Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing : The Salt : NPR

Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing : The Salt : NPR

Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing Embed Embed Enlarge this image
Boman Kohinoor, 97, has spent the past eight decades committed to his beloved Britannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s last Parsi cafes. Here, he proudly holds up a photo of himself with two members of the British royal family: the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William and the former Kate Middleton. Rebecca Rosman for NPR Rebecca Rosman for NPR Boman Kohinoor, 97, has spent the past eight decades committed to his beloved Britannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s last Parsi cafes. Here, he proudly holds up a photo of himself with two members of the British royal family: the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William and the former Kate Middleton. Rebecca Rosman for NPR
The brown walls are peeling at all ends. Giant paint chips cake the ceiling. And the cash register — if you can call it that — is just a series of old wooden drawers.
“I’m going to put up a sign that says ‘Enter at your own risk.’ Otherwise someone is going to hold me liable,” says Romin Kohinoor, one of the owners of the nearly century-oldBritannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s last Parsi cafes.
Luckily for Kohinoor, these quirky interiors have long been seen as more of an attraction than a liability.
Parsi cafes like Britannia & Co. started popping up around Mumbai in the late 19th century. They were founded by Parsis — Zoroastrians who fled religious persecution in their native Persia. The cafes became popular among many in India because, in a society where caste systems and long-standing taboos remain omnipresent, these cafes offered a place where various parts of Indian society mingled freely.
They are, in a word, cosmopolitan. They are also, in two words, dying out.
One of the world’s oldest religions, Zoroastrianism began thousands of years ago in what is now Iran, and the faith predates Islam. A central ethical tenet of the faith is to promote “good words, good thoughts and good deeds.” The Zoroastrian migrants brought to India not only their religious traditions but also their unique cuisine, offering a table to people of all classes, religions and ethnicities in an atmosphere scented with Iranian and Gujarati spices. Parsi cafes are emblems of tolerance, a core teaching of the Prophet Zoroaster, and their affordable food and snug tables attest to their place as servers of the common man.
At one point, there were around 400 Parsi cafes scattered across Mumbai. Today, there are less than 40.
A dwindling Parsi population, combined with little interest from newer generations to take over these family-owned businesses, means that there may not be any Parsi cafes in just a few decades.
But Britannia & Co. has a secret to standing strong amid a sea of dying neighbors: the 97-year-old owner, Boman Kohinoor, who has spent the past eight decades committed to his beloved cafe.
On one wall of Britannia & Co. is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. Next to her is a painting of Gandhi. Each serves as a reminder of the cafe’s unique cultural heritage. Rebecca Rosman for NPR Rebecca Rosman for NPR On one wall of Britannia & Co. is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. Next to her is a painting of Gandhi. Each serves as a reminder of the cafe’s unique cultural heritage. Rebecca Rosman for NPR
“They say habit is second nature,” the bespectacled owner tells me over a generous plate of chicken berry pulao, the restaurant’s signature dish. “And habit has kept me coming here every day now for the last 80 years.”
Every day during the busy lunch hour, Kohinoor slowly makes his way around each table to partake in one of his favorite activities: schmoozing. Current favorite topics include the British monarchy, U.S. politics and his longevity plans. (He plans on breaking the Guinness World Record for oldest living person.)
India was still under British rule when Kohinoor’s father opened the cafe in 1923, which inspired the cafe’s name. “My father wanted to please the local commissioner, who was handing out leases at the time,” says Kohinoor.
When the restaurant opened, the menu consisted mostly of lighter European fare. It wasn’t until after independence from the British in 1947 that Kohinoor decided to revamp the menu, adding a slew of Iranian comfort food options that have since become the favorites here — dishes like sali boti, a lamb curry stewed with tomatoes, jaggery and onions and topped with fried potato strings.
Or the chicken berry pulao — moist chunks of chicken cooked in a fragrant tomato sauce, mixed with a rice pilaf and garnished with Iranian sour barberries. Downed with a fresh lime soda and crème caramel, it’s hard not to indulge.
Most items on the menu today follow the original recipes of Kohinoor’s late wife, Bacha — and they remain a fiercely guarded secret.
A small black-and-white photo of Bacha hangs on the wall alongside the restaurant’s entrance. On the other side of the room is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II next to a painting of Gandhi. Several depictions of the Prophet Zoroaster, cloaked in white robes, are also on display. Each serves as a reminder of the cafe’s unique cultural heritage.
Chicken berry pulao is the signature dish at Britannia & Co. Rebecca Rosman for NPR Chicken berry pulao is the signature dish at Britannia & Co. Rebecca Rosman for NPR
Zoroastrians started arriving in India around 1,300 years ago to escape religious persecution from Arab invaders in their native Persia. By the mid-20th century, around 120,000 Parsis lived in India. Today there are less than half that. Zoroastrians don’t believe in conversion, making it hard to keep the religion alive.
But the more immediate problem for families like Kohinoor’s is a generational one.
Younger generations don’t want to inherit the long hours — and the risk of low returns — that come with running a restaurant.
“I’m only doing this for my dad,” admits Kohinoor’s 58-year-old son Romin, who has been working the register at Britannia & Co. for four decades. “He doesn’t want to close this place down. He doesn’t want to sell it at all.”
Romin has a 27-year-old daughter, Diana, who comes in at the end of each day to do the restaurant’s books.
She was studying law at university but didn’t really like it.
Now, “I would not want it to end because of me. So let’s take it forward,” she says.
But with her grandfather still going strong, her promotion from accountant to owner may be a while. Facebook

