Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing

Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing

Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing By Rebecca Rosman • 17 hours ago Boman Kohinoor, 97, has spent the past eight decades committed to his beloved Britannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s last Parsi cafes. Here, he proudly holds up a photo of himself with two members of the British royal family: the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William and the former Kate Middleton. Rebecca Rosman for NPR / Originally published on June 2, 2019 12:55 pm
The brown walls are peeling at all ends. Giant paint chips cake the ceiling. And the cash register — if you can call it that — is just a series of old wooden drawers.
“I’m going to put up a sign that says ‘Enter at your own risk.’ Otherwise someone is going to hold me liable,” says Romin Kohinoor, one of the owners of the nearly century-oldBritannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s last Parsi cafes.
Luckily for Kohinoor, these quirky interiors have long been seen as more of an attraction than a liability.
Parsi cafes like Britannia & Co. started popping up around Mumbai in the late 19th century. They were founded by Parsis — Zoroastrians who fled religious persecution in their native Persia. The cafes became popular among many in India because, in a society where caste systems and long-standing taboos remain omnipresent, these cafes offered a place where various parts of Indian society mingled freely.
They are, in a word, cosmopolitan. They are also, in two words, dying out.
One of the world’s oldest religions, Zoroastrianism began thousands of years ago in what is now Iran, and the faith predates Islam. A central ethical tenet of the faith is to promote “good words, good thoughts and good deeds.” The Zoroastrian migrants brought to India not only their religious traditions but also their unique cuisine, offering a table to people of all classes, religions and ethnicities in an atmosphere scented with Iranian and Gujarati spices. Parsi cafes are emblems of tolerance, a core teaching of the Prophet Zoroaster, and their affordable food and snug tables attest to their place as servers of the common man.
At one point, there were around 400 Parsi cafes scattered across Mumbai. Today, there are less than 40.
A dwindling Parsi population, combined with little interest from newer generations to take over these family-owned businesses, means that there may not be any Parsi cafes in just a few decades.
But Britannia & Co. has a secret to standing strong amid a sea of dying neighbors: the 97-year-old owner, Boman Kohinoor, who has spent the past eight decades committed to his beloved cafe. On one wall of Britannia & Co. is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. Next to her is a painting of Gandhi. Each serves as a reminder of the cafe’s unique cultural heritage. Rebecca Rosman for NPR
“They say habit is second nature,” the bespectacled owner tells me over a generous plate of chicken berry pulao, the restaurant’s signature dish. “And habit has kept me coming here every day now for the last 80 years.”
Every day during the busy lunch hour, Kohinoor slowly makes his way around each table to partake in one of his favorite activities: schmoozing. Current favorite topics include the British monarchy, U.S. politics and his longevity plans. (He plans on breaking the Guinness World Record for oldest living person.)
India was still under British rule when Kohinoor’s father opened the cafe in 1923, which inspired the cafe’s name. “My father wanted to please the local commissioner, who was handing out leases at the time,” says Kohinoor.
When the restaurant opened, the menu consisted mostly of lighter European fare. It wasn’t until after independence from the British in 1947 that Kohinoor decided to revamp the menu, adding a slew of Iranian comfort food options that have since become the favorites here — dishes like sali boti, a lamb curry stewed with tomatoes, jaggery and onions and topped with fried potato strings.
Or the chicken berry pulao — moist chunks of chicken cooked in a fragrant tomato sauce, mixed with a rice pilaf and garnished with Iranian sour barberries. Downed with a fresh lime soda and crème caramel, it’s hard not to indulge.
Most items on the menu today follow the original recipes of Kohinoor’s late wife, Bacha — and they remain a fiercely guarded secret.
A small black-and-white photo of Bacha hangs on the wall alongside the restaurant’s entrance. On the other side of the room is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II next to a painting of Gandhi. Several depictions of the Prophet Zoroaster, cloaked in white robes, are also on display. Each serves as a reminder of the cafe’s unique cultural heritage. Chicken berry pulao is the signature dish at Britannia & Co. Rebecca Rosman for NPR
Zoroastrians started arriving in India around 1,300 years ago to escape religious persecution from Arab invaders in their native Persia. By the mid-20th century, around 120,000 Parsis lived in India. Today there are less than half that. Zoroastrians don’t believe in conversion, making it hard to keep the religion alive.
But the more immediate problem for families like Kohinoor’s is a generational one.
Younger generations don’t want to inherit the long hours — and the risk of low returns — that come with running a restaurant.
“I’m only doing this for my dad,” admits Kohinoor’s 58-year-old son Romin, who has been working the register at Britannia & Co. for four decades. “He doesn’t want to close this place down. He doesn’t want to sell it at all.”
Romin has a 27-year-old daughter, Diana, who comes in at the end of each day to do the restaurant’s books.
She was studying law at university but didn’t really like it.
Now, “I would not want it to end because of me. So let’s take it forward,” she says.
But with her grandfather still going strong, her promotion from accountant to owner may be a while. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:
Mumbai, India, has been at the crossroads of cultures for millennia. In the 19th century, refugees from Iran fleeing religious persecution opened what came to be called Parsi cafes. At one point, there were 400 of them. Today, there are fewer than 40. Rebecca Rosman visited one of the last Parsi cafes.
REBECCA ROSMAN, BYLINE: The first thing you notice when you walk into Britannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s most popular Parsi cafes, is that the place is kind of falling apart. Giant paint chips cake the ceiling. The brown walls are peeling. And the cash register, if you can call it that, is just a series of old wooden drawers.
ROMIN KOHINOOR: Very old-fashioned, very old-fashioned, see. And I don’t want to change it because I’ve got so used to it.
ROSMAN: Fifty-eight-year-old Romin Kohinoor has been working behind this register for four decades.
R KOHINOOR: This is my grandfather’s counter bell.
(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)
R KOHINOOR: It’s 98 years old, and it is made from British gun metal. See the echo. See the echo.
(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)
R KOHINOOR: Even the restaurant is very old-fashioned – 96 years old. It’s all peeling out. It’s all dropping. I’m going to put up a board now that you enter at own risk because if something happens, somebody’ll hold me liable.
ROSMAN: Luckily for Kohinoor, these quirky interiors are seen as more of an attraction than a liability and so is the food – Iranian comfort food. One of the most popular menu items is a dish called chicken berry pulao – a rice pilaf topped with moist chunks of chicken and stewed in a fragrant tomato sauce, garnished with sour barberries, giving the dish a sweet and sour punch, and served with fresh lime soda. But one of the biggest draws here is the owner.
BOMAN KOHINOOR: I come here every day from 12 o’clock till 4:30. I have been coming here now nearly about 80 years.
ROSMAN: That’s Romin’s 97-year-old father Boman Kohinoor. Boman’s father opened the restaurant in 1923. But every day since Boman was about 16, the chattier Kohinoor has slowly made his way around each table to partake in one of his favorite activities – schmoozing. Today’s topics for the endearing owner include Hillary Clinton, the British monarchy and his longevity plans.
B KOHINOOR: You know, the oldest man in the world, he died one year ago. How old was he? One hundred Forty-Six.
ROSMAN: One hundred forty-six.
ROSMAN: Oh, in Indonesia.
B KOHINOOR: Indonesia – I’m going to break his record.
ROSMAN: Kohinoor’s great-grandparents came to Mumbai more than 180 years ago after fleeing religious persecution from the dominant religion in Persia – Islam. They were Zoroastrians, one of the oldest religions in the world, founded on three main principles.
B KOHINOOR: Good thoughts, good words and good deeds.
ROSMAN: The hundreds of thousands of Zoroastrians who fled to India became known as Parsis. And in the 19th century, many started opening up these cafes. Now most are gone.
B KOHINOOR: In another 20 years or 30 years, there won’t be none.
ROSMAN: The Parsi population is dwindling. Today in India, there are just over 60,000 Parsis. You have to be born into the religion. Zoroastrians don’t believe in conversion. But the more immediate problem for families like Kohinoor’s is a generational one. Younger people don’t want to inherit the long hours and risk of low returns that come with running a restaurant. Even Boman’s 58-year-old son Romin Kohinoor admits he is only helping to keep the business going for one reason.
R KOHINOOR: I’m doing this only for my dad. He doesn’t want to close this place down. He doesn’t want to sell it out. I’m doing it just for him.
ROSMAN: Romin has a 27-year-old daughter Diana. She comes in at the end of each day to do the restaurant’s books, a job that requires a computer, meaning it’s too techie for anyone else in the family. Diana was studying law at university but didn’t really like it. I asked if she would have any interest in taking over the family business.
DIANA KOHINOOR: I would like to because we make good money out here. It’s like a set business. It’s there since 1923, and I would not want it to end because of me. So let’s take it ahead – forward.
ROSMAN: But with her grandfather still going strong, her promotion from accountant to owner may take a while.
For NPR News, I’m Rebecca Rosman in Mumbai. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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Summer Fest begins in Shimla today

