Political Calendar: Week of July 14, 2019

Political Calendar: Week of July 14, 2019

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Political Calendar for the Week of July 14, 2019:
Monday, July 15, Noon: Democrats of Greater Tucson luncheon, ( NEW Location ) Kettle Restaurant, 748 W. Starr Pass Blvd., west of I-10. East 22nd Street turns into W. Starr Pass Blvd. at the I-10. The Kettle restaurant serves American buffet food, and is on the north side of the street, near the Quality Inn. An optional buffet lunch is available for just $12.00 that includes beverage, tax, and tip. Ordering from the regular menu is available. Featured speaker is Laura Enriquez on The Democratic Party’s Minority Operative Problem. Next Week: (rescheduled) Debbie Rich from Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona.
Monday, July 15, 6:00 p.m.: Northern Pinal County Democrats meeting, at Mountain View Lutheran Church, 2122 S. Goldfield Road, Apache Junction. For more information please contact David Coward at .
Tuesday, July 16, 11:00 a.m.: Democratic Women of Southeastern Arizona meeting, at Manda Le Bar & Grill, 3455 Canyon De Flores, Sierra Vista, Meet the third Tuesday of each month. The cost of the luncheon is $15.00. For more information please contact Pat Smith at pandw111167@aol.com. Visit our web page. Democratic Women of Southeastern Arizona .
Wednesday, July 17, 6:00 p.m.: Democratic Club of Northern Gila County meeting, at the Payson Public Library, 328 N. McLane Road, Payson. Meet the third Wednesday of the month. For more information please contact or call (928) 468-9669.
Tuesday, July 16, 6:00 p.m.: Yavapai County Democratic Party – Cottonwood meeting – at the Old Town Red Rooster Cafe, 901 N. Main St, Cottonwood. Featured speakers are candidates Coral Evans (AZ House) Eva Putzova (US House).
Wednesday, July 17, 6:00 p.m.: LUCHA – Black & Brown Solidarity: Finding Common Ground, at LUCHA Tucson, 2424 E. Broadway Blvd., Tucson. African American and Latino civil rights organizations continue to seek solutions to relevant issues. Yet they continue to grapple with the difficulty of forging solidarity across lines of cultural, class, and racial-ethnic difference, a struggle that remains central to contemporary American life.
Wednesday, July 17, 6:30 p.m.: Democracy for America – Maricopa County (DFA-MC) monthly meeting is the third Wednesday of every month, and the new location is Macayo’s on Central Avenue, South of Indian School. For more information contact DFAofMC@gmail.com .
Wednesday, July 17, 6:30 p.m.: ( No meeting due to our fundraiser on 7/20 ). Legislative District 10 meeting, at new meeting location, Unitarian Universalist Church, Goddard Hall, 4831 E 22nd Street, Tucson.There is a social time for all members and guests, beginning at 6 p.m. Meet the third Wednesday of each month. For more information please contact Bonnie Heidler at ld10azdems@gmail.com.
Wednesday, July 17, 6:30 p.m.: Copa City Democrats meeting, location varies. For more information please contact Constance Jackson at jcksconniejean@aol.com.
Thursday, July 18, 8:00 a.m.: Democrats of the Red Rocks breakfast, at Old Sedona Family Restaurant Bar & Grill, 1405 W. Hwy. 89A, Sedona. Featured speakers are Bill Pearce, candidate for state mine inspector, and Joe Costion, Sustainable economic Development Initiative Northern Arizona, on Mining, Fracking and Helium Extraction in Arizona. Meet the third Thursday of each month. Admission is $15, includes buffet breakfast and gratuity. Doors open at 8:00 a.m. Please RSVP to (928) 274-6541. Tucson Mayoral Debate hosted by the Pima County Democratic Party
Thursday, July 18, 6:00 p.m.: Tucson Mayoral Debate hosted by the Pima County Democratic Party, at Rincon/University High School Auditorium, 421 N. Arcadia Avenue, Tucson. Moderated by Christopher Conover, AZPM Political Correspondent and host of “The Buzz.” Come hear what the three democratic candidates for Tucson Mayor have to say as they debate the issues two weeks before early ballots are mailed for the Democratic Primary election. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Debate will begin at 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, July 20: 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon-landing – NASA .
Saturday, July 20, 10:00 a.m.: Pima County Democratic Party African-American Caucus meeting, at Grace Temple Baptist Church, 1020 E. 31st Street, Tucson. Meet the third Saturday of each month. The caucus is not exclusively for African-Americans, all are welcome to join. For more information please contact Connie DeLarge at or (520) 241-8408. LD 10 “Hoppy Hour” Beer Tasting
Saturday, July 20, 3:00 p.m.: LD 10 “Hoppy Hour” Beer Tasting, at the Hop Street Lounge, 7215 E. 22nd Street, Tucson. Join LD10 for a beer tasting, silent auction, food and fun!Tickets are available now: $20-includes 3 5 oz. tasters, $25-includes 4 5 oz. tasters. Tickets available secure online at ActBlue . For more information see our Facebook Page .
DCSRA Current Events Discussion Group
Wednesdays, 10:00 a.m.: Democratic Club of the Santa Rita Area hosts a Current Events Discussion Group at the DCSRA Headquarters, Continental Shopping Plaza, 240 W. Continental Road (exit 63), Green Valley (Suite 420, between the Barber Shop and the restaurant Carne Y Vino). Join us at the weekly meeting of the Democratic Headquarters Current Events Discussion Group. We’ll talk about some of the major events of the previous week, including but not limited to political topics, and try and go behind the news for a deeper understanding. For more information, please contact Jean Vickers .
Drinking Liberally
Third Wednesday of each month, 6:00 p.m.: Drinking Liberally returns to The Shanty, 401 E. 9th Street, Tucson. We need to know by the morning of each meeting approximately how many folks will attend. Next meeting Wednesday, July 17. Please RSVP to . Featured speaker is Tucson mayoral candidate Regina Romero . Informal but thoughtful conversation. As a reminder, The Shanty does not serve food (yes, there is popcorn), so please feel free to bring your own or order in, all allowed at The Shanty. There is no obligation to order anything–but as a thank you to our host, I hope everyone will order at least one drink (alcoholic or otherwise).
Sunday, July 21, 2:00 p.m.: Pima County Democratic Party presents “Tucson City Council: What Is It and Why Do I Care?” , at the Martha Cooper Library, 1377 N. Catalina Avenue, Tucson. The inaugural event in Pima County Democratic Party’s new speaker series, “Civics 2.0: What They Didn’t Teach in Middle School.” This month’s presentation will feature Councilman Steve Kozachik, who will talk about the Tucson City Council, what it does, how it works, and how it affects the lives of Tucson residents. This informational talk is geared to the general public and is not a campaign event. Free tickets available on Eventbrite .
Monday, July 22, 6:00 p.m.: Legislative District 3 meeting, at the Pima County Housing Center, 801 W. Congress Street. Meet the fourth Monday of each month. For more information please contact Eva Dong at ecdong1@gmail.com.
Tuesday, July 23, 6:30 p.m.: Legislative District 9 meeting, at the Water of Life Metropolitan Community Church, 3269 N. Mountain Avenue, Tucson. Meet the fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information please contact Kim Holoway at kimholaway@gmail.com.
Tuesday, July 23, 6:30 p.m.: Northern Pinal County Democrats meeting, at the Pizza Hut, 240 S. Phelps Drive, Apache Junction. Meet the fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information please contact Kathy Guillen at (480) 620-7840 or gataguillen@yahoo.com.
Wednesday, July 24, 6:00 a.m.: ( Rescheduled ) Special Counsel Robert Mueller testifies in public before the House Judiciary Committee, followed by the House Intelligence Committee.
Wednesday, July 24, 11:00 a.m.: Democratic Women of the Prescott Area luncheon, at the Centennial Center, 1989 Clubhouse Drive, Prescott (on the Antelope Hills golf course). Luncheon reservations are required. A buffet luncheon will be provided. Cost is $15 for members and $17 for nonmembers. RSVP by email: DWPrescottArea@gmail.com or call (928) 848-2753. Contact us ASAP if you make reservations and are unable to attend. The public is welcome, but reservations are required. To join, email the form and pay at the luncheon, or mail with a check to Sandy Baggenstos, DWPA Treasurer, 530 N. Fitzmaurice Drive, Prescott, AZ 86303.
Wednesday, July 24, 11:30 a.m.: Rotary Club Meet & Greet the Candidates for Tucson Mayor , at the Tucson Convention Center, Turquoise & Crystal Ballrooms, 260 S. Church Avenue, Tucson (free TCC parking in Lot B West of the Convention Center – West Cushing Street and S. El Paso Avenue). Rotary Club of Tucson is hosting a Mayoral Debate with Democrats Randi Dorman, Steve Farley and Regina Romero, as well as Independent Ed Ackerley. Moderator will be Lorraine Rivera from AZPM and Arizona 360. Cost: $35, please RSVP at Eventbrite .
Wednesday, July 24, 6:30 p.m.: Pima County Young Democrats meeting, at Pima County Democratic Party HQ, 4639 E. 1st Street, Tucson. Everyone interested in learning more about supporting democratic issues, candidates or our club is welcome. We generally meet the fourth Wednesday of every month. For more information please see our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/pg/pimayoungdems.
Thursday, July 25, 6:00 p.m.: Pima County Democratic Party Labor Caucus meeting, at Pima County Democratic Party HQ, 4639 E. 1st Street, Tucson.
Thursday, July 25, 6:00 p.m.: Casa Grande Democrats meeting, at Bedillon’s Restaurant (Adobe Room), 800 N. Park Avenue, Casa Grande. Meet the fourth Thursday of each month. For more information please contact Jack Guthrie at and Like Us on Facebook.
