Order Indian Food Online from local restaurant in by ZykaIndian

Order Indian Food Online from local restaurant in by ZykaIndian

Indian cuisine encompasses food from across India. While cuisines can vary anywhere from significantly to slightly between regions, staple ingredients used throughout Indian cuisine include rice, wholewheat flour, lentils, and mung beans. Spices like black pepper, cumin, turmeric, coriander and ginger are commonly found in Indian cooking, often colliding to create a delicious flavour explosion. From Chicken Tikka Masala and Nawabi Kebabs to Rogan Josh, Butter Chicken and practically every type of curry, the huge diversity of Indian dishes offer something for all palates. If you’re wondering, “Where are the best Indian restaurants near me?”, simply open the Zykaindiancuisine and Order Indian Food Online. Whether you’re looking for a light lunch or delicious dinner, Zykaindiancuisine offers the widest range of traditional Indian takeaway and delivery restaurants in your area. www.zykaindiancuisine.co.nz/pr…

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Herbs of Zaytuna

Search for: Herbs of Zaytuna – Mint April 15, 2019 by Amatullah Duniam & filed under Demonstration Sites , Food & Food Support Systems , General , Permaculture Projects , Plants On our last stops of the herbal tour of Zaytuna Farm we met Rosemary , Yarrow and Aloe . This stop is with the iconic, delicious, aromatic staple of any herb garden, Mentha spicata , you might know him as garden mint, common mint or spearmint. You might also know him by his numerous cousins; there are over 20 species of mint, and over 200 varieties. You might know his Egyptian cousin Mentha sylvestris , the star of Egyptian mint tea, or the tiny, prostrate Corsican mint Mentha requeinii . Or perhaps you know Peppermint, Pennyroyal, the surprising Pineapple Mint, or the truly delightful Chocolate Mint.
But don’t let me get distracted by the mints we don’t have, let’s just stick to the one we do. Zaytuna Farm’s plant community has plenty of varieties that seem to come and go, travellers that come with the stream of volunteers and visitors that gift the gardens cuttings and personal favourites, but the staple Garden Mint or Common Mint is a popular and abundant herb in Zaytuna’s kitchen garden.
Here he grows under our bananas, interplanted with comfrey, sweet potato, roses and other herbs. In Zaytuna’s subtropical climate mint is a perennial herb but in colder climates it can be deciduous. Mints have creeping rootstock and stem, and can spread both above and below ground, something to keep in mind when planting it. Mint likes rich, loose soil, with plenty of sunshine and water.
Mint is propagated by seed, cuttings, roots or runner. Mint species will readily cross fertilise so if you’re hoping to save seeds be aware of different varieties flowering at the same time. While some mints are richer in volatile oils than others they all have similar properties. And in common with other familiar herbs they pack a surprising punch in the vitamin and mineral department. Specifically mints contain Vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B6, B9, B12 and K, as well as calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, selenium and zinc. It’s also interesting to note that mint (like all plants) can vary in appearance and constituents depending on soil and growing conditions.
Mint is common but never dull. He’s a star used in kitchens around the world, most commonly fresh or dried for teas. Mint salads are common across the Mediterranean. Mint yogurt is a traditional side dish in Indian, Greek and Middle Eastern cuisines. Mint gravy is a traditional side to lamb dishes. Mint is also a delicious addition to soups, curries and stir fries. Mint tea is a refreshing digestive aid that helps breakdown rich and fatty food by stimulating digestion. Mint left in drinking water gives a light minty flavour that’s lovely in summer especially.
Medicinally, mint is used primarily for its effects on the nervous system, stomach and colon. It’s an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, carminative, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic, and stimulant. It’s been used to help colds and flu symptoms,colic, indigestion, diarrhea, muscle spasms, menstrual cramps, headaches, fever, heartburn, and travel sickness. Peppermint tea is a traditional remedy for nerves and tension. Peppermint oil capsules are an effective treatment for the symptoms of IBS. Mint, yarrow and elderflowers is a traditional herbal formula for colds, flu and fever. Mint is also reputed to repel insects and mice.
Peppermint essential oil has been shown to be effective in treating tension headaches, as well as being soothing to bites, sore muscles and cramps. Mint essential oils should be checked for the specific species, as their use and cautions vary. In high doses peppermint oil can be a neurotoxin and a skin irritant. Peppermint oil should not be used on or near the faces of young children or by people with cardiac fibrillation or G6PD deficiency. Spearmint oil has an invigorating scent, and although it may not be as therapeutic as peppermint it is generally considered safer (and suitable for children). Pennyroyal in any form can be toxic when ingested and should not be taken during pregnancy as it may be an abortive. Although mint is a traditional remedy for heartburn in can occasionally increase it in some people, especially those with active GERD symptoms. Excessive amounts of mint may dry up breast milk.
Because of the refreshing flavour, you’ll often find mint in tooth powders and homemade mouthwashes. Mint essential oils are often used in blends for breathing/congestion and muscle aches and pains. Mint leaves can be used in a paste to treat acne and skin issues. As a hydrosol mint is used as to tone and hydrate the skin and may help balance oily skin, cool sunburn, and soothe inflamed skin or itchy bites. Peppermint oil (properly diluted of course) is reputed to help hair growth and scalp health.
Mint is, in my humble opinion, a great gateway herb, a simple, delightful companion, who doesn’t ask for much, but will give more back. He will sit quietly in a pot, or stretch his legs and take over half your garden if you let him. His aroma is uplifting and calming simultaneously, in the same way that he is ordinary (everyone knows a mint or two) yet also extraordinary, (breathe in the smell of fresh mint tea and honey and see what I mean,) all at the same time. Mint is good company, the neighbour who as you (b)rush by him releases an aromatic reminder to be grateful and to appreciate what you have, to never undervalue the simple pleasures of life.
“We may think we are nurturing our garden, but of course it’s our garden that is really nurturing us.” Jenny Uglow The Modern Herbal Dispensatory by Thomas Easley and Steven Horne How can I use Herbs in my Daily Life? By Isabell Shipard 375 Essential Oils and Hydrosols by Jeanne Rose Alchemy of Herbs by Rosalee de la Foret Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young Related