Tribune News Service
Shimla, June 2
The district administration is geared up to welcome tourists with a plethora of events and activities for the Shimla Summer Festival from June 3 to 6 with the participation of tourism stakeholders.
Shimla DC Amit Kashyap today said the festival would be inaugurated by Governor Acharya Devvrat. He said artistes from Assam, Gujarat, Jammu and Kashmir, Madhya Pradesh and Telengana would perform in their traditional attire. Folk artistes from Rajasthan and Haryana too would present their performances. “The festival will be a perfect blend of folk, classical and pahari culture and schoolchildren and local artistes will be given an ample opportunity to showcase their talent,” said Kashyap.
The Tourism Industry Stake Holders Association will organise a heritage tour on June 4, which will cover one of the best places of tourist interests in Shimla — Annandale Army Heritage Museum, HP State Museum and Indian Institute of Advance Study. Mohinder Seth, president of the association, said this tour would be organised twice a day. The guided Heritage Walk would be organised on June 6 that would start from Scandal Point and culminate at the IIAS.
The district administration is also organising a food festival during the summer festival, which is aimed at popularising Himachali cuisine for which a stall, Himachali Rasoi, has been set up.

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Top 10 Non-Veg Restaurant in Najibabad| Najibdarbar

Published New Discard Success! Najibdarbar a Multi Cuisine Restaurant situated near the extreme well known location of Haridwar Bypass road. With the introduction of variety of dishes at NajiDarbar, we embody the spirit and essence of fine Indian cuisine with excellent taste and quality food. Najibdarbar is servicing you excellent quality food. People here can enjoy the food along with the ambiance within the restaurant; NajibDarbar cuisine is a mixture of modern style with traditional roots. The authentic taste of dishes you can enjoy by the online delivery of food.

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Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing

Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing By Rebecca Rosman • 17 hours ago Boman Kohinoor, 97, has spent the past eight decades committed to his beloved Britannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s last Parsi cafes. Here, he proudly holds up a photo of himself with two members of the British royal family: the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William and the former Kate Middleton. Rebecca Rosman for NPR / Originally published on June 2, 2019 1:55 pm
The brown walls are peeling at all ends. Giant paint chips cake the ceiling. And the cash register — if you can call it that — is just a series of old wooden drawers.
“I’m going to put up a sign that says ‘Enter at your own risk.’ Otherwise someone is going to hold me liable,” says Romin Kohinoor, one of the owners of the nearly century-oldBritannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s last Parsi cafes.
Luckily for Kohinoor, these quirky interiors have long been seen as more of an attraction than a liability.
Parsi cafes like Britannia & Co. started popping up around Mumbai in the late 19th century. They were founded by Parsis — Zoroastrians who fled religious persecution in their native Persia. The cafes became popular among many in India because, in a society where caste systems and long-standing taboos remain omnipresent, these cafes offered a place where various parts of Indian society mingled freely.
They are, in a word, cosmopolitan. They are also, in two words, dying out.
One of the world’s oldest religions, Zoroastrianism began thousands of years ago in what is now Iran, and the faith predates Islam. A central ethical tenet of the faith is to promote “good words, good thoughts and good deeds.” The Zoroastrian migrants brought to India not only their religious traditions but also their unique cuisine, offering a table to people of all classes, religions and ethnicities in an atmosphere scented with Iranian and Gujarati spices. Parsi cafes are emblems of tolerance, a core teaching of the Prophet Zoroaster, and their affordable food and snug tables attest to their place as servers of the common man.
At one point, there were around 400 Parsi cafes scattered across Mumbai. Today, there are less than 40.
A dwindling Parsi population, combined with little interest from newer generations to take over these family-owned businesses, means that there may not be any Parsi cafes in just a few decades.
But Britannia & Co. has a secret to standing strong amid a sea of dying neighbors: the 97-year-old owner, Boman Kohinoor, who has spent the past eight decades committed to his beloved cafe. On one wall of Britannia & Co. is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. Next to her is a painting of Gandhi. Each serves as a reminder of the cafe’s unique cultural heritage. Rebecca Rosman for NPR
“They say habit is second nature,” the bespectacled owner tells me over a generous plate of chicken berry pulao, the restaurant’s signature dish. “And habit has kept me coming here every day now for the last 80 years.”
Every day during the busy lunch hour, Kohinoor slowly makes his way around each table to partake in one of his favorite activities: schmoozing. Current favorite topics include the British monarchy, U.S. politics and his longevity plans. (He plans on breaking the Guinness World Record for oldest living person.)
India was still under British rule when Kohinoor’s father opened the cafe in 1923, which inspired the cafe’s name. “My father wanted to please the local commissioner, who was handing out leases at the time,” says Kohinoor.
When the restaurant opened, the menu consisted mostly of lighter European fare. It wasn’t until after independence from the British in 1947 that Kohinoor decided to revamp the menu, adding a slew of Iranian comfort food options that have since become the favorites here — dishes like sali boti, a lamb curry stewed with tomatoes, jaggery and onions and topped with fried potato strings.
Or the chicken berry pulao — moist chunks of chicken cooked in a fragrant tomato sauce, mixed with a rice pilaf and garnished with Iranian sour barberries. Downed with a fresh lime soda and crème caramel, it’s hard not to indulge.
Most items on the menu today follow the original recipes of Kohinoor’s late wife, Bacha — and they remain a fiercely guarded secret.
A small black-and-white photo of Bacha hangs on the wall alongside the restaurant’s entrance. On the other side of the room is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II next to a painting of Gandhi. Several depictions of the Prophet Zoroaster, cloaked in white robes, are also on display. Each serves as a reminder of the cafe’s unique cultural heritage. Chicken berry pulao is the signature dish at Britannia & Co. Rebecca Rosman for NPR
Zoroastrians started arriving in India around 1,300 years ago to escape religious persecution from Arab invaders in their native Persia. By the mid-20th century, around 120,000 Parsis lived in India. Today there are less than half that. Zoroastrians don’t believe in conversion, making it hard to keep the religion alive.
But the more immediate problem for families like Kohinoor’s is a generational one.
Younger generations don’t want to inherit the long hours — and the risk of low returns — that come with running a restaurant.
“I’m only doing this for my dad,” admits Kohinoor’s 58-year-old son Romin, who has been working the register at Britannia & Co. for four decades. “He doesn’t want to close this place down. He doesn’t want to sell it at all.”
Romin has a 27-year-old daughter, Diana, who comes in at the end of each day to do the restaurant’s books.
She was studying law at university but didn’t really like it.
Now, “I would not want it to end because of me. So let’s take it forward,” she says.
But with her grandfather still going strong, her promotion from accountant to owner may be a while. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:
Mumbai, India, has been at the crossroads of cultures for millennia. In the 19th century, refugees from Iran fleeing religious persecution opened what came to be called Parsi cafes. At one point, there were 400 of them. Today, there are fewer than 40. Rebecca Rosman visited one of the last Parsi cafes.
REBECCA ROSMAN, BYLINE: The first thing you notice when you walk into Britannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s most popular Parsi cafes, is that the place is kind of falling apart. Giant paint chips cake the ceiling. The brown walls are peeling. And the cash register, if you can call it that, is just a series of old wooden drawers.
ROMIN KOHINOOR: Very old-fashioned, very old-fashioned, see. And I don’t want to change it because I’ve got so used to it.
ROSMAN: Fifty-eight-year-old Romin Kohinoor has been working behind this register for four decades.
R KOHINOOR: This is my grandfather’s counter bell.
(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)
R KOHINOOR: It’s 98 years old, and it is made from British gun metal. See the echo. See the echo.
(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)
R KOHINOOR: Even the restaurant is very old-fashioned – 96 years old. It’s all peeling out. It’s all dropping. I’m going to put up a board now that you enter at own risk because if something happens, somebody’ll hold me liable.
ROSMAN: Luckily for Kohinoor, these quirky interiors are seen as more of an attraction than a liability and so is the food – Iranian comfort food. One of the most popular menu items is a dish called chicken berry pulao – a rice pilaf topped with moist chunks of chicken and stewed in a fragrant tomato sauce, garnished with sour barberries, giving the dish a sweet and sour punch, and served with fresh lime soda. But one of the biggest draws here is the owner.
BOMAN KOHINOOR: I come here every day from 12 o’clock till 4:30. I have been coming here now nearly about 80 years.
ROSMAN: That’s Romin’s 97-year-old father Boman Kohinoor. Boman’s father opened the restaurant in 1923. But every day since Boman was about 16, the chattier Kohinoor has slowly made his way around each table to partake in one of his favorite activities – schmoozing. Today’s topics for the endearing owner include Hillary Clinton, the British monarchy and his longevity plans.
B KOHINOOR: You know, the oldest man in the world, he died one year ago. How old was he? One hundred Forty-Six.
ROSMAN: One hundred forty-six.
ROSMAN: Oh, in Indonesia.
B KOHINOOR: Indonesia – I’m going to break his record.
ROSMAN: Kohinoor’s great-grandparents came to Mumbai more than 180 years ago after fleeing religious persecution from the dominant religion in Persia – Islam. They were Zoroastrians, one of the oldest religions in the world, founded on three main principles.
B KOHINOOR: Good thoughts, good words and good deeds.
ROSMAN: The hundreds of thousands of Zoroastrians who fled to India became known as Parsis. And in the 19th century, many started opening up these cafes. Now most are gone.
B KOHINOOR: In another 20 years or 30 years, there won’t be none.
ROSMAN: The Parsi population is dwindling. Today in India, there are just over 60,000 Parsis. You have to be born into the religion. Zoroastrians don’t believe in conversion. But the more immediate problem for families like Kohinoor’s is a generational one. Younger people don’t want to inherit the long hours and risk of low returns that come with running a restaurant. Even Boman’s 58-year-old son Romin Kohinoor admits he is only helping to keep the business going for one reason.
R KOHINOOR: I’m doing this only for my dad. He doesn’t want to close this place down. He doesn’t want to sell it out. I’m doing it just for him.
ROSMAN: Romin has a 27-year-old daughter Diana. She comes in at the end of each day to do the restaurant’s books, a job that requires a computer, meaning it’s too techie for anyone else in the family. Diana was studying law at university but didn’t really like it. I asked if she would have any interest in taking over the family business.
DIANA KOHINOOR: I would like to because we make good money out here. It’s like a set business. It’s there since 1923, and I would not want it to end because of me. So let’s take it ahead – forward.
ROSMAN: But with her grandfather still going strong, her promotion from accountant to owner may take a while.
For NPR News, I’m Rebecca Rosman in Mumbai. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR. © 2019 WMKY

