Nooks and Crannies: A New Buzz at Geylang Serai Ramadan Bazaar 2019

Nooks and Crannies: A New Buzz at Geylang Serai Ramadan Bazaar 2019

Events Ongoing A rich slate of Muslim-owned and halal-certified container stalls are set to liven up Geylang Serai Ramadan Bazaar 2019 running from 3 May–5 June.
The annual Geylang Serai night bazaar held during the Ramadan or fasting month typically draws crowds far and wide for its array of garments, knick knacks, and of course, street food. This year’s edition features 150 Muslim-owned or halal-certified food stalls.
If you approach the bazaar from Paya Lebar station, chances are you’d head straight for the tentage at Kampung Gemilang on Engku Aman Road. There’s lots to discover here, such as apam balik, a local corn and peanuts pancake snack; wadeh or vadai, the South Indian-origined deep fried fritters; alongside newer-fangled offerings such as lobster with nasi lemak, praffle (prata + waffle), and what’s dubbed ‘Singapore’s first halal flaming bubble tea’ from Milk Bro by actor Hafiz Aziz. Fairy lights and comfy corners for company
But follow the fairy lights across the carpark to Tanjong Katong Complex food hub at Lorong Sireh Pinang and you’d come across a new addition this year—a container-style annex dedicated to street food with seating space that invites you to tarry awhile. Around 60 stalls are calling this place home for the month of Ramadan.
Says Danial Hakim, spokesperson for Enniche Global Trading, organisers of the food hub, “The idea for the entire space is to reimagine the 80s with modernity. We felt that traditional food and new-age concepts had to have a balance. Thus we decided to have a few new entrants alongside traditional food, while maintaining our halal standards. We work with our halal consultants from Pure and Good consultancy to make sure that the process and educational angle is delivered to stallholders so that they can adhere to the standards.”
The vendors at the food hub include Geylang Serai bazaar stalwarts such as Loco Loco, serving up popular street snack takoyaki, and Ayam Gerprek Bang Syakir, which is back at the bazaar for the second year. Owner Syakir says he was inspired by a two-year stay in Bali in replicating the authentic taste of ayam gerprek or spicy smashed fried chicken. Their homemade chilli is definitely a fiery number that leaves you remembering the dish hours afterwards.
But there are more than a few stalls who are making their Geylang Serai debut through the food hub, bringing with them a myriad mix of offerings. Here are just a few to look out for: MyLaksa
This is MyLaksa from Malaysia’s first foray into Singapore, offering Penang assam laksa. Although they already have a presence in various Malaysian states such as Kedah, Perak and Selangor, they are looking to expand to Singapore if the opportunity arises. They thought the Geylang Serai Bazaar would be a good opportunity to test the market. Operations Director, Raymond Lim says that they “follow the halal process 100 per cent” from preparation of ingredients at the central kitchen, transportation, and their operations at the bazaar. Visitors can savour their Penang assam laksa dishes such as assam fishball ($5) or laksa special ($7) topped with hard-boiled egg and fish balls. Burgs
If you’re not passing by their outlets at Golden Mile Complex or Viva Business Park any time soon, you might want to catch the Muslim-owned Burgs by Project Warung at the food hub. They are offering a special menu featuring their gourmet burgers such as beef ‘bistik’ burger ($7) with slow-cooked beef brisket, Indonesian spices and lettuce; and curry lamb burger ($8.50) with braised lamb shoulder, curry yoghurt sauce and lettuce. Byblos Grill Authentic Lebanese Cuisine
Mohamad Slim of Byblos Grill Authentic Lebanese Cuisine in Kampong Glam says it was a deep desire to share Lebanese cuisine that led him to participate in the bazaar for the first time, along with the ample facilities offered by the organisers. He’s serving up falafel, a common Middle Eastern street food (from $4) made with eight different vegetables apart from chick peas. Have it as a falafel plate or falafel sandwich with hummus, along with meat-stuffed pitas. Biryani Boss’ Kannan Pillai with Bombay sliders Bombay Sliders
Nicknamed ‘the beard’, Kannan Pillai’s love for old-school biryani led up to start Biryani Boss, a new biryani business which makes its debut at the bazaar. He’s offering mango lassi ($4), dum Biryani (chicken $7; lamb shank $10) and nifty butter chicken, mutton keema and potato Bombay sliders ($4 each or 3 for $10). Their rich mango lassi and soft-bun sliders are must-tries. Bill & Bell
Muslim-owned Bill & Bell by Yasmine and her husband Ricky offers kürtőskalács or Hungarian chimney cakes (from $6.90), a funnel-shaped roll topped with sugar and cinnamon. The couple travelled to Hungary about two years ago, spotting kürtőskalács at a flea market. They returned inspired to make a business of this unusual snack. At the bazaar, they’d be offering kürtőskalács in flavours ranging from humble cinnamon to their new parmesan cheese kürtőskalác with nacho cheese and shabu shabu beef. BOO.EH
Muslim-owned BOO.EH was started by a group of friends about two years ago and have since been a travelling feature at fairs, events and night markets. Their specialty—butter.booeh—is a non-alcoholic beverage that imagines what the butterbeer found in the Harry Potter books would taste like. It’s no surprise that each member of the group is a hardcore Harry Potter fan. Without revealing the specific ingredients, they often describe their drink as a homemade brew that is slightly carbonated and topped with creamy foam.

