Nghe An leaves deep impression on foreign tourism reporters

Nghe An leaves deep impression on foreign tourism reporters

Nghe An leaves deep impression on foreign tourism reporters VNA Print The delegation in Khe Kem waterfall in Nghe An’s Con Cuong disitrict (Photo: baonghean.vn) Nghe An (VNA) – Foreign tourism reporters are touring different destinations in the central province of Nghe An on September 7 and 8 within the framework of the authorities’ programme on promoting local tourism. The trip, co-organised by the Tourism Departments of Nghe An and Ho Chi Minh City, gathers reporters from eight countries, namely Turkey, Germany, the Philippines, Russia, India, the Republic of Korea, Japan, and Austria. The delegation is visiting a series of popular destinations such as the Kim Lien special national relic site in Nam Dan district which is the birthplace of late President Ho Chi Minh and where he spent his childhood; as well as the Pu Mat national park, Khe Kem waterfall, and Khe Ran community-based eco site in Con Cuong district. They are expected to write articles on their experiences from the trip. Olga Mamonova from Russian Travel Digest magazine lauded the local hospitality, unique cuisine, and beautiful landscapes. De Rupanjana from the Indian-based Touriosity Travelmag magazine noted it is her first travel to Vietnam, a land of delicious food and friendly people. Vietnam holds great potential to attract Indian tourists, she stressed, adding that she will share her interesting experience from the trip with her readers. Famous Filipinos tourism blogger Ramos Lacsson Karina Angela said she was greatly impressed by the spectacular Khe Kem waterfall. On September 8, the delegation joined a discussion on Nghe An tourism, suggesting local authorities develop special tourism products, train a workforce capable of communicating in English, and diversify products targeting European tourists, among others. According to Nguyen Manh Hung, head of the Nghe An tourism promotion centre, the local tourism sector has grown significantly in recent years but still falls short of its potential. Particularly, the province’s western area, which houses impressive caves and waterfalls, a series of historical sites, and diverse cultural traditions from local ethnic minorities like Thai, Tho, Mong, and Kho Mu, is little known among international visitors.-VNA Related News

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CT Eats: A spicy escapade at Haveli Indian Cuisine

By Olivia Banc September 08, 2019
Indian and Asian cuisines are always a safe bet for me, as many of their most common dishes are dairy-free and/or gluten-free. There’s one Indian restaurant that I’ve been dying to try because I always pass it on my way to the grocery store. So, this week, I finally got myself to Haveli Indian Cuisine.
A few days a week, Haveli has a phenomenal deal for a $12 all-you-can-eat buffet. I didn’t even know this existed before I got there. I just happened to walk into pretty much my dream scenario. Of course, in true buffet fashion, I could not resist trying at least a bite of almost everything offered. So, I’ll keep my reviews of each individual food fairly short — just a taste of everything.
Additionally — just to point out allergens — I did try a couple of dishes containing wheat, but I went mainly dairy-free for this review. This was fortunately very easy, as the buffet offered tons of vegan dishes. I was especially impressed by how knowledgeable the staff were about the allergens in the dishes as well. So shout-out to the Haveli staff.
To start off with some non-gluten-free offerings, I tried two different “bready” options at Haveli. The free naan was superb — I almost ate half the basket of it. It had a nice buttery taste and a chewy, bready inside contrasted by a light and flaky outside. Totally worth the wheat-induced pain. Also absolutely worth it was the bhatura — for which I went back up for seconds. This one had more of a flaky, pastry texture rather than a bready one, and it was also super buttery and salty. Crisp on the bottom and light and flaky throughout, these were impossible to put down.
Now for vegetable dishes. My companion Ben and I both fell head-over-heels for the aloo tikki. The vegetable filling was rich and warm with spices, and the fried exterior was addictively crispy with a sharp saltiness that highlighted the flavors of all the wonderful spices. Another top vegetable contender was the saag, which was shockingly creamy for a vegan dish with an overall vibe of salty richness and comfort. I also enjoyed the mixed vegetable dish. It had a wonderful warm, tangy flavor and a stewy, creamy texture.
For those who enjoy meat and seafood, I would recommend every such dish I tasted. The shrimp kadal featured well-cooked shrimp in a fresh tomato sauce brightened by punchy spices. From the tandoori mix, I tasted the tandoori chicken, cooked perfectly — moist inside with blackened, crispy outer edges — and seasoned well with a delicate spice mix.
Even more addictive was the chicken biryani. It offered more overall flavor from the spices rather than heat. The chicken soaked in the spices like flavor bombs, while the rice was more subtle, acting almost as a palate cleanser.
I was bursting at the seams, but I just had to fit in dessert. I tried the barfi, which had a surprising, satisfying, almost cheesy tang to it. Above all else though, was the gulab jamun. It was sweet, moist, and spongy. I could have easily eaten an entire plate of just this.
Every step of the way, I was impressed by Haveli Indian cuisine. They not only have a huge variety of incredible food including allergen-free dishes, but also the endless buffet being offered for $12 is a steal if I’ve ever heard of one.
For those of you who are now considering heading over to try Haveli — which you undoubtedly should — I would say the dishes you absolutely don’t want to miss are the bhatura, aloo tikki, chicken biryani, saag, and the gulab jamun. Ben and I decided on the spot that we want to go back to Haveli together at least every couple of weeks to hang out and catch up over their delightful delicacies, so you might catch me back there soon.

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Am I the only person who just can’t stand spicy foods?

I like mildly spicy food, but too much is too much. I’ve had genuine Sichuan cooking in China that was too much. And in Houston I accidentally ate a jalapeno pepper in my food – had the hiccups for half an hour. Allüberall und ewig blauen licht die Fernen! Ewig … ewig … Likes (Received) 1823 I thought the Indian Ghost Pepper was the hottest, but obviously mankind’s insane quest for greater pain has made wondrous progress…. Three teaspoons in my coffee: Likes (Received) 295 Interestingly, all chiles originated in the Americas, so before the 1500s there were none in Asia or Europe. 358 Originally Posted by joen_cph Generally, spicy food isn’t that common traditionally here in Denmark, one will have to seek it out. But I like chili sauce in pita and durum kebabs , for example. Also, Thai food generally, but I only eat it rarely. My superficial impression is that Indian food probably tends to be too strong for me. I don’t remember Japanese or Chinese food to be generally spicy, but don’t eat it often. And you actually have that in Denmark? Originally Posted by EddieRUKiddingVarese Curried Dashhound anyone? As they say: A dog is not just for Christmas. With any luck there’ll be some left over for Boxing Day… 1 So the Sichuan kitchen can be spicy – is it generally, or just in a few cases? Is the usually mild, Chinese food, as it can be found in budget restaurants here in Europe, ‘watered out’ compared to the originals ? Last edited by joen_cph; Yesterday at 09:24 . Reason: typo 18012 Originally Posted by joen_cph So the Sichuan kitchen can be spicy – is it generally, or just in a few cases? Is the usually mild, Chinese food, as it can be found in budget restaurants here in Europe, ‘watered out’ compoared to the originals ? Sichuan food is mostly (very) spicy. “Chinese food” in Europe is a joke, it’s nothing compared to the variety and taste of food in China. China is as big as Europe, and as culturally diverse, including local foods. It’s like talking about “European food” and then only having tasted pizza (and not even real Italian pizza). Allüberall und ewig blauen licht die Fernen! Ewig … ewig … Originally Posted by Clouds Weep Snowflakes And you actually have that in Denmark? Tons of them, from immigrant fast food places, and actually Copenhagen has them for some of the cheapest prices in Europe – I often eat a filling & nice pita with kebab or chicken + salad for 2,4 Euros, on my biking back home say in the afternoon from the city centre. Basically a whole meal for that price, if adding a drink of some sort. Last edited by joen_cph; Yesterday at 18:11 . Reason: Grammar 1 Originally Posted by Art Rock Sichuan food is mostly (very) spicy. “Chinese food” in Europe is a joke, it’s nothing compared to the variety and taste of food in China. China is as big as Europe, and as culturally diverse, including local foods. It’s like talking about “European food” and then only having tasted pizza (and not even real Italian pizza). Thanks. I hope to go there at least once & check out China a bit more, maybe within a couple of years or less. Of course, we have some reputedly more authentic Chinese restaurants here in Copenhagen, but I haven’t frequented them yet. I know that the Sichuan kitchen is considered some of the most famous Chinese food. Last edited by joen_cph; Yesterday at 09:25 . Likes (Received) 41566 Generally speaking, the three most popular Chinese cuisines in the US are Cantonese (mostly not spicy), Sichuan (often spicy), and Beijing (in between). The last two are often found on the same menu. There are quite a few less-known regional cuisines: Shanghai, Shanxi, Fujian, and so forth. Restaurants specializing in these cuisines are rare in most cities. Fortunately, I live next door to the largest American city with a plurality of people boasting East Asian descent, so have the opportunity to experience less-common Chinese menu items. Likes (Received) 4741 I love spicy things – unfortunately, the older I have gotten, the lower my tolerance is. I could eat much spicier things in my younger days, but not now, sadly. I can still enjoy a good hot buffalo wing, though. 4741 Originally Posted by KenOC Generally speaking, the three most popular Chinese cuisines in the US are Cantonese (mostly not spicy), Sichuan (often spicy), and Beijing (in between). The last two are often found on the same menu. There are quite a few less-known regional cuisines: Shanghai, Shanxi, Fujian, and so forth. Restaurants specializing in these cuisines are rare in most cities. Fortunately, I live next door to the largest American city with a plurality of people boasting East Asian descent, so have the opportunity to experience less-common Chinese menu items. My brother-in-law has been dating a Chinese woman who owns a Chinese restaurant in Chattanooga, TN. She gave us some insight as to why so many Chinese restaurants have essentially the same menu, and so many dishes that aren’t truly “Chinese” although they may bear some resemblance. Apparently there is a city where she learned to cook and run a restaurant that essentially serves as a training ground for those looking to come to America to run a restaurant. They learn there to cook all of what we consider to be “Chinese” dishes. Now, I don’t know what percentage of those who have restaurants here learned in that city, but it certainly helps explain the relatively high level of homogeneity in “Chinese” cuisine in the U.S.