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Serving the Best Appetizers for Your Event

Serving the Best Appetizers for Your Event Posted On June 3, 2019 By Lejardin And has No Comment Are you planning to host an event soon? Whether you’re hosting an afternoon party for your co-workers or a big soiree for your friends and family, you’re most likely going to have appetizers to serve. Holidays! If you’re hosting a holiday party , cranberries are the perfect addition. Cranberries add the perfect dash of holiday cheer and will complete almost any dish. Serve up some cranberry crostini that features cranberries and whipped ricotta cheese. Add cranberries to bite-sized desserts and cocktails, but they also make great additions to meatballs, sauces, and dips for a holiday twist.
Stuffing is widely associated with the holidays, but you can also use fruits and vegetables as well. Try using mushrooms and peppers or Caprese salad bites in stuffed tomatoes. For the holidays, try stuffing some figs. A soft cheese to fill the figs and adding some pomegranate will ensure a sweet holiday treat that everyone will love. International Flavour Get some inspiration from around the world. Samosas and pakoras and other Indian flavours will sure to please your guests. For an Asian twist, try some deep-fried tofu and create tofu fritters. Even whipping up some spring rolls is quick and easy and makes for great finger food. Seafood is always an option as well. For some Scandinavian inspiration, serve some cured salmon and Russian-inspired blini for appetizers that will amaze your guests. If you feel like splurging, get some fresh raw oysters and have unique toppings and sauces that make the oysters customizable to your guests’ preferences. Vegetables Beets, carrots, and parsnips have rich and earthy flavours and are in season during the winter. Think about incorporating them into your appetizers if your event is in the winter. You can add beets to your hummus to give it a new flavour and seasonal colour, and it will be sure to keep your guests curious about your secret ingredient. Also, consider serving up beets, persimmons, and feta cheese on endive leaves. The combination of flavours will make your appetizers the star of the show. You can also try root vegetable galette, which is both substantial and visually appealing. If all else fails, you can always just make a hearty vegetable soup with root vegetables, such as a classic borscht or carrot soup. Versatile Meatballs If you’re stuck on deciding on what appetizer will appeal to all guests, meatballs have to be the most versatile. They are easy to dress up or down and make great individual appetizers. You can mix it up by adding different spices or even swapping in turkey instead of ground beef. For those who are vegetarian and don’t eat meat, meatless meatballs are also a possibility. Just ensure that they have little flags or indicators to let your guests know which are meatless. Dips! You can never go wrong with a dip. They are so customizable and versatile, you’ll be able to suit everyone’s tastes buds. Try a spinach and brie dip or a cheesy pizza dip. Skip the store-bought products and make your own French onion dip with sour cream, mayo, garlic, salt, pepper, and onions. Serve with potato chips and you have a quick and delicious crowd pleaser. No matter what kind of dip you have, all you need are chips, vegetables, or pita bread to serve with your dip. It’s not only quick, easy, and versatile, but also inexpensive! Kabobs Antipasto kabobs will definitely be a crowd pleaser. All you need are some skewers, stuffed olives, salami, and cheese cubes. This appetizer is very simple but has a lot of different characteristics. The flavours all tie in together perfectly, and serving them on a skewer will make it easy for your guests to mingle while still enjoying the food. You can also do Caprese salad kabobs with grape tomatoes, basil, and mozzarella cheese balls drizzled with olive oil and balsamic vinegar.
When planning your party, it’s always best to consult a professional. Caterers will always know the right amount of food to prepare and where to get the freshest ingredients. Check with your venue to see if they can provide you with serving staff and caterers to ensure your party is one to remember. It will ease the amount of stress and planning that you have to do, so you can focus on other things to ensure your party is a success.
Château Le Jardin is an event venue located in Vaughan. We provide international cuisine such as Greek, Portuguese, Indian, and Continental. All meals are carefully prepared with the utmost care, with only the freshest ingredients, and tailored to what you want. These include everything from homemade soups, salads, pastas with a variety of delicious sauces, and delectable desserts. We also offer a wide variety of specialty food stations and sweet tables that are prepared to perfection by our culinary chefs. To learn more about Château Le Jardin, give us a call at 1-888-517-0682 or contact us here .

