New Cookbooks: Summer 2019

New Cookbooks: Summer 2019

From plant-based suppers to top tips for recreating Thai, Spanish, Californian and Mauritian staples at home, here are this season’s top ten cookbooks… 25th June 2019 Save to My Favourites California: Living + Eating by Eleanor Maidment California: Living + Eating is a celebration of West Coast food. British food writer Eleanor Maidment journeyed through the state’s varied landscape – from Sonoma’s rolling vineyards to the deserts of Palm Springs, via the global food hotspots of San Francisco and Los Angeles – uncovering its diverse culinary influences and taking inspiration from some of its best chefs and restaurants. Within, over 80 recipes capture the Californian spirit, with chapters covering an array of sweet and savoury brunch dishes including whipped ricotta on toast with blackberry jam and breakfast burritos with cheddar scramble and coriander salsa. Colourful salads and light meals, such as salmon, citrus kale and black rice salad are ideal for everyday eating, while the likes of roast chicken with grapes, onions and sourdough, followed by cherry and almond galette are perfect for weekend entertaining. Buy here Greenfeast: Spring, Summer by Nigel Slater Greenfeast: Spring, Summer is a vibrant collection of the food TV favourite Nigel Slater eats at the end of the day. Featuring over 110 spring and summer recipes, each with suggested variations, the book focuses on meat-free dishes that can be on the table in 30 minutes. This is perfect for people who want to eat less meat, but don’t want to compromise on flavour and ease of cooking. From roasted spring vegetables with peanut sauce to rice broad beans and asparagus; and peaches with blackberries and ice-cream, Nigel’s follow-up to the bestselling Eat is for everyone who wants daily inspiration for quick plant-based suppers. Greenfeast: Autumn, Winter will follow in September 2019. Buy here Sardine by Alex Jackson Taking influence from Italy as well as North Africa, acclaimed chef Alex Jackson’s recipes are a delight to cook. For Sardine , Alex escaped his east London restaurant to create a book dedicated to the signature dishes of Provence. Within, Alex has included a selection of recipes for each season. From bouillabaisse and autumnal grand aÏoli to an Easter feast, most of these menus revolve around a central celebratory dish and each chapter ends with a set menu – perfect for dinner parties. With recipes running in seasonal order, Sardine promises to reignite a love affair with French provincial cooking and its multitude of influences, focus on seasonal eating and, ultimately, an attitude to food which centres around sharing and enjoying food. Buy here Andalusia by Jose Pizarro From sandy beaches to amazing architecture, buzzing tapas bars and flamenco dancers, the southern Spain is full of passion. In Andalusia , award-winning chef Jose Pizarro takes readers on a journey through its most delicious dishes. Blessed with land that produces magnificent wild mushrooms, delicious Jabugo ham and some of the world’s best olive oil and seafood, readers will be spoilt for choice when it comes to recipes – such as pork loin with pear and hazelnuts, prawns baked in salt with mango, chilli, coriander salsa, and a rather boozy barbary fig margarita. Written in Jose’s signature fuss-free style, this is genuine, bold-tasting Spanish food, easily made at home. Set to the backdrop of beautiful location shots, this cookbook is a must for anyone who loves authentic, simple Spanish food. Buy here Charred by Genevieve Taylor Fire and smoke don’t always have to be about hunks of meat. Chargrilling and barbecuing are fantastic ways of getting the maximum flavour out of versatile vegetables. If you’re bored of burgers, or if you’re vegetarian and want more than scorched sweetcorn and chewy halloumi, charred offers up over 70 original recipes to cater for all your veggie BBQ needs. With sections on ‘stuffed and wrapped veg’, ‘burgers and fritters’, ‘kebabs’, ‘low, slow and smoked’, and ‘sharing platters’, these vegetarian dishes will be the highlight of every meal. Expect the likes of whole roast cauliflower drenched in spiced garlic butter, griddled radicchio with burrata and figs, and corn on the cob with Cambodian coconut, lime and chilli. What’s more, live-fire and BBQ expert Genevieve Taylor has developed these dishes so that they can just as easily be cooked in a pan or conventional oven year-round. Buy here The Island Kitchen: Recipes from Mauritius and the Indian Ocean by Selina Periampillai This beautifully illustrated cookbook will take you on a journey around the Indian Ocean islands to taste the flavours of the colourful markets of Mauritius, the aromatic spice gardens of the Seychelles, the fishing coasts of the Maldives, the lagoons of Mayotte and the forests of Madagascar. Selina Periampillai, born in London but of Mauritian descent, celebrates the vibrant home-cooking of the islands, with dishes such as sticky chicken with garlic and ginger, mustard and turmeric-marinated tuna, Seychellois aubergine and chickpea cari, and pineapple upside-down cake with cardamom cream. With 80 simple recipes for everything from quick mid-week suppers to large rum-fuelled gatherings, this book will take you straight to the warm, welcoming kitchens of these beautiful islands. Buy here The Joyful Home Cook by Rosie Birkett From renowned food writer and broadcaster Rosie Birkett comes this collection of recipes aimed at inspiring readers to become instinctive home cooks. Embracing seasonal ingredients, The Joyful Home Cook shows you how to coax the most flavour out of every morsel to deliver delicious meals every day of the year. As well as resurrecting underused home cooking skills like smoking, brining and fermenting, this cookbook applies a thoroughly modern approach to flavour combinations and global culinary influences, including practical tips on how to minimise waste. Following her tips and techniques, you’ll be able to cultivate a well-stocked culinary arsenal you can call upon to create game-changing meals for friends