be tackled by Chef de Cuisine Made Adijaya. The occasion is all the merrier with desserts by Chef Yusuke, who was named World’s #1 Chocolate Chef at the 2018 Valrhona C3 Competition. Enjoy desserts by Executive Pastry Chef Yusuke Aoki as part of your Easter Sunday brunch at Sundara, who is also preparing special chocolate painting sessions on edible paper using organic Bali chocolate made from farm-fresh cacao beans.
The little ones will also get to experience a fulfilling Easter Sunday with the Kids Club next door hosting an Easter Egg Treasure Hunt, and chocolate painting on edible paper using organic Bali chocolate made from farm-fresh cacao by Chef Yusuke.
Enjoy Sundara’s Longest Easter Sunday Brunch at Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay, priced at IDR 650,000++, with beverage packages from IDR 125,000++ per person. For more information or to make your reservations, visit https://www.fourseasons.com/jimbaranbay/. Post navigation

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