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Visited Sandals Halcyon from 10th May 2019-23rd May 2019. Firstly, the staff were exceptional. Just walking around the resort staff would say “good morning” or “hello” it was lovely to have such a warm greeting everywhere we went. Room was beautiful and clean, we had an ocean view club room and although it didn’t directly face the ocean we could see it from our room, the tranquility soaking tub pool was gorgeous too. The rooms are well equipped and have all amenities you would need – as well as restocking the mini bar DAILY! The beach is lovely, it is not as advertised on tripadvisor or on the sandals website and I was a little disappointed with this. The beach is quite small and not as “luxurious” as they make out. It is good enough and has a few sun beds on – that mainly butlers reserve for their guests. Two different pools at Halcyon, we tried the pool nearest to the beach for a few days. It was quite “loud” and they had some entertainment going on which felt quite forced upon at times. People seemed to enjoy it but we prefer to just relax by the pool so decided to try the “honeymoon hideaway pool area” this is with the lazy river, it is a very nice pool. They add lovely touches like “tea time” at 4pm where they serve sandwiches, scones and cookies. Also the bar here is very good. Bob Marley is a must try. Food and drink – we tried all the restaurants on resort. The first night you are recommended to go into “the bayside” – the food was delicious and we really enjoyed it. One issue we did pick up upon; was the amount of cats and birds that seem to feast in the Bayside and at the bistro. Luckily we are both cat lovers and this really didn’t bother us, but I am very conscious of birds and at times (especially breakfast) it felt very dirty that birds would land on the area where they serve the buffet style food and pick at the food. It put us off a little and another couple we met had also made a complaint about this. Mario’s was very nice, Italian cuisine. One issue we had with Mario’s was the wait time. One evening we waited 45 minutes – if this is a regular occurrence maybe reservations should be required. Kelly’s is also fantastic, and the teriyaki station and Soy. The only comment we would make about the dining areas is that we felt they needed a little something else… we stayed for 13 nights and it didn’t feel that we were revisiting the same places again and again. It would also be nice to have more options for breakfast and lunch (like a pizzeria or an indoor buffet section – this may also stop cats and birds) Evening entertainment – I think this was one of the let downs of our trip. The entertainment (when it was on) seemed very forced and it seemed that the staff were trying far to hard to get people involved. It would have suited us and many others that we met on resort if a disco was playing in the evening, or upbeat music. It seemed that Halcyon didn’t really know how to use the very very talented entertainers they had brought into resort, and the times they had them performing were also awkward. We felt at times maybe halcyon didn’t worry too much about entertainment as it seemed that many people on resort had gone to bed by 10!! As Sandals advertise the “stay at 1 play at 3” we thought we would try this. The shuttle for halcyon comes every two hours. This is too long a gap. We decided to visit the Grande one day and the shuttle was meant to arrive at 11am. We waited half an hour to be told another would be coming; we have up in the end as it was too hot and we didn’t want to spend all day waiting. It is also a 20 minute journey to each resort. When we did get to the Grande one evening we had the best meal we had had on resort at Bombay (Indian) it was fantastic. If Sandals really want to advertise this as a stay at 1 play at 3 they need a better shuttle system. In conclusion; Halcyon is a wonderful resort if you are looking for a very chilled and quiet experience. If you are looking for evening entertainment and more going on during the day – look elsewhere. It is not a lively resort. We did 3 excursions and this livened up our trip. We would recommend Sandals.. but I would say that this resort is on par with other “platinum resorts” and just because the brand is sandals doesn’t necessarily mean it is going to be better. Visited Sandals Halcyon from 10th May 2019-23rd May 2019. Firstly, the staff were exceptional. Just walking around the resort staff would say “good morning” or “hello” it was lovely to have such a warm greeting everywhere we went. Room was beautiful and clean, we had an ocean view club room and although it didn’t directly face the ocean we could see it from our room, the tranquility soaking tub pool was gorgeous too. The rooms are well equipped and have all amenities you would need – as well as restocking the mini bar DAILY! The beach is lovely, it is not as advertised on tripadvisor or on the sandals website and I was a little disappointed with this. The beach is quite small and not as “luxurious” as they make out. It is good enough and has a few sun beds on – that mainly butlers reserve for their guests. Two different pools at Halcyon, we tried the pool nearest to the beach for a few days. It was quite “loud” and they had some entertainment going on which felt quite forced upon at times. People seemed to enjoy it but we prefer to just relax by the pool so decided to try the “honeymoon hideaway pool area” this is with the lazy river, it is a very nice pool. They add lovely touches like “tea time” at 4pm where they serve sandwiches, scones and cookies. Also the bar here is very good. Bob Marley is a must try. Food and drink – we tried all the restaurants on resort. The first night you are recommended to go into “the bayside” – the food was delicious and we really enjoyed it. One issue we did pick up upon; was the amount of cats and birds that seem to feast in the Bayside and at the bistro. Luckily we are both cat lovers and this really didn’t bother us, but I am very conscious of birds and at times (especially breakfast) it felt very dirty that birds would land on the area where they serve the buffet style food and pick at the food. It put us off a little and another couple we met had also made a complaint about this. Mario’s was very nice, Italian cuisine. One issue we had with Mario’s was the wait time. One evening we waited 45 minutes – if this is a regular occurrence maybe reservations should be required. Kelly’s is also fantastic, and the teriyaki station and Soy. The only comment we would make about the dining areas is that we felt they needed a little something else… we stayed for 13 nights and it didn’t feel that we were revisiting the same places again and again. It would also be nice to have more options for breakfast and lunch (like a pizzeria or an indoor buffet section – this may also stop cats and birds) Evening entertainment – I think this was one of the let downs of our trip. The entertainment (when it was on) seemed very forced and it seemed that the staff were trying far to hard to get people involved. It would have suited us and many others that we met on resort if a disco was playing in the evening, or upbeat music. It seemed that Halcyon didn’t really know how to use the very very talented entertainers they had brought into resort, and the times they had them performing were also awkward. We felt at times maybe halcyon didn’t worry too much about entertainment as it seemed that many people on resort had gone to bed by 10!! As Sandals advertise the “stay at 1 play at 3” we thought we would try this. The shuttle for halcyon comes every two hours. This is too long a gap. We decided to visit the Grande one day and the shuttle was meant to arrive at 11am. We waited half an hour to be told another would be coming; we have up in the end as it was too hot and we didn’t want to spend all day waiting. It is also a 20 minute journey to each resort. When we did get to the Grande one evening we had the best meal we had had on resort at Bombay (Indian) it was fantastic. If Sandals really want to advertise this as a stay at 1 play at 3 they need a better shuttle system. In conclusion; Halcyon is a wonderful resort if you are looking for a very chilled and quiet experience. If you are looking for evening entertainment and more going on during the day – look elsewhere. It is not a lively resort. We did 3 excursions and this livened up our trip. We would recommend Sandals.. but I would say that this resort is on par with other “platinum resorts” and just because the brand is sandals doesn’t necessarily mean it is going to be better.