Thursday, July 26, 5:30 p.m.: Arizona List July Tucson Happy Hour, at Rigo’s Restaurant, 2725 S. 4th Avenue, Tucson. Join us for a cold drink and spend some time with your fellow Democrats! Meet your local elected officials, Sen. Andrea Dalessandro, Rep. Rosanna Gabaldon, and Supervisor Sharon Bronson, and make some new friends. Please RSVP by buying tickets online or emailing allison@arizonalist.org.
Saturday, July 27, 9:00 a.m.: Arizona List Finance and Fundraising Training, at Tucson Planned Parenthood, 2255 N. Wyatt Drive, Tucson. An in-depth training on finance and fundraising for campaigns for all current and future campaign staff! For more information or to RSVP, please email Chesney at chesney@arizonalist.org.
Saturday, July 27, 10:00 a.m.: Northern Cochise County Democratic Club meeting. Meeting locations rotate between Benson and Wilcox. For more information please contact Kathy Suagee at . Visit our web page Northern Cochise County Democrats .
Saturday, July 27, 2:00 p.m.: Legislative District 11 meeting, at the Wheeler, Taft, Abbett Library, 7800 N. Schisler Drive, Tucson. Meet the fourth Saturday of each month. For more information please contact Steve Witthoeft at sdwitt77@gmail.com.
Yavapai County Democratic Party Annual Picnic
Sunday, July 28, 1:00 p.m.: Yavapai County Democratic Party Annual Picnic, at Watson Lake Park, 3101 Watson Lake Park Road, Prescott. Lunch and beverages provided. $20.00 per person, $30 per family of four (+ State park fee for parking at the gate on entry). For more information please contact 928.541.0413 or email us at info@yavdem.org.
Sunday, July 28, 3:00 p.m.: Marana Democrats meeting, at the Continental Reserve Plaza, 8333 N. Silverbell Road, Tucson. For more information please contact Buddy Gill at maranadems@gmail.com or (408) 806-2036.
Monday, July 29, 5:30 p.m. : Maricopa County Democratic Party Executive Committee Meeting at HQ, 2914 N. Central Avenue, Phoenix. Meet and greet (and dinner) begins at 5:30. Meeting begins promptly at 6:00 p.m.
Second 2020 Democratic Presidential Primary Debates
Tuesday, July 30 and Wednesday July 31, (8:00 ET) 5:00 p.m.: CNN Democratic Primary Debate from the Fox Theater in Detroit, Michigan. Aired On: CNN. Live Stream: CNN.com .
LD 10 Democratic Presidential Primary Debate Watch Party
Tuesday, July 30, 5:30 p.m.: LD 10 Debate Watch Party, at Pima Country Democratic Headquarters, 4639 E 1st Street, Tucson. Join your like-minded neighbors for the first night of the July 2019 Presidential Debates. Bring a snack to share and your own covered drinking container with your beverage of choice and watch the live stream broadcast on multiple screens. Bring a friend to this free event organized by the LD10 Democrats of Pima County. Please RSVP to stephotucson@gmail.com by Tuesday, July 30th at noon to reserve a space. Seating is limited.
Saturday, August 3, 9:30 a.m.: Legislative District 2 meeting, at the Sam Lena Library, 1607 S. 6th Avenue, Tucson. For more information please contact Gerald Stoops at gfstoops@gmail.com.
Saturday, August 3, 10:00 a.m.: Greater Huachuca Area Democrats meeting, at the Golden Corral Restaurant, 798 S. Highway 92, Sierra Vista. For more information please contact .
Monday, August 5, 6:30 p.m.: Pima County Democratic Party executive committee meeting.
Tuesday, August 6, 5:30 p.m.: Arizona List August Phoenix Happy Hour, at North Mountain Brewing Company, 522 E. Dunlap Avenue, Phoenix. Join us for a cold drink and spend some time with your fellow Democrats! Meet your local elected officials, Re. Kelli Butler, Mayor Ginny Dickey, Mayor Alexis Hermosillo, and Councilmember Solenge Whitehead, and make some new friends. Please RSVP by buying tickets online or emailing allison@arizonalist.org.
Thursday, August 8, 5:30 p.m.: Pima County Democratic Party Nucleus Club meeting, at the Viscount Suite Hotel, 4855 E. Broadway Blvd., Tucson. Featured speaker is Congressman Raul Grijalva . Meet the second Thursday of each month. For more information, contact DGT at Pima County Democratic Headquarters (520) 326-3716.
Thursday, August 8, 5:30 p.m.: Pima County Democratic Party Disability Caucus meeting, at Direct Center, 1001 N. Alvernon Way, Tucson. Monthly meeting of the Disability Caucus. Open to the public. For more information please contact Contact Carol Brown (520) 325-9874.
Thursday, August 8, 5:30 p.m.: Yavapai County Democratic Party meeting, at the Prescott Adult Center, 1280 E. Rosser Road, Prescott. $10.00 donation, $5.00 if you bring a dish to share. Meet the second Thursday of each month. Please RSVP to (928)541-0413 or email us at info@yavdem.org.
Thursday, August 8, 7:00 p.m.: Yuma County Democratic Party meeting, at the new Yuma Democratic Party HQ at 290 S. 1st Avenue, Ste. 1, Yuma. Parking is available in back. Meet the second Thursday of each month. For more information please contact us at yumademocrats@gmail.com.
Saturday, August 10, 9:30 a.m.: Tanque Verde Valley Democrats meeting, at Risky Business, 8848 E. Tanque Verde Road. Featured speaker is Merrill Eisenberg of Outlaw Dirty Money. Usually meet the second Saturday of each month. For more information visit our web site. Tanque Verde Valley Democratic Club .
Saturday, August 10, 10:00 a.m.: Mule Mountain Democrats meeting, at the Community Y, 26 Howell Avenue, Old Bisbee. For more information please contact John Viverto at or visit our web page Mule Mountain Democrats .
Saturday, July 13, 10:00 a.m.: Coconino County Democratic Party meeting, at Coconino County Democratic Party HQ, 201 E. Birch Avenue, Suite #6, Flagstaff. Meet the second Saturday of each month. For more information please call (928) 214-0393 or email Kevin Ordean at .
Saturday, August 10, 1:00 p.m.: Sun City Democrats of Oro Valley meeting, in the Navajo Room of the Activity Center, 1495 Rancho Vistoso Blvd., Sun City. Meet the second Saturday of each month. For more information lease contact Maureen Salz .
Saturday, August 10, 3:00 p.m.: Democratic Club of the Santa Rita Area meeting at the DCSRA Headquarters, Continental Shopping Plaza, 240 W. Continental Road (exit 63), Green Valley (Room 203 meeting room). For more information please contact (520) 838-0590.
Monday, August 12, 7:00 p.m.: Democrats of Oro Valley meeting, at the Oro Valley Public Library, 1305 W. Naranja Drive (SE corner at La Cañada). Meet the second Monday of each month. For more information please contact Mike Dayton at or (520) 742-3774, or visit our web site http://www.demsov.org/ .
9th Annual Arizona Alliance for Retired Americans Congressman Raul Grijalva Award Luncheon
Tuesday, August 13, 11:00 a.m.: 9th Annual Arizona Alliance for Retired Americans Congressman Raul Grijalva Award Luncheon, at the Randolph Clubhouse, Copper Room, 600 S. Alvernon Way, Tucson. Honoring Fred Yamashita, executive director Arizona AFL-CIO “A Champion for Arizona’s Labor Retirees.” Tickets: $35 individual, $300 table of 10. Complete a registration form and send check payable to: “AARA” by August 7, 2019, c/o Arizona AFL-CIO, 3117 N. 16th Street, #200, Phoenix, AZ 85016. To obtain a form and for more information, please contact Charlene Grossman – Tucson (520) 682-2171, Dora Vasquez – Phoenix (602) 689-8048, or email Retirees@azaflcio.org.
Monday, August 13, 7:00 p.m.: Democrats of the Highlands at Dove Mountain meeting, in the Dove Mountain Clubhouse Catalina Room II, 4949 W. Heritage Club Blvd., Marana. For more information please contact (520) 661-1919.
Tuesday, August 13, Noon: Democrats of Rim Country meeting, at Tiny’s Family Restaurant, 600 Arizona Hwy. 260, Payson, AZ. Meet the second Tuesday of each month. For more information please contact or call (928) 468-9669.
Tuesday, August 13, 3:30 p.m.: Saddlebrooke Democrats meeting, at SaddleBrooke Activities Center, 64518 E. Galveston Lane (Saddlebrooke). Meet the second Tuesday of each month. For more information please contact Steve Groth at (520) 385-6686 or check our web site. SaddleBrookeDemocrats.org .
Tuesday, August 13, 4:00 p.m.: Democrats for Picture Rocks meeting, at Horseshoe BBQ Restaurant, 6575 N. Sandario Road, Tucson. Meet the second Tuesday of each month. For more information please contact Catalina Hall at .
Wednesday, August 14, 7:00 p.m.: Graham County Democratic Party meeting, at La Paloma Restaurant, 5183 Clifton Street, Solomon. Meet the second Wednesday of each month. For more information please contact us at grahamcountydemocraticparty@gmail.com or visit our Facebook Page .
Thursday, August 15, 8:00 a.m.: Democrats of the Red Rocks breakfast, at Old Sedona Family Restaurant Bar & Grill, 1405 W. Hwy. 89A, Sedona. Topic: Millenials and Beyond – Panel of young elected officials, candidates and activists. Meet the third Thursday of each month. Admission is $15, includes buffet breakfast and gratuity. Doors open at 8:00 a.m. Please RSVP to (928) 274-6541.
Friday August 16 – Sunday, August 18: Woodstock 50 in Watkins Glenn, NY.
Saturday, August 17, 10:00 a.m.: Pima County Democratic Party African-American Caucus meeting, at Grace Temple Baptist Church, 1020 E. 31st Street, Tucson. Meet the third Saturday of each month. The caucus is not exclusively for African-Americans, all are welcome to join. For more information please contact Connie DeLarge at or (520) 241-8408.
Monday, August 19, 6:00 p.m.: Northern Pinal County Democrats meeting, at Mountain View Lutheran Church, 2122 S. Goldfield Road, Apache Junction. For more information please contact David Coward at .
Tuesday, August 20, 11:00 a.m.: Democratic Women of Southeastern Arizona meeting, at Manda Le Bar & Grill, 3455 Canyon De Flores, Sierra Vista, Meet the third Tuesday of each month. The cost of the luncheon is $15.00. For more information please contact Pat Smith at pandw111167@aol.com. Visit our web page. Democratic Women of Southeastern Arizona .