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Sound of silence – SUPPLEMENTS News – Issue Date: Sep 16, 2019

The thing that strikes you about the Turkish Airlines business class the wonderful moment you enter is the absence of noise advertisement New Delhi September 6, 2019 ISSUE DATE: September 16, 2019 UPDATED: September 6, 2019 18:07 IST The chefs on board lay out an admirable spread for privilege class passengers.
The thing that strikes you about the Turkish Airlines business class the wonderful moment you enter is the absence of noise. This is in part because of the exceptionally well-trained cabin stewards and in part because of Denon headphones that cancel out external chaos to 99 per cent. Add to that the fact that you can access the internet, watch all the latest films and eat from a well-curated menu and there’s little that’s unimpressive about your home in the sky.
When you are ready to turn in, the cabin crew make your bed, much like someone in a hotel would. The service is attentive without being obsequious and the fully lie-flat seats ensure some shut eye between eating all that food and drinking some fine wine.
Turkish food is similar to Indian cuisine in many ways, given the use of spices, the love for sweet, and the flatbreads that accompany every meal, so even while you fly, you can sample the fare that Turkey has to offer, or choose food that’s closer home. Menus are altered according to the season and all the meals are prepared with consistently fresh, high-quality ingredients. Much like you would tell staff at a restaurant if you had any dietary restrictions or were looking to go vegan or glutenfree for that day, here too the meals are planned keeping several parameters in mind. Add access to the airline’s new lounge in Istanbul to your list and you have a winner, as the sprawling lounge caters to almost every whim and fancy of travellers. www.turkishairlines.com
By Prachi Buchar
Passport to Luxury
A new app lets locals and travellers experience the high-end hotel life without booking a room.
A growing number of working professionals are seeking newer and easier ways to decompress without the commitment of making prior bookings or paying hefty annual fees. LuxePass, a new app that allows you to enjoy all the amenities of a luxury hotel without being a resident, is a flexible way for luxury lovers to plan their leisure time no strings attached. The app, available for both Android and iOS users, lets you book your timeranging from an hour to the whole dayat the pool, gym, spa or salon. The LuxePass gives you access to almost 20 hotels across Delhi NCR and Mumbai including Leela The Roseate House, Hyatt Regency and Le Meridien among others. Yash Malik, founder of the app says, The LuxePass is the easiest way to experience the luxury of a high-end hotel. Its a quick passport to the luxe life. The app is ideal for tarvellers with long layovers, weekend family events and professionals looking for a mid-week pickme-up. www.theluxepass.com
By Jahnavi Chakravarty
Hair Apparent
Everyone loves a little drama especially when it’s in the form of chic hair jewellery. Launched by Priyanka Sanghi, Hair Drama Co. is a niche, aesthetic and fashion forward brand which has been inspired by the rich and powerful history of hair accessories for women. A touch of grace for every occasion, Hair Drama Co.’s aspirational pieces exude a personal style statement for each woman who wears them. The designs uses a range of materials and fabrics such as crystals, metal, chains, leather, lace, velvet and satin where every piece is a unique amalgamation of colours, textures, comfort and unparalleled elegance. Basically, the perfect jewel for your crowning glory.Available at www.hairdramacompany.com
By Akanksha Thirani
Altar ego
Hot on the heels of his latest launch of haute-couture make-up, Manish Malhotra has added another notch on his belt with a foray into bridal jewellery, in collaboration with Raniwala 1881, the heritage jewellery brand from Jaipur. The collection offers a wide array of options spanning across categories such as necklaces, earrings, rings, pendant sets, maangtikas, maathapattis,bracelets, bangles, brooches, buttons, cufflinks for men, among others. The very first chapter of this association pays tribute to the handcrafted beauty of jadau rendered in an expansive range of chandbalis, danglers, studs, jhumkis, kadas, chokers and layered necklaces in an eclectic combination of uncut polkis. Each piece is an ode to the experience and expertise of two creative minds. Price on Request; Available the entire range of jewellery will be available at the designer’s stores in New Delhi followed by Mumbai and Hyderabad.
A Fine Line
Anniversaries are usually the best time to rethink, reimagine and reinterpret the past. Fashion designer Gaurav Gupta seems to have arrived on a similar premise as he launched a couture jewellery brand as an ode to completing 15 years. Gupta interprets his couture language through a sparkle saga with a joint venture with Occasions Fine Jewellery. Fifty handmade pieces were created with precious stones and diamonds in specially crafted white gold mould and showcased during the recently concluded FDCI India Couture Week. The fine jewellery line is expressed through capsuled themes that capture the distinct elementsthe Feather, Forest and Infinity collectionsand draw from the designer’s obsession with nature and birds of flight and freedom. The collection includes necklaces, bracelets, rings, earrings and ear-cuffs.Price on request Available Gaurav Gupta flagship couture store,Mehrauli, New Delhi. Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Do You Like This Story? Awesome!

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Great hole in the wall Mexican Taqueria Guerroro
Great Viet but it’s on the wank Tahn Din
Not hole in the wall but fantastic small plates and pizza at Paladar 511
Good old fashioned NOLA cuisine at Mandina’s
I’ll second Cafe Degas, you can eat at the bar (it’s small) and the bartender will keep you company. The tables on the porch are my faves to sit at because you can people watch.
Can’t go wrong at Lola’s. The sauteed shrimp app is awesome; get the bread and their crazy garlic butter so you can sop up the sauce. Combo paella is on pernt.
Pal’s lounge for dranks. If Budsi Thai is doing her pop-up, can’t go wrong. I’ve been known to eat her food 3xs in a week. Check Pal’s or budsithai insta for sche dule
Saffron NOLA for Indian-creole fusion. Bring your wallet and make a reservation in advance tho
Adolfo’s for crazy rich Creole-Italian. Get there early (5ish), put your name on the list and then go downstairs and have a drink at the Apple Barrel. They’ll come down and scream your name. AB usually has live music too
Too lazy to get links anymore but some other spots:
– Daiwa in Metairie has some crazy good “special fish” that is flown in from Japan bi-weekly. It can take awhile if you order from that menu but if you book an omakase you’ll literally have the owner/chef all to yourself.
– Sazerac Bar or Carousel bar for classic NOLA cocktails
– Guy’s or Liuza’s by the Track for poboys
– Toast is good for breakfast/brunch. I always go to the one near the Fairgrounds but they have a location in the Quarter
_ Atchafalaya is good for brunch too.
– Coquette is good (can get $$$ tho). They just opened up Thalia which is less $, pastas and NOLA food
– I had the most amazing martini (Farmers Market martini) at Bakery Bar last weekend. Hands down prolly the best cocktail I’ve ever had. Their doberge cakes are good too.


That’s all I can think of off the top of my head. I’ll edit if I can think of anything else.

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A Date With Cultural Cuisine

As the festive season approaches with awe and excitement filling the air, Saptapadi Restuarant is here with a whole new menu for all those Bengalis with a hearty appetite. Bengali is not only a sweet language but also a cuisine comprising of sweet yet filling dishes that compel both our minds as well as soul to gorge to their heart’s content. Kolkatans have always been a sucker for culture and the Saptapadi restaurant offers nothing less than auspicious dishes that combine love, culture and lovely dose lively chaos. This adventure has been prepared with aromatic spices and some Bengali touch as the most auspicious event of the year , Durga Puja, approaches.
Spices have always been welcomed in a heartwarming way by the authentic Bengalis and have always played a major role in every meal. Although it was the Portuguese that introduced spices to Bengal, we have embraced it as if it had always been our own. So, as Maa Durga embarks on her wondrous journey to Kolkata, it is our duty to enjoy her smooth sailing welcome and thus, indulge in the myriad of spices and dishes and introduce them to our stomachs or as Bengalis say, “Bhuri”. With every year comes a menu filled with love and affection and this year, Saptapadi has brought us yet another joyful menu of culture as well as mirth and love. A special menu catered with loving hospitality as well as eclectic company has found it’s way to every Bengali individual’s heart. The restaurant is all geared up to serve a range of alluring delicacies to celebrate Durga Puja. The special menu will come into effect from 6th September 2019 at both the outlets of Saptapadi stationed at Purna Das Road and Baghajatin, Kolkata.
The Sharodiya Thali and the Special Sharodiya Thali are the dazzling stars of this celebration. The Sharodiya Thali includes various veg/ non- veg delicacies of Kolkata; it includes Rice/ Pulao, a Vaja(fry) of the day, Veg of the day, Sonali Vekti Fritters, Narkel Murgi Nuggets, Mutton, Chingri, Vekti, salad, chatni, papad and of course, dessert. For those who crave a meal to satisfy larger urges, the restaurant offers a Special Sharodiya Thali which includes Rice/ Pulao, a Vaja (fry) of the day, Veg of the day, Sonali Vekti Fritters, Narkel Murgi Nuggets, Mutton, Ilish, Chingri, Vekti, salad, chatni, papad and dessert.
For the sincerer love of food you cannot miss what Saptapadi has to offer you this Durga Puja. “I wanted to share my own romance with my birth-State’s cuisine to the table. Serving my city’s glorious cuisines to Indian diners has taught me one thing – there is a little bit of Kolkata in everyone. The emphasis is on Bengaliness and everybody wants to be a bit traditional during this time of the year in both attire and food habits. As Bengalis are best known for their love for food, most of us celebrate our special days by enjoying a scrumptious Bengali spread.” said Chef Ranjan Biswas, Owner, Saptapadi. So, if you are a true Bengali come indulge in the colors of the festive season with Saptapadi and fill your heart and “bhuri” with food, joy and a pinch of spice that might just leave you speechless. Location: 49B, Purna Das Road, Kolkata – 700019. G40 Baghajatin, Kolkata 700047. Timings: 12.00 noon- 4pm; 6 pm – 10:30 pm Meal for two: Rs.800/- plus GST (Reported by Anoushka Mukherjee)