and family; from homemade sourdough and pickled veg to pistachio pesto and peach eton mess. Buy here Green by Elly Pear In Green , bestselling cookery author Elly Pear shows you how to easily vary veggie and vegan dishes, with ingenious options to make a meal speedy and simple or a bit more special. The book offers over 100 easy recipes developed for either weekdays or weekends. The weekday recipes target speed and ease, and the weekend recipes are for when you have a bit more time and fancy something a bit special. Weekday offerings include freezable food, no-fuss traybakes and one-pot dishes for when you can’t face washing up or hands-on cooking. A meal prep section will have you sorted for the week ahead, plus there’s a whole load of meals you can make in 20 minutes. Whether you are already vegetarian or vegan, or just want to eat a bit less meat, this new book serves up tasty, flexible fare, all of which is meat-free, and half is vegan. Buy here Baan by Kay Plunkett-Hogge Born and raised in Bangkok, Kay Plunkett-Hogge spoke Thai before she spoke English and has spent more than half her life in Thailand. Baan is an homage to her childhood, to the delicious recipes that she was raised on and a cuisine and country that she loves. The book features over 120 recipes that Kay has collected from all over Thailand from friends, acquaintances and street-stall holders, all gathered over around 30 years of travel, and all of them tried and tested back in London. Here, Kay demystifies Thai food, providing clear and concise recipes and revealing the shortcuts, kitchen hacks and ingredient substitutions that make delicious Thai cookery achievable in an ordinary Western home. Essential chapters include ‘How To Cook Rice’ – which covers the necessities and offers easy recipes for the likes of steamed jasmine rice or sticky rice. Buy here Veg: Easy & Delicious Meals for Everyone by Jamie Oliver From simple suppers and family favourites to weekend dishes for sharing with friends, Jamie Oliver’s forthcoming book is packed full of nutritious recipes. Whether it’s embracing a meat-free day or two each week, living a vegetarian lifestyle, or just wanting to try some brilliant new flavour combinations, this1 book ticks all the boxes. Sharing simple tips and tricks that will excite the tastebuds, this book will also give readers the confidence to up their veg intake and widen their recipe repertoire, safe in the knowledge it’ll taste great. If it’s anything like his best-selling 5 Ingredients book, Veg is guaranteed to become a household staple. Pre-order here
DISCLAIMER: We endeavour to always credit the correct original source of every image we use. If you think a credit may be incorrect, please contact us at . Editor’s Picks

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FoodPicker/Expected response with Category

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Largest restaurant booking platform to launch London’s edible map

With almost 70% of Londoners agreeing that the city is home to the most diverse selection of cuisines and cultures from across the globe, it’s no surprise to see the variety of international dishes regularly consumed at restaurant tables throughout the capital. To champion this, OpenTable, the world’s leading restaurant booking service, is giving Londoners a chance to taste their way through the capital’s boroughs with the first edible map 4 of the city. On Tuesday 2nd July, those visiting King’s Cross Euston Road between 12pm and 5pm will be able to take a bite into the flavours of London from OpenTable’s interactive edible map billboard. To celebrate London’s vibrant diversity of cuisines from Turkish to Japanese, the map will feature a selection of canapé style dishes from around the world paired with the boroughs in which they’re most associated, for diners to take away 5 . Adrian Valeriano, VP EMEA, comments “London is such an exciting city to dine in and explore. The choice of restaurants and cuisines available are ever evolving, constantly delighting diners whether they are local residents or those visiting the city. Our research highlights how this diversity shows itself in every borough, with beloved dishes and world-class restaurants found the length and breadth of London. We are excited to bring this to life with the edible map installation and to ensure that whether you are looking for an award winning restaurant, newly opened hot spot, or a casual dinner with friends, OpenTable can help you find the right restaurant for anything.” To determine the flavour of each borough, OpenTable conducted exclusive research among two thousand residents and frequent visitors to the city. With diners in Lambeth dreaming of Turkish delights and Tower Hamlets most associated with the best Bangladeshi biryani, OpenTable’s edible map will share Londoner’s love for global eats. The foodie favourites across the city show West is best for Greek eats, while those in North West London are most likely to enjoy Indian. Islington in North London is one of the most popular regions for Italian food, giving extra amore to Mediterranean pizza and pasta dishes, with nearly a fifth of the areas’ restaurants dedicated to this cultural cuisine 6 . South London offers plenty of variety with those researched associating Bromley with Japanese and Greenwich enjoying traditional British cuisine. Research shows that 18-24 year olds are the most adventurous foodies, with nearly 80% eating a meal from across the globe every week 1 , London’s love for global cuisines shows no sign of slowing down. Before foodie fans decide where to head for their next great dining experience, they can visit OpenTable’s edible map in King’s Cross to get a ‘taste’ of the area. EDIBLE MAP – KING’S CROSS, 2nd JULY 2019 London Borough

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Food safety inspections find fewer violations thanks to social pressure

Since 2017, six Big Island food establishments have received red food safety placards from the state Department of Health, issued to businesses when imminent public health hazards are observed.