City of Tucson’s Official 242nd Birthday
Tuesday, August 21, 5:30 p.m.: City of Tucson’s Official 242nd Birthday, at the Presidio San Agustín del Tucson, 196 N. Court Avenue, Tucson. Details TBA. For more information see tucsonpresidio.com .
Wednesday, August 21, 6:00 p.m.: Democratic Club of Northern Gila County meeting, at the Payson Public Library, 328 N. McLane Road, Payson. Meet the third Wednesday of the month. For more information please contact or call (928) 468-9669.
Wednesday, August 21, 6:30 p.m.: Democracy for America – Maricopa County (DFA-MC) monthly meeting is the third Wednesday of every month, and the new location is Macayo’s on Central Avenue, South of Indian School. For more information contact DFAofMC@gmail.com .
Wednesday, August 21, 6:30 p.m.: Legislative District 10 meeting, at new meeting location, Unitarian Universalist Church, Goddard Hall, 4831 E 22nd Street, Tucson.There is a social time for all members and guests, beginning at 6 p.m. Meet the third Wednesday of each month. For more information please contact Bonnie Heidler at ld10azdems@gmail.com.
Wednesday, August 21, 6:30 p.m.: Copa City Democrats meeting, location varies. For more information please contact Constance Jackson at jcksconniejean@aol.com.
Thursday, August 22, 6:00 p.m.: Pima County Democratic Party Labor Caucus meeting, at Pima County Democratic Party HQ, 4639 E. 1st Street, Tucson.
Thursday, August 22, 6:00 p.m.: Casa Grande Democrats meeting, at Bedillon’s Restaurant (Adobe Room), 800 N. Park Avenue, Casa Grande. Meet the fourth Thursday of each month. For more information please contact Jack Guthrie at and Like Us on Facebook.
Saturday, August 24, 10:00 a.m.: Northern Cochise County Democratic Club meeting. Meeting locations rotate between Benson and Wilcox. For more information please contact Kathy Suagee at . Visit our web page Northern Cochise County Democrats .
Coconino County Democratic Party’s Annual Monsoon Picnic
Saturday, August 24, 11:00 a.m.: Coconino County Democratic Party’s annual Monsoon Picnic, this year at Bushmaster Park, 3150 N. Alta Vista Drive, Flagstaff. Come enjoy the food, hobnob with candidates and socialize with like-minded people! This is a potluck with the party providing burgers, veggie burgers, hot dogs, buns, and drinks. We ask that those whose last names begin with A-M bring a dessert and those whose last names begin with N-Z bring a salad or side dish. (Bring reusable plates and utensils if you can. We will provide paper and plastic.)
Saturday, August 24, 2:00 p.m.: Legislative District 11 meeting, at the Wheeler, Taft, Abbett Library, 7800 N. Schisler Drive, Tucson. Meet the fourth Saturday of each month. For more information please contact Steve Witthoeft at sdwitt77@gmail.com.
Sunday, August 25, 3:00 p.m.: Marana Democrats meeting, at the Continental Reserve Plaza, 8333 N. Silverbell Road, Tucson. For more information please contact Buddy Gill at maranadems@gmail.com or (408) 806-2036.
Monday, August 26: Women’s Equality Day , commemorating passage of the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote.
AZ Celebrates the 19th Amendment
Monday, August 26, 5:30 p.m.: AZ Celebrates the 19th Amendment, at Arizona State University, West Campus, 4701 W. Thunderbird Road, Glendale. Keynote Speaker: Kathy Hoffman, AZ Superintendent of Public Instruction. Also Mayor Coral Evans, Flagstaff, AZ. For Tabling, Sponsorship opportunities, and to participate in our Parade of Runners, please contact Karen Bravo at 602-509-7231 or or . For more information see EventBrite .
Monday, August 26, 5:30 p.m. : Maricopa County Democratic Party Executive Committee Meeting at HQ, 2914 N. Central Avenue, Phoenix. Meet and greet (and dinner) begins at 5:30. Meeting begins promptly at 6:00 p.m.
Monday, August 26, 6:00 p.m.: Legislative District 3 meeting, at the Pima County Housing Center, 801 W. Congress Street. Meet the fourth Monday of each month. For more information please contact Eva Dong at ecdong1@gmail.com.
Tuesday, August 27: City of Tucson Primary Election for Mayor and Council members .
Tuesday, August 27, 6:30 p.m.: Legislative District 9 meeting, at the Water of Life Metropolitan Community Church, 3269 N. Mountain Avenue, Tucson. Meet the fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information please contact Kim Holoway at kimholaway@gmail.com.
Tuesday, August 27, 6:30 p.m.: Northern Pinal County Democrats meeting, at the Pizza Hut, 240 S. Phelps Drive, Apache Junction. Meet the fourth Tuesday of each month. For more information please contact Kathy Guillen at (480) 620-7840 or gataguillen@yahoo.com.
Tuesday, August 27, 7:30 p.m.: PCDP Primary Election Night Party , at Reilly’s Craft Pizza, 101 E. Pennington Street, Tucson. Join Pima County Democrats to celebrate our Tucson mayor and council candidate primary winners on the November ballot.
Wednesday, August 28, 11:00 a.m.: Democratic Women of the Prescott Area luncheon, at the Centennial Center, 1989 Clubhouse Drive, Prescott (on the Antelope Hills golf course). Luncheon reservations are required. A buffet luncheon will be provided. Cost is $15 for members and $17 for nonmembers. RSVP by email: DWPrescottArea@gmail.com or call (928) 848-2753. Contact us ASAP if you make reservations and are unable to attend. The public is welcome, but reservations are required. To join, email the form and pay at the luncheon, or mail with a check to Sandy Baggenstos, DWPA Treasurer, 530 N. Fitzmaurice Drive, Prescott, AZ 86303.
Wednesday, August 28, 6:30 p.m.: Pima County Young Democrats meeting, at Pima County Democratic Party HQ, 4639 E. 1st Street, Tucson. Everyone interested in learning more about supporting democratic issues, candidates or our club is welcome. We generally meet the fourth Wednesday of every month. For more information please see our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/pg/pimayoungdems.
Friday, August 30 – Monday, September 2: Coconino County Fair , at Fort Tuthill County Park, 2446 Fort Tuthill Loop, Flagstaff.
Saturday, August 31 – Monday, September 2: 104th Sonoita Labor Day Rodeo , at the Sonoita Fairgrounds, 3142 AZ-83, Sonoita.
Monday, September 2: Labor Day.
PALF Annual Labor Day Picnic
Monday, September 2, 10:00 a.m.: Pima Area Labor Federation’s 23rd Annual Labor Day Picnic at the Reid Park Bandshell. Join us for free food, drinks, games and our 9th annual union olympics. Details TBA.
Santa Cruz County Democratic Party Labor Day Picnic
Monday, September 2, 11:00 a.m.: Santa Cruz County Democratic Party Labor Day Picnic, at Teyechea Park, W. Paseo Contento Loop (behind city hall), Nogales. Free Chuyito’s hot dogs to the fist 200 guests. Music, games and prizes.
Wednesday, September 4 – Saturday, September 7: Apache County Fair , at 825 W. 4th, North Saint Johns.
Thursday, September 5 – Sunday, September 8: Yavapai County Fair , at the Prescott Rodeo Grounds, 840 Rodeo Drive, Prescott.
Thursday, September 5 – Sunday, September 8: Northern Gila County Fair , at the Payson Event Center, 1400 Beeline Hwy., Payson.
Sunday, September 8: Week one of the 2019 NFL season.
Wednesday, September 11: Patriot Day.
Wednesday, September 11 – Sunday, September 15: Navajo County Fair & Rodeo , at the Navajo County Fair Grounds, 404 E. Hopi Drive, Holbrook.
Thursday, September 12 – Sunday, September 15: Mohave County Fair , at the Mohave County Fairgrounds, 2600 Fairgrounds Blvd., Kingman.
Third 2020 Democratic Presidential Primary Debates
Thursday, September 12 and Friday, September 13, (Time TBA): ABC News Democratic Primary Debate from Houston, TX (venue TBA). Aired On: ABC, Univision. Live Stream: ABC News Live .
Saturday, September 14, 11:00 a.m.: Sierra Vista Oktoberfest , at Veterans’ Memorial Park, 3105 E. Fry Boulevard, Sierra Vista, AZ. Beer garden, german cuisine via food vendors, live entertainment from the Hamptons, kid’s carnival and arts & craft vendors.
Saturday, September 17: Constitution Day/Citizenship Day.
Thursday, September 19 – Sunday, September 22: Gila County Fair , at the Gila County Fairgrounds, located just north of Globe on US 60.
Thursday, September 19 – Sunday, September 22: Greenlee County Fair , at the Greenlee County Fair Grounds, 1248 Fairgrounds Road, Duncan.
Friday, September 20 – Sunday, September 22: Santa Cruz County Fair , at the Sonoita Fairgrounds, 3142 AZ-83, Sonoita.
Arizona Democratic Party State Committee Meeting
Saturday, September 21, 9:00 a.m.: Arizona Democratic Party State Committee Meeting, at Prescott Mile High Middle School, 300 S. Granite Street, Prescott. Registration will be from 8:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. Caucus meetings are from 9 a.m. to noon. Lunch available at meeting location. Plenary session begins at 1 p.m.
Democrats of Greater Tucson 2019 Awards Luncheon – Save the date!
Sunday, September 22, 11:30 a.m.: Democrats of Greater Tucson 2019 Awards Luncheon, at Hotel Tucson City Center, 475 N. Granada Avenue, Tucson. Master of Ceremonies is David Fitzsimmons of the Arizona Daily Star . Details TBA. Save the date!
Tuesday, September 24: National Voter Registration Day .
Thursday, September 26 – Sunday, September 29: Cochise County Fair , at the Cochise County Fair Grounds, 3677 N. Leslie Canyon Road, Douglas.
Saturday, September 28, 11:00 a.m.: Tucson Pride Parade 2019 . Step off at 11:00 a.m. at Reid Park, 22nd Street (at Alvernon Way) in Tucson.
Saturday, September 28, Noon: 42nd Annual Pride in The Desert , at Reid Park, 22nd Street (at Alvernon Way) in Tucson. See Pride In The Desert 2019 .
Friday, October 4 – Sunday, October 27: Arizona State Fair , at the Arizono State Fair Grounds, 1826 W. McDowell Road, Phoenix.
Thursday, October 10 – Sunday, October 13: Graham County Fair, at the Graham County Fairgrounds, 527 E. Armory Road, Safford. Share this:

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How saag feta became a cultural amalgam

Fifteen minutes into my meeting with Indian-American cookbook author Priya Krishna, we are both sputtering on the extra hot chillies in the Chicken Chili Dry at Mizo Diner, a modest restaurant serving Mizoramese food in Humayunpur, Delhi. Krishna says she is out of practice. “My spice tolerance levels have gone down ever since I moved away from home—at meals with my parents, I would just casually pop hari mirch into my mouth.”
Krishna’s new book, Indian-ish: Recipes And Antics From A Modern American Family, chronicles some of those meals—not fully Indian, not fully American, but belonging wholly to the Krishna family.
In her book, she makes deliberate choices to dispel strident stereotypes about Indian food. For one, the subtitle of the book— Recipes And Antics From A Modern American Family —underscores that Krishna’s family is what modern, multicultural America looks like. Also deliberate is her decision to omit translations of Indian ingredients, beyond an initial table describing them. No substitutions for hing (asafoetida) are possible and no Hindi words are italicized. This food is her normal and she wants to represent it on her terms.
In his 2017 book Curry: Eating, Reading And Race, Naben Ruthnum dissects the idea of a universal South Asian experience. He christens an entire genre of books “currybooks” that deliberately exoticize immigrant narratives by using lazy signifiers, such as food and its attendant nostalgia, to denote entire communities and their experiences. If some South Asian fiction writers rely on exotic smells and spices to explore homelands and exile, diasporic food writers in the US seem to be headed in the opposite direction. Stepping away from representing an all-encompassing, “authentic” Indian cuisine, they are using food writing as a narrative medium to tell personal family histories of being at the table.
In a disclaimer that echoes Ruthnam’s adamant claim that curry is non-existent, Krishna writes: “THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS CURRY—at least not the way you might know it.”
Priya Krishna.
When I ask her to elaborate, she says, “I hate the way that ‘curry’ has been used to reduce Indian food to a monolith, when in fact it’s this incredibly diverse cuisine! I hate when people tell me, ‘I don’t like Indian food because I hate curry’—what does that mean? People have this understanding of Indian food as some monochromatic stew, and it really bums me out that because of that word—curry—people can’t see beyond that image.”
At the same time, the word “curry” has an immediate recall value. Krishna mentions how New York-based Chitra Agarwal, a food entrepreneur whose company Brooklyn Delhi creates condiments with Indian flavours, eventually gave in and called her spicy ketchup “Curry Ketchup”, simply because it is what sells.
During this trip to India, Krishna is keen to explore just how diverse Indian food is, in ways that challenge her own experience of growing up in a north Indian family.
Later, when I ask her about whether she has found any exciting Indian-ish instances of traditional food in India being fused with global dishes, she turns the question on its head. “I felt the opposite, actually—I was excited by the number of hyper-regional restaurants, focusing on specific areas of the country, leaning into sourcing from India itself rather than abroad.”
Krishna’s career began neither with a focus on mainstream Indian food, nor a burning need to shed light on more obscure regional food from the country, but with a book called Ultimate Dining Hall Hacks , which used ready-made ingredients available in most college dining halls to create easy recipes.
While working at the now discontinued Lucky Peach magazine, she collaborated with her mother Ritu (also a co-writer of Indian-ish ) to contribute recipes such as Dahi Toast, an Indian riff on a grilled cheese, to the magazine’s Power Vegetables cookbook. The result was Indian-ish , a book about the Krishna family and their food.
Ritu is the life force that animates Indian-ish . It is her shortcut recipes, born out of her need to juggle a successful career as a software programmer and provide Indian flavours at the dinner table, that populate the entire book.
Growing up, although Priya always liked Indian food, she felt self-conscious about eating dishes that were different. Often, her sister and she demanded American foods at their dinner table, which led to inventions such as Roti Pizza—an oven-crisp roti with toppings like Parmesan and thinly shaved potatoes—becoming Krishna family’s favourites.
Much of Krishna’s work comes from navigating the occasional tension of living in a house with parents who grew up in India while being a first-generation American. Over time, she says, she came to view it as good tension that yielded dishes like saag feta . “That my sister and I and my mom and dad were products of very different cultures meant we had to find compromises in the kitchen. Those compromises were delicious, and they are the bedrock of what makes this book unique.”
While tasty corruptions such as Roti Pizza and Quinoa Shrimp Pulao were allowed, some traditions were fiercely protected. Krishna’s father Shailendra makes a guest appearance in the book with a piece—“Why My Yogurt is Fabulous”—in favour of his homemade yogurt, which he has been setting, using the same culture, for over 25 years.
The book is full of these surprises—on the one hand, an adherence to rituals and traditions that have assumed personal significance, and, on the other, a playful attitude to experimentation and substitution. Even if it was initially born out of necessity, how could adding feta to saag paneer instead of paneer be a bad idea?
At a time in American cooking and food writing when ghee is being described as “lactose-free, clarified butter” and turmeric is the new superfood, Krishna’s book makes sure that the histories of those ingredients, and their place in South Asian cultures, is acknowledged, even as she imagines unorthodox departures from their traditional use.
Krishna says she was tired of Indian food being thought of as heavy or too complicated. “If there is a ribollita recipe in any American food magazine with rosemary, thyme, oregano and sage, that’s okay but if I write an Indian recipe with multiple spices, somehow that’s thought of as complicated.” Similarly, the idea of Indian food being too rich peeves her. “So many working Indian people make quick, healthy meals every day. If nobody is going to dispel these myths, then I need to.”