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Metatalktail Hour: F D

Good Saturday evening, MetaFilter! This week, with the seasoning changing, I am ready for some NEW FOOD! Tell me what you’re eating! What are you cooking, what are you getting as takeout, what are you eating at fancy gastronomy restaurants? slenderloris is also interested in knowing WHERE you eat and ON WHAT you eat (disposable? Fine china?). Pictures of course welcome! Recipes welcomer! As always, this is a conversation starter, not limiter, so tell us everything that’s up with you! And send me ideas for future metatalktails! posted by Eyebrows McGee to MetaFilter-Related at 5:34 PM (59 comments total) 3 DH and I went vegan a month ago for health and the animals. I’ve been cooking a ton of stuff from pickuplimes.com and her youtube channel. Delightful! I’m still job hunting. Sigh… posted by KleenexMakesaVeryGoodHat at 5:49 PM on September 7 [ 6 favorites ] There’s a local brewery near here that makes some wonderful beer. We’re currently enjoying a growler. And now we’re about to watch Mary and Max. It’s that kind of a night. I hope everyone is having a wonderful weekend. Hug your loved ones. Hug yourself. posted by Fizz at 5:55 PM on September 7 [ 4 favorites ] Oh yes! It went from 80 to 60 here in Maine. We turned the heat on for one cycle last night. Brr! I got a lot of proteins on sale last week: St. Louis style ribs, pork loin, and burger. I put them all in the freezer, as I had made eggplant parm and way too much for 2 people, so we got more than I cared to eat of that! This week: – Tonight. Shopping day. Took frozen carnitas pulled pork out of the freezer, served with Mrs. Renfro’s Green Sauce; – Sunday: Broccoli cheddar soup, with homemade croutons; – Monday: Thai green curry, vegetarian, with zucchini, green bell pepper, chickpeas, maybe tomato and cauliflower, IDK; – Tuesday: Pork Tenderloin with homemade applesauce, farro, and acorn squash. – Wednesday: Probably some leftovers of one the the above or more. – Thursday: Grilled St. Louis style ribs, with grilled Romaine salad on the side. I finally convinced Mr. Mon Dieu that ribs are good, no, it’s not too much work to eat them (as he said about wings, until I made him wings), so when ribs went on sale, I got them. – Friday: This is a dream, I want to make homemade orecchiette pasta, and a meat sauce using Pom strained tomatoes (which I have!), and serving it in a big white bowl, family style, with lots of people enjoying it, and just living live, eating together. It’s just me and my husband, mind you, but I always cook as if there might be guests. posted by Marie Mon Dieu at 5:57 PM on September 7 [ 3 favorites ] It’s almost SOUP SEASON!!! I love making homemade soup and I probably make it once a week in autumn and winter. Favorites include beef/veggie/barley, cream of chicken with wild rice, cheddar-veggie chowder, and lasagna soup. I usually make an enormous quantity and then freeze some in individual portions. It doesn’t take long before I have a big collection in the freezer. I used to get takeout a couple of times a week but I’m on a pretty tight budget these days so it’s down to 1-2 times a month now. As far as where I eat, I live alone so I usually eat on the couch while watching tv. My cat usually sits on the nearby coffee table staring at me. I always use real dishes—I have white stoneware that makes pretty much anything I make look gorgeous and delicious. I love talking about food and look forward to hearing about what everyone else is eating and cooking! posted by bookmammal at 5:58 PM on September 7 [ 4 favorites ] I grew a plot of watermelons for their seed this summer, which means I’m eating an enormous amount of watermelon. Since the dry beans are coming in right now I’m eating up the last of 2018’s. The hens are laying pretty well too, so lots of eggs. It’s a good moment to be living alone. posted by Rust Moranis at 5:58 PM on September 7 [ 2 favorites ] I’m interested to know if people who start work really early actually eat breakfast. I leave for work at five thirty AM most mornings, and all I consume before lunch at eleven thirty is an iced coffee or an orange juice. I love food but not before noonish. posted by Dumsnill at 5:59 PM on September 7 [ 1 favorite ] I made this Smitten Kitchen pasta bake today (sans sausage). It’s super delicious but my kitchen was absolutely sweltering what with the oven preheating, the pasta cooking, and the bechamel going. I’m trying to do all of my cooking on the weekend since I have discovered that I am only willing to microwave things on weeknights. But for dinner tonight I splurged on Amy’s frozen pizza . They are surprisingly delicious and way cheaper than takeout since it’s just me 🙂 For plates, I love-love-love my botanic garden plates . My mom has a set and when she offered to get me some plates for Christmas, I asked for these. I don’t why they make me so happy, but I love them so much, and they make meals feel like home. Plus they wear like iron and don’t chip or scratch at all 🙂 posted by Mouse Army at 6:08 PM on September 7 [ 3 favorites ] Last weekend I made the first batch of my annual roasted tomato sauce, and tomorrow I will make batch #2. I’ll use some of the sauce to make a lasagna for tomorrow’s dinner and freeze the rest to use later. Tonight’s dinner was haddock baked in a hoisin-miso sauce, a cold noodle salad with cucumber, carrot, tomato, and a sesame-lime dressing, and broccoli sauteed with garlic, soy sauce and rice wine. Maybe a little summery given how chilly it was here this morning, but it was 87 degrees here just the other day, so it ain’t fall yet. Last night we went out for Japanese. I had nobeyaki udon and my wife had vegetable maki. posted by briank at 6:10 PM on September 7 [ 1 favorite ] Had some decent fish tacos last night along with two pints of “Larryville Lager”. It’s one of the first brews from a local brewery that is making a different beer for each of Pittsburgh’s 90 neighborhoods. posted by octothorpe at 6:12 PM on September 7 My favorite little meal is whole grain peanut butter toast, with butter you grind yourself at a store, (honey nut roasted at Winco.) With it, a fresh peach sliced, a fine drizzle of honey with pumpkin seeds stuck on, with the honey. For early dinner I had blue corn chips with triangles of white, organic goat gouda, placed just so, and 6 marinated artichoke sections and a few teaspoon sized dollops of organic marinara. I microwaved this into nachos, and had my neighbor’s hatch chili salsa for dunking. I confess I had pastry and tea for dinner. We all know I will go for Popeye’s with the grandson later. *sigh* the food day started well and went downhill. posted by Oyéah at 6:22 PM on September 7 [ 2 favorites ] I have been eating entirely too much takeout/delivery (and have delivery on its way right now! “Avocado relleno” from a local Mexican restaurant). Friends talked up Sun Basket , so I put an order in Thursday, but that won’t start until the week after this coming one. There’s a fancy-ish grocery store with a good deli counter where they’ll make sandwiches. I ordered their Philly cheesesteak sandwich but asked them to sub grilled mushrooms 9which they had in the deli case) for the steak, as I’m pescetarian. The sandwich took for ver, and when I finally started eating it, I discovered she had just added mushrooms to the steak. As I was trying to pick the steak out of the sandwich, I also realized she had left off the onions and peppers, which I had been looking forward to. It was a very disappointing sandwich experience. (I ended up bringing it back to the customer service desk and asking for my money back, which they did. But then I was sandwich-less, because I had already been running late. Sigh.) posted by lazuli at 6:37 PM on September 7 [ 1 favorite ] I’ve been eating strangely and haphazardly lately, but a friend and I made a feast last night! Into a grill basket we threw steak tips marinated in chipotle in adobo sauce, salt, and brown sugar, lamb marinated in a concoction my friend made with about fifteen different ingredients, and ripe yellow pluots. That went over very hot hardwood charcoal until the meat was chewy and juicy and caramelized. Then we grilled peaches, nectarines, and halloumi cheese. Made a giant salad with carrots, beans, herbs, lettuces, and tomatoes from my garden. Steamed small artichokes and made garlic lime butter to go with them. We ate a big pile of these things with delicious Sauvignon blanc and made little crabapple tarts with crabapples from my tree for dessert. I’ve been having a rough summer and this meal was like a great big hug. 6:52 PM on September 7 [ 3 favorites ] Mouse Army (I read that 1st as Mouse Amy), I love Portmerion; I have a giant salad bowl I got years ago, how has it never broken? I have arthritis in my hands and other joints, and now prefer light weight dishes, enamel or glass, but I have a stack of blue and white oriental china bowls that I enjoy using. Yeah, Maine got cold; I had to close all the windows. My favorite hearty chicken soup has a stick of sausage in it, usually chorizo, because I made a clean-the-fridge pot of soup once, and 1 stick of chorizo (sliced and browned) added a ton of flavor, and you get the occasional spicy spoonful. Typing the recipe made me crave it, and I got the ingredients and need the energy to make it, ideally tomorrow. I’ll make a huge pot of it and freeze quite a bit. Thursday I put cauliflower in to roast and forgot to turn on the oven, quite a disappointment for lunch, but cooked it for a late supper, and the rest of it for Friday breakfast. I have been having BLTs on corn tortillas with home-grown tomatoes, arugula from the garden, thick bacon. A few Brandywine tomatoes finally ripened; they are spectacular and sadly did not produce well, making them rather precious. Northern Lights were predicted, so drove to a lake a bit north of us, the cabin faced north, so the aurora would have been sweet. It had settled down, but we laid on the dock and admired the Milky Way in beautifully clear skies, and reflected in the water. 