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KHAREEF SEASON LUXURY: VISIT SALALAH AND CHOOSE ANANTARA

Share KHAREEF SEASON LUXURY: VISIT SALALAH AND CHOOSE ANANTARA For those of you eager to explore Oman’s Southern Dhofar region this summer, you’ll be thrilled to learn that the Khareef season from mid-June to mid-September in Salalah is one of the most breathtaking in The Middle East. So, deciding where to stay during your visit is imperative to making the most of your holiday; enter Al Baleed Resort Salalah by Anantara , a 5-star luxury resort with every comfort and convenience you could ask for.
KHAREEF SEASON
“Khareef,” a colloquial term meaning ‘autumn’ in Arabic, is when the rainy season comes to Salalah from June to September – bringing with it a beautiful blanket of green across the region. The fascinating weather pattern is not to be missed, and one of the best places from which to appreciate the beautiful scenery and intrepid activities is Al Baleed Resort Salalah by Anantara. An award-winning resort with five-star services that include the only private pool villas in Salalah, it’s the perfect choice as a base when visiting during the Khareef season. Not only is it one of the most luxurious hotels to stay at, but in comparison to the hot and humid summer days in Bahrain, a visit to Salalah is the perfect antidote with its pleasant climate and varied landscape of emerald green coastal plains and mountains. Led by the resort’s Salalah Guru, nature enthusiasts can venture into the verdant mountains and watch the region come to life with cascading waterfalls creating clear freshwater pools along with lush foliage and colourful wild flowers. Various wildlife, even camels, usually spotted near the sea can be found lazing in Salalah’s mountains – making the most of the cooler temperature.
LOCAL MEETS LUXURY
There are many reasons why Al Baleed Resort Salalah by Anantara should be your choice of accommodation. The property draws on its local elements and surroundings, weaving Omani culture and Thai hospitality into its many soothing services, its remarkable décor and, of course, its rooms and villas. The resort has villas with or without pools, but our favourite would have to be the resort’s One-Bedroom Garden View Pool Villa. Here are just some of the great options, made to be enjoyed by couples, families, groups of friends and solo travellers all in search of an unforgettable Khareef adventure mixed with a little relaxation.
ONE BEDROOM VILLAS
No matter your preference of luxury, Anantara villas truly have it all. One can enjoy various views: the beach, lagoon, or a charming garden, which allows for complete privacy. Your spacious villa boasts unique comforts unrivalled amongst resorts in Oman. Lounge in tranquility, with your personal Villa Host on hand to take care of everything for you, including dining reservations and local excursions. Your villa interior features a large bedroom and separate majlis lounge. The grand bathroom features a huge rain shower and soaking tub. You can even access your outdoor private pool from the bathroom. Your villa exterior is without a doubt a secluded haven of indulgence and you cannot help but enjoy the refreshing climate that this season has to bring. Slip into your plunge pool and unwind, completely unseen, or drift into sleep on a poolside cabana. After a day out exploring all that the Khareef season has to offer, retreat to your villa for an al fresco meal on your private pool terrace. Then head indoors for a movie and a bubble bath drawn by your Villa Host. This stunning villa – perfect for a family of four – will make your Khareef holiday an unforgettable experience.
TWO BEDROOM GARDEN VIEW POOL VILLA
A generous retreat at this lush Salalah resort that blends the best of both worlds – quality time together and quiet spaces to cherish alone. Rise to a morning swim in your pool. Bask in your surroundings in the privacy of your courtyard. Gather for drinks served by your Villa Host in your lounge, then retire to en-suite havens. Accommodating up to four adults and two children, privacy is key as you get to pamper yourself with a private courtyard, private pool, two cabanas, sundeck and loungers, separate indoor lounge and two bedrooms, each with a luxurious bathroom. THREE BEDROOM ROYAL BEACH VILLA
The royal villa boasts a prime position overlooking the Arabian Sea and lagoon. Step straight from your terrace on to a private white sand beach. Soak up the view of the mesmorising monsoon waves crashing ashore from your spacious terrace complete with 40sqm private pool. Share elegant meals together, taking full advantage of your beach villa’s indoor and outdoor dining areas, mini-kitchen and Villa Host service. Think ultimate sanctuary vibes and then times it by 100, as this 630sqm space comfortably accommodates six adults and three children.
THE SPA
Enter a world of indulgence at Anantara Spa, with Oman’s ancient beauty rituals, traditional Thai massage and the 5,000-year- old techniques of Ayurveda on offer. Discover hammam rituals that detoxify and soothe in the only luxury hammam in the region. Explore the healing properties of frankincense and pomegranate amongst other signature treatments that specialise in indegiounous ingredients, including coconut and banana. Talk about being at one with nature… it’s never smelled so yummy!
DINING DEFINED
Another great reason to make Al Baleed Resort Salalah by Anantara your home during a trip to Salalah is down to one simple thing: food. A simple thing that this resort does exceptionally well. Indigenous ingredients, harvested from tropical plantations and the Arabian Sea allow visitors to explore exotic local specialities. And sample delights from East to West. Take a seat at one of these fabulous venues…
SAKALAN
Translating as ‘The Land of Frankincense’, Sakalan’s open kitchens and culinary stations dish up cuisines from near and far – served in the stylish dining room, or on the outside terrace beside the infinity pool. Breakfast is a brimming buffet of international favourites, healthy and exotic treats, live stations and bakery temptations. A la carte lunch dishes inspire a world of choice – from authentic Arabic dishes, to fiery Indian specials and contemporary western classics. New surprises excite at themed buffet dinners, as the resort’s chefs get creative with unique gourmet journeys.
MEKONG
The countries that border the Mekong River are renowned for their distinctive cuisines. Enjoy a voyage of discovery through Thailand, China and Vietnam – savouring age-old recipes and regional surprises. This is one of Anantara’s signature dining concepts that has grown popular at sister properties around the region too. We would highly recommend trying the Tom Yum Soup and tucking into the Mekong Sharing Platter!
AL MINA
Al Mina captures the vibrant Mediterranean in a relaxed ambience. Lunch on Italian, Greek and Spanish classics – each crafted from the finest seasonal ingredients and seafood catches. Choose your preferred spot – dining at a shoreline table, or lounging poolside. Evenings here feel fresh and sophisticated. Pair barbecue delights with a fine grape vintage. Unwind with shisha on a terrace under a blanket of stars.
There’s also the famous Anantara tailored private service: Dining by Design, alongside cooking classes to tantalise your taste buds and teach you a few tips and tricks in the kitchen! Not to forget the resort’s Khareef Gourmet Picnics that they offer to guests who are spending the day looking at the many sites Oman has to offer. This comes with a choice of salads, sandwiches, mains and desserts. along with rental chairs, shades and carpets chairs, shades and carpets… and that is only the beginning. There truly is nothing Al Baleed Resort Salalah by Anantara hasn’t thought of to amplify the experience of drinking in the spectacular scenery of Oman. LET IT RAIN KHAREEF SPECIAL
Escape the summer heat for a luxurious Khareef at Al Baleed Resort Salalah by Anantara with 25% savings on private pool villas and spa treatments. Dine on lavish buffet breakfasts and daily buffet or a la carte dinner at one of the restaurants of your choice during your stay. Lounge in your spacious private pool villa. Experience pure relaxation in our Anantara Spa complete with luxury hammam. Marvel at the magnificent scenery of lush, green mountains and cascading waterfalls in Salalah – the ultimate summer destination.
Package includes:
25% savings on villa accommodation Daily buffet breakfast for two persons Daily buffet or à la carte for dinner for two persons at the restaurant of your choice 25% savings on spa treatments Valid for stays between July 26 until September 7, 2019.
GO: GULF AIR WILL OPERATE DIRECT DAILY FLIGHTS FROM BAHRAIN TO SALALAH FROM JUNE 15 TO SEPTEMBER 14. VISIT WWW. GULFAIR.COM FOR BOOKINGS AND MORE INFORMATION. CALL +968 2322 8222 OR VISIT WWW.SALALAH.ANANTARA.COM FOR RESERVATIONS AND MORE INFORMATION. Tags