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How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation?

How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation? By Priya Krishna
There’s a specific section of my family’s fridge that is reserved for the large, seemingly bottomless tub of chickpea flour — or as we and lots of other Indians who also rely on it call it, besan — that my parents keep on hand. We’re not gluten-free, nor do we do a lot of baking. Yet chickpea flour shows up everywhere in our food. It’s the nutty coating for my mom’s green beans spiced with earthy ajwain , the key ingredient in her creamy, tangy, yogurt-based soup, kadhi , and the base for our favorite variety of laddoos , sweet, fudge-like balls flavored with ghee, sugar and nuts.
Across the many regional cuisines in India, chickpea flour is a common denominator: Gujaratis turn it into pudla , thin, savory crepes laced with turmeric and chilies. In Karnataka and Maharashtra, it can be found in jhunka , a spicy porridge. And in Andhra Pradesh, it is the thickener in Senagapindi Kura , an onion-heavy stew. For the country’s large vegetarian population, where eggs are often considered non-vegetarian, chickpea flour mixed with water serves as a convincing omelet replacement.
Indians — along with the Nepalese, Pakistanis, Italians, the French, and many others — have been cooking with chickpea flour for centuries. Americans, on the other hand, only seem to have woken up to the ingredient in the last decade or so. And they’ve woken up in a big way.
It’s hard to trace the exact origin of chickpea flour’s sudden popularity in the U.S. Anna Stockwell, the senior food editor of the publications Epicurious and Bon Appétit , said she first started seeing chickpea flour around 2009 on gluten-free blogs. Stockwell is gluten-free herself, and was excited to find a recipe for savory chickpea pancakes.
She didn’t know much about chickpea flour’s culinary heritage, but she was immediately excited. “Its binding power was magic,” she recalls. “All you have to do is combine chickpea flour and water, and suddenly you can make flatbread, or fritters or vegetable pancakes.” Still, Stockwell saw it as a niche ingredient — something only gluten-free consumers cared about. She wasn’t even allowed to call for it in Epicurious recipes.
Slowly but surely, that started to change. In 2010, one of the more popular recipes from Plenty , Yotam Ottolenghi’s bestselling cookbook, was a chickpea flour pancake, or socca , as it’s known in France, layered with tomatoes and onions. In 2015, food and fitness writer Camilla Saulsbury wrote the popular book The Chickpea Flour Cookbook . That was followed a year later by Chickpea Flour Does It All , by blogger Lindsey Love.
Lani Halliday, the founder of Brutus Bakeshop, a gluten-free Brooklyn bakery, says she noticed a huge uptick in the number of chickpea flour-based, gluten-free sweets available about a decade ago. For baked goods, chickpea flour worked uniquely well, “as it can hold air bubbles and hold moisture,” she says. Plus, “it was cheap, it was accessible, and it was versatile.”
Halliday launched her bakery in 2015. One of her bestselling items among both gluten-free and non-gluten-free customers was a chocolate cupcake made with chickpea flour.
Stockwell believes the mainstreaming of chickpea flour is directly linked to one company in particular — Banza. The company started producing its chickpea flour-based pasta in 2014, and by 2017, it was in 8,000-plus grocery stores and had raised $8 million in funding. The key to the company’s success? It didn’t exclusively market itself as a gluten-free product. Instead, it was branded as health food. And it was one of the first alternative pastas that had a smooth, al dente texture, just like the real thing.
“I had friends who had never heard of chickpea flour, but now they eat Banza,” Stockwell says. “It’s not because they are trying to eat gluten-free but because it’s a delicious and higher-protein pasta. It’s a substitute for empty carbs.”
This year, Epicurious was finally allowed to publish recipes with chickpea flour. Dennis Vaughn, the CEO of Bob’s Red Mill, says that in the past five years, chickpea flour has become a clear bestseller among the company’s sundry flour options.
“My grocery store doesn’t even carry red meat,” Stockwell says, “but they carry Bob’s Red Mill” chickpea flour.
In many ways, it has been weird to watch this ingredient that has always felt so quotidian to me become so ubiquitous so quickly in the U.S. This is certainly not the first Indian ingredient or dish this has happened to. Consider turmeric, chai, or khichdi , which have all been claimed by the wellness community and food bloggers as their own, often times without giving due credit to Indian cuisine. It baffles me that the vast majority of people I talk to are shocked to hear that chickpea flour has long been a common ingredient in my family’s cooking.
On the other hand, it was important to me when I was writing my new cookbook, Indian-ish , that people could find the ingredients for the dishes in their average grocery store. Because chickpea flour is now so common, I could include recipes like those addictive chickpea flour green beans, and the silky, soupy kadhi .
I’m not against chickpea flour entering the mainstream. But I wish that more of the stories I read about it, or the recipes I saw that featured it, didn’t frame it as a brand-new discovery, and completely ignore its heritage.
No one culture can “own” an ingredient — I’m literally writing this with a box of Banza chickpea pasta in my kitchen cabinet — but let’s not treat food like it exists in a vacuum. There’s context for that chickpea flour flatbread you’re making for dinner. Don’t take it for granted.
Priya Krishna is a food writer who contributes to The New York Times, Bon Appétit , and others. She also serves as one of the hosts of Bon Appétit’s video series, From the Test Kitchen . She is the author of the cookbook Indian-ish: Recipes And Antics From A Modern American Family . Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @ PKgourmet Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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How to Make Preserved Lemons