7:15 PM on September 7 [ 4 favorites ] It’s salsa season here, finally! My tomatoes got a slow start and then got attacked by hornworms but in the last few weeks I’ve harvested enough to make salsa a few times and I have a bunch more that are almost ripe. I’m also growing tomatillos this year and I’ve made one small batch of tomatillo salsa. Our favorite salsa is just chopped fresh tomatoes (with excess juice drained off), onion, pepper (serrano or jalapeno), cilantro, lime juice, and a bit of sugar, salt and pepper. I don’t measure anything, just eyeball, taste and adjust. I have a broken arm right now (for the second time this year, FML!) but fortunately my kids love homemade salsa so much they’re willing to help chop. posted by Redstart 7 [ 2 favorites ] My garden is in the final throes of summer and I’ve got more butternut squash, hot peppers, eggplant and cherry tomatoes than I know what to do with. There will be no more after these, but right now it’s just Too Much All At Once. I made these butternut squash coconut muffins today and they’re delicious though don’t really use up that much squash. Tomorrow I’ll probably put some squash on a pizza along with figs, arugula and goat cheese. We do have a tiny little fig tree that has like two tiny little figs on it, but it’s also figs-at-trader-joes season. The cherry tomatoes are mostly destined to be dried in the oven and chucked in the freezer. All my sauce tomatoes went kerblooey this year, so I’ve not been able to put any sauce up, which bums me out. I made a batch of honey roasted red jalapeno hot sauce tonight that blew the top of my head off (I’m a hot sauce lightweight though). I’ll probably make baba ganoush tomorrow and take that to work for lunch all week, as I’ve been doing for the past month (so! many! eggplants!). Climate change has wreaked merry havoc on my basement (water water everywhere) but the tropical veg in the garden has been quite happy. The chickens are fixing to molt so egg production is down and I think one of my girls is pretty much in henopause. I like her, though, so we’ll see whether she kicks back into gear in the spring. This all sounds like I’m dressed in gingham living on a farm, but I’m on a wee 3000sq ft lot in the city. We pack a lot in and I spent a lot of time today reclaiming my back yard from dying butternut squash vines. posted by soren_lorensen at 7:50 PM on September 7 [ 6 favorites ] I’m trying to bake eggless brownies and they keep flopping. Anyone here have tips? I’m currently trying EnerG Egg Replacer specifically with a recipe it’s supposed to work with, but I did something wrong and it’s all soupy. posted by eirias at 7:55 PM on September 7 Thing to add: Seattle is having a glorious thunderstorm right now – we hardly ever get them, so it’s a big deal! – and I’m standing barefoot under my patio umbrella, drinking a Space Dust IPA from a beautiful soda-fired beer glass made by one of my favorite potters and taking in the gorgeous chaos. A . 8:18 PM on September 7 [ 6 favorites ] You can grind nuts, like pecans to a heavy cream with water, and use it as egg sub. Look up the fluid measure of one evg, so you don’t go over on the liquid. posted by Oyéah at 8:35 PM on September 7 [ 1 favorite ] I just bought an apartment so I’m really looking forward to outfitting the kitchen the way I want and not having to deal with shorty refrigerators, etc. I make pizza maybe once a week, on Sunday morning, during the cooler months, and I’m excited about finally using a pizza stone. I never wanted to get one before because the thought of schlepping it from apartment to apartment wasn’t especially appealing. Im also looking forward to making another sourdough starter and baking bread with the stone. posted by holborne at 8:43 PM on September 7 [ 3 favorites ] My daughter got her own apartment for her senior year of college, and she’s definitely inherited mama’s frugal gene to which she has added her own…idiosyncrasies. We got her a basic starter set of cookware, and she wanted mostly cheap plastic dishes and cups and so on (and promptly discovered that tomato sauce will stain plastic bowls like whoa). So far she’s been basically making a pot of chicken and vegetable soup every morning and just eating on that all day, along with bread and my homemade jams. She knows how to do basics like rice and eggs, and we’d talked about how to cook dried beans, but apparently she got the message about soaking them overnight but not the part about cooking them for a couple of hours on their own after soaking. She wondered why they were too crunchy still when she added them to her soups. Meanwhile mama is still trying to figure out how to enjoy cooking for one when she’s got too much other non-food stuff on her plate. Lately I’ve just been cooking a few times a week, making several servings of one or two one pot meals like spaghetti or chili or stirfry of some sort. After 35 years of nightly cooking, It’s a struggle to find the motivation to try new things. I feel like I’m about 5-10 years away from just buying Lean Cuisines and yoghurt by the case each week. posted by drlith at 9:15 PM on September 7 [ 2 favorites ] As I mentioned on AskMe some time ago, I have moved to a smallish central Iowa town for a new job. The vegetarian options are… unfortunate. There’s nowhere very interesting to go for lunch, which is annoying, but the silver lining is that I am cooking and bringing my lunch more. Lately that’s been: -Veggie paella (an unexpected disaster) – Soupe au pistou (Great the first and second day, but bit by bit the sogginess of the celery took over) – Chickpea sunflower sandwich , which is great (chickpeas make a decent tuna fish substitute) but I will have to remember to soak the chickpeas in the future because I don’t love canned chickpeas. (Even when I rinse them.) MeFites, hit me with your leftover-friendly vegetarian recipes? This week I plan to make either an apple galette or a ginger stout cake for a literary event. I haven’t done any baking since I moved, so I’m looking forward to it! posted by Jeanne at 9:46 PM on September 7 [ 1 favorite ] I do all my cooking for the week on Sundays, so the timing for this is perfect. This week we’re having: 1) Mussels in lemon-tomato sauce. Lotsa garlic and white wine as well. 2) Lime-baked sweet potato tacos with guac 3) Eggplant and chicken tagine 4) Burmese egg and okra curry 5) Was going to be charred baby octopus salad with lemon thyme salsa, but I got groceries delivered this week and in what I’m sure is a total coincidence, the two most expensive items I bought never got to my door. Sigh. $70. They better refund me. Huge week at work coming, and my foot has taken running off the menu; I’m feeling nervy as hell and I can’t run it out, boo. I’m interested to know if people who start work really early actually eat breakfast. I make bircher muesli with steel cut oats and fruit salad the night before, then eat at my desk when I get in. posted by smoke at 9:59 PM on September 7 [ 1 favorite ] on the going out front we are progressing nicely on Phase 2 of our “get to know the local places” project. this is where we pick a street close by the apt and systematically eat at every single restaurant (no takeaway places allowed under our project’s “rules”). Most of the places have been OK, no bad meals yet and a couple of newly discover gems that we can’t wait to get back to. I took a small project sidestep last month as a had the chance to eat at noma . their new place is just gorgeous and you have the feeling of being totally away from everything. it was the tail end of the summer “vegetarian” menu and I surprised myself by thoroughly enjoying all 16, no-animal-proteins-involved, courses. on the home front i recently learned how to make fresh pasta so that has been fun (so easy!) and as scandinavia is actually getting colder now I am moving towards more braised dishes. Also making a ton of pies with the plentiful apples 🙂 posted by alchemist at 10:03 PM on September 7 [ 2 favorites ] Jeanne, the vegetarian paella reminded me of Budget Byte’s Spanish Chickpeas and Rice , which is kind of paella-like and which I’ve been meaning to make again for a while. It definitely works as leftovers. posted by lazuli at 10:05 PM on September 7 [ 2 favorites ] This week, with the seasoning changing, I am ready for some NEW FOOD! Eyebrows , I see what you did there… I just want to know if it was on purpose or an, er, foodian slip. My first couple of weeks as a full-time freelancer have been stressful–missing my job (at least a few colleagues) much more than I thought I would, feeling lonely and doubtful, the works. Also right now it’s so hot, I mean it’s so. hot. It doesn’t leave much energy to do anything. My husband’s staying with his parents tonight, which is another lonely-making factor in itself but does mean that I can make myself Thai curry using my last veranda habanero (too spicy for him) and gorge on it: chicken, eggplant, bamboo shoots, baby corn, shiitake, habanero, rice, etc. When I was single I ate this literally two or three times a week (I’d make a big pot and keep eating it) and it’s one of the few things I really miss now I’m married. One thing I have converted my husband to is my peculiar variety of tuna salad, an excellent summer dinner: tuna, chickpeas, red onion, and black olives, plus garlic sauteed in olive oil and added oil and all. Dressed with red vinegar for me and ponzu for him, served with a side of sauteed brussels sprouts or asparagus. Good fortune and delicious food to all… posted by huimangm at 10:22 PM on September 7 [ 5 favorites ] For my, uh, friends, this month’s meat set was Jalapeño garlic bacon, cured with jalapeños from my garden, smoked with hickory Buckboard bacon, which is bacon made from the shoulder instead of the belly, cured with brown sugar, black pepper, and a hint of molasses Super garlicky kielbasa, with 3x the normal amount of garlic I normally use for kielbasa. You could kill a vampire with them And bacon jam. I mean, you spend all that time hand slicing bacon, you’re going to have all those end bits that won’t fry well, and yeah, I could just keep putting them on salads and in Mac and cheese, but why not share the wealth? Bacon Jam, a recipe Chop up a bunch of bacon ends (lardons, if you’re being fancy) and cook them down in the biggest fry pan you have, until they’re crunchy bits of bacon love swimming in a pool of bacon fat. Remove them from the fat, set them aside in a strainer. Fill the pan til overfull with onions sliced as thin as you can get them, and caramelized the hell out of them. Like, set up a tablet in the kitchen, you’re going to be there for about an hour. Salt the onions, it helps draw out the liquid and speeds up the process a bit. When the onions are on their way to brown, soft, and slushy, add one really, really well minced jalapeño and a really solid sock of ground black pepper. Keep going, this takes forever. When the onions are as brown as you have patience for, add a quarter cup of brown sugar, and mix well, cooking the sugar into the onions. Before it starts to burn, add a quarter cup of cheap bourbon, cook down, and add a couple glugs of balsamic vinegar. Return the bacon chunks, stir well. Let cool a bit, then use a food processor to get to a consistency like jam. Spread it on the inside of the bread for a grilled cheese, or mix into a cream sauce pasta. Don’t mention what you’re eating to any insurance person. posted by Ghidorah at 10:48 PM on September 7 [ 11 favorites ] I usually have Huel for breakfast and lunch during the work week because it’s vegan, gluten-free, cheap, nutritionally complete and saves me time but lately I’ve been switching to porridge/oatmeal in the morning at work. As an American in the UK, this has prompted some funny conversations with coworkers around how we do things differently. But because I was raised