A stoplight placard system, adopted in 2014, aims to alert consumers before entering an establishment whether it has met state food safety standards. ADVERTISING
Following an inspection, restaurants and other food establishments receive either a green (pass), yellow (conditional pass) or red (closed) placard.
The most recent red placard on Hawaii Island was issued to Genki Sushi in Kailua-Kona last month, which came after an inspection prompted by multiple complaints of roaches.
Peter Oshiro, who oversees Hawaii’s food safety program as environmental health program manager for the DOH’s Sanitation Branch, said Friday that the West Hawaii restaurant remains closed, and no date has been set for re-inspection.
“If a food facility is closed down by DOH, the time frame for them to open is completely on them,” he said. “We do not care about rapid compliance if the food facility is no longer serving food to the public. Public health is protected by the facility being closed.”
A Genki Sushi representative did not immediately respond to an email from the Tribune-Herald.
However, Mary Hansen, vice president and chief administrative officer, Genki Sushi USA Inc., said in a statement to West Hawaii Today earlier this month that the Kailua-Kona eatery is working to take necessary actions to ensure it is in compliance with all state Department of Health food safety requirements, “while also meeting the high standards for cleanliness and sanitation that we set for all of our restaurant locations.”
“We regret the continued delay, but we want to make sure our customers are assured of a clean restaurant when we reopen,” she said at that time.
Genki is just one of more than 10,000 food establishments across Hawaii routinely inspected by the DOH as part of its food safety program. According to Oshiro, there are about 6,000 on Oahu, 1,800 each on the Big Island and Maui, and 700 on Kauai.
Establishments are ranked into three risk categories based on food operations and what they serve.
High risks are inspected three times a year, medium risks, like fast food restaurants, undergo routine inspections twice a year, and low risks, like ice cream and snack shops, are inspected once a year, he explained.
And violations are sorted into two categories.
Critical food illness risk factors, which look at factors like hygienic practices and hand-washing, food temperatures, disinfection and cross-contamination, affect the placarding.
“All these things people cannot see,” Oshiro said. “They see the front of the house — floor, walls and ceiling — which does not affect public health. It’s what we observe in the back of the house that protects public health.”
Good retail practices, which Oshiro said are more aesthetic, do not affect the type of placard issued at the end of the inspection.
Inspections are unannounced, and according to Oshiro, if there is one critical violation that cannot be corrected at the time of the inspection, or two or more that can be immediately corrected, restaurants are issued a yellow placard.
If restaurants can correct the problems right away “and call us up and have it inspected, we’ll take down the yellow (placard),” he said. “Our object is to rapidly correct the violation — not punish the establishment.”
Red placards are issued if yellow placard violations are not corrected in a timely manner or if there’s an imminent health hazard and the establishment needs to be closed on the spot, said Oshiro.
Imminent health hazards could be the lack of water (meaning no one can wash hands or dishes), lack of power, rodent or insect infestation, or sewage in the restaurant.
Oshiro said the “social pressure” caused by the placard system and posting inspection reports online for public consumption has been the “focus point (of) why we get such good voluntary compliance. The whole theory was using government transparency to influence industry behavior.”
Oshiro said inspectors tend to find the same problems, regardless of geographic region. “From Oahu to Hilo to Kansas City (it’s) the same,” he said.
Issues with staff hand washing, whether doing it at all or frequently enough, is a problem nationwide, he said.
Making sure foods are hot or cold enough and cooked to the proper temperature is another common problem.
But Hawaii’s placard system has seen success.
When the program started, Oshiro said the yellow placard issuance rate was 30-35% during routine inspections.
Today, “we actually cut that number in half,” he said. Now, only 15-17% of routine inspections lead to a yellow placard.
“I think it’s been very, very effective.”
Current health inspection reports can be found online at hi.healthinspections.us/hawaii/.
Those who feel they got sick from a food establishment can call 586-4586 to report food borne illness.
Email Stephanie Salmons at ssalmons@hawaiitribune-herald.com.
•••
A list of Big Island restaurants that have received a yellow or red placard over the past two years was provided by the DOH after an open records request from the Tribune-Herald. More than 250 entries are on the list, which also includes the inspection date and type of inspection.