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The Subversive, Surprising History of Curry Powder

One of India’s most popular gastronomic exports tells a tale of empire. Atlas Obscura by Rohini Chaki April 09, 2019 Mmm, curry. Natasha Breen / The Picture Pantry In the 2001 romantic comedy Bridget Jones’s Diary , the iconic meeting of the film’s lead couple begins with a voiceover as Bridget trudges through the snow down her mother’s driveway: “It all began on New Year’s day, in my 32nd year of being single. Once again I found myself on my own and going to my mother’s annual turkey curry buffet. Every year she tries to fix me up with some bushy-haired, middle-aged bore, and I feared this year would be no exception.” The presence of turkey curry—a hybrid Indian and British food—as the background to this budding British romance reveals how much curry has become synonymous with British culture.
This love of curry, a dish adopted and adapted after the colonization of India, is a relic of when the sun never set on the British Empire. But the term “curry” reflected a willful ignorance of the diversity of Indian food. Lizzie Collingham, who mentions the Bridget Jones scene in her book Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors, writes that curry was something “the Europeans imposed on India’s food culture.” While their Indian cooks served them rogan josh , dopiaza , and qorma , the British “lumped all these together under the heading of curry.”
Domesticating curry also aided in Britain’s colonizing m ission. Susan Zlotnick, a professor of English at Vassar College, has written about how the memsahibs of the British Raj were doing the work of empire by incorporating Indian elements into British cooking and making curry, in essence, culturally British. Cookbooks of the time were “self-conscious cultural documents in which we can locate a metaphor for nineteenth-century British imperialism,” writes Zlotnick. “By virtue of their own domesticity, Victorian women could neutralize the threat of the Other by naturalizing the products of foreign lands.” Taking the culinary wisdom of the colonized, and making it their own, was part of the grand imperial project.
Currying things, with fresh or tinned curry powder, became synonymous with British cookery. Isabella Beeton’s Book of Household Management (first published in 1861) and Eliza Acton’s Modern Cookery in all its Branches (1845), both bestsellers of their time, with several reprints, contained an abundance of curry recipes that called for curry powder. Some, such as Mrs. Beeton’s “fricasseed kangaroo tails,” revealed the multiple threads of colony in a single dish.
This became an enduring legacy of the British Empire and colonization—it sent native foods between colonies and around the world. Much of Indian cuisine today comprises ingredients from the Americas introduced by colonists, such as chilies, potatoes, and tomatoes. Likewise, the spice trade was formative to European colonial conquest, fostering global connections between continents. This was at a time when “Europe was clearly not in the center, but on the margins of a world system centered around Asia and the Middle East,” writes anthropologist Akhil Gupta in the book, Curried Cultures: Globalization, Food, and South Asia . And so, curry powder’s popularity in England ensured its journey to America with early settlers.
Map of the British Empire in 1886. Forgemind ArchiMedia/CC BY 2.0 According to culinary historian Colleen Taylor Sen, author of Curry: A Global History , Indians arrived in North America almost immediately after the founding of the Jamestown colony in 1607. “The British from the East India Company made great fortunes and came to America, where they had these big estates,” she says. They brought servants and indentured laborers from India for their estates. “India and America were like sister colonies.” Curry made the trip too.
Through the 1800s, curry was a common dish, and curry powder a familiar flavor, in the United States. One of the earliest quintessentially American cookbooks, The Virginia Housewife by Mary Randolph, has at least six recipes that call for curry powder, including one to make the powder. Eliza Leslie’s bestselling Directions for Cookery, in Its Various Branches (1837) contains a “genuine East India receipt for [chicken] curry,” including recipes for mulligatawny soup with freshly ground curry powder. Mrs. Hill’s New Cook-Book (1870), which proclaimed itself “especially adapted to the Southern States,” contained recipes for curried meat stews and roasts, a “rice chicken pie” in a curry powder gravy, several ways to curry a calf’s head, and Mrs. Hill’s own curry powder recipe, made of pounded coriander seed, turmeric, ginger, black pepper, mustard, allspice, cumin, and cardamom.
Some recipes, such as Mrs. Beeton’s “fricasseed kangaroo tails,” revealed the multiple threads of colony in a single dish.
The expense of shipping spices to the colonies, and to Britain, was probably the primary reason why blended, pre-made curry powder became common. Although there has never been a set combination of spices that goes into curry powder, the British commercialized and sold spice blends under that broad rubric since at least 1784.
Not everyone could afford to buy the individual spices and make their own blends. And while Brits in colonial India had servants to freshly grind spices and select the right combinations for each dish, the average home cook in London or Virginia often leaned on one commercial curry powder (and swapped in more familiar techniques and ingredients, such as butter in place of ghee) for all their curries.