in an atypical home, I often have no idea if this is a US thing or a ‘my parents are weird’ thing. So I end up sitting there with my coffee mug filled with thick oatmeal (and not coffee, just using a mug because handle) made from hot water, contemplating whether to add butter (which the British refer to as ‘weirdly savoury’ but I find to be a childhood comfort and makes the porridge more like an oatmeal cookie, which is also not a common thing in these parts anyway) and a splash of milk on top of it all. I’m pretty sure the British are right on this one. After all, my tea making practices were an absolute abomination until I learnt some common sense and decency . posted by iamkimiam at 11:12 PM on September 7 [ 3 favorites ] Oh and I passed my ‘Life in the UK’ test the other weekend, which means I’m slightly better at the traditional pub quizzes around here. And I can apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain soon. If the wheels don’t fall off before then. posted by iamkimiam at 11:16 PM on September 7 [ 3 favorites ] Supposedly the first day of spring was 1 September, but it’s still blustery and rainy in Wellington. So today (Sunday) was comfort day: treats for the team: Chocolate chip cookies dinner: spatchcock chicken with blue cheese mashed potatoes. No pics, sorry! posted by lemon_icing at 1:17 AM on September 8 [ 2 favorites ] I’m running out of money, so I’m working on eating yet more cheaply than I already did. The challenge for me is to eat healthy, tasty vegetarian food for dirt cheap, without having to spend hours and hours in the kitchen. The past couple days my breakfasts have started with a bowl of 10-grain hot cereal (currently I’ve been using Bob’s Red Mill, but I’m going to see if bulk oats work out to be cheaper still). After that I’ll have a couple eggs fried in olive oil, over a generous portion of cooked chopped spinach or mixed greens. The spinach/greens is a nice one because I can buy it frozen for cheap, and I’ll eat about half a bag in a sitting, so it’s like maybe 50 cents or a dollar. I cook it with a generous tsp of Better Than Buillon vegetable stock paste and a bunch of black pepper, so it’s nicely seasoned, very quick and easy to make, and hella cheap. The eggs I buy are a little expensive, but supposedly they’re humanely raised, so I see that as something of a worthwhile expense (and there’s always eggs from the people at the farmer’s market, but those are a little pricier still, I think). Literally the one thing I’ve accomplished this year is that I’ve gotten more confident cooking Indian food, and now that I have a full compliment of spices, it’s pretty cheap for me to make a huge batch of dal, with a couple different varieties. It takes a little while, but I can hang out and do other stuff while it’s simmering. I’ve even been confident enough to improvise a little, which says a lot for me; I forgot to bring my toor dal with me when I was housesitting, so I can’t make that for a while, but a little while ago I made a decent dish of chana dal with spinach. A big batch will last me a few days at least, and I don’t know exactly how much it costs me, but I know it’s insanely cheap. The most expensive ingredients, by far, are the onion and tomato. I’m trying to figure out if there’s a way to buy bulk frozen diced tomato, since canned tomato doesn’t seem to taste right. I’m also very happy to buy my rice at the Indian grocery, where I can buy 10 pounds of high quality Basmati rice for about $13. At this point I’ve made so much jeera rice that I can whip that up blindfolded, but a good quality rice is good on its own, too. I can vary that with brown rice, barley, bulgur, or couscous, all of which can be purchased in bulk and keep practically forever. For variety and laziness, I also bought a bulk bag of Quorn chicken nuggets. One bag lasts me a little while, and it’s pretty easy (and again, cheap) to have 7-8 of those with some frozen broccoli or something. For ultimate laziness, I can have someone pick me up a 12 pack of Annie’s box mac n cheese for like $10 from Costco. But! If I want to have a nicer pasta dish, I learned how to make decent fettuccine alfredo. My one splurge here was a block of nice parmesan, which was like $14, but is good for maybe 6-7 meals at least. But this recipe is literally just pasta, water, salt, butter, cheese, and black pepper. Comes together really quickly. It’s this Bon Appetit recipe, if you’re curious. Pretty soon I’ll try making the Marcella Hazan marinara recipe, famous for its simplicity, which conveniently translates to cheapness. My next major goal is to finally try making my own fake meats (I posted an AskMe about it earlier this year, but that project got sidelined by major life changes). I think it’ll be way cheaper than buying stuff like Field Roast sausages, because I can buy vital wheat gluten and nutritional yeast in bulk. The one thing is that it seems kind of time-consuming, in that you have to steam stuff, but thrift is a great motivator for me, and I think I can make this happen. Well anyway, I could go on, but this is where I’m at, food-wise. Other than that, I’m having problems with my bike and probably need to get a new frame, if not a new bike altogether. Not happy about the expense, but the bike was free, and I figure it’s worth the investment, since it’s my primary mode of transportation. I’ve had some health issues for a little while, but I’m slowly easing back into my daily riding schedule. I’m sure having a new or newish, nicely-tuned-and-oiled bike will help shapes that haunt the dusk at 1:29 AM on September 8 [ 4 favorites ] I eat bachelor chow, which is a combination of basically one meal a day and it’s hard to cook for one and keep fresh things in the fridge / freezer without hitting the “should I still eat this” question. So it goes like eat the same thing for 4 days, eat something else the next 4 days. All hunter-gatherer like (ugg). One pound of ground beef and you’re eating hamburgers or tacos or manwich for the next few days or it will go bad. Lately I’ve been really lazy and it’s been corndogs and pizza from the freezer. Week before it was sandwiches. The norm is rice and beans and broccoli. It all comes down to avoiding spoilage and freezer burn and uggg zengargoyle caught pizza deal today, eat pizza, with a dash of use that can of pineapple and those jalapenos that have been there forever and put some extra parm on it. Sorta wish I had a couple more people who eat three meals a day to cook for. +++ Rough week. During my failed attempt at a grand tour of family summer vacation I learned that my mother’s husband had had a stroke and I should sorta deal with my sisters because mom has her hands full at the moment. My trip failed miserably. Now I find out MH has brain cancer and only a couple of months and is going into hospice care soon. I have to make maybe that final call sooner than later. We have let’s say some history and I’m not particularly good at this sort of thing. It’s all been hashed out and settled before, but it’s still going to be a bit of an ordeal wishing someone off. posted by zengargoyle at 1:46 AM on September 8 [ 4 favorites ] I am divorced. I was stuck with the fine china we got for our wedding. Ex did not want it and I did not want to toss it out. I use the plates whenever I get takeout. Any and all takeout. When the kids were younger and still living here, I would even put the rare trip to McDonald’s on them. Chicken nuggets and tons of ketchup on fine china with gold leaf edges just seems right. For some reason, I have never broken one. I have not tried, but I have chipped or cracked my “everyday” dishes regularly to the point I now use Correlle. The only time I do not use the fine china for takeout is when my GF is over. She does not like using the marital, pattern chosen by ex-wife, china. She’s not wrong about that. Now I have to confess I love my eating utensils. I have had them since 1992. The forks are perfectly balanced. They are heavy without being too heavy. The pattern is simple and plain. The spoons, both the soup and the teaspoons are also perfectly weighted. Actually, I do not have but 2 of the original teaspoons. The other 8 or 10 were lost over the years and when I say lost, I mean my kids took them to their room when they were sneaking food upstairs and got lost in their rooms or even thrown out to hide the evidence. I ordered replacements on Replacements.com, but those turned out to be cheap copies or not the same ones I had despite the claims to the contrary. Don’t get me started on glasses. Drinking glasses that is. I am a firm believer in them being heavy and solid. I actually have about two dozen of the same ones. I have ones I got at Ikea. (The ex took the family’s glasses when she left.) I was at Ikea buying stuff for the house after she left and took with her beaucoup of our belongings. I was having a party too with some friends who were in a band playing in the backyard and me BBQing away. I was going to buy a shitload of Red Solo cups as one does for a backyard party that included a keg and lots of summer drinks like vodka-lemonade, but when I was at Ikea I found some glasses I really liked and they were like $0.55 each. I purchased 100 of them. I put them out on the counter next to the bar stacked in a large pyramid with the glasses turned upside down, and told every one to use them and take as many as they wanted home when they left. That was about 12 years or so ago. I have 24 left. I probably had about 50 or so after the party. I like my food spicy. Very spicy. Teeth and hair sweating spicy. GF likes her food bland. Very bland. Sharing is not happening. I add my homemade hot sauces to pretty much anything. Even my salad dressing is spicy. The food is just a delivery vehicle for my spice. I have also been eating PB&J sammies lately. My son was home for a few days and he asked me to get a loaf of bread and he was making them. We spent a lot of time discussing technique and PB to J ratios. His mother was a spread the jelly on the peanut butter person which is just insane. The key to a successful PB&J is to spread the jelly on its own side of the bread and then put the two together, not use one piece for both and then add a top. We can discuss different types of jelly or adding additional things into the sammie, but my son and I were sticking to the basic, traditional, cannot be beat, smooth Jif peanut butter, Welch’s grape jelly on Martin’s potato bread. posted by AugustWest at 2:03 AM on September 8 [ 5 favorites ] I’m trying to bake eggless brownies and they keep flopping. Anyone here have tips? I’m currently trying EnerG Egg Replacer specifically with a recipe it’s supposed to work with, but I did something wrong and it’s all soupy. Applesauce (1/3 c per egg, if I recall correctly) works, though the brownies definitely tend towards the fudgy end. posted by hoyland at 2:57 AM on September 8 [ 1 favorite ] Thanks for the eggless baking tips, all. In the end I went with “husband gives the eggless brownies a try, knocks it out of the park, meanwhile eirias goes to sleep and gets up at 5 to make the eggy ones.” posted by eirias at 3:17 AM on September 8 [ 1 favorite ] Every Saturday I take my kids to this Japanese grocery store that has a takeout section that features all these prepared meals and snacks, including delicious sushi, bento boxes, curries, karaage, and onigiri. And one of my kids is on the spectrum, which affects her diet. She is practically a vegetarian because she hates the texture of meat. The only exception to that rule seems to be salmon. Not raw like on sushi, but grilled or in onigiri. It’s the only protein I can get into her, so I’m more than happy to get her three or four onigiris if she’s really hungry. If you don’t know, onigiri is a portable snack or meal that usually comes in the shape of a triangle, consisting of rice with something in the middle, and then it’s all wrapped in nori, a seasoned, dried seaweed. There are several varieties like red bean, tuna, or pickled plum, but my daughter loves the salmon. I think it helps that all the anime characters she loves also love salmon onigiri. She even learned how to make her own, but I think she prefers the storebought. So about three weeks ago I noticed they had a new variety they’ve never offered before, Spam. I did a doubletake. Really? Spam onigiri? I picked up the package and noticed it didn’t look like the other onigiri. It was still sort of triangular in shape, but there were two triangles created by slicing the rectangular-shaped finished product diagonally, creating what reminded me of fancy sandwich triangles. The presliced shape was rectangular to accommodate the grilled slice of Spam, but unlike the traditional onigiri, this one had more than one ingredient in the middle of the rice. There was also a thin layer of Kewpie mayonnaise, and a slice of tamago, a Japanese style scrambled egg. So it kind of looked like a ham and egg sandwich, if you pretended the rice was bread and the nori the crust. I bought one and couldn’t even wait to get home to eat it and instead noshed it down in the car. It was fucking delicious. The following week they had them again. This time I bought three. At $2.50 for each, they’re a steal. Again, my daughter and I didn’t wait until we got home and instead, ate the first one in the car. I had my second for dinner and a third for breakfast the following morning. And we went again yesterday so I’m eating one right now. I suspected early on this wasn’t Japanese in origin, and I looked it up and that’s kind of true. It wasn’t first made in Japan and instead was a fusion of Hawaiian and Japanese cultures, with Spam being a food introduced to Hawaii by us, one of their colonizers. All these cultures and this history, wrapped in rice and nori, apparently produces something insanely delicious. I know it sounds odd, but if you’re ever offered Spam onigiri, accept it. You won’t be sorry. posted by Stanczyk at 5:29 AM on September 8 [ 7 favorites ] Jeanne — For leftovers, I particularly like a masala-style chickpea curry or a dal. I usually just make a bunch of extra rice when I make the curry. Also, this chickpea salad is good filling for sandwiches or topping for a salad, though it does get a bit soggy round day four. I made this last night with some roasted celery. The celery was a bit of a revelation — and now I know how to keep that vegetable from going bad after I’ve used the 2-4 stalks whatever recipe I made last week calls for. posted by platitudipus at 6:06 AM on September 8 I am pretty much never not thinking about food. Most recent highlights: went to a lovely Mexican restaurant with friends last night and had the cochinita tacos, which were excellent. We had to wait a bit for our table so they comped us some very tasty guacamole. At the end of the meal, they gave us an extra frozen margarita they had made by accident and we all split it. Don’t have any exciting eating plans today but will bottle some kombucha tonight! Last batch I made was super tart and I loved it; let’s see if I can replicate it. posted by ferret branca at 6:43 AM on September 8 [ 1 favorite ] I just finished plopping some beef short ribs into my old-school crock pot (Rival, with a floral/botanical print) with a sauce consisting of: (In rough order of ratio, I just kind of eyeball it/taste test it) Ketchup Honey Soy sauce (extra dark) Chili garlic sauce (Huy Fong, I go between using either this or sambal, depending on which one I have open/on hand) Lots of garlic More garlic because we are not animals Toasted sesame oil Tonight will be corn on the cob and ribs. Yeah. I also picked up some nice eggplants this weekend. Now that it’s getting cooler, I might fire up the oven for the first time in a while and give black pepper tofu and eggplant a whirl tomorrow. posted by mandolin conspiracy at 6:48 AM on September 8 After more than twenty years of mediocre results, I’ve recently figured out how to steam vegetables perfectly. Or, at least, in exactly the way that I like. (I guess I’ve never actually been taught how to steam things. It’s one of many kitchen skills I just made up for myself and then never questioned.) The first trick is to cook them for a very short amount of time over a high heat and a huge amount of steam. The second trick is to add each item with a proper time delay: carrots (beets, parnips) to start while the water heats, cabbage (brussels sprouts, onion, fennel, bok choi, chinese broccoli) five or six minutes in, peas (raddish, asparagus, calabrese broccoli, cauliflower) two or three minutes later. After ten minutes total, remove the heat and either dump out the vegetables or pour cold water into the bath to stop the steam. The difference between this and the mush I’ve been making my whole life is pretty amazing. A long, low heat works for steam buns, but it’s terrible for vegetables. I also recently discovered Trader Joe’s Mushroom and Company brand umami powder. It’s magical. (A tiny bit goes a very long way.) posted by eotvos at 6:58 AM on September 8 [ 2 favorites ] We tried a new local Indian restaurant last night, which was amaaazing except for the part where they brought us a chicken appetizer instead of the cauliflower we ordered. When they brought us the right one we could see why – they look basically identical plated up. So my husband got a bonus chicken app. Dumsnill – I don’t work quite as early as you (generally get in around 6:45), but I take a breakfast and eat it at my desk. I never eat at home before work. Every once in a while I don’t eat til lunch but usually my body gets mad if I try that. posted by obfuscation at 7:36 AM on September 8 There is usually a week at the end of summer/beginning of fall when it’s cool enough that it’s OK to have the oven on all day and, more importantly, tomatoes are still in season, albeit at the tail end. This is that week. We bought probably 60 pounds of tomatoes yesterday and I’ll spend the next few days slow-roasting them to then stash in the freezer for winter. There was a time when I canned tomatoes, but that is honestly a lot of work for a payoff that, to me, is not that much better than frozen, slow-roasted tomatoes. The edges get slightly caramelized, the flesh becomes gently sweet. Most of the tomatoes are red San Marzano-style, though I did also buy a much smaller quantity of orange plum tomatoes (and tomatillos, for that matter) for the same treatment. Most years, by the time we use up the tomatoes it’s April and, while the weather is still iffy, the days are longer and you can tell yourself that spring is around the corner. posted by veggieboy at 7:41 AM on September 8 [ 1 favorite ] We’re still getting CSA veggies through at least the end of October, and the garden is still dribbling out some veggies, so it looks like we’ll be going through some more tomatoes, beets, turnips, and radishes. The freezer is still stocked with a lamb and a small pig I bought earlier in the summer, and I probably need to start thinking about sausage making soon. Hunting season is just opening up around here, so I’m hoping I’ll get some waterfowl this year. Squirrel season will be in full swing by the time we get home from vacation, so I’m looking forward to that. Squirrel is surprisingly good, like fine dark meat chicken. I’ll also start getting pheasants next month. We have a small peninsula in the kitchen where we normally eat, since it’s just the two of us. Day to day, we use a set of Polish pottery that my parents collected when we lived in Germany; they’ve been downsizing over the years and handed most of it off to us. When I’m trying to be a little fancier (or we have more guests than Polish plates), we have a set of simple white china. We leave for Scotland tomorrow (Islay and Glasgow), so I am hoping for a lot of good North Atlantic seafood (on Islay), an authentic chicken tikka (in Glasgow), and lots of good Scotch and local beer. posted by backseatpilot at 7:51 AM on September 8 Well I can tell you what I’m not eating. Turns out no beef is the way to go for a happy stomach and I am in fact intolerant of all cow not just dairy. This is making me sad, but my intestines happy. September is a busy time of the year. Lost of things getting pulled out, and a lot of things getting planted. My first fall bed is in. Bok Choy and Peas. I also nuked my tree collard with ladybugs in an attempt to kill those nasty grey aphids. It’s been a busy but productive week at least. posted by Homo neanderthalensis at 8:03 AM on September 8 [ 1 favorite ] Oh food. I love food so very much. We have the CSA share again this summer but the farm has not been as productive. Or maybe not as generous? Some of the stems on the greens have been looking terrible, very obviously cut a day or more before the farm packs them. At any rate here is a small sample of what I’ve made lately red currant and plum jam lamb with fresh herbs (cilantro, mint, oregano, thyme), lemon, salt, olive oil and toasted corriander seed. I did this in the sous vide with two boneless lamb legs and froze one for later. This is the single most decadent thing I’ve made all summer. I got potatoes from the grocery store and boiled those with lots of salt and then added butter after they had drained Rick Bayless’ Chili en adobo – so much cilantro and parsely we have six jars of this in the fridge. This has been nicknamed “angry pesto” Pan grilled shishito peppers – we’ve gotten these a few weeks in a row. This weeks peppers are turning red in a dish because I haven’t had t me for them Roasted eggplant – we put the angry pesto on this Curried chickpeas (one can chickpeas, one 14 ounce can crushed tomatoes, 1 can minus 1/4 cup coconut milk, curry powder, ginger, garlic, onion, one bumch of cilantro) Tomatoes with mozzarella and basil Corn. Just corn. Roasted in the oven and then shucked over the compost bag and eaten right off the cob Cooked greens. Chard. Collard. Spinach. Kale. Sauteed in bacon fat or olive oil BLT sandwiches