How to Make Preserved Lemons
Preserving Lemons is easy! All you do is cut washed lemons in quarters, saturate them with kosher salt, and smash them in a clean jar! Let them naturally ferment on the counter for several days and up to 3 weeks. Stir bits of lightly salty bright preserved lemon into soups, greens, grains, and more and your taste buds will be forever delighted!
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Lemons preserved in a salty lemon brine are a staple in Moroccan, Middle-Eastern, and Southern Indian cuisines. Sometimes they are called pickled lemons. As the lemons ferment in their salty juice, the bitterness of the peel transforms into a softened bright intense lemon flavor that enhances all kinds of food! What kind of lemons can I use for preserved lemons? You can use regular lemons or Meyer lemons. Meyer lemons are the citrus hybrid of lemon and orange. They are tiny bit sweeter, and in my experience, a lot juicier than regular lemons. I recommend organic lemons because any pesticide residue will be in the skin, and that’s what preserved lemons are–salt-fermented lemon skins. Whatever lemons you choose, wash them well! The skins of almost all citrus, organic too, are waxed for longer shelf life. How long do preserved lemons last? Don’t feel like you have to hurry and use them up before they go bad. Preserved in salt, lemons will keep for about a year in the refrigerator. Start seeking recipes that would love a bright lemon flavor bump, and put those recipes in your menu plan. In Morocco, preserved lemons are left at room temperature, but it’s safer to refrigerate the jar after the lemons ferment for a time. On the counter or in the fridge, always make sure the squashed lemons are covered with the salty lemon juice. What can I do with preserved lemons?
Try adding bits of preserved lemon just about anywhere you’d be using lemon zest. Heighten the flavor of soups, salads, sauces, dips, and dressings. *** Before chopping preserved lemons give them a quick rinse under cool water to remove excess salt. Stir bits of chopped preserved lemon into Very Brown Rice . Add to Pinto Beans for a Moroccan-inspired side dish. Finely chopped, they bring an exotic note to hummus salad dressing. When you make simple vinaigrette in the blender, blend in a teaspoon of preserved lemon pieces. You will love the flavor preserved lemons bring to fresh tomato salsa ! Preserved lemons and beets are a flavor match made in heaven! Try them stirred into whole wheat parsley fettuccine or other pasta dishes.
Have you come across recipes calling for preserved lemons, and either decided not to try the recipe or just leave out that ingredient? That used to be me. Not any more. Once I learned how easy they are to make, I keep finding more ways to include their unique bright flavor in my cooking!
Make it a flavorful day–get in the kitchen and try something new! Thanks for being here. To get my latest recipe posts and exclusive monthly newsletters, subscribe here . (I hate Spam too and will never share your email with anyone.) Follow me on Instagram ! It’s my favorite! Peruse my Pinterest boards for more vegetarian recipe ideas. Find daily vegetarian and healthy living ideas on my Facebook page.
PS If you make preserved lemons and love them, please consider leaving a blog post comment. Your comments help other readers learn more about the recipe. If you’d also give the recipe a rating, I’d be delighted! 5 from 1 vote How to Make Preserved Lemons Prep Time

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Amazing Experience; Wonderful Food

I have been visiting Marriott Group of Hotels for years now but can easily confirm this in by far the best amongst them. In terms of the quality of service there are few areas of improvement, particularly when it comes to the promptness in addressing customer requests by their house-keeping staff. There were few instances when I had to wait for almost two hours to get a bottle of water (in spite of repeated reminders to them) or instances when they just forgot to keep bottles of water in my room after cleaning up the room. Also, they could have considered my request to accommodate me for one additional day, either in Le Meridien or any other of their group hotels (e.g. Westin) which are close to this hotel; since my flight was cancelled and I had to stay over in Mauritius for one additional day. But was unfortunately unable to get a room and had to shift to Holiday Inn, near the Airport. nnHowever, these were minor spoilers at the best and all the concerns or complaints I had were easily mitigated by the excellent food prepared at the Indian restaurant “Cumins”. We had requested for a special meal (Jain food) and from my experience of years of travel I can easily say it is really difficult to get an authentic indian cuisine (forget about jain food) abroad. However, during every single day of our stay (we stayed there for 6 nights) we were treated with some of the best indian (and jain) food, specially prepared for myself, wife and son by the Chef Shajuddin Khan and his team. They went out of their way to make us feel at home; btw the dinner on out last day there was the best. It was specially prepared by three chefs (again pure jain), one dish by each of them, just to ensure the most memorable dining experience we have ever had. The highlight though was an insightful discussion with Mr. Khan on our last day which went for over an hour; he is an extremely passionate chef, loves his work and will go to any length to ensure our trip stays in our mind for years to come. I can vouch that one would never come across such hospitality in any other hotels and Cumins certainly is the best Indian restaurant at least in African Continent. If anyone wishes for authentic Indian food just go ahead and book a room in this hotel..nnApart from food, the rooms are also really spacious; I had specifically requested for a room on ground floor and had booked an Ocean/Garden view room. It has direct access to the beach. There are numerous in-house activities in the hotel itself which will easily keep one occupied for at least a couple of days; unfortunately we couldn’t enjoy all of them due to our busy trip schedule which left us with minimal time to explore the hotel. nnTo summarize, Le Meridien easily deserves a 5* rating, primarily because of the hospitality of Mr. Khan and his team and an array of activities in the hotel, notwithstanding the few issues I came across during my stay.. Will be there again soon for sure.