As soon as Indians had a voice in the British and American food worlds, they would denounce the use of curry powder, which reduced the region’s rich and varied cuisine to a few mass-produced mixes.
In the United States, this denunciation came strongly after the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965, which abolished quotas based on national origins and encouraged high-skilled immigration. The influx of newly-arrived South Asians led to an increase in restaurants catering to these migrants. The face and flavor of curry changed from recipes written by white Americans to ones by South Asian chefs who voiced concerns about authenticity and appropriation while introducing their own versions of Indian food.
“What you don’t need is curry powder,” Madhur Jaffrey, the high priestess of Indian cooking in America, wrote in 1974 in An Invitation to Indian Cookery . “To me the word ‘curry’ is as degrading to India’s great cuisine as the term ‘chop suey’ was to China’s.” She added that “no Indian ever uses curry powder,” nor would they mix their own, since then every dish would taste the same. “If ‘curry’ is an oversimplified name for an ancient cuisine,” she charged, “then ‘curry powder’ attempts to oversimplify (and destroy) the cuisine itself.”
A magazine advertisement from 1910. The Advertising Archives / Alamy The rage felt toward curry powder was also fueled by the association between curry and racial slurs. While Britain had embraced curry—and Americans followed suit—anti-immigrant sentiments transcended a shared love of food. When Indians migrated to England and sister colonies, the racial epithet “curry-muncher” was the xenophobic response. After the East India Company’s trade monopoly in India ended in 1813, and the British government set up a more solid presence in India, the colonizing mission necessitated a separation from “natives.” Within India, an archetypal colonist discourse around disgust, backwardness, and mistrust set in, along with a need to establish the Englishness of the rulers.
Still, the term curry and Westerners’ taste for it was too strong to ignore. Jaffrey’s early readers were primarily Euro-American, and she went on to write bestselling cookbooks with such names as Madhur Jaffrey’s Ultimate Curry Bible , 100 Essential Curries , and Madhur Jaffrey’s Curry Nation .
Later Indian-origin chefs in the U.S. and England, such as Meera Sodha, Raghavan Iyer, and Julie Sahni, had the benefit of writing and cooking for a more diverse audience that included diasporic Indians. Over time, they reclaimed the word curry by offering traditional or family recipes and introducing a more nuanced view into the diversity and range of Indian cuisine.
One of the earliest quintessentially American cookbooks, The Virginia Housewife by Mary Randolph, has at least six recipes that call for curry powder.
None of these authors would be caught dead using store-bought curry powder, but South Asian home cooks began to exert ownership over these products. By the 21st century, South Asian Americans were the fastest growing immigrant group in the United States. Both in the homeland and in the diaspora, double income South Asian households with little time to freshly grind spices and prepare jhalfrezi, qorma, kalia, bhuna , or dopiaza (different forms of dry and gravy-laden Indian dishes that typify curry) reached for commercial spice mixes—the equivalent of the curry powder of yore.
Countless food forums include discussions on how best to use these premade blends, which, notably, are never called curry powder, the Hindi term masala (etymologically rooted in Urdu and Arabic) being preferred. Today the Indian premade packaged spice blend is an industry that, by some accounts , is worth a billion dollars. “Biryani masala,” “pav bhaji masala,” “goat curry masala,” and an assortment of masalas to marinate kebabs have become staples of the South Asian pantry. Curry endures, but now in the kitchens of South Asians, and at South Asian restaurants whose fare became considered “ethnic food.”
The decline in the popularity of curry in America—relative to the days when it featured prominently in American cookbooks—can be accorded in part to its reclamation by diasporic South Asians. “Our tastes are probably more racialized than we are willing to acknowledge,” said Krishnendu Ray, Chair of the Department of Food and Nutrition Studies at New York University, in an interview with WNYC . Most of the cuisines that have achieved “elite” status in the U.S. belong to ethnicities now considered white, such as Italian, French, and New American food. “Poor immigrants coming into the country—their food can become popular, but it is very difficult for their cuisine to acquire prestige.” And so, much of Indian, Chinese, and Mexican cuisine today gets relegated to a niche.
Food is often tied to national identity, but the contribution of curry powder to the global kitchen is a noteworthy instance of the early forces of globalization. An invention of a colonial empire, it epitomized Britishness—under the guise of being authentically Indian—and graced the tables of white southerners in America, ultimately drawing the ire of South Asians until it was reclaimed, reinvented, and rebranded under its current avatar as “masala.” The history of this humble kitchen ingredient is the history of empire and its aftermath.