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Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing

Parsi Cafes, A Centuries-Old Tradition In India, Are Vanishing By Rebecca Rosman • 16 hours ago Boman Kohinoor, 97, has spent the past eight decades committed to his beloved Britannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s last Parsi cafes. Here, he proudly holds up a photo of himself with two members of the British royal family: the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William and the former Kate Middleton. Rebecca Rosman for NPR / Originally published on June 2, 2019 12:55 pm
The brown walls are peeling at all ends. Giant paint chips cake the ceiling. And the cash register — if you can call it that — is just a series of old wooden drawers.
“I’m going to put up a sign that says ‘Enter at your own risk.’ Otherwise someone is going to hold me liable,” says Romin Kohinoor, one of the owners of the nearly century-oldBritannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s last Parsi cafes.
Luckily for Kohinoor, these quirky interiors have long been seen as more of an attraction than a liability.
Parsi cafes like Britannia & Co. started popping up around Mumbai in the late 19th century. They were founded by Parsis — Zoroastrians who fled religious persecution in their native Persia. The cafes became popular among many in India because, in a society where caste systems and long-standing taboos remain omnipresent, these cafes offered a place where various parts of Indian society mingled freely.
They are, in a word, cosmopolitan. They are also, in two words, dying out.
One of the world’s oldest religions, Zoroastrianism began thousands of years ago in what is now Iran, and the faith predates Islam. A central ethical tenet of the faith is to promote “good words, good thoughts and good deeds.” The Zoroastrian migrants brought to India not only their religious traditions but also their unique cuisine, offering a table to people of all classes, religions and ethnicities in an atmosphere scented with Iranian and Gujarati spices. Parsi cafes are emblems of tolerance, a core teaching of the Prophet Zoroaster, and their affordable food and snug tables attest to their place as servers of the common man.
At one point, there were around 400 Parsi cafes scattered across Mumbai. Today, there are less than 40.
A dwindling Parsi population, combined with little interest from newer generations to take over these family-owned businesses, means that there may not be any Parsi cafes in just a few decades.
But Britannia & Co. has a secret to standing strong amid a sea of dying neighbors: the 97-year-old owner, Boman Kohinoor, who has spent the past eight decades committed to his beloved cafe. On one wall of Britannia & Co. is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. Next to her is a painting of Gandhi. Each serves as a reminder of the cafe’s unique cultural heritage. Rebecca Rosman for NPR
“They say habit is second nature,” the bespectacled owner tells me over a generous plate of chicken berry pulao, the restaurant’s signature dish. “And habit has kept me coming here every day now for the last 80 years.”
Every day during the busy lunch hour, Kohinoor slowly makes his way around each table to partake in one of his favorite activities: schmoozing. Current favorite topics include the British monarchy, U.S. politics and his longevity plans. (He plans on breaking the Guinness World Record for oldest living person.)
India was still under British rule when Kohinoor’s father opened the cafe in 1923, which inspired the cafe’s name. “My father wanted to please the local commissioner, who was handing out leases at the time,” says Kohinoor.
When the restaurant opened, the menu consisted mostly of lighter European fare. It wasn’t until after independence from the British in 1947 that Kohinoor decided to revamp the menu, adding a slew of Iranian comfort food options that have since become the favorites here — dishes like sali boti, a lamb curry stewed with tomatoes, jaggery and onions and topped with fried potato strings.
Or the chicken berry pulao — moist chunks of chicken cooked in a fragrant tomato sauce, mixed with a rice pilaf and garnished with Iranian sour barberries. Downed with a fresh lime soda and crème caramel, it’s hard not to indulge.
Most items on the menu today follow the original recipes of Kohinoor’s late wife, Bacha — and they remain a fiercely guarded secret.
A small black-and-white photo of Bacha hangs on the wall alongside the restaurant’s entrance. On the other side of the room is a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II next to a painting of Gandhi. Several depictions of the Prophet Zoroaster, cloaked in white robes, are also on display. Each serves as a reminder of the cafe’s unique cultural heritage. Chicken berry pulao is the signature dish at Britannia & Co. Rebecca Rosman for NPR
Zoroastrians started arriving in India around 1,300 years ago to escape religious persecution from Arab invaders in their native Persia. By the mid-20th century, around 120,000 Parsis lived in India. Today there are less than half that. Zoroastrians don’t believe in conversion, making it hard to keep the religion alive.
But the more immediate problem for families like Kohinoor’s is a generational one.
Younger generations don’t want to inherit the long hours — and the risk of low returns — that come with running a restaurant.
“I’m only doing this for my dad,” admits Kohinoor’s 58-year-old son Romin, who has been working the register at Britannia & Co. for four decades. “He doesn’t want to close this place down. He doesn’t want to sell it at all.”
Romin has a 27-year-old daughter, Diana, who comes in at the end of each day to do the restaurant’s books.
She was studying law at university but didn’t really like it.
Now, “I would not want it to end because of me. So let’s take it forward,” she says.
But with her grandfather still going strong, her promotion from accountant to owner may be a while. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:
Mumbai, India, has been at the crossroads of cultures for millennia. In the 19th century, refugees from Iran fleeing religious persecution opened what came to be called Parsi cafes. At one point, there were 400 of them. Today, there are fewer than 40. Rebecca Rosman visited one of the last Parsi cafes.
REBECCA ROSMAN, BYLINE: The first thing you notice when you walk into Britannia & Co., one of Mumbai’s most popular Parsi cafes, is that the place is kind of falling apart. Giant paint chips cake the ceiling. The brown walls are peeling. And the cash register, if you can call it that, is just a series of old wooden drawers.
ROMIN KOHINOOR: Very old-fashioned, very old-fashioned, see. And I don’t want to change it because I’ve got so used to it.
ROSMAN: Fifty-eight-year-old Romin Kohinoor has been working behind this register for four decades.
R KOHINOOR: This is my grandfather’s counter bell.
(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)
R KOHINOOR: It’s 98 years old, and it is made from British gun metal. See the echo. See the echo.
(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)
R KOHINOOR: Even the restaurant is very old-fashioned – 96 years old. It’s all peeling out. It’s all dropping. I’m going to put up a board now that you enter at own risk because if something happens, somebody’ll hold me liable.
ROSMAN: Luckily for Kohinoor, these quirky interiors are seen as more of an attraction than a liability and so is the food – Iranian comfort food. One of the most popular menu items is a dish called chicken berry pulao – a rice pilaf topped with moist chunks of chicken and stewed in a fragrant tomato sauce, garnished with sour barberries, giving the dish a sweet and sour punch, and served with fresh lime soda. But one of the biggest draws here is the owner.
BOMAN KOHINOOR: I come here every day from 12 o’clock till 4:30. I have been coming here now nearly about 80 years.
ROSMAN: That’s Romin’s 97-year-old father Boman Kohinoor. Boman’s father opened the restaurant in 1923. But every day since Boman was about 16, the chattier Kohinoor has slowly made his way around each table to partake in one of his favorite activities – schmoozing. Today’s topics for the endearing owner include Hillary Clinton, the British monarchy and his longevity plans.
B KOHINOOR: You know, the oldest man in the world, he died one year ago. How old was he? One hundred Forty-Six.
ROSMAN: One hundred forty-six.
ROSMAN: Oh, in Indonesia.
B KOHINOOR: Indonesia – I’m going to break his record.
ROSMAN: Kohinoor’s great-grandparents came to Mumbai more than 180 years ago after fleeing religious persecution from the dominant religion in Persia – Islam. They were Zoroastrians, one of the oldest religions in the world, founded on three main principles.
B KOHINOOR: Good thoughts, good words and good deeds.
ROSMAN: The hundreds of thousands of Zoroastrians who fled to India became known as Parsis. And in the 19th century, many started opening up these cafes. Now most are gone.
B KOHINOOR: In another 20 years or 30 years, there won’t be none.
ROSMAN: The Parsi population is dwindling. Today in India, there are just over 60,000 Parsis. You have to be born into the religion. Zoroastrians don’t believe in conversion. But the more immediate problem for families like Kohinoor’s is a generational one. Younger people don’t want to inherit the long hours and risk of low returns that come with running a restaurant. Even Boman’s 58-year-old son Romin Kohinoor admits he is only helping to keep the business going for one reason.
R KOHINOOR: I’m doing this only for my dad. He doesn’t want to close this place down. He doesn’t want to sell it out. I’m doing it just for him.
ROSMAN: Romin has a 27-year-old daughter Diana. She comes in at the end of each day to do the restaurant’s books, a job that requires a computer, meaning it’s too techie for anyone else in the family. Diana was studying law at university but didn’t really like it. I asked if she would have any interest in taking over the family business.
DIANA KOHINOOR: I would like to because we make good money out here. It’s like a set business. It’s there since 1923, and I would not want it to end because of me. So let’s take it ahead – forward.
ROSMAN: But with her grandfather still going strong, her promotion from accountant to owner may take a while.
For NPR News, I’m Rebecca Rosman in Mumbai. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR. © 2019 Alabama Public Radio 920 Paul Bryant Drive, Digital Media Center – Gate 47 35487 (800) 654-4262

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Is the online food ordering trend influencing the way parents cook?