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Is Great British food Actually Great?

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Disclaimer: The views expressed within this article are entirely the author’s own and are not attributable to Wessex Scene as a whole.
As a self-confessed foodie I love trying all manner of cuisines, however, some of my greatest memories all revolve around classic British grub. It is this love of British food and the feeling of nostalgia towards it that that makes me find it difficult to believe that British food has such an awful reputation with visitors. Maybe this is because British food has a bit of a lost identity due to its rich social and cultural influence, or maybe it is because it simply is not great.
When thinking about what British food it is easier to imagine it as a melting pot of worldwide cuisine. With curry houses and Chinese restaurants popping up on every street corner, and the ongoing British love of Italian food, it is clear to see that traditional British food could easily get lost in this global tapestry. Many traditional dishes are however still integral to the British diet, such as fish and chips, shepherds pie and the good old fashioned Sunday roast.
Historically speaking, the British empire occupied so many countries around the world during its existence that it is unsurprising that our food has been influenced. For example, Britain occupied Hong Kong right up until 1997 so it’s unsurprising that a love of oriental cuisine was brought back to Britain. Another influential factor in British cuisine is immigration. In my local area of South Wales, there is a very prevalent Italian community that dates back to the 19 th century, meaning that there is an array of authentic Italian restaurants, cafes, and bistros that all celebrate their heritage.
One of the most popular dishes in Britain is curry. The curry houses of Britain have a very long and vibrant history. Since 1971, 65-75% of Indian restaurants in the UK were owned by Bangladeshi immigrants and today there are more Indian restaurants in Greater London than there are in Delhi and Mumbai combined. Clearly, the foods that we Brits typically enjoy aren’t British at all and we often take their history for granted, so next time you’re sat in Manzils tucking into to your 3am post-jesters student deal, remember that it is in fact steeped in social and cultural history.
Although there are many dishes in Britain that aren’t of British heritage, there are ones that bring back excellent memories of most people’s upbringing. For most of my childhood, my grandparents had caravans along the coast and even now one of my favourite things to do is sit on a beach with fish and chips bought from the local chippy. Now, this memory of fish and chips fuels my excitement of heading down to the Cornish fishing village of Padstow. Another food memory of mine stems from the good old-fashioned Sunday dinner. I’m unsure if it’s because my dad has always cooked the best roast potatoes or that it brings the whole family together, but when I’m at uni I often get a little sad around 3pm on a Sunday knowing that back home there is a slap up feast of Lamb, veg, roasties and gravy being dished up for my whole family to enjoy.
My excitement around the Sunday roast intensifies from about November onwards when I start to get excited for the greatest meal of the year… the Christmas dinner. As well as the traditional roast, I am unsure that I would survive the winter without shepherd’s pie and a big lashing of gravy. It is the ultimate comfort food and it baffles me to think that visitors to Britain are unimpressed. For me shepherd’s pie was my dads go to dish for when I was sad, unwell or stressed and when I moved to university it was the first dish I learned to cook. It may be the humble Shepard’s pie, but it holds a special place in my heart. It is probably obvious to you that these British dishes, however simple they may be, trigger a feeling of nostalgia in me. That is probably down to my dad’s love of cooking, and food, however this love of food that was sparked in me at an early age means that I am now a massive foodie who enjoys home cooked meals and a trip out to a restaurant.
Over recent years the UK food Scene has massively improved, and the country has gone from being ridiculed on the international stage, to being regarded as a culinary hot-spot. This is unsurprising when the UK has churned out top chefs such as Nigella Lawson, Heston Blumenthal and Gordon Ramsey. London also has the 6 th highest concentration of Michelin-Starred restaurants in the world. With a wide and diverse cultural influence on the British restaurant scene, there are few cities on the planet that offer good food across the board as well as London. As well as boasting 70 Michelin-starred restaurants, London is home to huge markets offering fresh produce. As for the rest of the UK, Birmingham is the home to Cadburys chocolate, Cornwall offers some of the best seafood, and Wales boasts some of the best lamb you will ever eat. The point is, wherever you go in the UK, you will not be disappointed by the food on offer.
British food does not deserve the bad reputation it often gets by international visitors. Although British food may have a slightly confusing identity, its cultural influences make for a more vibrant, varied and colourful food scene that reflects our social history and celebrates those that have emigrated here. I find it difficult to believe that our food often gets criticised when Britain is the home of the Sunday roast, pie and mash and fish and chips, some of the most nostalgia-fuelling dishes there are. Britain boasts 163 Michelin-starred restaurants and has produced an abundance of famous chefs. Our food is far from bland and boring… it is great.
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Tips to create Call Quality Monitoring Program

by Uwe Powell on 1 hour ago 5 views (3) Birla Mandir – Birla mandir is one of the big temples of delhi and most visited place. Mahatma gandhi was inaugurated this temple with one condition, escort service in gurgaon and the condition is each and every persons of all castes allowed to enter Birla Temple, without any problem. Step 5: Create a Call Evaluation Form, and Agent Scorecard The primary output of quality monitoring is the agent evaluation. The intent is to gather the information required to evaluate agent performance on “soft” skills. The monthly quality audit examines skills and qualities like listening, voice clarity, accuracy, empathy, courtesy, call control, product knowledge, and adherence to procedures. Delhi Russian Escorts Services, hello Profile Russian Escorts in Delhi as well as Gurgaon, call girls, Russian Escorts Delhi furthermore easily accessible on one call. Extraordinary Escorts benefit in Delhi and also region adjacent Delhi Escorts Russian i.E. Gurgaon, Noida, Faridabad and so on. Call us for Indian Housewife, Russian call women Delhi, objective Escorts, college females, systems, Air Hostess, Working ladies. Oversupply: The first-rate housing property segment of gurgaon is hitting by oversupply, swarming with luxuries penthouse and apartments. According the DTZ, reports supply side in Gurgaon, higher end housing section has exceed the specify side. With this, the investor are not looking for the kind of proceeds that they have confined previously from the agreement and that’s why their concern in buying housing property in gurgaon is moderately lower. Recording calls is an important step in the quality monitoring process. The supervisor should be able to replay a call. It is important for the agent to listen to their own calls subsequently for self-assessment. Delhi Russian Escorts Services, hello there Profile Russian Escorts in Delhi and also Gurgaon, call girls, Russian Escorts Delhi similarly available on one call. Exceptional Escorts benefit in Delhi and territory adjacent Delhi Escorts Russian i.E. Gurgaon, Noida, Faridabad and so on. Our Delhi Russian Escorts name lady service provider uses an figuring out pal to individuals that be aware of the relevance of having Delhi companions Russian. One of the main features of hotels in New Delhi is the mouth-watering cuisines. The guests enjoy at their multi-cuisine restaurants, which serve world-class food items for different tastes of people. Another major characteristic that these lodges have possessed is their easy accessibility. For a longer stay, some prefers guest house in Delhi. Although capital values of residential properties in gurgaon is high, investors who had purchased properties, especially in the 60- sq. Yard segment in the view of exorbitant returns are now adopting long term perspective and ready to wait than sailing them in hurry. Guide to Creating a Quality Monitoring Process The primary objective of quality monitoring is to improve the performance of the call center. It is not intended to provide an accurate indication of individual agent performance. (2) Humayun’s Tomb – Humayun’s Tomb situated at Lodhi Road, near the Jawahar lal Nehru Stadium Metro Station. If you have virtually any concerns about where as well as tips on how to make use of escort service in gurgaon , you can e-mail us from the website.