Red
808 Grindz Cafe-Kona, Kailua-Kona, June 20, 2017, routine.
Genki Sushi, Kailua-Kona, May 22, 2019, general complaint.
Just the Two of Us, Kailua-Kona, Oct. 31, 2018, illegal vendor.
Mauna Loa Macadamia Nut Corp., Keaau, Sept. 21, 2018, emergency response.
Splasher’s Grill, Kailua-Kona, July 25, 2018, general complaint.
Subway Waimea, Freeman Investments LLC, Waimea, May 25, 2018, routine.
Yellow
1 Plus 1 Cafe, Hilo. May 17, 2019, routine.
3 Frogs Cafe, Waimea, June 12, 2018, routine.
808 Grindz Cafe -Kona, Kailua-Kona, Feb. 13, 2019, routine.
ABC Store #75, Kailua-Kona, Nov. 28, 2018, general complaint.
Affordable Catering, Hilo, Jan 31, 2018, routine.
AJ & Sons Catering, LLC, Hilo, Oct. 10, 2018, routine.
Aka Sushi Bar LLC, Waimea, Feb. 20, 2018, routine.
Aloha Deli Ice Cream & Shave Ice, Waimea, June 22, 2017, routine.
Aloha Island Mart Kamuela Shell #1301, Waimea, May 9, 2019, routine.
Aloha Island Mart Waiakea Shell #1311, Hilo, Oct. 30, 2017, routine.
Amici Vista Bar & Grill, Kailua-Kona, Dec. 22, 2017, routine.
Asian House Inc., Hilo, Nov. 11, 2017, routine.
Avalux Cafe, Kailua-Kona, Nov. 30, 2018, routine.
Banyan Mini Mart, Hilo, Sept. 22, 2017, routine.
Big Island Grill, Kailua-Kona, March 1, 2017, routine.
Big Kmart#7683, Kailua-Kona, Sept. 18, 2017, routine.
Big Robs Bakery & Cafe, Captain Cook, May 30, 2019, general complaint.
Black Rock Cafe, Pahoa, Jan. 26, 2018, routine.
Blane’s Drive Inn, Hilo, March 15, 2018, routine.
Blane’s Drive Inn – Orchidland, Keaau, Jan. 16, 2018, routine.
Bongo Ben’s Island Cafe & Grill, Kailua-Kona, Oct. 6, 2017, routine.
Bongo Ben’s Island Cafe & Grill, Kailua-Kona, Oct. 2, 2018, routine.
Boogie Woogie Pizza, Pahoa, July 6, 2018, routine.
Broke da Mouth Grindz & Catering, Kailua-Kona, Feb. 13, 2018, routine.
Cafe Il Mondo, Honokaa, April 17, 2018, routine.
Chen’s, Hilo, Nov. 1, 2017, routine.
Chen’s, Hilo, Nov. 19, 2018, routine.
Chen’s, Hilo, March 19, 2019, routine.
Choice Mart-Bakery & Deli, Captain Cook, Feb. 1, 2018, routine.
Christine Delivers Walua Plaza, Kailua-Kona, Feb. 14, 2018, routine.
Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, Keaau, Nov. 6, 2017, routine.
Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, Keaau, Jan. 9, 2019, routine.
Coffee Shack, Captain Cook, June 13, 2018, routine.
Costco Wholesale #140, Kailua-Kona, March 1, 2019, general complaint.
Cousins Seafood & Bento, Inc., Hilo, Aug. 1, 2018, routine.
D&E Fuel Good Stop, Captain Cook, Sept. 4, 2018, routine.
Da Poke Shack LLC, Kailua-Kona, June 18, 2018, routine.
Daiichi Ramen at Kona Inc., Kailua-Kona, Jan. 15, 2019, routine.
Daylight Mind Bakery & Cafe, Kailua-Kona, May 29, 2018, routine.
Daylight Mind Waikoloa, Waikoloa, May 21, 2019, routine.
Dimple Cheek Cafe and Market LLC, Mountain View, Oct. 1, 2018, routine.
Dimple Cheek Cafe and Market LLC, Mountain View, Feb. 1, 2019, routine.
Don’s Chinese Kitchen-Kailua, Kailua-Kona, July 6, 2017, routine.
Eagles Lighthouse Cafe Corp., Volcano, Oct. 20, 2017, routine.
East Hawaii Metals Inc. dba La Hiki, Keaau, Oct. 10, 2017, routine.
East Hawaii Metals Inc. dba La Hiki, Keaau, Oct. 30, 2018, routine.
East Wind Chinese, Hilo, Oct. 4, 2018, routine.
El Mercadito Rincon Mexicano LLC, Kailua-Kona, April 2, 2019, routine.
Fairmont Orchid- Hawaii, main kitchen and sushi bar, Kohala Coast, March 5, 2018, routine.