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New restaurant brings a taste of Poland to Bromsgrove

New restaurant brings a taste of Poland to Bromsgrove See photos images 0 comment A NEW restaurant is causing a stir in Bromsgrove – because it’s not your typical cuisine.
While streets up and down the country are packed full of food outlets offering English, Indian, Chinese, Thai, Mexican and Italian fare, Darren and Dominika Griggs have tried something different.
They have opened Polish restaurant Red & White – named after the country’s dual-striped flag for those of you not so hot on geography – in Stoke Road, Aston Fields.
Dominika is originally from Poland and husband Darren said the idea has been in the couple’s minds for some time.
Darren said: “We’ve thought about opening something like after living in Bromsgrove for the past few years and we noticed the premises at the end of South Road (the former Bromsgrove Convenience Store) became vacant.
“We’ve transformed it from a rundown corner shop into a trendy looking restaurant – Aston Fields is really up and coming and is becoming a foodie – centre! We’ve got great exposure and the transport links are fantastic with the new train station so nearby.
“We have a small menu which changes on a weekly basis, everything is freshly cooked and there is nothing frozen or ready-made, Dominika even bakes all of the cakes!
“We’ve just finished our first week and the feedback so far has been brilliant – people area really pleased to have a different cuisine to taste along with the Polish beverages too.”
The restaurant is open from Thursday to Saturday from 5.30-10pm and Sunday from 11am-4pm, and can also cater for private hire or events. Visit www.redwhitebistro.com

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Summer Fest begins in Shimla today

Himachal Posted at: Jun 3, 2019, 7:45 AM; last updated: Jun 3, 2019, 7:45 AM (IST) Summer Fest begins in Shimla today Also in this section Tribune News Service Shimla, June 2
The district administration is geared up to welcome tourists with a plethora of events and activities for the Shimla Summer Festival from June 3 to 6 with the participation of tourism stakeholders. Shimla DC Amit Kashyap today said the festival would be inaugurated by Governor Acharya Devvrat. He said artistes from Assam, Gujarat, Jammu and Kashmir, Madhya Pradesh and Telengana would perform in their traditional attire. Folk artistes from Rajasthan and Haryana too would present their performances.
“The festival will be a perfect blend of folk, classical and pahari culture and schoolchildren and local artistes will be given an ample opportunity to showcase their talent,” said Kashyap. The Tourism Industry Stake Holders Association will organise a heritage tour on June 4, which will cover one of the best places of tourist interests in Shimla — Annandale Army Heritage Museum, HP State Museum and Indian Institute of Advance Study.
Mohinder Seth, president of the association, said this tour would be organised twice a day. The guided Heritage Walk would be organised on June 6 that would start from Scandal Point and culminate at the IIAS.
The district administration is also organising a food festival during the summer festival, which is aimed at popularising Himachali cuisine for which a stall, Himachali Rasoi, has been set up.

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Streetfood Sunday: new dates announced for June

Cookery School Review: “What a day, what an experience”
What a day, what an experience; from start to finish, well organised, conducted and delivered. At first it may seem expensive, but once you are on the course you soon realise it is very good value for money. The keep-sake ‘Anand George’ recipe book and denim apron, the sample food throughout the day and taster meal … Best Indian Meal I’ve Had
Review via Tripadvisor by Owen G Richards 24th Oct 2018 We went for the set Sunday menu dishes and I can honestly say it’s probably the best Indian meal I’ve had. The starter of aloo chaat was incredible. The staff were really friendly and the service was great. I am looking forward to going back … Excellent Indian restaurant in Cardiff
Review via Tripadvisor by Saber S on 31st October 2018 This is an excellent restaurant. The food was freshly prepared and very tastey. The portions are smaller than normal but the food is perfectly cooked. The service was also excellent and quick. They have adequate professional number of staff who were always nearby to attend … Good food lovely presentation, great collection of flavours
Review via Tripadvisor by DenisinWales on 26th September 2018 1st despite the very long sign board covering 2 store fronts, the entrance is a tiny door at the far left. Once you climb to the 1st floor, you are greeted with a very understated and tasteful restaurant seating about 60-70 people. For a Tuesday night … THE MOST AUTHENTIC AND DELICIOUS INDIAN FOOD WE’VE HAD
Review by Ellym106, TripAdvisor, April 2018 We had an excellent meal here. We visited India in November and know how the food is supposed to be – and this is it! Everything was beautifully cooked and full of flavour, with our particular favourites being the onion pakoras, laccha parathas and the planner makhni – the …
Our ever popular Streetfood Sunday menu returns this Sunday 9th June and 23rd June from 12noon – 6pm. This is your opportunity to feast on your favourite Indian streetfood favourites by Chef Anand George.
If you are unable to get to the restaurant pre-order your collection or delivery to enjoy at home on the following dates:
Order from Thursday 6th June ready for Streetfood Sunday on June 9th
Order from Thursay 20th June ready for Streetfood Sunday on June 23rd
The menu:
– Bombay Frankie Roll featuring Kerala Fried Chicken– Kerala fried chicken and fries – Samosa chaat– Bombay fries with homemade thousand island dressing
Delivery/takeaway option on Sunday 9th June and 23rd June:
– Collect your takeaway from 1pm – Deliveries will start from 2.30pm
Book now on 02920 220026
*We will only deliver to a 3 mile radius of the restaurant but please check with our staff when you call to pre-book. The minimum order for delivery is £20.
Nouvelle Indian Cuisine By Anand George