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7 Success Recipes for Indian Restaurant Branding

by DesignerPeople
WOW !!! Remember good old days when going to a restaurant was always a week before plan or Sunday outing plan, and then visiting hotel which served tasty and your favourites cuisines was the sole motto.
Gone are those days, today in 2019, even a small kid visit McDonald’s with their perception of getting ‘Happy Meal’ there. So Era is changing so as we, Now customer expectations are beyond generic needs of food taste and its quality, while these aspects are still essential, but somehow they are now into mandatory services and fundamental lack of customers. Now Restaurant Branding comes into the picture, if on time restaurants don’t enhance their branding, then it is left for customers to decide and perceive themselves, which is not a good sign. Let’s understand what is Restaurant Branding?
It is not just about a pretty logo and a catchy jingle. Great, powerful, and effective restaurant branding is all about marrying your marketing with your operations.
Focusing on every little detailed experience, define every touchpoint. Conceptualizing and realizing a top-tier dining experience requires more than putting together a tasty menu. You have to satisfy customers with a purpose and deliver what you are promising. Wow, guests with your restaurant’s particular panache. Which Comes First—Marketing Or Branding?
Branding comes first as its process of creating some story and culture that communicates value to your customer. The brand will keep your clients coming back for more. It is the foundation upon which you will build consumer loyalty.
Branding is a strategy to build an image of “who are you “while marketing is how you make awareness. Branding is your strategy, while marketing encompasses your tactical goals.
The brand doesn’t outright say, “Buy me.” It says, “This is who I am.” BRAND IS STORY There is a faithful saying, “He who has the best story wins”. “Facts tell, but stories sell”.
Every restaurant has a story, such as, you are the fourth generation owner of your town’s favourite pizza place, you were the farmer who was supplying organic products to the restaurant owner, and when the owner died then you bought it. If you grew up fishing with your grandfather and that inspired you to open a fish shack such many more inspirational stories.
The story is part of you, people love the excellent narration, and if it’s interesting, then they will always be emotionally connected to your brand rendering their loyalty.
It can also be an influential culture that creates a “sense of belongingness” among customers. Such as if you visit Rajdhani restaurant chains, you will notice they will put tikka on your forehead and greet with Namaste. While interior designing also correlate with its ethnic look that strengthens its inspirational story.
You will always see elements of Happiness with Mac D with their “happy man” clown, which depicts their story to spread happiness.
Coke made its strong story with character “Santa clause” and hence correlated all its branding strategies around its famous colour Red. Visual branding – Weaving in visual communications helps tell a story.
It gives practical consideration to the emotional aspects, and abstract constructs need for portraying about the restaurant’s culture and story.
Once content is decided, next its time to process that information and start building a visual message communication plan that accurately serves the businesses’ core values.
Three essential elements are, 3C’s:
correctness, creativity and consistency. Correctness :
While building your restaurant’s visual branding elements, ask yourself whatever you are promoting is genuine and authentic to what is you are delivering, does that align with your brand? Weaving in visual communications helps to tell a story.
If its an Italian cuisine restaurant then Indian music will not connect the audience. Creativity :
Dining is a very personal and emotional experience that depends on visuals aspects to appeal to all senses. Evoking excitement within your customers won’t be achieved through flat, dull imagery.
You can come up with an interactive standee that customers can take a selfie with and share on social media.
If you observe Haldiram North, you will see creativity with their restaurant SPACE BRANDING , where Space branding is done innovatively by creating Generic Wall portraying holistic event images such as Birthday Party, and Kitty party many more such events. Consistency:
Customers are least interested in engaging with brands that have an identity crisis.
They want the consistency to rely on a brand that delivers the product or service with the same price, quality and experience each time.
Colour, typefaces, style of photography, the location wise experience should follow consistency.
If you visit Dominos, Mac D, or SF Express, you will find all marketing collaterals consistent irrespective of your location. 7 STEPS TO DEVELOP YOUR RESTAURANT BRANDING:
When we say Branding is a process that takes place even before opening the restaurant, doesn’t mean existing restaurants cannot develop a brand. It’s never too late to build and refine your brand existence.
Your brand identity is the personality of your restaurant. Once you define it, you can apply it in all areas of your business and marketing.
Let’s look at the trends in restaurant branding, which are focus points for each professional restaurant branding agency. 1.BE REAL
Authenticity and transparency play a vital role in restaurant branding. You have to tell them clearly what you are going to provide them when they get connected to you.
Portray your customers you care for them by extending your brand through community service projects like leftover food is provided to some NGO’s or any such. 2.FINE TUNE WITH CUSTOMERS
We are in an era where customers are “KING “, and so you have to consider with each touchpoint your customer is having with your restaurant, and do everything you can to make their experiences seamless.
Be in touch with them through online reviews, websites and social media. 3.ENHANCE ENGAGEMENT
Branding is much more than just creating awareness after that its also necessary to retain your customers.
Application of Artificial Intelligence in restaurants includes chatbots for interacting with customers that help to enhance customer engagement. 4.UNCLUTTER YOUR MESSAGE
Don’t over clutter your message. Please keep it simple, so it’s easy for your guests to know what you value.
Your goal should let your customers know what you are offering them. There is much overcommunication about the brand in the world today, so to compete, you have to grab their attention quickly
Over communication is a problem all face today, so to overcome this start to simplify things. 5.PROTECT YOUR BRAND
Protecting your brand is very important if you stray from it, then you have lost your message and your competitive edge.
Always ask yourself questions such as does this new menu item fit with my brand? Alternatively, Have I stayed true to my brand colours and fonts? 6.SET YOUR PRIORITIES
Your restaurant is all about your valuable customers. If you come across one unhappy customer in your restaurant or online, respond to their comments with empathy and understanding. Do everything that takes to make it right.
Like Barbeque if you share any in-store food quality issue, they go to the extent of cancelling your bill cost and also provides apology cake which shows how dedicatedly they want you to carry positive image about their brand. 7.BE PATIENT
Being Patient is vital for a happy life. You will always have some ups and downs while building your brand identity.
Stay real and transparent to your brand even when times are hard. Understand your brand and keep it in the forefront always. Consistency and honesty are still paying off. IMPORTANT ELEMENTS OF RESTAURANT BRANDING 1.CONCEPT
A restaurant is a concept including things like the style of food, type of service, and other distinguishing features.
If Restaurant is Vegan, Keto specialized Italian, Self-service or not many more important points which are decided by the owner. 2.DEMOGRAPHICS
Clarity on your target group will always help you to plan brand positioning and its strategies accordingly.
You need to understand if you are aiming to serve families, romantic couples, businesspeople, or some combination? Are they trendy or traditional? Customer price point?
CCD is focusing on a romantic couple with the tagline “A lot can happen over a cup of coffee.”
Starbucks aiming at corporate people who want the calm business environment to concentrate on work. 3.MISSION STATEMENT
Explains what your restaurant is aiming to achieve on an emotional level, what distinct value your brand is providing compared to competitors. 4.NAME
Your name should be memorable yet simple the title should portray what type of food you are offering this will help customer to know what they will get when they enter inside your restaurant.
If you come across Soups and salad restaurant, you know what you will get inside before you enter. 5.LOGO
The logo carries emotional perception in the mind of your audience, make sure your logo has a unique story which will help people to get connected.
If you observe Disneyland logo, you will get a feel of fantasy and imagination. 6.TAGLINE
A tagline should define the feature of your brand. The motive behind the concept is to generate a memorable creative phrase that will collaborate with tone and feel of an audio/visual product and strengthen the audience’s memory of a product.
Lays define tagline as ‘no one can eat just one.’ 7.WEBSITE
Your website is very first impression customer carry so a website should be user-friendly to understand and visually appealing is mandatory. 8.AMBIENCE
Today restaurants need to put valuable time creating a distinct and pleasant ambience.
Factors that play an essential role are as below : Lighting

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Will Travel for Food: Cameron Trading Post