Feeding Leaf – kitchen & okazuya, Kailua-Kona, March 16, 2018, routine.
Fish & The Hog, Waimea, Feb. 22, 2017, routine.
Fishhopper Restaurant, Kailua-Kona, Aug. 3, 2017, routine.
Fishhopper Restaurant, Kailua-Kona, Aug. 6, 2018, routine.
Foodland Keaau No. 41, Keaau, Aprl 12, 2019, routine.
Foodland Super Market, No. 38 Waimea, Waimea, Feb. 28, 2018, routine.
Foodland Super Market, No. 38 Waimea, Waimea, July 5, 2018, routine.
Fujihara Store, Kealia Honaunau, Jan. 26, 2017, routine.
Fujihara Store, Kealia Honaunau, Sept. 4, 2018, routine.
Fumi’s Kitchen, LLC, Kailua-Kona, Aug. 3, 2017, routine.
Fumi’s Kitchen, LLC, Kailua-Kona, Sept. 27, 2018, routine.
Genki Sushi, Kailua-Kona, Aug. 25, 2017, routine.
Green Machine, Hilo, August 30, 2017, routine.
Gypsea Gelato, Kailua-Kona, Feb. 15, 2018, routine.
Habaneros Grill, Kailua-Kona, June 15, 2017, routine.
Hamakua Living A General Store, Honokaa, Apirl 8, 2019, routine.
Hapuna Prince-main kitchen/room service, Waimea, March 7, 2017, routine.
Hawaiian Ice Cones, Kailua-Kona, April 7, 2017, routine.
Hawaiian Style Cafe, Waimea, Oct. 25. 2017, routine.
He’es LLP, Kailua-Kona, June 13, 2018, routine.
Hilo L & L Drive-Inn, Hilo, Feb. 7, 2018, routine.
Hilo L & L Drive-Inn, Hilo, Oct. 11, 2018, routine.
Hilo L & L Drive-Inn, Hilo, Feb. 19, 2019, routine.
Hilo Yacht Club, Hilo, April 9, 2018, routine.
Hiro’s Place, Hilo, Feb. 27, 2018, routine.
Hiro’s Place, Hilo, Oct. 24, 2018, routine.
Holoholo Market #424, Kailua-Kona, Jan. 12, 2018, routine.
Holy Donuts, Kailua-Kona, July 11, 2018, routine.
Huggo’s and Huggo’s on the Rocks, Kailua-Kona, Sept. 25, 2018, general complaint.
Hula Hula’s, Hilo, 93 Feb. 15, 2018, routine.
Humpy’s Big Island Alehouse, Kailua-Kona, Jan. 25, 2018, routine.
Hwy-X-Press Mini Mart, Pepeekeo, April 2, 2019, routine.
Ippy’s Hawaiian BBQ, Inc., Waikoloa, July 9, 2018, routine.
Ippy’s Hawaiian BBQ, Inc., Waikoloa, Jan. 24, 2019, general complaint.
Ippy’s Hawaiian BBQ, Inc., Waikoloa, Jan. 24, 2019, routine.
Island Naturals Kona, Inc. (deli), Kailua-Kona, Sept. 21, 2017, routine.
Island Naturals Kona, Inc. (deli), Kailua-Kona, May 14, 2019, routine.
Iwa Arts & Cafe, Kealakekua,July 13, 2018, routine.
J. Hara Store, Inc., Kurtistown, July 24, 2018, routine.
Jack in the Box #8251 Kailua-Kona, Aug. 2, 2018, routine.
Jackie Rey’s Ohana Grill, Kailua-Kona, Jan. 25, 2017, routine.
Jade Palace Chinese Restaurant, Waimea, Oct. 5, 2018, routine.
Jade Palace Chinese Restaurant, Waimea, May 22, 2019, routine.
James Angelo’s Underground Pizza LLC, Waimea, Jan. 25, 2018, general complaint.
James Angelo’s Underground Pizza LLC, Waimea, Jan. 25, 2018, routine.
James Angelo’s Underground Pizza LLC, Waimea, Oct. 26, 2018, routine.
James Angelo’s Underground Pizza LLC, Waimea, May 10, 2019, routine.
Junjira, Captain Cook, Aug. 10, 2018, routine.
Kahuku Country Market, Ocean View, Dec. 6, 2017, routine.
Ka-Lae Garden, Ocean View, Dec. 8, 2017, routine.
Kalaekilohana Inn & Retreat, Naalehu, Aug. 15, 2018, routine.
Kalani Honua, Inc. Pahoa, Feb. 5, 2018, routine.
Kaleo’s Bar & Grill, Pahoa, Oct. 18, 2018, general complaint.
Kalikala Cuisine, Kailua-Kona, Feb. 8, 2019, routine.
Kamana Indian Cuisine, Kailua-Kona, April 20, 2017, routine.
Kamana Indian Cuisine, Kailua-Kona, May 7, 2018, general complaint.