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Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing

/ Originally published on June 2, 2019 1:55 pm
The brown walls are peeling at all ends. Giant paint chips cake the ceiling. And the cash register — if you can call it that — is just a series of old wooden drawers.
“I’m going to put up a sign that says ‘Enter at your own risk.’ Otherwise someone is going to hold me liable,” says Romin Kohinoor, one of the owners of the nearly century-oldBritannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s last Parsi cafes.
Luckily for Kohinoor, these quirky interiors have long been seen as more of an attraction than a liability.
Parsi cafes like Britannia & Co. started popping up around Mumbai in the late 19th century. They were founded by Parsis — Zoroastrians who fled religious persecution in their native Persia. The cafes became popular among many in India because, in a society where caste systems and long-standing taboos remain omnipresent, these cafes offered a place where various parts of Indian society mingled freely.
They are, in a word, cosmopolitan. They are also, in two words, dying out.
One of the world’s oldest religions, Zoroastrianism began thousands of years ago in what is now Iran, and the faith predates Islam. A central ethical tenet of the faith is to promote “good words, good thoughts and good deeds.” The Zoroastrian migrants brought to India not only their religious traditions but also their unique cuisine, offering a table to people of all classes, religions and ethnicities in an atmosphere scented with Iranian and Gujarati spices. Parsi cafes are emblems of tolerance, a core teaching of the Prophet Zoroaster, and their affordable food and snug tables attest to their place as servers of the common man.
At one point, there were around 400 Parsi cafes scattered across Mumbai. Today, there are less than 40.
A dwindling Parsi population, combined with little interest from newer generations to take over these family-owned businesses, means that there may not be any Parsi cafes in just a few decades.
But Britannia & Co. has a secret to standing strong amid a sea of dying neighbors: the 97-year-old owner, Boman Kohinoor, who has spent the past eight decades committed to his beloved cafe. On one wall of Britannia & Co. is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. Next to her is a painting of Gandhi. Each serves as a reminder of the cafe’s unique cultural heritage. Rebecca Rosman for NPR
“They say habit is second nature,” the bespectacled owner tells me over a generous plate of chicken berry pulao, the restaurant’s signature dish. “And habit has kept me coming here every day now for the last 80 years.”
Every day during the busy lunch hour, Kohinoor slowly makes his way around each table to partake in one of his favorite activities: schmoozing. Current favorite topics include the British monarchy, U.S. politics and his longevity plans. (He plans on breaking the Guinness World Record for oldest living person.)
India was still under British rule when Kohinoor’s father opened the cafe in 1923, which inspired the cafe’s name. “My father wanted to please the local commissioner, who was handing out leases at the time,” says Kohinoor.
When the restaurant opened, the menu consisted mostly of lighter European fare. It wasn’t until after independence from the British in 1947 that Kohinoor decided to revamp the menu, adding a slew of Iranian comfort food options that have since become the favorites here — dishes like sali boti, a lamb curry stewed with tomatoes, jaggery and onions and topped with fried potato strings.
Or the chicken berry pulao — moist chunks of chicken cooked in a fragrant tomato sauce, mixed with a rice pilaf and garnished with Iranian sour barberries. Downed with a fresh lime soda and crème caramel, it’s hard not to indulge.
Most items on the menu today follow the original recipes of Kohinoor’s late wife, Bacha — and they remain a fiercely guarded secret.
A small black-and-white photo of Bacha hangs on the wall alongside the restaurant’s entrance. On the other side of the room is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II next to a painting of Gandhi. Several depictions of the Prophet Zoroaster, cloaked in white robes, are also on display. Each serves as a reminder of the cafe’s unique cultural heritage. Chicken berry pulao is the signature dish at Britannia & Co. Rebecca Rosman for NPR
Zoroastrians started arriving in India around 1,300 years ago to escape religious persecution from Arab invaders in their native Persia. By the mid-20th century, around 120,000 Parsis lived in India. Today there are less than half that. Zoroastrians don’t believe in conversion, making it hard to keep the religion alive.
But the more immediate problem for families like Kohinoor’s is a generational one.
Younger generations don’t want to inherit the long hours — and the risk of low returns — that come with running a restaurant.