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How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation?

How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation? By Priya Krishna • 21 hours ago Chickpea flour is gaining attention thanks to its gluten-free binding properties. But the ingredient has been a staple of cooking for Indians, Pakistanis and many others for centuries. Pinkybird / Getty Images
There’s a specific section of my family’s fridge that is reserved for the large, seemingly bottomless tub of chickpea flour — or as we and lots of other Indians who also rely on it call it, besan — that my parents keep on hand. We’re not gluten-free, nor do we do a lot of baking. Yet chickpea flour shows up everywhere in our food. It’s the nutty coating for my mom’s green beans spiced with earthy ajwain , the key ingredient in her creamy, tangy, yogurt-based soup, kadhi , and the base for our favorite variety of laddoos , sweet, fudge-like balls flavored with ghee, sugar and nuts.
Across the many regional cuisines in India, chickpea flour is a common denominator: Gujaratis turn it into pudla , thin, savory crepes laced with turmeric and chilies. In Karnataka and Maharashtra, it can be found in jhunka , a spicy porridge. And in Andhra Pradesh, it is the thickener in Senagapindi Kura , an onion-heavy stew. For the country’s large vegetarian population, where eggs are often considered non-vegetarian, chickpea flour mixed with water serves as a convincing omelet replacement.
Indians — along with the Nepalese, Pakistanis, Italians, the French, and many others — have been cooking with chickpea flour for centuries. Americans, on the other hand, only seem to have woken up to the ingredient in the last decade or so. And they’ve woken up in a big way.
It’s hard to trace the exact origin of chickpea flour’s sudden popularity in the U.S. Anna Stockwell, the senior food editor of the publications Epicurious and Bon Appétit , said she first started seeing chickpea flour around 2009 on gluten-free blogs. Stockwell is gluten-free herself, and was excited to find a recipe for savory chickpea pancakes.
She didn’t know much about chickpea flour’s culinary heritage, but she was immediately excited. “Its binding power was magic,” she recalls. “All you have to do is combine chickpea flour and water, and suddenly you can make flatbread, or fritters or vegetable pancakes.” Still, Stockwell saw it as a niche ingredient — something only gluten-free consumers cared about. She wasn’t even allowed to call for it in Epicurious recipes.
Slowly but surely, that started to change. In 2010, one of the more popular recipes from Plenty , Yotam Ottolenghi’s bestselling cookbook, was a chickpea flour pancake, or socca , as it’s known in France, layered with tomatoes and onions. In 2015, food and fitness writer Camilla Saulsbury wrote the popular book The Chickpea Flour Cookbook . That was followed a year later by Chickpea Flour Does It All , by blogger Lindsey Love.
Lani Halliday, the founder of Brutus Bakeshop, a gluten-free Brooklyn bakery, says she noticed a huge uptick in the number of chickpea flour-based, gluten-free sweets available about a decade ago. For baked goods, chickpea flour worked uniquely well, “as it can hold air bubbles and hold moisture,” she says. Plus, “it was cheap, it was accessible, and it was versatile.”
Halliday launched her bakery in 2015. One of her bestselling items among both gluten-free and non-gluten-free customers was a chocolate cupcake made with chickpea flour.
Stockwell believes the mainstreaming of chickpea flour is directly linked to one company in particular — Banza. The company started producing its chickpea flour-based pasta in 2014, and by 2017, it was in 8,000-plus grocery stores and had raised $8 million in funding. The key to the company’s success? It didn’t exclusively market itself as a gluten-free product. Instead, it was branded as health food. And it was one of the first alternative pastas that had a smooth, al dente texture, just like the real thing.
“I had friends who had never heard of chickpea flour, but now they eat Banza,” Stockwell says. “It’s not because they are trying to eat gluten-free but because it’s a delicious and higher-protein pasta. It’s a substitute for empty carbs.”
This year, Epicurious was finally allowed to publish recipes with chickpea flour. Dennis Vaughn, the CEO of Bob’s Red Mill, says that in the past five years, chickpea flour has become a clear bestseller among the company’s sundry flour options.
“My grocery store doesn’t even carry red meat,” Stockwell says, “but they carry Bob’s Red Mill” chickpea flour.
In many ways, it has been weird to watch this ingredient that has always felt so quotidian to me become so ubiquitous so quickly in the U.S. This is certainly not the first Indian ingredient or dish this has happened to. Consider turmeric, chai, or khichdi , which have all been claimed by the wellness community and food bloggers as their own, often times without giving due credit to Indian cuisine. It baffles me that the vast majority of people I talk to are shocked to hear that chickpea flour has long been a common ingredient in my family’s cooking.
On the other hand, it was important to me when I was writing my new cookbook, Indian-ish , that people could find the ingredients for the dishes in their average grocery store. Because chickpea flour is now so common, I could include recipes like those addictive chickpea flour green beans, and the silky, soupy kadhi .
I’m not against chickpea flour entering the mainstream. But I wish that more of the stories I read about it, or the recipes I saw that featured it, didn’t frame it as a brand-new discovery, and completely ignore its heritage.
No one culture can “own” an ingredient — I’m literally writing this with a box of Banza chickpea pasta in my kitchen cabinet — but let’s not treat food like it exists in a vacuum. There’s context for that chickpea flour flatbread you’re making for dinner. Don’t take it for granted.
Priya Krishna is a food writer who contributes to The New York Times, Bon Appétit , and others. She also serves as one of the hosts of Bon Appétit’s video series, From the Test Kitchen . She is the author of the cookbook Indian-ish: Recipes And Antics From A Modern American Family . Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @ PKgourmet Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org. © 2019 KERA News