The words “historic restaurant” almost always pulls me to a stop and that was true last week when I was driving down US-89 about an hour north of Flagstone and saw the sign for the Cameron Trading Post in Cameron, Arizona, a small town seemingly consisting of a gas station, Burger King and laundromat.
Everyone with me always groans when I start reading the long details about the history of a place and I have to admit that old doesn’t always mean good but this time I lucked out.
The trading post, located on a high plateau at an elevation of over 4000-feet, opened in 1916, five years after a suspension bridge, at the time the longest bridge west of the Mississippi and now the oldest in the state, was built spanning the Little Colorado River where it streams into the Grand Canyon.
This is Navajo land (indeed, the Navajo name for Cameron is Naʼníʼá Hasání) and the elegant restaurant reflects that. The menu features not only American and Mexican dishes but also Navajo cuisine, some with a fancy twist including prickly pear French toast and milk shakes as well as staples like green chile stew, Navajo tacos, Navajo beef stew and Yah-Ahtay chile (ground sirloin, pinto beans, red chile and spices) to name just a few.
The spacious restaurant has quality Native American art and rugs on the walls, antique tin ceilings, rich wood cabinetry and a fireplace large enough to cook on. The large windows overlook a sandstone garden brimming with honeysuckle, hollyhocks, chrysanthemums, roses and daisies and views of the gorge.
Our waiter tells us it was truly a trading post back in the early 1900s when the Navajo and Hopi who lived on the surrounding land arrived on horse-drawn wagons to barter their wool, blankets and farm animals in exchange for dry goods. Later, as roads improved and tourism travel took hold, its location close to the entrance of the Grand Canyon brought more visitors who stayed in post’s hotel.
There is, of course, a gift shop but it doesn’t just sell trinkets. Instead there’s high quality Navajo and Hopi arts and crafts including hand woven Navajo rugs, Indian baskets, Hopi kachinas, Pueblo pottery, paintings, jewelry and ceramics as well. I was particularly intrigued by a cow’s skull inlaid with pieces of a type of turquois once mined in Arizona but now almost impossible to find. But I figured, it was one of those things that just wouldn’t fit in with my condo’s décor.
If you enjoyed the prickly pear dishes served at the restaurant, you can pick up jars of the jelly, syrup and tea to take home. If you love fry bread (and I certainly do like the puffy discs of fried dough that for the tacos is topped with meat, beans and cheese), you can buy up to 20-pound bags of Blue Bird Flour which Navajos use to make fry bread. Provided
1 medium sweet yellow onion, diced
2-3 tablespoons olive oil
1 1/2 pound lean ground beef
1 (8 ounce) can chili sauce
3/4 teaspoon crushed cumin seeds or ground cumin
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 (approx.15 oz) cans pinto beans, drained
6 pieces Navajo fry bread × Already a subscriber? Log in or Activate your account . Loading&hellp;

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Tandoori Taqueria Brings Unexpected Indian Spice To Cowboy Country : NPR

Enlarge this image Five years ago, Ripple Desai opened the Tandoori Taqueria in her hometown of Panguitch, Utah, tapping into a growing tourist market. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption
toggle caption Kirk Siegler/NPR Five years ago, Ripple Desai opened the Tandoori Taqueria in her hometown of Panguitch, Utah, tapping into a growing tourist market.
Kirk Siegler/NPR Rural southern Utah is cowboy country, and with it comes a deserved reputation of being a meat and potatoes kind of place. So after a recent three-day hiking trip in Bryce Canyon National Park, when Kim Johnson saw a sign advertising a Tandoori Taqueria, she pulled over immediately.
Johnson and her family, who live in Salt Lake City, are vegetarian.
“We’ve eaten a lot of Subway sandwiches [this trip],” she says, laughing. “And a lot of large side salads because it’s a pretty meaty environment here.”
Inside, the family grinned as they dug into heaping plates of cauliflower tacos, with garbanzo beans, smoky Mexican spices and tomatillo chutney.
“They’re not flavors we’ve had for the last few days in rural southern Utah,” Johnson says.
Enlarge this image Ripple Desai talks with costumers at the Tandoori Taqueria. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption
toggle caption Kirk Siegler/NPR Ripple Desai talks with costumers at the Tandoori Taqueria.
Kirk Siegler/NPR And that’s exactly the idea. Five years ago, Ripple Desai opened the Tandoori Taqueria in her hometown of Panguitch, which has population of about 1,500. The Tandoori Taqueria definitely stands out on the town’s short main drag among several mom and pop coffee shops and diners, a Family Dollar and NAPA Auto Parts store.
“I’m Indian, my parents are both from India,” says Desai, quickly adding, “And, I love tacos.”
Her menu is a fusion of traditional Indian dishes with that beloved Mexican staple — tacos. She uses naan bread as the tortilla. Over a busy recent lunch hour, customers packed the tidy dining room eating slow-roasted beef chorizo tacos topped with tomatillo chutney, spicy pozole with pork marinated in a turmeric dry rub and a dish called curry a la verazcruzana, chicken and garbanzo beans in a roasted red pepper sauce. Every dish is cooked to order in a small kitchen off the dining area.
Enlarge this image A sampling of tacos wrapped in naan bread from the Tandoori Taqueria. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption
toggle caption Kirk Siegler/NPR A sampling of tacos wrapped in naan bread from the Tandoori Taqueria.
Kirk Siegler/NPR The Salt How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation? “I wanted to do something completely different,” Desai says. “I wanted to make sure that you’re eating something unlike anything else you’ve had.”
The Taqueria mostly caters to tourists who visit Bryce Canyon and Zion national parks and the nearby Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument. Desai says she did get a few second looks initially from locals. But she was used to it. They were the only Indian family in a mostly white, Mormon town for most of her childhood. Her parents still own the motel they bought in the 1980s, down the street from the restaurant, which is in a building Ripple’s father also owned.
Desai recalls fondly begging her mom to make tacos as a kid — her mom mostly made traditional Gujrati dishes from her native state of Gujrati in India, lots of spices, lentils, vegetables and rice. She grew up learning to cook it.
“And that’s what my mom [still] makes every single day, even to this day,” Desai says. “That’s what I have when I leave here at 10 p.m. and go home.”
Her mom, Tarla Desai is always cooking, except when she stops into her daughter’s Taqueria for a snack.
Enlarge this image Ripple Desai and her mother Tarla Desai in Panguitch, Utah. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption
toggle caption Kirk Siegler/NPR Ripple Desai and her mother Tarla Desai in Panguitch, Utah.
Kirk Siegler/NPR “She samples everything,” Ripple says, adding that she’s always letting her know if her rice is too crispy or if a dish needs more seasoning.
It’s clear though that Tarla is proud of her daughter.
“She’s doing good, everyone loves it,” Tarla says. “She has a business mind and got the Indian cooking style.”
And Mom is playing another key role. Every winter when the tourists leave, she and Ripple’s father close up their hotel and travel, usually home to India. They return in the spring with spices in two 50-pound suitcases.
It’s what gives those tasty chicken tikka tacos that extra kick.

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Foodie news and trends: The stories you might have missed this week