“I’m only doing this for my dad,” admits Kohinoor’s 58-year-old son Romin, who has been working the register at Britannia & Co. for four decades. “He doesn’t want to close this place down. He doesn’t want to sell it at all.”
Romin has a 27-year-old daughter, Diana, who comes in at the end of each day to do the restaurant’s books.
She was studying law at university but didn’t really like it.
Now, “I would not want it to end because of me. So let’s take it forward,” she says.
But with her grandfather still going strong, her promotion from accountant to owner may be a while. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:
Mumbai, India, has been at the crossroads of cultures for millennia. In the 19th century, refugees from Iran fleeing religious persecution opened what came to be called Parsi cafes. At one point, there were 400 of them. Today, there are fewer than 40. Rebecca Rosman visited one of the last Parsi cafes.
REBECCA ROSMAN, BYLINE: The first thing you notice when you walk into Britannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s most popular Parsi cafes, is that the place is kind of falling apart. Giant paint chips cake the ceiling. The brown walls are peeling. And the cash register, if you can call it that, is just a series of old wooden drawers.
ROMIN KOHINOOR: Very old-fashioned, very old-fashioned, see. And I don’t want to change it because I’ve got so used to it.
ROSMAN: Fifty-eight-year-old Romin Kohinoor has been working behind this register for four decades.
R KOHINOOR: This is my grandfather’s counter bell.
(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)
R KOHINOOR: It’s 98 years old, and it is made from British gun metal. See the echo. See the echo.
(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)
R KOHINOOR: Even the restaurant is very old-fashioned – 96 years old. It’s all peeling out. It’s all dropping. I’m going to put up a board now that you enter at own risk because if something happens, somebody’ll hold me liable.
ROSMAN: Luckily for Kohinoor, these quirky interiors are seen as more of an attraction than a liability and so is the food – Iranian comfort food. One of the most popular menu items is a dish called chicken berry pulao – a rice pilaf topped with moist chunks of chicken and stewed in a fragrant tomato sauce, garnished with sour barberries, giving the dish a sweet and sour punch, and served with fresh lime soda. But one of the biggest draws here is the owner.
BOMAN KOHINOOR: I come here every day from 12 o’clock till 4:30. I have been coming here now nearly about 80 years.
ROSMAN: That’s Romin’s 97-year-old father Boman Kohinoor. Boman’s father opened the restaurant in 1923. But every day since Boman was about 16, the chattier Kohinoor has slowly made his way around each table to partake in one of his favorite activities – schmoozing. Today’s topics for the endearing owner include Hillary Clinton, the British monarchy and his longevity plans.
B KOHINOOR: You know, the oldest man in the world, he died one year ago. How old was he? One hundred Forty-Six.
ROSMAN: One hundred forty-six.
ROSMAN: Oh, in Indonesia.
B KOHINOOR: Indonesia – I’m going to break his record.
ROSMAN: Kohinoor’s great-grandparents came to Mumbai more than 180 years ago after fleeing religious persecution from the dominant religion in Persia – Islam. They were Zoroastrians, one of the oldest religions in the world, founded on three main principles.
B KOHINOOR: Good thoughts, good words and good deeds.
ROSMAN: The hundreds of thousands of Zoroastrians who fled to India became known as Parsis. And in the 19th century, many started opening up these cafes. Now most are gone.
B KOHINOOR: In another 20 years or 30 years, there won’t be none.
ROSMAN: The Parsi population is dwindling. Today in India, there are just over 60,000 Parsis. You have to be born into the religion. Zoroastrians don’t believe in conversion. But the more immediate problem for families like Kohinoor’s is a generational one. Younger people don’t want to inherit the long hours and risk of low returns that come with running a restaurant. Even Boman’s 58-year-old son Romin Kohinoor admits he is only helping to keep the business going for one reason.
R KOHINOOR: I’m doing this only for my dad. He doesn’t want to close this place down. He doesn’t want to sell it out. I’m doing it just for him.
ROSMAN: Romin has a 27-year-old daughter Diana. She comes in at the end of each day to do the restaurant’s books, a job that requires a computer, meaning it’s too techie for anyone else in the family. Diana was studying law at university but didn’t really like it. I asked if she would have any interest in taking over the family business.
DIANA KOHINOOR: I would like to because we make good money out here. It’s like a set business. It’s there since 1923, and I would not want it to end because of me. So let’s take it ahead – forward.
ROSMAN: But with her grandfather still going strong, her promotion from accountant to owner may take a while.
For NPR News, I’m Rebecca Rosman in Mumbai. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR. © 2019 WABE 90.1 FM