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How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation?

How Did Chickpea Flour, A Staple Of Indian Cuisine, Become A Health Food Sensation? By Priya Krishna • 19 hours ago Chickpea flour is gaining attention thanks to its gluten-free binding properties. But the ingredient has been a staple of cooking for Indians, Pakistanis and many others for centuries. Pinkybird / Getty Images
There’s a specific section of my family’s fridge that is reserved for the large, seemingly bottomless tub of chickpea flour — or as we and lots of other Indians who also rely on it call it, besan — that my parents keep on hand. We’re not gluten-free, nor do we do a lot of baking. Yet chickpea flour shows up everywhere in our food. It’s the nutty coating for my mom’s green beans spiced with earthy ajwain , the key ingredient in her creamy, tangy, yogurt-based soup, kadhi , and the base for our favorite variety of laddoos , sweet, fudge-like balls flavored with ghee, sugar and nuts.
Across the many regional cuisines in India, chickpea flour is a common denominator: Gujaratis turn it into pudla , thin, savory crepes laced with turmeric and chilies. In Karnataka and Maharashtra, it can be found in jhunka , a spicy porridge. And in Andhra Pradesh, it is the thickener in Senagapindi Kura , an onion-heavy stew. For the country’s large vegetarian population, where eggs are often considered non-vegetarian, chickpea flour mixed with water serves as a convincing omelet replacement.
Indians — along with the Nepalese, Pakistanis, Italians, the French, and many others — have been cooking with chickpea flour for centuries. Americans, on the other hand, only seem to have woken up to the ingredient in the last decade or so. And they’ve woken up in a big way.
It’s hard to trace the exact origin of chickpea flour’s sudden popularity in the U.S. Anna Stockwell, the senior food editor of the publications Epicurious and Bon Appétit , said she first started seeing chickpea flour around 2009 on gluten-free blogs. Stockwell is gluten-free herself, and was excited to find a recipe for savory chickpea pancakes.
She didn’t know much about chickpea flour’s culinary heritage, but she was immediately excited. “Its binding power was magic,” she recalls. “All you have to do is combine chickpea flour and water, and suddenly you can make flatbread, or fritters or vegetable pancakes.” Still, Stockwell saw it as a niche ingredient — something only gluten-free consumers cared about. She wasn’t even allowed to call for it in Epicurious recipes.
Slowly but surely, that started to change. In 2010, one of the more popular recipes from Plenty , Yotam Ottolenghi’s bestselling cookbook, was a chickpea flour pancake, or socca , as it’s known in France, layered with tomatoes and onions. In 2015, food and fitness writer Camilla Saulsbury wrote the popular book The Chickpea Flour Cookbook . That was followed a year later by Chickpea Flour Does It All , by blogger Lindsey Love.
Lani Halliday, the founder of Brutus Bakeshop, a gluten-free Brooklyn bakery, says she noticed a huge uptick in the number of chickpea flour-based, gluten-free sweets available about a decade ago. For baked goods, chickpea flour worked uniquely well, “as it can hold air bubbles and hold moisture,” she says. Plus, “it was cheap, it was accessible, and it was versatile.”
Halliday launched her bakery in 2015. One of her bestselling items among both gluten-free and non-gluten-free customers was a chocolate cupcake made with chickpea flour.
Stockwell believes the mainstreaming of chickpea flour is directly linked to one company in particular — Banza. The company started producing its chickpea flour-based pasta in 2014, and by 2017, it was in 8,000-plus grocery stores and had raised $8 million in funding. The key to the company’s success? It didn’t exclusively market itself as a gluten-free product. Instead, it was branded as health food. And it was one of the first alternative pastas that had a smooth, al dente texture, just like the real thing.
“I had friends who had never heard of chickpea flour, but now they eat Banza,” Stockwell says. “It’s not because they are trying to eat gluten-free but because it’s a delicious and higher-protein pasta. It’s a substitute for empty carbs.”
This year, Epicurious was finally allowed to publish recipes with chickpea flour. Dennis Vaughn, the CEO of Bob’s Red Mill, says that in the past five years, chickpea flour has become a clear bestseller among the company’s sundry flour options.
“My grocery store doesn’t even carry red meat,” Stockwell says, “but they carry Bob’s Red Mill” chickpea flour.
In many ways, it has been weird to watch this ingredient that has always felt so quotidian to me become so ubiquitous so quickly in the U.S. This is certainly not the first Indian ingredient or dish this has happened to. Consider turmeric, chai, or khichdi , which have all been claimed by the wellness community and food bloggers as their own, often times without giving due credit to Indian cuisine. It baffles me that the vast majority of people I talk to are shocked to hear that chickpea flour has long been a common ingredient in my family’s cooking.
On the other hand, it was important to me when I was writing my new cookbook, Indian-ish , that people could find the ingredients for the dishes in their average grocery store. Because chickpea flour is now so common, I could include recipes like those addictive chickpea flour green beans, and the silky, soupy kadhi .
I’m not against chickpea flour entering the mainstream. But I wish that more of the stories I read about it, or the recipes I saw that featured it, didn’t frame it as a brand-new discovery, and completely ignore its heritage.
No one culture can “own” an ingredient — I’m literally writing this with a box of Banza chickpea pasta in my kitchen cabinet — but let’s not treat food like it exists in a vacuum. There’s context for that chickpea flour flatbread you’re making for dinner. Don’t take it for granted.
Priya Krishna is a food writer who contributes to The New York Times, Bon Appétit , and others. She also serves as one of the hosts of Bon Appétit’s video series, From the Test Kitchen . She is the author of the cookbook Indian-ish: Recipes And Antics From A Modern American Family . Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @ PKgourmet Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org. © 2019 Hawaii Public Radio