Kamana Indian Cuisine, Hilo, May 13, 2019, routine.
Kamana Indian Cuisine, Kailua-Kona, June 10, 2019, food illness complaint.
Kamana Indian Cuisine, Kailua-Kona, June 10, 2019, routine.
Kamehameha Preschool, Pahoa, Aug. 27, 2018, routine.
Kawailani Mart, Hilo, April 9, 2018, routine.
Kawailani Mart, Hilo, Sept. 19, 2018, routine.
Kealakehe High School gym, Kailua-Kona, Sept. 19, 2017, routine.
Kealakekua L&L Inc., Kealakekua, June 26, 2018, routine.
Keei Cafe Mamalahoa, Kealakekua, July 18, 2018, routine.
Keoki’s Ono Fish N Chips, Captain Cook, June 16, 2017, routine.
Keoki’s Ono Fish N Chips, Captain Cook, June 5, 2018, routine.
Kilauea General Store, Volcano, Nov. 1, 2017, routine.
Kilauea General Store, Volcano, June 27, 2018, routine.
Kilauea General Store, Volcano, Oct. 26, 2018, routine.
Kim’s at Hilo Muni, Hilo, Feb. 26, 2018, routine.
Kim’s at Hilo Muni, Hilo, Oct. 3, 2018, routine.
Kohala L&L Inc., Kapaau, Oct. 2, 2017, routine.
Kona Brewery LLC — Growler Shack, Kailua-Kona, Jan. 15, 2019, routine.
Kona Korean BBQ, Kailua-Kona, Nov. 1, 2018, routine.
Kona No.1 Chinese BBQ, Inc., Kailua-Kona, Aug. 14, 2017, routine.
Kona No.1 Chinese BBQ, Inc., Kailua-Kona, June 28, 2018, routine.
Kona No.1 Chinese BBQ, Inc., Kailua-Kona, Dec. 4, 2018, routine.
Kona Taeng-on Thai Food Restaurant, Kailua-Kona, Sept. 27, 2017, routine.
Kona Taeng-on Thai Food Restaurant, Kailua-Kona, Dec. 13, 2018, routine.
Kona Wikiwiki Mart, Kailua-Kona, Oct. 11, 2017, routine.
Korner Pocket Bar & Grill, Kealakekua, June 12, 2018, routine.
Korner Pocket Bar & Grill, Kealakekua, Nov. 1, 2018, routine.
KTA Express Kealakekua -bakery/deli, Kealakekua, July 26, 2018, routine.
KTA Super Stores — Waikoloa deli, Waikoloa, Feb. 13, 2019, routine.
KTA Super Stores — Keauhou grocery, Kailua-Kona, Oct. 17, 2017, routine.
KTA Super Stores — Waimea deli, Waimea, March 3, 2018, routine.
Kuhio Grille, Hilo, June 29, 2018, routine.
Kuleana Rum Shack, Waikoloa, Jan. 29, 2019, routine.
Kum Yo’s Okazuya, Hilo, Feb. 14, 2018, routine.
Kurtistown Cafe, Kurtistown, Feb. 16, 2018, routine.
L & L Drive Inn — Captain Cook, Captain Cook, June 7, 2018, routine.
L & L Drive Inn — Palani Road, Kailua-Kona, Aug. 13, 2018, routine.
L & L Drive Inn — Palani Road, Kailua-Kona, Dec. 27, 2018, routine.
L & L Hawaiian BBQ — Honokohau, Kailua-Kona, Jan. 22, 2018, routine.
Lanky’s Pastries, Hilo, June 14, 2017, routine.
Lanky’s Pastries, Hilo, Dec. 28, 2018, routine.
Le Magic Pan, Hilo, June 7, 2018, routine.
Lemongrass Express Inc., Waikoloa, Oct. 6, 2017, routine.
Lemongrass Express Inc., Waikoloa, Feb. 25, 2019, general complaint.
Lemongrass Express Inc., Waikoloa, Feb. 25, 2019, routine.
Leung’s Chop Suey House, Hilo, July 6, 2018, routine.
Life Care Center of Hilo, Hilo, Sept. 26, 2018, routine.
Ling’s Chop Suey House, Hilo, Oct. 31. 2017, routine.
Ling’s Chop Suey House, Hilo, June 5, 2018, general complaint.
Ling’s Chop Suey House, Hilo, June 5, 2018, routine.
Lin’s No. 1 Chinese BBQ II Inc., Pahoa, Jan. 26, 2018, routine.
Lin’s No. 1 Chinese BBQ II Inc., Pahoa, July 18, 2018, routine.
Little Caesars — Big Kmart #7683, Kailua-Kona, Sept. 18, 2017, routine.
Los Habaneros, Kailua-Kona, July 3, 2018, routine.
Malama Market #2808, Honokaa, June 6, 2019, routine.
Malama Market #2805, Ocean View, Oct. 23, 2017HI 96737 10/23/2017 Routine Yellow
Malama Market #2805, Ocean View, May 1, 2019, routine.