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Go For Gold in Colorado This Autumn with Unforgettable Adventures and Can’t Miss Events

Photo by@HotSpringsPool 2019 marks the 160 th anniversary of the Colorado Gold Rush, and while settlers originally migrated west in hopes of striking gold, travelers today head to the state to strike it rich with adventures during Colorado’s golden season: autumn. There’s no better time to visit the Centennial State than during the fall months. The days are sunny and warm, while the nights are cool and crisp. Across all four corners of the state, the landscape shimmers with a vast array of fall colors. After the jump is a sampling of the best outdoor adventures and events to enjoy Colorado’s brilliant fall foliage.
COLORADO LEAF PEEPING ADVENTURES:
Four-Wheel Among the Aspens on the Alpine Loop Scenic & Historic Byway: Travelers equipped with four-wheel drive can head to the Alpine Loop Scenic and Historic Byway, connecting the mountain towns of Ouray, Silverton and Lake City. This rugged route has hiking and mountain biking trails galore, a rich mining history and unfettered views of shimmering aspen leaves and 14,000-foot peaks.
Search for Gold on Breckenridge’s Singletrack: The trails of French Gulch pass through Breckenridge’s “Golden Horseshoe,” one of Colorado’s most fertile mining regions. The initial gold strikes here in 1859 gave birth to the town and, for most of the next century, Breckenridge’s fortunes were largely driven by the Golden Horseshoe’s output. Today, the French Gulch Road area offers a number of singletrack options, several that pass by old mining remains and groves of changing aspens, that make for a beautiful autumn ride or hike.
Soak in the Colors at Glenwood Hot Springs: With high country colors at their showy peak, fall is one of the best seasons to visit Glenwood Hot Springs, the world’s largest hot springs pool . T he 130-year-old resort is unveiling a major renovation this year that includes an Adventure River, with fast-moving waters with cascading tiers and boulders, and a new children’s play area that’s equipped with mini water slides and a fun splash pad.
Take A Colorful Road Trip Along the Grand Mesa Scenic Byway: The 63-mile Grand Mesa Scenic Byway leads travelers to the top of Grand Mesa, the largest flat-top mountain in the world, and into the fall-color-saturated Grand Mesa National Forest. From there, drivers can explore Cedaredge, replete with apple orchards and groves of white ash.
Round Up the Herd at Latigo Ranch: The ultimate dude and guest ranch experience, Latigo Ranch near Kremmling invites visitors to participate in its annual fall cattle roundup. Held the third week in September, participants will help local cattle ranchers gather their herds, bring them home and move them from place to place on their home ranches, all while experiencing the area’s outstanding fall colors.
Hop Aboard the Fall Color Train in Leadville : Train enthusiasts can ride up into the San Isabel National Forest aboard the Leadville Colorado & Southern Railroad where the mountains are ablaze with yellow, orange and red. The train departs daily at 1 p.m. on weekdays in the fall and offers photo weekend specials. These three-hour rides allow visitors to experience untouched wilderness in its autumn beauty, the headwaters of the Arkansas River Valley and sweeping vistas of Colorado’s two highest peaks, Mt. Elbert and Mt. Massive.
Climb to Colorful Heights at the Royal Gorge Bridge & Park: The Royal Gorge Bridge in Cañon City, the highest suspension bridge in America, marks its 90 th anniversary this year. To celebrate, the park opened a brand new Via Ferrata climbing experience. All climbs are led by a trained mountain guide who will show participants the breathtaking beauty of the park from new heights.
Take A Wild Hike in State Forest State Park: Located near Walden, State Forest State Park is considered the moose-viewing capital of Colorado with some 600 of Bullwinkle’s buddies roaming free. Fall is prime moose viewing season, and wilderness access is easy for visitors who start at the Moose Visitor Center.
Soar Above the Trees in Steamboat: For travelers who have a hot-air balloon ride on their bucket list, Steamboat is the place and fall is the time of year to do it. Wild West Balloon Adventures will have guests gliding above Steamboat Springs’ color-soaked fall scenery with views of the Flat Top Mountains and Hanh’s Peak, an inactive volcano.
COLORADO’S NOT-TO-MISS FALL EVENTS:
Fall Tarantula Migration on the Comanche National Grassland, La Junta, Sept.-Oct.: Each fall, Colorado’s Arkansas Valley becomes an arachnophobe’s nightmare. During this time, thousands of tarantulas migrate through the area during their mating season. Generally, this peaks sometime in mid-October. T he best place to spot this natural phenomenon is on Highway 71, just north of Ordway, as well as on Highway 109, between La Junta and the town of Kim.
ArtoCade, Trinidad, Sept. 13-14 : Trinidad’s delightfully quirky ArtoCade will roll through historic downtown in a parade of “artfully enhanced” cars, motorcycles, bikes, trikes, scooters, tractors and golf carts. There’s a lot packed into the two-day festivalincluding an ArtoKids booth for hands-on kiddie fun, a circus-like dance party called Cardango and meet-and-greets with the event’s “cartists.”
Pedal the Plains, Sept. 13-15: Pedal the Plains is more than a bicycle tour; it’s a traveling party packed with boot-stomp’n live music, beer gardens, delicious locally sourced food, interactive educational exhibits and a touch of country fun. The 2019 ride host communities include Holly, Springfield and Lamar.
Snowmass Wine Festival, Snowmass, Sept. 14: A long-standing fall tradition, the Snowmass Wine Festival features a weekend of wine tasting and pairing dinners hosted by the Rotary Club of Snowmass Village. Friday evening features a wine pairing dinner, while the Saturday highlight is a three-hour grand tasting event with wines from all over the world.
Historic OHV Tour, Buena Vista, Sept. 17-21: Riders will can experience four days of self-guided tours through the awe-inspiring backcountry of the Collegiate Peaks range with 12 14,000-foot mountains during Buena Vista’s OHV Fall Color Tour, Sept. 17-21, 2019. Participants will immerse themselves in the fall foliage during these self-guided tours and will also explore old mining camps and ghost towns via high mountain passes where gold and silver ore were carried by mule wagons to the railroads.
FORToberfest, Fort Collins, Sept. 21: Fortoberfest, Downtown Fort Collins’ last music festival of the summer, features a full day of live music on the Choice Organics stage, seasonal microbrews from Odell and High Country Beverage, wine from Wilbur’s Total Beverage and regional German-themed cuisine.
Mountain Harvest Festival, Paonia, Sept. 26-29: Head to Paonia to celebrate this everything-local harvest. From agricultural producers to artists, writers and crafters, this is a true local event. Live music will be playing throughout the four-day event, and there is a Friday night pub crawl. Plus, enjoy all the fall colors along the way to the Western Slope.
Elk Fest, Estes Park, Sept. 29–30: The beautifully haunting bugle of a bull elk is unmistakable, and spectators head to Estes Park every autumn to experience the phenomenon. The elk gather there, at the edge of Rocky Mountain National Park, to show off for their ladies during the start of the rutting (breeding) season. At Elk Fest, visitors can learn about these beasts’ behavior, observe them in their natural habitat, participate in a bugling contest and see performances by American Indians.
La Veta Oktoberfest, La Veta, Oct. 5: Beer, music and fall foliage all converge during La Veta’s Oktoberfest. This downtown street fair also features a car show, dancing and more than 60 arts and crafts vendors.
Old West Fest, Ridgway, Oct. 11-13: 2019 marks the 50 th anniversary of True Grit , the movie that earned John Wayne his only Academy Award and was filmed in Ridgway and Ouray County in 1968. The first annual Ridgway Old West Fest will celebrate Ridgway’s brief transformation into Fort Smith, Arkansas half a century ago. Festivities will highlight Ridgway’s film, ranching and railroad heritage and celebrate Western arts and culture.
Dairy Block Fall Flannel Festival, Denver, Oct. 20: Dairy Block and Denver Milk Market will again celebrate the changing of the seasons with the second annual Fall Flannel Festival on Sunday, Oct. 20. This free community event, held in the Alley at Dairy Block, will feature a festive line-up of events for all ages, including face painting and balloon art, live music, games, an urban pumpkin patch, a live pumpkin carving artist and more.
Emma Crawford Coffin Races, Manitou Springs, Oct. 26: The Emma Crawford Coffin Races and Parade is an annual event held just days before Halloween. The rules are very simple: form a team with one “Emma” in a coffin and four “runners” dressed in the most creative costumes and have them race toward the finish line. It’s an uncanny and crazy spectacle for everybody’s amusement.