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‘Pride, Prejudice, And Other Flavors’ Is More Than Just Reheated Austen

‘Pride, Prejudice, And Other Flavors’ Is More Than Just Reheated Austen By Kamrun Nesa • 13 hours ago Originally published on May 11, 2019 7:00 am
Bollywood meets Jane Austen — in San Francisco! — in Sonali Dev’s Pride, Prejudice and Other Flavors . Neurosurgeon Trisha Raje’s family is Indian American royalty: Not only is her father is an actual prince in India, but her mother is a former Bollywood star and her brother’s running for governor of California.
Trisha’s estranged from her family, but she’s trying to reconnect — and at one of her brother’s fundraisers, she runs into (almost literally) chef DJ Caine, who’s there to cater the event. It’s a fiery meeting, full of anger fueled by misplaced pride, so you can imagine Trisha’s shock when she realizes that DJ is also the protective older brother of one of her patients.
Born in London to Anglo-Indian and Rwandan parents, DJ turned to cooking to cope with the poverty and racism of his childhood. Trisha’s not-so-white privilege gets his defenses up, and their ongoing battle of wills forces them to examine their own positions in society and their biases against each other.
Their story is reminiscent of Austen’s classic novel — both pride and prejudice abound –but calling it a retelling of Pride and Prejudice would do it an injustice. Dev’s sharp voice cuts through the tension to take a sensitive look at class strife and parlay it into a bigger examination of race and privilege from a diverse perspective.
By juxtaposing a first-generation wealthy Indian American against a struggling multiracial Brit, Dev widens our perception of privilege, and shows Trisha coming to terms with her own. It’s important to note the power dynamic between Trisha and DJ: He works for her family, and she holds his sister’s life in her hands. As readers, we can’t help but empathize with DJ’s circumstances — but Trisha’s drive to protect her family and career from a manipulative ex-friend, and the way she goes above and beyond to save DJ’s sister illuminates the true core of her character.
Though the buildup to Trisha and DJ’s happily-ever-after is paved with contentious encounters, the journey feels emotionally fulfilling — it almost seems like Dev’s main concern is tracking her characters’ personal growth, rather than the romance itself. And she uses their slow-burn bond to launch necessary conversations around race and class. ‘Pride’ feels more like a love story about family, redemption, and acceptance than a traditional romance — with food as a running motif. –
In fact, Pride feels more like a love story about family, redemption, and acceptance than a traditional romance — with food as a running motif. Trisha’s improved relationship with her family allows her to open herself up to DJ, and Dev depicts this transformation through DJ’s skills in the kitchen. By fusing different cuisines and pairing complementary spices, DJ — and in turn Dev — shows us that people can come together just as well as DJ’s luscious Arabica bean gelato with dark caramel sauce.
Vivid and deliciously enticing, Dev’s storytelling is layered with emotional depth as she draws us into Trisha and DJ’s story and endears us to the rest of the Rajes — even Trisha’s seemingly awful father. Much like DJ’s dishes, Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors is a flavorful harmony of cross-cultural unions, familial love, and an entertaining ensemble of characters that will leave readers with a serious craving for more.
Kamrun Nesa is a freelance writer based in New York. Her work has been featured in Bustle, HelloGiggles, PopSugar, BookBub, RT Book Reviews , and Alloy . Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org. © 2019 WPSU