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Advantages and Disadvantages of Diversity

Author Advantages and Disadvantages of Diversity
How does it feel to live in a place that has people from all over the world? Doesn’t diversity make you feel lost in translation? To get an answer for these questions, we have to look at what kind of society people of many races build together. Diversity related to population has both advantages and disadvantages. Advantages No peer pressure: Being friends with people from different countries is a great relief from peer pressure. Your personal life stays personal. They are not going to expect you to get a boyfriend or graduate at some specific age. Everyone is given the freedom to maintain space. Greater amount of individualism: Diversity sharpens your ability to maintain your individualism. With cultural pressure gone, you are more focused on your inner voice and that helps you become what you desire. You also learn to have your own opinions which you get to express without fearing. Wide variety of cuisines for enjoyment, health and wallet: This, perhaps, is the best part. There is not a single country in the world where diversity has not led to increase in restaurants and shops selling exotic foods and ingredients. There is always something new to taste. But that is not all. Such businesses are a blessing for those who need to restrict the intake of normal foods. For instance, if you are a Californian trying to lose weight by changing diet you can always shop for low calorie ingredients at Japanese and Indian stores. Diversity gave you access to them. Such places also carry organic items at a very cheap price. Man enjoying Persian Food in Dubai Rapid Innovation and Progress: When a region promotes freedom of thought and expression its diversity opens the door to innovation and progress. How? People of different countries get to introduce their cultural ideas to the system, paving the way for development. Educator Khan, for instance, changed the way kids have been studying in the US through a teaching method common in his original country. Then think about Dubai from UAE. Its out of the world skyscrapers are the result of welcoming architects who had crazy designs ideas. In general, regions that have diversity get to become wealthy very quickly. Variety in dating market: Some of us can’t date people from our race because they remind us of our parents and siblings. Some of us can’t relate to our own culture. It is high maintenance. Diversity erases that discomfort by allowing us to date people of other races and cultures. Genuine Academic help from students: People of all races don’t see school stuffs in the same way. For instance, most white students give politically correct reviews of classes and thus, not reliable if you are concerned about your grades. If you want the brutally honest review you will need to talk to people of other races. Indian students will generally give you the most details. Bad at math? Diversity will allow you to befriend Asian students so they can help you learn it. Disadvantages Colorful festivals can be depressing: Some cultures you will see have really colorful festivals. If you are away from home witnessing them can make you feel lonely. Participating in one does not help no matter how much they welcome you. You will still feel like an outsider. You will be depressed. Struggle with language barrier: In some places, you will be lost in translation and that can affect your career. For instance, colleges usually don’t care if the professor they are hiring is fluent in English. Once he is in the lecture hall, the students are the ones who suffer. Rampant nepotism: It can be very difficult to find a job and climb the corporate ladder in an area of diversity unless you have an exceptionally great resume. People, in general, love to work with those of their own race. They do it through recommendations and thus, in the job market, you have to feel like a fish out of water. This is quite common in California. People will often tell you in this state that most people are hired through networking. That is actually nepotism in disguise. Making friends is not easy: If you are new in a place of diversity you will struggle to make friends. People here usually focus just on themselves. The friendship usually occurs when you become regular to them. High living cost: There is a pattern and true for large cities. As mentioned earlier, diversity can trigger development which ironically makes living cost high.

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Hotel Review: DoubleTree by Hilton Penang, Malaysia