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WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#203)

Yummly WEEKLY MENU PLAN (#203) – A delicious collection of dinner, side dish and dessert recipes to help you plan your weekly menu and make life easier for you! In these menu plans, we will be sharing some of our favorite recipe ideas for you to use as you are planning out your meals for the week. Just click any of the recipe titles or pictures to get the recipe. A little about how we plan our week and our menu plan: Mondays are soup and salad. Tuesdays we are bringing you delicious Mexican cuisine. Wednesdays are a taste of Italy. Thursdays are designed around yummy sandwiches, burgers, and wraps. Fridays are a no cook day around here. Going out with friends and loved ones is something that we think is important. It’s your night off from cooking- enjoy! Saturdays are an exotic food night, it’s a great night to try something new, from cooking with seafood, to trying Indian or Thai dishes. Sundays are a traditional old fashioned all American family dinner- think meat and potatoes. 🙂 There will also always be a couple of delectable desserts to use any day you wish. A new weekly menu plan will be posted every SUNDAY morning so be sure to check back each week! CLICK ON THE LINKED RECIPE TITLES OR PHOTOS TO GET THE FULL RECIPE WEEK #203

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Jalapeño-Cheddar Sourdough Bread

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This delicious Jalapeño-Cheddar Sourdough Bread is made with pickled Jalapeños, sharp cheddar cheese and garlic chives. Perfect with soup or on its own.
My sourdough bread saga continues with this Jalapeño Cheddar Chive Sourdough bread. I like to bake bread with various ingredients, that makes it not only tasty but also a filling one.
I don’t have any routine to bake the bread, if I decide that I need to bake bread I get my starter ready by the evening and next morning make the dough and refrigerate overnight and bake them next day. I don’t know why, but I am crazy about the Jalapeño Cheddar combo, I have tired Jalapeño Cheddar Biscuits , Jalapeño Cheddar Wheat buns , Jalapeño Cheddar Cumin Scones . Then I realized that I didn’t tried a sourdough bread with this combo. Decide to give it a try, and it turned out to be delicious.
With biscuits I tried pickled Jalapeño, whereas wheat buns fresh ones and with scones, I cooked it. For this Sourdough I used pickled sliced Jalapeño. Also, I like to use sharp cheddar when it comes to baking and is soups.
Coming to the sourdough bread this is simple recipe you can add the cheese and other filling if you want while making the dough itself. But I like to add it after their bulk rise. Usually mix in and then shape and do the overnight fermentation in the refrigerator.
Since this bread has cheese in it, make sure to bake it with parchment paper. You can have this Jalapeño Cheddar Chive Sourdough Bread with your favorite bowl of soup or just as such. It will be a good idea if you toast them with little butter. Enjoy as you wish.
Need to make a starter? Click HERE . Jalapeño-Cheddar Sourdough Bread 50 g OR ¼ cup Sourdough starter 365 g OR 1 ½ cup + 1 tsp warm water 280 g OR 2⅓ cups bread flour 200 g OR 1¾ cups all purpose flour 20 g whole wheat flour 9 g OR 1 ½ tsp fine sea salt 50 g OR ⅓ cup sliced pickled Jalapenos 135 g OR 1 heaped cup Sharp cheddar cheese cubed into ¼ inch 12 g OR ¼ cup minced chives Instructions In a large bowl add starter and water and mix well. Then add all purpose, whole wheat flour and bread flour combine everything and set aside for 30 minutes Then add salt and mix again and set aside for another 6-8 hours. I didn’t do it, if you want you can strengthen the dough with folding at every 30 minutes for next 2 hours and then 1-hour interval for 2 hours and finally set aside for 2-3 hours. When you are ready to shape mix in cheese, jalapenos and chives then shape and transfer to banneton or mold. Refrigerate for overnight, next morning pre-heat oven to 450F. Transfer the dough to cold Dutch oven and bake for 10 minutes at 450F and then reduce the temperature to 425 F and bake 25 minutes with lid on. Then remove the lid and bake for another 10 minutes or until loaf develop golden color and when you tap the loaf it makes whole sound or register 210 F internal temperature. Cool the loaf and cut it into slice and enjoy. 3.5.3229 Swathi Iyer
Swathi ( Ambujom Saraswathy) loves to explore cuisines from all over the world, and write about the ones that she and her family enjoyed on her blog Zesty South Indian kitchen. She loves to gives an Indian touch to several of the world cuisine, and has weakness for freshly baked bread. She is also a mom to two wonderful young kids who gives a up or down vote to the food she creates.

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