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Mumbai Food Memories – Misal in Girgaum – Vinay Health Home

Writing by Vikram Karve from Pune India Mumbai Food Memories – Misal in Girgaum – Vinay Health Home I enjoyed the six Best Years of My Life in Mumbai – six glorious years from the years 2000 to 2006. During these six best years of my life, I lived in EMPRESS COURT – my all time favourite home – the best house I have ever lived in during my entire life. I wish I could have had my retirement home in that lovely neighbourhood – or nearby – but then – can an honest Naval Officer afford a house in South Mumbai…? Maybe a Merchant Navy Officer can afford a house in “So Bo” (South Bombay) – but if you have spent your life honestly serving the nation in the “Fauji” Indian Navy – forget about Mumbai – you will not be able to afford a home in the heart of Pune – and – you would probably have to settle down in some faraway suburb like Wakad or Baner or Kharadi – or in one of those military veteran “fauji ghettos” like Mundhwa, Kondhwa or Mohammadwadi – where most retired service officers have settled down. But in your mind’s eye – you can always hark back – and relive your “good old days” with nostalgia. That is what I did on this lovely morning – during my foodwalk – I reminisced about my glorious Sunday Morning “Food Walks” in Mumbai. Sometime ago – I told you about my favourite Non-Veg Morning Foodwalk in Mumbai. Now – let me tell you about my favourite Vegetarian Morning Foodwalk in Mumbai. MY FAVOURITE VEG MUMBAI FOOD WALK
“ MISAL ” at GIRGAUM (Girgaon) – Mouthwatering Mumbai Memories By VIKRAM KARVE Mumbai is in Maharashtra. You will get all genres and varieties of cuisine in Mumbai. But tell me – where would you go for an authentic Maharashtrian breakfast…? My favorite place is Vinay Health Home (aka Vinay Lunch Home) near Thakurdwar in Girgaum in Mumbai. When I used to stay at Churchgate – I used to walk down Marine Drive towards Chowpatty – cross the road near Taraporewala Aquarium – take the lane between Kaivalyadhama Yoga Centre and Savitribai Phule Ladies Hostel – (the lane is called Income Tax Lane) – cross the railway overbridge at the southern end of Charni Road Station on the Western Railway – walk straight on Thakurdwar Road – cross Girgaum (JSS) Road – and continue walking till I reached Vinay Health Home on my right. Have you ever tasted a dish called Misal …? If you want to know what an authentic Misal tastes like – try the Misal at Vinay. It is the signature dish of the place. In fact – I will say that – in my opinion – MISAL is the signature dish of Maharashtra. The Misal at Vinay Health Home is my favourite Misal. I don’t think anyone else serves a better Misal than Vinay of Girgaum – and – in my opinion – not even the many famous Misals of Pune can surpass the Misal at Vinay Lunch Home. The place is always crowded and you may have to wait for a seat – but the sight of foodies voraciously eating and the gastronomic ambiance will help build up your appetite. The moment you sit down in the shiny bright eatery – with mirrors all around – the waiter will appear pretty fast – and you can order a Misal . The Misal will arrive quickly as service is prompt and efficient. Don’t delve too much on the contents – or the ingredients – which basically comprise an Usal – a Rassa (the spicy curry) – and a zesty garnish of Shev (Sev), Chiwda, Farsan, onions, fresh corriander and green chillies – arranged in three tiers and served with a wedge of lemon. There are two bowls and two spoons. Using both spoons – mix the contents thoroughly – squeeze the lemon – and eat. It’s hot – lip-smacking – and – delicious. Soon your tongue will be on fire – your nose will run – and – your eyes will water – that’s the true test of a genuine Misal . Bash on Regardless. Never try to douse the appetizing zesty fire in your insides by sipping water – or – ruin the gastronomic experience by succumbing to a bite of P av or bread – which they may have the temerity to place alongside your plate of Misal That’s right – never have P av or bread with a misal. Pav with Bhaji or Vada may be fine ( Pav-Bhaji or Vada-Pav ) – but if you want to savor the genuine taste of Misal – and experience the “proof” of the real stuff – it would be tantamount to sacrilege to have Pav with Pisal. Vada-Pav – okay Misal-Pav – it’s a No, No! If you like things less spicy try Dahi Misal . The sweet cool curds (dahi or yoghurt) mixed with fiery chillies, zesty onions and spicy crisp chiwda-shev provide an excellent contrasting symbiosis of tastes and flavours. And – if you do want to have something with Pav – try the Patal Bhaji or Usal. Fresh soft bread ( Pav ) drenched in those delicious gravies – it’s heavenly. You’ll find all the Maharashtrian specialties on the menu – including the Upas (Fast) Food like Sabudanyachi Khichadi and Wade – but you must go there and discover for yourself. There are quite a few exquisite preparations of Pohe too. But do remember to end your breakfast with chilled Piyush or Mango Lassi to savor a sweet end to a delightful repast. If you are looking for authentic value-for-money pure vegetarian Maharashtrian cuisine in Mumbai – head for Vinay – and you will carry mouthwatering memories of the place forever. It has been a long time since I last relished a Misal at Vinay. I wonder if the place still exists. If you are a Mumbaikar – and you live nearby – please do visit Vinay Health Home – and let us know whether the place is still going strong – and does it still serve the same high quality Misal and other dishes. Dear Reader:
If you know of a place that serves a good Misal – please be so good as to let us know. Happy Eating…!!!