25 – Advertisement – Tucked away on a quieter stretch of Batu Ferringhi, DoubleTree by Hilton Penang has established itself over the past year as a popular family-oriented resort on the island. 1 of 9
The mix of modern design elements and striking Peranakan motifs is a clear nod to Penang’s rich cultural heritage. The unusual zig-zag arrangement of sea-facing rooms in the building’s structure allows guests to have the best view of the strait with the most sunlight.
The resort has 88 pairs of rooms that can be sold in a pair to cater to families or sold as individual rooms. These paired rooms are linked by a front corridor with lockable sliding doors, allowing for privacy when occupied by families. The resort’s Kids Club offers babysitting services, a Kids Pool and a Kids Wet Play Area to keep young children entertained. The on-site TeddyVille Museum is an interesting attraction that retells the history of teddy bears and the history of Penang in some of the most adorable and Instagrammable exhibits.
While a private beach is just a 100-metre walk away, the landscaped outdoor pool is also designed to look like an artificial beach, with cosy cabanas for relaxing in the daytime. Overlooking the pool is the signature all-day dining restaurant, Makan Kitchen, which showcases the diversity of local Malay, Chinese and Indian cuisines. Stop by The Food Store to grab light snacks and drinks on the go, or unwind at the Axis Lounge in the lobby area to enjoy tea time and a wide range of beverages.
Number of rooms : 316.
What stood out: The many kid-friendly features of the resort, from paired family rooms to the Kids Club. – Advertisement –
What we love most: The adorable yet educational TeddyVille Museum. Have fun identifying the teddy bear versions of famous Penang personalities.
DOUBLETREE BY HILTON PENANG
56, Jalan Low Yat, Batu Ferringhi, Penang 11100, Malaysia
+604 8928 000

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Urgent need of Chef &Cook | Chef Casey Area – Doveton | 1215760803

Cook job Looking for a reliable, fast, honest and energetic Cook to work in a busy Indian Restaurant. Happy to consider Job ready candidates. NO DISHWASHERS REQUIRED Must Have: 1. Wednesday to Monday Availability. 2. Previous Experience of food handling an advantage but must have good knife skill. 3. Good knowledge of Indian cuisine. Please Note: The job requires Knowledge in Dosa, Tandoor and indo-chinese cuisine. We are not looking for candidates who have been cooking at home. The restaurant is located in Dandenong, Victoria. Please google the suburb to check suitability. Call only if you fulfill the above three requirements. Strictly no time wasters please. Please send through your resume to be considered or call me on *

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Vaccination debate heats up as over 100 daycare centres ban unvaccinated children

19 apr All Day 21 Paaspop/Easter Doll Festival Event Details
Paaspop/Easter Doll, has been going since 1974 and has grown year on year. It went from a friendly regional festival to an internationally recognisable three-day event. Last year 83,000 people more Event Details
Paaspop/Easter Doll, has been going since 1974 and has grown year on year. It went from a friendly regional festival to an internationally recognisable three-day event. Last year 83,000 people attended Passpop to see 230 different acts, on 14 different stages. They also got to try 42 different food trucks, offering a variety of different cuisines from all over the world.
Paaspop has seen acts such as Iggy Pop, Bastille, Nothing But Thieves, The Prodigy, Underworld, Kaiser Chiefs, The Kooks, Fatboy Slim, The Wombats and many more. So, who is going to be there this year?
25 Years Charly Lownoise & Mental Theo • 2manydjs DJ Set • 4shobangers • 80’s Verantwoord • Aap uit de Mouw • Abba Fever • Alex Agnew • The All Star Gary Moore Tribute Band • All Them Witches • Amartey • Amyl And The Sniffers • Arie & Silvester • Atmozfears • Baby Blue • Bizzey • Black Water County • Blood Red Shoes • Brennan Heart • Camo & Krooked • Circus Brothers • Claw Boys Claw • Clean Bandit • Comeback Kid • D-Block & S-te-Fan • D-Sturb • Daddy Long Legs • DAISY • Daniel Caldèras & the Shrunken Big Band ft. Benjamin Herman • Davina Michelle • De Hofnar • De Jeugd van Tegenwoordig • De Lievelings DJ’s van je Zusje • De Staat • The Devil Makes Three • DeWolff • The Dirty Daddies • Donnie & Joost • Dopebwoy • Douwe Bob • Dr Phunk • Dropkick Murphys • Drunken Dolly • EAUXMAR • Ellen Ten Damme • Famke Louise • FATA BOOM • Fiesta Macumba Soundsystem • Flonti Stacks • For I Am King • Freddy Moreira • Frenna • The Gaslamp Killer • GENTA • Handrick • Hannah Williams & The Affirmations • Heavy Hoempa plays Iron Maiden • Hef • Heideroosjes • HENGE • Herrie met Gerrie • Ho99o9 • Idaly • IDLES • Ilse DeLange • Indian Askin • Jailhouse Jimmy • Jameszoo • Jarreau Vandal • Jeangu Macrooy • Jett Rebel • Jiri11 • JoeyAK • Johnny 500 • Jordymone9 • Kovacs • Kraantje Pappie • Kris Kross Amsterdam • La Fuente • LNY TNZ • Louder Than Love • Louder Than Love (Soundgarden tribute) • Lukas Graham • MADUK hosted by Ben Verse • Mash-Up Jack • Mate Power • Merol • Mia More • Michelle David & The Gospel Sessions • Mike Krol • Mike Williams • Mr. Belt & Wezol • Mula B • NAFTHALY RAMONA • Navarone • Nervana • Nicole Atkins • Nielson • Noisia DJ Set • NOMA$ • Nona • Novastar • Ooostblok • Oscar and the Wolf • Passenger • Pendulum DJ Set • Phuture Noize • Ploegendienst • Plunder • Poke • Prime • Puinhoop Kollektiv – The Final Weekend Tour • Puri • Que Pasa! • Ran-D • Rondé • Ronnie Flex & Deuxperience • Rowwen Hèze • Russkaja • S10 • Sam Feldt LIVE • Scooter • Sevn Alias • Singlefeestje • Sir Reg • Sjaak • Sjannies • SMP • Snelle • Son Mieux • Stahlzeit • The Stand-Up Club • The Stand-Up Club • Steel Panther • T & Sugah b2b NCT • Tabanka • TAPE TOY • Ten Times A Million • Terry Alderton • Thijs Boontjes Dans- en Showorkest • Tim Akkerman Sings The Boss • Tim Knol & The Blue Grass Boogiemen • Trobi • Tusky • The Vintage Caravan • Vinylfeestje • Waxfiend • The Wetnecks • White Lies • Winne • Within Temptation • Yonaka • Young Ellens • Yung Felix • Yungblud • Zer00’s Heroes Tickets