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American woman charged with trafficking ‘baby in bag’ at Manila airport

The Thaiger
Tropical nights, curious mountain silhouettes, sprawling rice paddies and pungent cuisine. And some snow-topped mountains as well. The Thaiger has selected the Top Ten of these camera-worthy towns. Southern Asia is a concoction of the ancient, very modern, traditional and enigmatic.
Amongst the islands, megacities and spectacular scenery there are also some very pretty towns that deserve your days pottering around and investigating. Some of them you would have never heard of. Here’s our Top Ten, in no particular oder… Old Phuket Town, Thailand
Most tourists head for the beaches, but the southern Thai island of Phuket offers a lot, lot more these days up and down the west coast and across to the island’s east coast as well, not just Patong.
The historic old quarter of Old Phuket Town, located in the central east coast of the island, is lined with Sino-Portugeuse colonial shophouses, built during the island’s tin-mining boom of the 18th and 19th centuries.
Twenty years ago you couldn’t give them away. Now the old shop-houses are hot property and getting spruced up and re-used for a new generation of tourists and culture vultures. There are plenty of hip shops, cafés, restaurants, bars, art galleries and book shops. The area is also filled with Chinese temples, crumbling mansions and cultural museums.
Check out the weekly Sunday night ‘Lard Yai’ market along Thalang road for some local market vibes in amongst some local ephemera, astonishing Thai street food, some local performers and a few bargains. Kicks off around 4pm. If it rains during the island’s wet season (May to November), you’ll get wet but it’s always around 30 degrees C and you can duck undercover anywhere around the Old Town’s sidewalks. Galle, Sri Lanka
On the southwestern coast of Sri Lanka is the walled town of Galle, an important trade port for centuries.
The UNESCO-listed fortress has been through three bouts of colonial rule – the Portuguese from 1505-1658, the Dutch from 1658-1796 and the British from 1796-1948. These days, many of the old merchant houses are renovated into museums, boutique hotels, shops, restaurants and bars.
The dining scene has grown in breadth and popularity, with fresh seafood, excellent Sri Lankan curries and egg hoppers (dome-like pancakes).
There’s also plenty to see as you walk off all that food. The Dutch Reformed Church, Sudharmalaya Temple, Galle Clock Tower, Galle Lighthouse, Meeran Mosque and the old Spice Warehouse.
Then head down the southern coastline to enjoy the surf, diving, whale-watching or just laying around Unawatuna Beach. City of Vigan, Philippines
Experience a rich history of Spanish colonial-era architecture in the city of Vigan. It lies on the west coast of Luzon island in northwestern Philippines. Vigan was established by the Spanish in 1572. It’s also a UNESCO World Heritage City.
Conquistador Juan de Salcedo developed a modern grid plan for the city, and Spanish architects designed beautiful churches, grand mansions and schools with unique windows and dark timber interiors.
Most of the colonial buildings are situated around the Plaza Salcedo, including the St Paul’s Cathedral. This beautiful Baroque structure was first built in 1641 and then restored after several earthquakes and fires. Hoi An, Vietnam
Located on the central coast of Vietnam, about 40 minutes drive south of Da Nang, Hoi An’s Old Town has an international reputation as a haven for photographers, architecture lovers and lovers of food. Added to the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1999, the town was a former French colonial trading port that has been a commercially vital town for Vietnam since the 16th century. It’s now more important to Vietnam as a commercially vital tourist magnet.
The rambling narrow streets of Hoi An feature rows and rows of charming mustard coloured old trading houses. Many are now trendy restaurants, bars, design boutiques, coffee shops and tailors. Seemingly with a production designer preparing the town as a set for a ‘colonial asian’ movie, lush foliage spills from the rooftops and silk lanterns light up the town at night. It’s right out of a picture book. George Town, Malaysia
Designated a UNESCO World Heritage site, the sprawling historic quarter of George Town on Penang island showcases its many cultural influences over the centuries. You’ll also find some similarity with Phuket’s Old Town, just 600 kilometres north, but with a broader cuisine and more colonial influence.
George Town’s colourful heritage traces back 500 years when the former British colony was a prominent hub of trade on the Malacca Strait, enabling cultural exchange between Malay, Chinese, Indian and European residents. The town still resinates with influences from all of these cultures.
There is an eclectic mix of pastel-hued shophouses, Chinese mansions, churches and temples, colonial buildings, food and fortresses.
George Town deserves its reputation as the “food capital of Malaysia” and remains one of the best food cities in Asia – from street food to hawker centres, chintzy local restaurants to fully renovated mansions serving up high end fusion cuisine. Like the architecture, the local cuisine captures George Town’s multicultural history.
If you’re heading to George Town, take your appetite. Luang Prabang, Laos
The former capital of Laos on the banks of the Mekong River, is the picturesque Luang Prabang, home to temples and dramatic natural scenery.
It’s either one of Southeast Asia’s most spiritual places or an emerging party town for the backpacker set, or both. Either way Luang Prabang makes a dramatic first impression.
The town is hugged by mountains as it rests at the bottom of a valley in central Laos. The location was the first kingdom in Laos from the 14th to 16th centuries, Luang Prabang was long a strategic location along the famed Silk Route. Since then the French have also had their time as colonial overlords which has resulted in a fusion of European and Laotian architecture creating a distinct townscape.
Although Vientiane, on the Thai border, is now the capital, Luang Prabang, named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1995, continues to be the country’s cultural and artistic capital.
In addition to the graceful architecture, Luang Prabang is also home to beautiful natural attractions including the Kuang Si Waterfalls and Phousi Mountain. There are also more than 30 Buddhist temples, the Royal Palace Museum, night markets, river boat rides and biking tours. Kampot, Cambodia
Think Cambodia and you automatically think ‘Angkor Wat’, but Cambodian travellers are falling in love with the southern charms of Kampot.
The serene coastal town, on the southern coast along the Gulf of Thailand, is getting a reputation as one of the prettiest small towns in the region. Think colourful French colonial shophouses, tidy pedestrian-friendly streets, river activities and a feast for the cameras. You can spend your days kayaking, mountain trekking, biking, river cruises, paddle-boarding, or you could take a day trip through the countryside’s lush paddy fields, cave temples and waterfalls.
Kampot has a growing foodie reputation as a culinary playground with everything from traditional Khmer cuisine to vegan delights. The town still has a bit of a ‘rough’ reputation but is well worth a visit and certainly deserves its place amongst the top ten prettiest towns in Asia. Kota Gede, Indonesia
Among the oldest parts of Yogyakarta in central Java, Kota Gede is known for its silver industry, cute laneways and photogenic architecture.
The location’s history goes back to the 15th century, when Yogjakarta was the seat of the Mataram Sultanate, the last kingdom before the Dutch colonised Java island. Wealthy merchants built palatial homes in the Kalang style, a mix of Dutch structural elements, traditional Javanese layouts and local craftsmanship.
Travellers in the 21st century can now walk along Jalan Kemasan and browse through boutiques, art galleries and silver workshops showcasing the famous jewellery and elaborate tableware. For a little history, travellers can also venture out to Yogyakarta’s most famous UNESCO-listed landmarks – the Prambanan Temple and the eighth-century Borobudur Temple. Mawlynnong, India
In amongst one of the world’s most chaotic and messy countries, lies Mawlynnong, located in the East Khasi Hills of northeastern India, which has been named the “Cleanest Village in Asia”. Go figure!
The village lives up to its reputation thanks to the Khasi community who call the town ‘home’ and take great pride in keeping the village pristine. The town is famous for its meticulously pruned gardens.
There’s a popular 85 foot high tree house called Sky View constructed of bamboo that overlooks the jungle canopies all the way across the plains of Bangladesh to the south. There’s also the Mawlynnong Waterfall, while a living tree root bridge creating a scene from Game of Thrones or an Indiana Jones movie. Ghandruk, Nepal
Ghandruk is a mountain village at the foothills of the Himalayas in central Nepal. The village is more than 2,000 metres above sea level, the highest in our Top Ten list.
The village is about a five-hour hike from Pokhara, a pretty lakeside city in central Nepal that acts as the starting point for the popular Annapurna Circuit (and also worthy of a visit for a few days).
You’ll find traditional tea houses, a mountain-top temple, horseback riding and the local customs of the Gurung people who live here.
Members of this Nepalese community have served in the British Army’s Gurkha regiments during many conflicts and you should make time to visit the Old Gurung Museum which provides lots of fascinating historical insights.
And the village has quite a spectacular backdrop with Mounts Annapurna, Machhapuchhre and Himalchuli looming large as you look over your shoulder. Keep in contact with The Thaiger by following our Facebook page .