Manny’s, Captain Cook, March 2, 2017, routine.
Maui Tacos, Hilo, July 23, 2018, routine.
Maxxwell’s Landing — Aloha, Kona International Airport, Kailua-Kona, Dec. 28, 2018, routine.
Maxxwells Landing — Hilo Cafe, Hilo, Oct. 3, 2018, routine.
McDonald’s, Kealakekua, Nov. 9, 2017, routine.
McDonald’s, Kealakekua, Sept. 28, 2018, routine.
McDonald’s — Kona Commons, Kailua-Kona, Jan. 15, 2019, routine.
McDonald’s — Walmart Kona, Kailua-Kona, July 31, 2018, routine.
Mehe’s Ka‘u Bar & Grill, Ocean View, April 24, 2019, routine.
Mi Ranchito Kohala Trade Center, Hawi, March 13, 2017, routine.
Minit Stop Leilani, Hilo, Sept. 17, 2018, routine.
N and P Food Mart, Pahoa, June 26, 2018, routine.
New Saigon Vietnam Restaurant, Hilo, Nov. 20, 2018, routine.
Ocean Front Kitchen, Hilo, Nov. 27, 2018, routine.
Ocean Seafood Chinese Restaurant, Kailua-Kona, April 3, 2017, routine.
Ocean View Market, Ocean View, Oct. 19, 2017, routine.
Ocean View Market, Ocean View, April 24, 2019, routine.
Oceanview Pizzaria, Ocean View, Dec. 8, 2017, routine.
Orchidland General Store, Keaau, Jan. 9, 2019, routine.
Outback Steakhouse, Kailua-Kona, April 12, 2018, routine.
P & J’s Tacos de la Calle, Keaau, May 2, 2019, routine.
Pahoa Museum, Pahoa, July 12, 2018, routine.
Pancho & Lefty’s Cantina & Restaurante, Kailua-Kona, April 17, 2019, routine.
Paradise Brewing Company Tap & Grill, Kailua-Kona, Feb. 8, 2019, general complaint.
Patz Pies, Captain Cook, Aug. 16, 2017, routine.
Pho’ 19, Pahoa, Feb. 8, 2019, routine.
Ponds, Hilo, Nov. 19, 2018, routine.
Puna Lemongrass, Keaau, July 30, 2018, routine.
Queens Court Restaurant, Hilo, Sept. 25, 2017, routine.
Regency Hualalai, MBSB Hualalai LLC, Kailua-Kona, April 27, 2018, food illness complaint.
Restaurant Osaka, Hilo, Dec. 7, 2017, routine.
Restaurant Osaka, Hilo, Sept. 17, 2018, routine.
Royal Jade Garden Chinese Restaurant, Kailua-Kona, May 29, 2018, routine.
Royal Jade Garden Chinese Restaurant, Kailua-Kona, Dec. 27, 2018, routine.
Royal Jade House, Kailua-Kona, April 8, 2019, consultation.
Royal Kona Resort — main kitchen, Kailua-Kona, Jan. 24, 2018, routine.
Sack n’ Save, Hilo, April 24, 2017, routine.
Sack n’ Save, Hilo, May 2, 2019, routine.
Sack ‘n Save Foods #25, Kailua-Kona, Aug. 13, 2018, routine.
Sakura Japanese Restaurant Inc., Kailua-Kona, April 17, 2017, routine.
Sakura Sakura, Hilo, March 21, 2018, routine.
Sakura Sakura, Hilo, Jan. 9, 2019, routine.
Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai, Kailua-Kona, Jan. 1 , 2018, routine.
Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai, Kailua-Kona, June 28, 2018, routine.
Seaside Restaurant, Hilo, April 16, 2019, routine.
Sirius Hotspot Coffee, Pahoa, Jan. 24, 2018, routine.
Sirius Hotspot Coffee, Pahoa, Jan. 14, 2019, routine.
Standard Bakery, Inc., Kealakekua, July 24, 2018, routine.
Strato’s New York Pizzeria, Pahoa, Aug. 6, 2018, routine.
Subway, Hilo, Oct. 31, 2017, routine.
Subway, Kailua-Kona, March 7, 2018, routine.
Subway, Waikoloa, June 15, 2017, routine.
Subway, Waikoloa, Feb. 27, 2019, routine.
Sum Leung Chinese Kitchen, Inc., Hilo, March 1, 2018, routine.
Sumo Deli Kailua-Kona, Dec.28, 2017, routine.
Sumo Deli Kailua-Kona, Nov. 28, 2018, routine.
Sunlight Express, Hilo, Feb. 28, 2018, routine.
Sunlight Express, Hilo, Feb. 21, 2019, routine.
Sunset Terrace, Kailua-Kona, Jan. 24, 2017, routine.
The Isles Cafe, LLC, Hilo, Sept. 4, 2018, routine.