Advertising Is the online food ordering trend influencing the way parents cook? Access to the Internet, travel and the rise of online food ordering have inspired Indian parents to add value to what they cook for the family. And they are constantly in search of a new, healthy menu for their children. Published: June 3, 2019 11:03:04 am Related News Parents are focussing on giving their kids healthy meals. (Source: Getty Images)
By Chef Mukesh Rawat Advertising
The growing popularity of ordering food online has impacted how Indian homes are cooking these days. Due to the ease of placing orders, a love for experimenting with new dishes along with a higher disposable income, millennials are indulging in online food ordering. And keeping pace with this, parents are too changing their cooking styles so that their offspring do not opt for online food orders every now and then. They are watching YouTube recipe videos, learning about new recipes from magazines and hugely applying their acquired, reinvigorated cooking skills.
A 2018 report says that this sector grew at 15 per cent quarter-on-quarter from Jan-Sep 2017. In that, average daily orders grew to 400,000 in the three months to Sep 2017. Also, home deliveries accounted for 56 per cent of all orders in the Sep quarter. If this wasn’t enough, food delivery time has reduced to 42 minutes in Q3 FY17 vs 47 minutes in Q4 FY16. These combined factors have been giving a strong impetus to the trend in India. Modern kitchen and gadgets
There is a huge change that has happened in the Indian kitchen. Appliances such as OTGs, electronic blenders and roti makers have made inroads into the Indian style of cooking. Also, there is a new kind of recipes that parents are making for the liking of their children. A South Indian kitchen now prepares chole bhature for an elaborate breakfast during a weekend. Because today there is a lot of ease when it comes to accessing a food video and recipe online and parents are using these platforms to try out new recipes. For example, ‘how to make a cake’ is among the top five searches if you explore the how-to tag on YouTube India. The objective is to make a new menu or present it in a style that attracts the younger generation. Advertising Variety of food
Like mentioned earlier, these days, an Indian family does not restrict the menu to traditional dishes only. They look for something new to include in the menu. For example, a non-vegetarian family includes sausages, scrambled eggs along with toast, etc to follow a classic English breakfast menu. Likewise, the cooking method has also undergone change. Deep-fried food items have almost been abandoned by today’s parents as they try to incorporate healthy cooking styles. The impact is such that, some urban families even go beyond South Indian or North Indian dishes and try Thai, Burmese, Japanese, Mexican, even Ethiopian cuisines. The probability is that within a few years, with the help of smartphones and the Internet, Mexican, Japanese cuisines might be considered as Ghar Ka Khana, when prepared at home. Inclusion of olive oil
Indian urban homes have started adopting olive oils in making their food items. The whole concept of including olive oil in the Indian food recipes have been inculcated to make it a healthier delicacy. Specifically, digital savvy urban Indians, being well-travelled too, along with growing health-conscious mindsets have an increasing tendency of adopting MUFA (monounsaturated fatty acids) which come in a variety of cooking oils including olive oil, rice bran oil, canola oil, mustard oil, and groundnut oil. As per a report published on Olive Oil Times, MUFAs lower the death rate from several heart diseases and lowers the cholesterol level as well. Olive oil, with its antioxidant components, is very useful in lowering joint pains. Further, olive oil is also very helpful in reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.
In a nutshell, access to the Internet, travel to international destinations along with the rise of online food ordering have inspired Indian parents to add value to what they cook for the family. And they are constantly in search of a new, healthy menu to attract their children.
(The writer is an Executive Pastry Chef in Academy of Pastry Art India.)

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The Asian Millionaire Traveler in 2019

News
Adding further weight to several pieces of research commissioned by ILTM Asia Pacific and presented during its annual event in Singapore this week, the behaviour of the Asian millionaire traveler; their motivations, media channels, brand preferences and consumption patterns were the focus of a seminar presentation to both exhibitors and buyers.
Having interviewed 903 millionaires across China, India, Singapore, Hong Kong, South Korea and Japan, Agility Research & Strategy defined millionaires as those whose HNW was $US1m+.
Key takeaways from the study include:
– 2019 will be another year of strong growth for the luxury travel segment. Particularly encouraging is the willingness to travel manifested by Chinese and Indian millionaires, given the large number of HNW individuals residing in these two countries. Japanese millionaires, on the other hand, remain reluctant to travel internationally, a trend that persists despite a stabilizing economy and increased inbound touristic flows.
– The research indicates that millionaires’ reasons to travel are shifting from status and recognition to personal growth and better quality of life. Increasingly, business trips become a mix of business and leisure, and millionaires plan their trips with the whole family, to spend quality time with children, and to share the experiences together.