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Register with your social account or click here to log in I would like to receive the latest restaurant reviews, recipes and food trend every week, by email A week is a long time in the restaurant world. We’ve had comings and goings, Michelin-starred chef collaborations and, most importantly, a cheese-laden conveyor belt. London’s food and drink scene is constantly changing, and it’s not always easy to keep up. To help out the most fervent foodies, we’ve gathered some of the most exciting, game-changing news in the business to have popped up on our radar this week. From a new look for a Soho favourite to the loss of a longstanding neighbourhood restaurant, here’s the foodie news you need to know from the last seven days. Foodie news you might have missed this week Chris Leach and David Carter take over 10 Heddon Street Smokestak chef David Carter and Chris Leach of Kitty Fisher’s will join forces for a new restaurant residency at 10 Heddon Street. The focus will be on pasta, in-house butchery and charcuterie, and will open in the former site of Magpie on July 18. Soho Bun House to become Hong Kong-style diner Wun’s Following the launch of its new Chinatown location, the original Bun House in Soho will host a new concept from founders Z He and Alex Peffly. Restaurant and bar Wun’s will be inspired by the late night cafes of 60s Hong Kong, and serve “nostalgic” Cantonese-style dishes. Phil Howard-backed Sonny’s Kitchen closes in Barnes Barnes neighbourhood restaurant Sonny’s Kitchen is to close on July 21 after an impressive 33 years in business. The “chef’s chef” Phil Howard joined as a co-owner in 2014 with restaurateur Rebecca Mascarenhas, and the pair are expected to announce a new concept for the site within the month. Kricket launches guest chef series (with Pierre Koffmann) The White City site of Indian restaurant Kricket will welcome five chefs for a series of charity dinners in September. Top of the bill is multi Michelin-starred Pierre Koffmann, alongside Flank’s Tom Griffiths, Anglo Thai’s John Chantarasak, Perilla ’s Ben Marks, and broadcaster Valentine Warner, all of whom will cook with Kricket founder Will Bowlby. Proceeds will go towards anti-trafficking organisation Apne Aap Women’s Collective. The Harwood Arms and Calum Franklin team up for Glorious Twelfth Holborn Dining Room chef and pie king Calum Franklin will join Sally Abé at Michelin-starred pub the Harwood Arms for a Glorious Twelfth dinner on August 12. Celebrating the first grouse shoot of the season, the menu will feature grouse with a mushroom and truffle pie. Top stories of the week Ex-Fat Duck chef and sommelier announce Trivet Jonny Lake and Isa Bal, the former head chef and sommelier of The Fat Duck announce new restaurant in London. Read the full story here. Pick & Cheese conveyor belt restaurant comes to Covent Garden The team behind The Cheese Bar will open a cheese conveyor belt restaurant next month. Read the full story here. American boss of The Standard wants Londoners to eat after midnight
The boss of new hotel The Standard hopes to reinvigorate late night dining in London. Read the full story here. New restaurants opening in London this July 5 show all New restaurants opening in London this July 1/5 Project TÓU Who eats sandwiches anymore? Instagram-savvy foodies know it’s all about the sando. This is in-part thanks to foodie duo Ana Gonçalves and Zijun Meng, whose concept TATA Eatery has been flying the flag for the neat Japanese sarnies. Following on from the opening of snack and cocktail bar Tayer + Elementary earlier this year, the pair will launch second permanent spot Project TÓU inside the forthcoming Arcade Food Theatre at Centre Point. Alongside the Iberian pork katsu sando of Insta-fame, the pair will also serve egg tofu and ox cheek varieties, with rice bowls available too. 2/5 Nutshell As much as we’re partial to them, there’s so much more to Iranian food than the kebab. Steering away from street food, Tehran-born restaurateur Mohammad Paknejad and his Saudi Arabian partner Marwa Alkhalaf are looking to educate London in the more homely aspects of Iranian cooking. The restaurant was initially slated to open with ex-Noma chef Leonardo Pereira at the helm, but the kitchen will instead be run by Jeremy Borrow, former head chef of hit Jerusalem-inspired restaurant The Palomar. Expect sharing plates of tahdig (a buttery rice dish with a scorched crust) and rich stews, alongside plenty of pistachios – Paknejad’s family are in the business of farming them, after all. 3/5 Isla New York, Miami Beach, West Hollywood – and King’s Cross? Stateside hospitality group The Standard is set to open its first hotel outside the US, and it will be doing so in a converted Brutalist building on Argyle Street. Despite the connections across the pond, the hotel’s flagship restaurant Isla will be very much dedicated to home comforts: Adam Rawson’s menu will focus on the coastal cuisine of the British Isles. Meanwhile, over at the hotel’s bar Double Standard, traditional pub dishes will sit alongside American dive bar food. @charliemckay 4/5 Three Uncles Hanging out with your mates in a fast food joint isn’t always teenage loitering – for these three guys, it was the beginnings of a business model. Cheong Yew (Uncle Lim), Pui Sing Tsang (Uncle Sidney) and Mo Kwok (Uncle Mo) grew up together in Hong Kong during the 70s, spending plenty of time in the area’s siu mei – Cantonese roasted meat – restaurants. The trio’s new kiosk on Seven Sisters Road will feature a round rotisserie oven, built specifically to keep the skin of the 48-hour marinated meats perfectly crispy. Alongside char siu and siu yuk pork belly, you’ll find Irish Silverhill Farm duck marinated in 17 herbs and spices. Jennifer Cauli 5/5 Flor The team behind Shoreditch restaurant Lyle’s is having a pretty big few weeks. Hot off their success at the World’s 50 Best Restaurant Awards, where they rose to 33rd place, James Lowe and co are preparing to open Flor. The new restaurant, wine bar and bakery will take cues from Parisian buvettes and San Sebastian pintxo bars, all housed inside a 19th century building at the heart of Borough Market. A strong focus on baking is promised at the all-day venue, with an offering ranging from sourdough loaves to birch syrup Kouign-amann. Lunches include a cured mangalitsa and comté sandwich on fermented potato bread, while evening meals will feature burrata and salted tomatoes, and whole Dover sole with capers and wild marjoram. 1/5 Project TÓU Who eats sandwiches anymore? Instagram-savvy foodies know it’s all about the sando. This is in-part thanks to foodie duo Ana Gonçalves and Zijun Meng, whose concept TATA Eatery has been flying the flag for the neat Japanese sarnies. Following on from the opening of snack and cocktail bar Tayer + Elementary earlier this year, the pair will launch second permanent spot Project TÓU inside the forthcoming Arcade Food Theatre at Centre Point. Alongside the Iberian pork katsu sando of Insta-fame, the pair will also serve egg tofu and ox cheek varieties, with rice bowls available too. 2/5 Nutshell As much as we’re partial to them, there’s so much more to Iranian food than the kebab. Steering away from street food, Tehran-born restaurateur Mohammad Paknejad and his Saudi Arabian partner Marwa Alkhalaf are looking to educate London in the more homely aspects of Iranian cooking. The restaurant was initially slated to open with ex-Noma chef Leonardo Pereira at the helm, but the kitchen will instead be run by Jeremy Borrow, former head chef of hit Jerusalem-inspired restaurant The Palomar. Expect sharing plates of tahdig (a buttery rice dish with a scorched crust) and rich stews, alongside plenty of pistachios – Paknejad’s family are in the business of farming them, after all. 3/5 Isla New York, Miami Beach, West Hollywood – and King’s Cross? Stateside hospitality group The Standard is set to open its first hotel outside the US, and it will be doing so in a converted Brutalist building on Argyle Street. Despite the connections across the pond, the hotel’s flagship restaurant Isla will be very much dedicated to home comforts: Adam Rawson’s menu will focus on the coastal cuisine of the British Isles. Meanwhile, over at the hotel’s bar Double Standard, traditional pub dishes will sit alongside American dive bar food. @charliemckay 4/5 Three Uncles Hanging out with your mates in a fast food joint isn’t always teenage loitering – for these three guys, it was the beginnings of a business model. Cheong Yew (Uncle Lim), Pui Sing Tsang (Uncle Sidney) and Mo Kwok (Uncle Mo) grew up together in Hong Kong during the 70s, spending plenty of time in the area’s siu mei – Cantonese roasted meat – restaurants. The trio’s new kiosk on Seven Sisters Road will feature a round rotisserie oven, built specifically to keep the skin of the 48-hour marinated meats perfectly crispy. Alongside char siu and siu yuk pork belly, you’ll find Irish Silverhill Farm duck marinated in 17 herbs and spices. Jennifer Cauli 5/5 Flor The team behind Shoreditch restaurant Lyle’s is having a pretty big few weeks. Hot off their success at the World’s 50 Best Restaurant Awards, where they rose to 33rd place, James Lowe and co are preparing to open Flor. The new restaurant, wine bar and bakery will take cues from Parisian buvettes and San Sebastian pintxo bars, all housed inside a 19th century building at the heart of Borough Market. A strong focus on baking is promised at the all-day venue, with an offering ranging from sourdough loaves to birch syrup Kouign-amann. Lunches include a cured mangalitsa and comté sandwich on fermented potato bread, while evening meals will feature burrata and salted tomatoes, and whole Dover sole with capers and wild marjoram.

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Sandwich Shops in Norwood

Indian Food Restaurant: Fine Dining Orlando – Florida Restaurant – Food Service Orlando (Florida) July 8, 2019 Check with seller
Are you in Orlando and find the place to spend your quality time with quality food then visit Eat at Rasa. Eat at Rasa serve you delicious Indian multi-cuisine food. Best Indian Find Dining Place in Florida. Test of Indian Food Orlando: Weekend Lunch Buffet Restaurant – Food Service Winter Park (Florida) July 8, 2019 Check with seller
Looking for Indian food at the weekend? Mynt Orlando provides you a real test of Indian food. You can also enjoy buffet lunch here at the weekend. Persian Food Las Vegas : Shiraz Restaurnt Restaurant – Food Service Las Vegas (Nevada) July 3, 2019 Check with seller
Shiraz is Halal Food conveniently located in Decatur Blvd, Las Vegas. At Shiraz, we take pride in making fresh food, and providing our customers with a friendly atmosphere.Our kitchen also offers one of the best selection of Persian Food in Las Vegas… Call : (702) 870-0860 21:33

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Seattle has good food, but it’s expensive. Also, I feel like the recent growth on high end earners has led to the proliferation of expensive places that are not worth the price. With that said, I made a list of the good and bad things I see about Seattle restaurants
Good
Teriyaki as a cheap eat that you can’t find in most of the US Many options for international cuisines. You can find Ethiopian, Somali, Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese, Indian, decent Mexican, and some good Middle Eastern (Iranian, Turkish, etc) with no problem Very good seafood Good local beer options Bad/missing
More late night options (tacos, gyros/kebab, hot dogs, pizza, etc) Need more fine dining options More regional American cuisine options (BBQ, Cajun, etc). I hope this changes seeing that people from all over the US are moving here I would like to see more Eastern European options

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