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Brisbane’s best cooking classes: our top picks

Dinner Lunch Since at least one member of the G&G almost burns her house down on a semi-regular basis in pursuit of culinary excellence, we usually like to leave the cooking to the experts.
Whether your repertoire is limited to toast and cereal or you’re whipping up insta-worthy three-course meals every second night, there’s a cooking class for everyone to try. Every now and again we get it in our heads that we might actually be Australia’s next Masterchef, so off to cooking school we go! GOLDEN PIG | NEWSTEAD
From sourdough to soufflés, Golden Pig has a class and a cuisine for every occasion. Taught by husband/wife/executive chef team Katrina and Mark Ryan, you’ll be a kitchen wiz before the entrees have been served. Master modern Greek or froth over French bistro cuisine, salivate over seafood dishes and perfect pastry – you’ll be holding that Masterchef trophy above your head before you know it! HUNDRED ACRE BAR | ST LUCIA
Finally invited that Tinder cutie over for dinner but your currently specialty is beans on toast? Don’t order Uber Eats just yet, because Hundred Acre Bar is here to help. Hosting cooking classes each month with different themes, their classes will not only equip you with impressive skills, but you’ll also get to enjoy ‘an abundance of food and drink.’ That’s both a direct quote and our favourite amount of food. JAMES STREET COOKING SCHOOL | NEW FARM
This Brisbane institution has been teaching the kitchen-challenged for the better part of 12 years. The small classes are taught by qualified chefs and encourage you to get your hands dirty! Get messy with classes like Indian and BBQ, and tuck in afterwards over a couple of glasses of wine. Bliss! JAM PANTRY | GREENSLOPES
Do you think you can can? We didn’t until we met the ray of sunshine that is Nims and learnt about the joys of fermentation. The only time you’ll want to be in a pretty pickle is at Jam Pantry’s awesome kombucha classes, where one will brew, flavour, carbonate and repeat to end up with 2 litres of the stuff to take home and enjoy! VANILLA ZULU | WILSTON
With a delicious line up of courses that are all about making cooking less intimidating and a whole lot more fun, Vanilla Zulu can do everything from making sure your next dinner party wins you a round of applause to teaching you professional chef skills for that MKR audition you’re planning! Get hands-on learning how to whip up exotic international feeds, or turn your future meals into masterpieces with a lesson in ‘culinary bling.’ MY THAI KITCHEN | MILTON
Wish you could recreate your favourite Thai takeaway at home? We can’t promise you’ll be a pro, but you might save yourself a few plastic containers if you book in for one of My Thai Kitchen’s spicy classes. You’ll get to make every recipe yourself (and eat it, of course), with the expert advice of Chef Taya to guide you every step of the way. Just remember our top bit of advice when you head to one of the best cooking classes Brisbane has to offer: you can never have too much butter. GELATO MESSINA | MILTON
Don’t miss out on Gelato Messina, whose regular gelato appreciation classes in South Brisbane always promise a melt-worthy time! Step in for a part gelato-making, part science, part degustation at which teachers will guide you through a multitude of flavours as well as how to make the perfect creamy base for your next gelato or sorbet.
What will you be plating up next? Words by Emma Callaghan and Jessimin Horder – the gourmands putting their fruit ninja skills to practical use. Share the love!

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These 7 Unique Theme Based Bars & Restaurants in The City Should Definitely be on Your Must-Visit List!