– There is increased awareness that luxury travel is more than luxury accommodation and transportation. Experience seeking has become the true motivation to travel. Food experiences remain high on the millionaires travel bucket-list, starting from a varied breakfast at the hotel, continuing with a local, authentic and safe lunch to sample the local cuisine, and ending with fine dining at a Michelin-rated restaurant. The need for authenticity drives the choice of where to travel: Japan remains a very attractive destination for Asian millionaires because it is seen as safe, diversified and authentic.
– Shopping, which until a few years ago was cited as the top reason to travel across all 6 markets covered by the study, is becoming less relevant. Asian millionaires’ interests are becoming more sophisticated: city tours, diving, beach, food, amusement parks, spas and hot springs are some of the most mentioned reasons to travel. We expect to see in the next few years an increase of interest in art & cultural travel, on the tail of the opening of major museums and cultural institutions throughout the region.
– Online and digital is gaining traction both as a channel to search for information and as way to research and book travel. At the same time, traditional channels such as recommendation from friends and family, TV and magazines are still very relevant in shaping and influencing millionaires travel decisions.
– Over 85% of millionaires surveyed in China consider a hotel’s eco-friendliness important.
“ The presentations we lined up for ILTM Asia Pacific have focused on three key subject matters, and this one analyses the upcoming trends of the luxury traveler in the region. With more than 6m millionaires in the APAC region (a double digit growth in 2018) this is a powerhouse market which continues to grow with sustained optimism. However at the same time we also can see that their travel habits are changing. As a leader in the luxury travel sector, we will continue to support every one of our events with information, trends and facts from thought leaders in this sector to help all our participants with obtaining the knowledge that will drive their business objectives through the next decade.” Said Alison Gilmore, Portfolio Director ILTM & Lifestyle Portfolios.”
The full report is available on view.iltm.com
eTN is a media partner for ILTM. ( Source )
Adding further weight to several pieces of research commissioned by ILTM Asia Pacific and presented during its annual event in Singapore this week, the behaviour of the Asian millionaire traveler; their motivations, media channels, brand preferences and consumption patterns were the focus of a seminar presentation to both exhibitors and buyers.
Having interviewed 903 millionaires across China, India, Singapore, Hong Kong, South Korea and Japan, Agility Research & Strategy defined millionaires as those whose HNW was $US1m+.
Key takeaways from the study include:
– 2019 will be another year of strong growth for the luxury travel segment. Particularly encouraging is the willingness to travel manifested by Chinese and Indian millionaires, given the large number of HNW individuals residing in these two countries. Japanese millionaires, on the other hand, remain reluctant to travel internationally, a trend that persists despite a stabilizing economy and increased inbound touristic flows.
– The research indicates that millionaires’ reasons to travel are shifting from status and recognition to personal growth and better quality of life. Increasingly, business trips become a mix of business and leisure, and millionaires plan their trips with the whole family, to spend quality time with children, and to share the experiences together.
– There is increased awareness that luxury travel is more than luxury accommodation and transportation. Experience seeking has become the true motivation to travel. Food experiences remain high on the millionaires travel bucket-list, starting from a varied breakfast at the hotel, continuing with a local, authentic and safe lunch to sample the local cuisine, and ending with fine dining at a Michelin-rated restaurant. The need for authenticity drives the choice of where to travel: Japan remains a very attractive destination for Asian millionaires because it is seen as safe, diversified and authentic.
– Shopping, which until a few years ago was cited as the top reason to travel across all 6 markets covered by the study, is becoming less relevant. Asian millionaires’ interests are becoming more sophisticated: city tours, diving, beach, food, amusement parks, spas and hot springs are some of the most mentioned reasons to travel. We expect to see in the next few years an increase of interest in art & cultural travel, on the tail of the opening of major museums and cultural institutions throughout the region.
– Online and digital is gaining traction both as a channel to search for information and as way to research and book travel. At the same time, traditional channels such as recommendation from friends and family, TV and magazines are still very relevant in shaping and influencing millionaires travel decisions.
– Over 85% of millionaires surveyed in China consider a hotel’s eco-friendliness important.
“ The presentations we lined up for ILTM Asia Pacific have focused on three key subject matters, and this one analyses the upcoming trends of the luxury traveler in the region. With more than 6m millionaires in the APAC region (a double digit growth in 2018) this is a powerhouse market which continues to grow with sustained optimism. However at the same time we also can see that their travel habits are changing. As a leader in the luxury travel sector, we will continue to support every one of our events with information, trends and facts from thought leaders in this sector to help all our participants with obtaining the knowledge that will drive their business objectives through the next decade.” Said Alison Gilmore, Portfolio Director ILTM & Lifestyle Portfolios.”
The full report is available on view.iltm.com
eTN is a media partner for ILTM. ( Source ) Submit