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Music City Lead Gen Summit: Where To Dine And What To Do In Nashville This October

Weekly sales and marketing content for professionals IT Weekly The latest business technology news HR Digest A bimonthly digest of the best HR content September 6, 2019 Music City Lead Gen Summit: Where To Dine And What To Do In Nashville This October Written by Forrest Brown
It’s hard to believe it, but October is right around the corner. You know what that means: the 2019 Music City Lead Gen Summit (MCLGS).
Music City Lead Gen Summit is a conference we’re hosting from October 6-8 at Holston House in our hometown of Nashville, Tennessee. We’re bringing in 30 of the best demand gen specialists for B2B software to talk about challenges and solutions that we all face in B2B lead gen, and we want to see you there! We’ll be joined by people from Sage Intacct , Veracode , and Icertis , among others.
→ RSVP To The 2019 Music City Lead Gen Summit
You’ll have many exciting sessions to get through, but you’ll also have plenty of time to get out and experience a bit of Nashville. As your hosts for the long weekend, here are our top recommendations on where to eat and have fun in Nashville. Where to dine in Nashville
You may know Nashville for whiskey and country music, but you may not have heard about our booming culinary scene. From nationally-acclaimed Nashville hot chicken joints to James Beard Awards semifinalists , Nashville offers a diverse and tasty array of restaurants, bars, hole-in-the-wall treasures, craft breweries, and food trucks. Chauhan Ale & Masala House (food)
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Aug 31, 2019 at 11:55am PDT $$
From Maneet Chauhan—chef, restaurateur, and judge on the Food Network show Chopped —comes Chauhan Ale & Masala House. This eatery serves up Indian cuisine with a Southern twist, like the desi tiffin, an Indian spin on the classic Southern meat and three. Oh, and you can also take the occasional cooking class with Maneet herself! Where: 13-minute walk, 5-minute rideshare from Holston House Nashville Tip: Reservations recommended

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Adventurous Eats

– September 6, 2019
Burgers. Shrimp-and-grits. Fried chicken. Yes, Jacksonville has them all and, although admittedly delicious, most of us have eaten our fill. And then some. That’s why this year’s Food Issue focuses on flavors you might not have had before—including off-the-menu, secret eats (or just dishes you might otherwise overlook)—that make the local culinary landscape adventurous, colorful and downright delicious. words by Staff // photos by Agnes Lopez
Much of the upscale cuisine at Riverside’s Restaurant Orsay relies on a combination of French fare and Southern flair—cue the sweetbreads (the culinary name for the thymus or pancreas) and lamb belly appetizer ($19), a stellar example of the restaurant’s take on upscale-meets-comfort food classics. Here, chicken-fried sweetbreads and smoked lamb bacon are accompanied by a warm mushroom and radish salad, sweet corn purée, Champagne gastrique, and fine herbs.
The menu at Mr. Sharks —a brightly-colored building with neon signs advertising “fish” and “oysters” on Blanding Boulevard—is divided into two sections: raw and steamed. That means that here, you can buy oysters by the bushel, chicken livers by the pound or cooked delicacies, like garlic shrimp and fried blue crab. Garlic crabs (market price) are a fan favorite and, when cooked in-house, come doused in a heavy helping of Old Bay and cayenne. And garlic. Lots of garlic.
A gamey take on the Southern classic, the alligator ribs ($17) at Gilbert’s Social on the Southside are an off-menu special. Chef Kenny Gilbert sources his gator meat locally, dusting them with a Cajun spice rub before both smoking and braising them, for an extra shot of flavor. The best part: alligator meat does not shrivel when cooked, so it will still be plump and juicy by the time it reaches your table. He often serves them by the rack but also shreds the meat to fold into tacos and on sliders, too.
Sure, there’s Tikka Masala and chili chicken, but one of the tastiest ways to experience all that the 5th Element —an Indian buffet located on the Southside—has to offer is with the egg curry ($11). The dish features whole boiled eggs, simmered in homemade sauce punctuated with spices, onions, tomatoes and coconut milk. The resulting dish is rich, creamy, and highly addictive. The best way to ensure you sop up all the tasty goodness? A side of naan.
At Cantonese Dim Sum house Timwah , located on the Southside, tasty morsels are served on two carts that make their way around to diners seated in the restaurant. One cart is comprised of steamed eats and the other fried, with patrons encouraged to try as many as they can comfortably stomach. It’s a tall task when it comes to the pan-fried chicken potstickers ($4 per order), a blend of chicken and spices wrapped in a thin dough and lightly pan-fried. The result is a slightly crispy exterior and a pillowy middle—and a can’t-stop-eating flavor combination that requires more than one order.
When life gives you lemons, throw some salt on them. That’s the idea of the salty lemonade and salty kumquat beverages ($3.50) at Yummy Pho . The drinks are a combination of sweet and sour, served over ice for a refreshing summer sip. The elixir is said to have health benefits, having been used for centuries as a sore throat ailment.
Most of the menu offerings at 5 Points’ Derby House Diner skew traditional—pancakes, meatloaf and the like. But among the derby classics is a stellar, sophisticated cocktail menu. We’re partial to the Frida Kaklo ($10) with El Jimador Reposado, Plymouth Sloe Gin, lime juice, cane simple syrup, and finished with a salt and clove rim.
There are only four ingredients in beer: grain, water, yeast, and hops. At least there used to be. These days brewers are adding fruits, spices, herbs—anything that fits into the mash tun or fermentation tank—and seeing what develops. The new flavors lend themselves to more than just beer, though, and breweries such as San Marco’s Aardwolf are taking it one step further, turning the concoctions into beer slushies . Options change daily and feature everything from milky stouts to tropical sours. Pictured on the right is San Marco Sour with blackberry, black currant, and vanilla, and on the left is Lactic Zeppelin (also a sour) with pineapple, mango, and mint.
The San Sebastian Winery ’s blends are different than what you most often find in a wine shop. That’s because they’re made from native Muscadine grapes , a sweeter variety than the more common Vitis vinifera (the stuff used to make Pinots and Rieslings). The St. Augustine vintner’s Rosa ($9 per bottle) looks like rosé but offers a different finish, one that’s light, refreshing and balanced with just a hint of sweetness.
In Springfield, abandoned service station-turned-restaurant Strings Sports Brewery takes vegan cuisine to new heights with the Tahini Red sandwich ($14). The handheld includes a blood-red, smoked watermelon drizzled with red tahini sauce, shallots, pickles, sweet potato and jalapeños on a warm bun.
Cruisers has been serving patrons in Jacksonville Beach for over 20 years—though, in 2019, the eatery received a significant makeover, unveiling a new interior and a handful of new menu items, including the fried bologna sandwich ($9). The bologna is cured in-house, fried to a crisp and topped with Provel, a white processed cheese from St. Louis, and Dijon ranch on white bread. Throw caution to the wind and top with a fried egg for an additional buck.
Sub Cultured , a walk-up sandwich joint at a busy intersection in Mayport, offers all the standard sammies—Italians, Cubans and the like. But where the casual eatery really shines is with its riffs on old classics. The K-Pop Porto ($9.50), for instance, has all the makings of a standard Philly, but with a Korean twist, replacing steak with marinated portobello mushrooms and topping it with onions, melted havarti cheese and gochujang aioli.
They’re known for farm-to-table eats, but Coop 303 in Atlantic Beach doesn’t shy away from lab-created foods, either. Coop is the latest in a string of local restaurants to offer the Impossible Burger ($15), a plant-based patty reverse-engineered to replicate the flavor and texture of beef. Here, the eight-ounce veggie patty (made from a protein found in soy) gets the all-American treatment with lettuce, tomato and vegan ranch on a vegan brioche bun.
Chicken feet aren’t on the menu at Blue Bamboo —but if you ask Chef Dennis Chan nicely (and call in advance, as they take a while to procure), he just might make you some “Phoenix Claws.” The basket-steamed morsels are a dim sum classic and make a delicious case for whole-animal cooking. They’re also very gelatinous, a texture common in Asian cuisine, and comprised of no muscle, instead getting their flavor from bone and a combination of garlic, ginger and black bean sauce. They are quite literally the ultimate finger food: easy to eat and fairly messy. And they taste, well…like chicken.
Your standard buffalo-based gameday wings , these are not. But Congaree & Penn ’ s version of the classic ($14) might be even more addicting. At the farm’s on-site taproom and kitchen, wings are doused in a smoked blackberry barbecue sauce (made from blackberries grown on-site, of course) and served with ranch, bleu cheese and hand-cut fried potatoes.
Chefs Erika Cline and Linda Dixon Evans are best known for the decadent cakes and pastries served at their Springfield cafe, Bleu Chocolat . But at lunch and dinner, they’re turning out heartier fare inspired by their love of classic cooking techniques and time spent in Tortola (where the original Bleu Chocolat was located before being destroyed by Hurricane Irma). Case in point: chicken in a pot , a dish served in a cast-iron pot with white wine sauce, root vegetables and side of peas and rice—and large enough to feed two.
Tom Moffitt was stationed in the Philippines when, after a long day at work, the Naval air instructor started craving ice cream. “I wasn’t craving plain Jane vanilla, but something with big, bold flavors like bourbon, rum, or cold brew coffee—tastes that weren’t common in ice cream at the time,” says Moffitt. Upon coming back to the states, he launched his own artisanal ice cream company: Reed Thomas Southern Creamery . Moffitt blends regional extracts and minimal ingredients to create his range of flavors, including vanilla bourbon, cookies and cream and Ube, made from a purple yam native to the Philippines. Pints are available for $8 at Springfield’s Bleu Chocolat Café, along with seasonal offerings (like ice cream sandwiches).

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