Print As Delhi people, we are hardcore foodies and we love to explore new places. Nobody can deny that! But, when we step out to eat, its not just about the food. It’s about the experience as a whole, right? Which is why we are always on the lookout for new places with exciting themes and of course, the city never disappoints. There are plenty of theme based restaurants, cafes and bars to try across Delhi and NCR. So here’s a shout out to 8 such places that are worth checking out for their uniquely themed ambience. 1. Gravity Space Bar Image Source: Zomato
The Gravity Spacebar is a microbrewery that will literally give you an ‘out of the world’ experience. Sound interesting? This is an adults-only restaurant with space-themed interiors and you can also see the earth gleaming on one side. The restaurant serves Continental, North India, European and Asian Cuisines and also has a fully loaded bar. If you are curious about the outer space, then this place is definitely for you!
Where: Plot 6 & 7, Sector 29, Gurgaon 2. 38 Barracks Image Source: RanceLab
38 Barracks is a tribute to the defence forces from the hospitality industry. The restaurant is designed around an army personnel’s house, who served in the British Indian Army. The walls are decorated with awards and medals. Vintage radio sets, tiffin boxes and other artefacts add a personal touch to the ambience. They do North Indian, Italian, Chinese and Continental cuisines. This place should definitely be on the top of your list for a family night!
Where: M-38, Outer Circle, Opposite Shankar Market, Connaught Place, New Delhi 3. Guppy by AI Image Source: ChicLifeByte
Japanese food is all the rage these days. So, if you’re one of those who loves some Sushi and sashimi then Guppy is a must visit for you. This place is not just a treat for your taste buds, but also for your eyes. This is an anime-inspired restaurant which will give you the experience of a wonderland. With lion fish lights, Japanese Kokeshi Dolls and a number of other Japanese wonders popped in shades of green and pink. Trust us when we say this, you are going to love this place! They specialise in Japanese and their Jumbo Prawns and Ramen are a must have.
Where: 28, Main Market, Lodhi Colony, New Delhi 4. Southpoint Carnival Image Source: Baromeeter
Just as the name suggests, Southpoint Carnival will transport you to a real life carnival with carousels, merry go rounds and bright, colourful lights. They have a rotating bar and swings which serve as tables. That’s not all, they let you experience different types of carnivals as they make changes every month! What else do we need to unleash our inner 12 year old? They specialise in finger food and sea food and also have their own microbrewery, a fully stocked bar and even a small pool. Yes, you read that right! Time to pay a visit to the Southpoint Carnival yet?
Where: 1st Floor, Southpoint Mall, Golf Course Road, Gurgaon 5. The Darzi Cafe and Bar Image Source: India Today
The Darzi cafe and bar is based on a unique tailor shop theme, inspired by the streets of Saville Row in London. One wall is entirely covered with tabletop sewing machines and another has cascading drawers. Some of the tables look like reels of thread and there are sections where there are thick ropes that make a grid-like pattern to represent the web-like network that makeup fabric. During the day time, The Darzi Cafe and Bar doubles as a co working space. Now doesn’t that sound like an interesting work place ? They serve North Indian, Chinese and Continental Cuisines and also do really good pizzas.
Where: H 55, 1st Floor, Outer Circle, Connaught Place, New Delhi 6. Circus Image Source: TrueLocalz
Located at one of the most happening places in Gurgaon, Circus, as the name suggests is a circus themed restaurant with one-of-a-kind eye catching, funky and spunky interiors. This place stands out for its joyful and vibrant ambiance. With clowns and magic mirrors, this place is perfect for a family outing. One that even the little ones will enjoy. They serve North India, Chinese and Italian Cuisines and they also have some really nice and refreshing cocktails. Their Butter Chicken Pizza is a must try.
Where: DLF Tower 2, 8th Road, Cyber Hub, DLF Cyber City, Gurgaon 7. Prankster Image Source: Indiatoday.in
Don’t you sometimes wish you could go back to your good, old school days? Well, at Prankster you can relive your school days! This school themed restaurant is adult only and does not allow any school kids, oh the irony! The interiors of the restaurant are made to resemble the various areas of the school such as the laboratories, libraries, classroom etc. What’s more? Unlike real school, you can even consume alcohol at this school! They specialise in Modern Indian cuisine and they have some of the juiciest burgers in town!
Where: Site 8-10, Sector 29, Gurgaon
Featured Image Source: VenueMonk

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How to eat around the world in San Francisco