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RIXOS REVELRY: TWO TURKISH IFTARS TO TRY

RIXOS REVELRY: TWO TURKISH IFTARS TO TRY RIXOS SAADIYAT ISLAND
Set in the main all-day dining restaurant, Turquoise, the Iftar spread at this luxury, all-inclusive 5-star resort is simply breathtaking. Merging together the best of Arabic and Turkish cuisines, you’re really spoilt for choice. As we arrive a little close to 7pm, the dining crowd is a mix of corporate gatherings and in-house hotel guests. We see families, both local and international, enjoying the lavish food spread. The tables are elegantly topped with dates and water whilst, although packed, there is no queue or congestion at the buffet (just how we like it). We begin to navigate the buffet and find that a few stations are mirrored on both sides of the restaurant, so no matter which side you’re sat on, you have direct access to the freshest food. If you’re someone who knows what they want, then navigating this vast buffet will be a treat. Otherwise, have a couple of walks around and see what catches your eye! This is when you’ll also recognise the soothing sounds of an Oud player, adding more Ramadan vibes to your melodic route around the buffet.
We start the feast with a plate full of fresh greens and our favorite cold mezzeh – hummus, muhammara, tabbouleh, spinach salad and more. If you’ve been fasting, this alone will be enough to tempt the taste buds but, word of advice, leave room for the mains. Before that, make sure you head over to the far end of the buffet which is where the bread station sits in all its glory. We’ve got two words for you, Turkish Pide. The hot, oven-fresh bites of oozing cheese topped on beautifully light bread is the standout dish of the evening for us. In fact, we had around three helpings of it – SO yummy!The mains are, with no surprise, meat heavy – there’s lamb, beef, and a live grills station to keep things sizzling. We highly recommend trying the lamb soup which is a beautiful hot broth with tiny meat pieces, reminding us of true winter warmer dishes back home. The beef short ribs are also appetising, and the one item that seems to run out at a quick pace (try and hang around the counter to get it served hot and fresh). Indian and Italian dishes also make a prominent appearance, with curries and rice as well as a huge Parmesan wheel taking centre stage – if you love pasta and cheese – this is a dream dinner choice.
What’s Iftar without desserts? At Rixos Saadiyat Island, you’ve got tables packed with sweet offerings as far as the eye can see. Traditional Turkish Delights, different kinds of dates, a crepe station, chocolate fountain, cakes galore and even an extensive fruit option, there isn’t a single craving that you can’t satisfy here – they really have it all. We quickly agreed that the Turkish Baklava, which was presented in abundance, was some of the best we’ve tasted in the city. This Kadayıf was crispy on top and sticky and chewy in the middle. There file pastry brought the crunch whilst the nuts, butter and sugary syrup brought the flavours. For those who prefer a savory ending, there’s an impressive cheese table to get your fix. We have to commend the service of the waiters. They were incredibly attentive and friendly to all the tables around us. They accommodated various requests with urgency and efficiency – like walk-ins, big families who wanted specific seating for small children, and drink orders that showed up to the table within minutes. We must point out that as the restaurant is fully-licensed and operating with alcohol being served throughout Ramadan, expect to find many visiting guests sipping on a pint of beer or other alcoholic beverages at tables all around. It’s a jarring scene, and it would perhaps be better during the Holy Month to separate dining areas for those who want to drink alcohol.
For the variety of food alone, the Iftar at Rixos Saadiyat Island is well worth a visit this Ramadan (and it’s one of the most instagrammable too!).
Time & Price: Sunset to 8.30pm, AED260.
GO: Call (0)2 492 2222 for reservations and more information. RIXOS PREMIUM DUBAI
An Istanbul Iftar? Yes, please! With its Turkish roots and traditions, Rixos Premium Dubai offers an inspiring atmosphere and genuine hospitality during the Holy Month of Ramadan. Savour authentic local flavours of Turkish cuisine, impeccable service and the most exquisite Iftar experience. Discover authentic dishes including a wide variety of hot and cold mezze, soups, salads, and main courses, with juicy Turkish grilled meats stealing the show. This is all washed down with Ramadan juices, Arabic coffee and soft drinks.
From 9pm onwards, diners can then head upstairs to Turquoise Restaurant’s private enclosed terrace, which will be transformed into a traditional majlis lounge for the occasion. Here, guests can enjoy shisha and help themselves to baklava, an ice cream bar, and special Turkish teas and coffees.
Time & Price: Daily from sunset to 9pm, AED199.
GO: Call (0)4 520 0333 for reservations and more information. Tags

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