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Restaurant Vendors Find New Leads for Restaurants Opening Soon

Restaurant Vendors Find New Leads for Restaurants Opening Soon
Flhip.com has released its latest restaurant openings report, providing restaurant vendors with a sampling of fresh sales and marketing leads that can be found on their website.
Flhip provides regularly updated lead lists, allowing vendors to check for updates at any time. To see leads in your sales area click here .
Click on the map above to see how Flhip can get you in the door first of new restaurants!
Amagansett, NY – Coche Comedor will stand as a year-round eatery, offering elevated Mexican cuisine highlighted by fresh, local ingredients. The restaurant will utilize a woodburning grill and rotisserie to cook roasted chickens, meat and seafood, highlighting the vibrant flavors of Mexican cuisine will be debuting this summer.
Chicago, IL – Superkhana International Yamada and Shah are bringing their long-running Bombay Breakdown pop-up to a permanent location with a fun and modern take on Indian food. The restaurant will focus on dinner, though there’s potential for a late-afternoon happy hour (or a “samosa hour” as Yamada described, referring to the fried savory pastry stuffed with potatoes and peas) The restaurant is now slated to open sometime in June
Midland, GA – The Simple Greek Mediterranean-style chain restaurant, could open as early as this summer at Lakeside Village in Midland. The menu includes traditional gyro, chicken gyro, grilled steak and grilled chicken as well as vegetables, cheese, sauces and sides like dolmades, tiropita, garlic green beans and spanakopita, to name a few.
Dayton, OH – Wright Cafe The new Wright Café in Vandalia has had “very good success since opening,” and is gearing up to expand its menu with seasonal offerings in the coming weeks. A grass-roots type of concept with an outstanding menu where a family or group can get a very reasonable bang for their buck,” its founder Michael Dixson told this news outlet.
Evansville, IN – Drake’s The Promenade on Evansville’s East Side is getting a new development.Drakes filed paperwork to build a new restaurant planned opening for later on in 2019. This new restaurant concept featuring a diverse menu and craft beers on tap.
Waterville, ME – Mé Lon Togo Bistro plans to open mid-May at 220 Main St, guests will eat at antique wooden tables that mimic the style of a family dining room. Owner Jordan Benissan hopes to bring a combination of the traditional cooking skills he learned from his mother in his home country of Togo and various techniques and styles he picked up working in American. hopes the unique Togolese-European offerings at Mé Lon Togo will encourage more people to travel to Waterville and experience the central Maine area
or to view the leads in your area, please visit Flhip.com
Contact:

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Restaurant Visit #4 May 7 2019

SAN IDLI – South Indian Vegetarian Cuisine LITTLE INDIA
sanidli.com
The picture to the left shows 3 Idli and a Dosa along with chutneys for dipping. The Idli is a steamed cake and the Dosa is a crisply thin crepe; both are made from fermented rice and lentil batters.
Most of the Indian restaurants we are familiar with in San Diego serve North Indian cuisine and we are just beginning to learn about SOUTH Indian Cuisine. Basically, more bread (chapati, naan) is eaten in the North, and more rice is consumed in the South. Also meat appears on tables in the North, while the South remains mostly vegetarian. South Indian cuisine is also known for its snack-like dishes like the Idli and Dosa shown here, and coffee is more common than tea (chai).
At SAN IDLI southern cuisine is offered with a wide choice of these snack-like dishes. Dosa, Uttapham (pancake with ingredients in the batter), and the Idli which appears in the restaurant’s name. Rice appears in many forms here: the posted Weekday Specials offer your choice from Lemon Rice, Tamarind Rice, Coconut Rice, and Curd (yogurt) Rice. Other rice specialties are Pongal and Bisi Bele Bath where rice is enhanced with legumes and other ingredients.
No handout menu is available, but there are good pictures and descriptions of menu items on the website (above). The Weekday Special mentioned above is $12.99 and includes your choice of one of the rices mentioned; plus an Idli OR Vada; plus a Dosa OR Uthappam; plus a papad (savory fried cracker), coconut chutney, yogurt, pickled lemon, and a semolina dessert.
SAN IDLI is favored by native Indian diners for its fresh housemade chutneys, the coconut chutney being a specialty. Most foods are cooked bland to be elaborated with chutneys while eating. This applies for Idli (rice cakes), Dosa (crisply crepe), Vada (lentil flour “doughnuts” and just about anything served here.
Gluten sensitive folk can eat safely at South Indian restaurants, as most, not all, of the items are made with other-than-wheat flours, chiefly rice and lentil flours.
HOW TO GET THERE: SAN IDLI is in Little India, the area of Black Mountain Rd off Miramar Rd. This is just the third traffic light west from I-15 on Miramar Rd. Be sure to take Miramar ROAD and NOT Miramar WAY.

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