2 weeks ago Crab dinner and wine
San Francisco is known for its incredible diversity, and that extends to food. That’s why it should be no surprise that it’s one of the few cities in the world where you can taste the cuisine from dozens of countries without stepping foot outside of its 49 square miles. So, if you’re looking for a unique global experience rather than just another meal, look at how you can enjoy the food of several countries without leaving San Francisco.
Mexican – Tacolicious (741 Valencia St.) There are plenty of spots in the Mission to put on this list, and if you’ve gotten a Mission Burrito at one you might feel like you’ve been to all of them. But if you want to try something you can’t find just anywhere, such as shot-and-a-beer braised chicken or corn, summer squash and sweet peppers tacos, it’s time to visit Tacolicious.
Spanish – Alegrias (2018 Lombard St.) We get. After eating your way through San Francisco, you might be in search of something on the smaller side. Might we suggest tapas – or Spanish snacks – at Alegrias. The most popular dishes on the menu are empanadillas de carne, machego flambeado, patatas alioli and the much talked about flan. You’ll feel like you’ve been instantly transported across the Atlantic Ocean to Spain.
Moroccan – Mourad (140 New Montgomery St.) If you’ve never tried Moroccan food, your trip to San Francisco wouldn’t be complete without a trip to Mourad, a recently Michelin Star awarded restaurant. Popular Moroccan dishes include tagine, couscous and b’stilla. If you don’t want to splurge, check out Mourad between lunch and dinner service at the bar for a great, and more affordable, dining experience.
French – La Folie (2316 Polk St.) La Folie is a critically acclaimed yet intimate, family-run restaurant located in Russian Hill in San Francisco. Chef Roland Passot and his wife Jamie opened La Folie in 1988 and, for decades, have thrived in their original location Polk street. La Folie’s dining room offer exquisitely prepared meals in an elegant ambience with warm lighting, sophisticated wood and mirrored panels, and top-notch service.
German – Schroeder’s (240 Front St.) When you get a sudden craving for bratwurst, strudel or any sort of schnitzel, you’ll be happy you’re in San Francisco, where you can find Schroeder’s billing itself as the West Coast’s oldest German restaurant since 1893. The restaurant, which has been in the same spot since shortly after the 1906 earthquake, was remodeled a few years ago, ushering in a new era for the German eatery.
Italian – Locanda Osteria & Bar (557 Valencia St.) North Beach, the West Coast’s Italian mecca, is a great destination for delicious Italian food like lasagna, spaghetti, ravioli and, of course, pizza. However, San Francisco is home to dozens and dozens of Italian restaurants and one of the top-rated Italian restaurants is in the Mission District called Locanda, which has a menu that includes rigatoni, prosciutto, roasted eggplant and the Jewish-style artichoke. Pair that with one of their signature cocktails and you have yourself an amazing night.
Greek – Souvla (517 Hayes St.) If baklava, lamb, Greek fries or gyros sound good to you, it’s time to find a Greek restaurant. Fortunately, there’s Souvla, a fast-casual, affordable option in Hayes Valley that is quickly becoming famous for their photogenic food and inexpensive prices.
Ethiopian – New Eritrea (907 Irving St.) Typical Ethiopian cuisine includes injera, wat and kitfo. If none of these terms sound familiar, it’s time to try out some Ethiopian food, preferably at one of the top-rated eateries here, such as New Eritrea Restaurant and Bar in the foggy, but delicious Sunset District.
Russian – Red Tavern (2229 Clement St.) Considering the extreme diversity of food in San Francisco, it should come as no surprise that you can get some incredible Russian food here without traveling to St. Petersburg and back. When you want beef stroganoff, pelmeni or kotlety, the Red Tavern has just what you need.
Indian – Amber India (25 Yerba Buena Ln.) Indian cuisine is known for combining practically every spice in the pantry to result in a flavorful, unique dish that’s unforgettable. So, if you’re craving curry, tandoori chicken or some soft naan or any other North Indian specialties, Amber India Restaurant in SOMA has you covered.
Thai – Thai Spice (1730 Polk St.) Some of the most popular foods from Thailand include moo namtok, green curry, som tam, pad Thai and Thai fried rice. If you have a hankering for any of these delicious dishes, Thai Spice Restaurant can satisfy your craving. To our astonishment, they serve 80 more unique Thai dishes. After all, the “San Francisco Chronicle” named it one of the top five Thai restaurants in this city.
Korean – Han Il Kwan (1802 Balboa St.) Kimchi, guksu or bokkeum might sound good to you right now. Then it’s essential that you find an amazing Korean restaurant while you’re in San Francisco. Han II Kwan consistently gets great reviews and is known for both delicious food and excellent customer service.
Japanese – Ozumo (161 Steuert St.) If you’re craving Japanese food during your trip to San Francisco, conventional wisdom would tell you to go to the historic Japantown, but you’ll be glad to know that Ozumo Restaurant near the Embarcadero likely has what you need. Its menu includes traditional Japanese dishes like miso and edamame to start, followed by main dishes like shabu-shabu, tempura, sashimi and sushi. The extensive menu is complemented by a sake lounge and amazing views of the bay.
American – The Dorian (2001 Chestnut St.) Sometimes you just need a burger, ribs or tender steak with a side of baked beans and tater tots, followed by apple pie. Good ‘ole hearty American Fare at its finest. Fortunately, you can get all that plus more American food at the Dorian, which serves everything from burgers and steaks to chicken sliders and oysters in the Marina.
California – Foreign Cinema (2543 Mission St.) The final stop on the world tour is right back where you started, California and Californian cuisine, which tends to mix different cooking styles. In other words, don’t show up expecting to get a simple pasta dish or house salad that you could get anywhere else. Instead, excite your palate with interesting options like sea bass ceviche or Pacific ahi seared rare, which you can find at Foreign Cinema. 2019-04-16

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