The Isles Cafe, LLC, Hilo, Feb. 5, 2019, routine.
Tin Shack Bakery, Pahoa, Aug. 8, 2017, routine.
Tin Shack Bakery, Pahoa, June 19, 2018, routine.
TJ’S Pau Hana Hale, Kailua-Kona, June 15, 2018, routine.
TK Noodle House, Kailua-Kona, Nov.19, 2018, routine.
Trini’s Mixed Plate & Catering by: Tante, Kailua-Kona, April 11, 2019, routine.
Tropical Frozen Yogurt, Kailua-Kona, Oct. 6, 2017, routine.
Tropics Ale House LLC, Waikoloa, Sept. 7, 2017, routine.
Tropics Ale House LLC, Waikoloa, Aug. 15, 2018, routine.
Tuk Tuk Thai Food — mobile, Volcano, Oct. 24, 2018, routine.
Ultimate Burger, Kailua-Kona, Oct. 18, 2018, routine.
Umeke’s, Kailua-Kona, Nov. 6, 2017, routine.
Umeke’s Kuakini Fish Market Bar & Grill, Kailua-Kona, March 16, 2018, routine.
University of the Nations — Banyan Tree Cafe, Kailua-Kona, Oct. 6, 2017, routine.
University of the Nations — Global Outreach Center, Kailua-Kona, Nov. 22, 2017, routine.
Volcano Garden Arts, Volcano, Aug. 14, 2018, routine.
Volcano Grill and Bar LLC, Kailua-Kona, Feb. 28, 2019, routine.
Volcano School of Arts & Sciences — Keakealani campus1, Volcano, May 15, 2018, routine.
Waimea Express, Waimea, Oct. 27, 2017, routine.
Waimea Express, Waimea, Jan. 29, 2019, routine.
Wicked Chirashi — kiosk, Kailua-Kona, Nov. 27, 2018, routine.
Yong’s Kal-bi, Waimea, June 13, 2017, routine. ADVERTISING
Yum Yum Korean BBQ LLC, Waimea, July 3, 2018, routine.
Yum Yum Teriyaki, Hilo, Jan. 22, 2018, routine.

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Whistleblower staff that complained against chef Karunesh Khanna ‘sacked’

Whistleblower staff that complained against chef Karunesh Khanna ‘sacked’ Jun 26, 2019 (13 hours ago) | IANS London, June 25 : London-based restaurant chain Tamarind Kitchen has reportedly fired three employees who complained against Michelin-starred Karunesh Khanna, a chef of Indian-origin, used chicken as an ingredient in vegetarian and vegan dishes without informing the customers. According to a report in Surrey-based publication Personnel Today on Tuesday, the Central London Employment Tribunal heard that the staff concerned were working at Tamarind Kitchen, “one of three Tamarind outlets in the capital specialising in upmarket Indian cuisine”. The news about Khanna’s secret ingredient broke after six staff members of Tamarind Kitchen complained that Khanna told one manager “Guests don’t need to know what ingredients” were used. The former assistant manager Mafis Ali who brought the employment tribunal case into limelight, lost his job after he alerted bosses about the use of the chicken cubes.Restaurant director Fateh Dhaliwal, however, has denied the allegations made by the employees.Ali and five other employees approached another Tamarind Kitchen manager Malik who discussed the issue with the chefs.Malik “concluded the chicken stock was being used under the instructions of Khanna, who later allegedly told Malik that “guests don’t need to know what ingredients” were used.Malik then raised the issue with Dhaliwal and was told to keep selling dishes. “Those members of staff need to be phased out,” Dhaliwal allgedly told Malik. Khanna’s food has tickled the taste buds of celebrities like David Beckham and Oscar-winning actress Charlize Theron. A message sent to Khanna’s Instagram account went unanswered.One of the first Indian restaurants in the world to win a Michelin star, which it holds to this day, the Tamarind chain offers top-class Indian food in London.The news instantly led to an outcry on Twitter. “Everything is wrong with this. This is an absolutely clear case of cheating a people by scheming to make something delicious in such illegally disingenuous ways. Nobody is doing a favor letting the other know. 1stly, it should not be advertised as vegan. 2nd, customers are required to know!” a user posted on Twitter. “I’m more shocked that a Michelin-starred chef uses shop-bought stock when they tell the rest of us to make it at home. Michelin-starred chef Karunesh Khanna accused of using chicken cubes in vegetarian meals,” another user tweeted. “@karuneshkhanna Why not use vegetable stock or even one of the many faux chicken stocks available? So irresponsible and disrespectful. I’m headed to London later this year and will be skipping @TamarindMayfair,” a user posted. Like This Article?

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JW Marriott rustles up a unique street food line-up from four cities

The food festival has handpicked special treats from the streets of Indore, Chennai, Lucknow and Amritsar
Indian street food offers a delicious mix of spices and flavours. Not only does it represent bold, unrestricted flavours, it is also a reflection of our diverse culture and tastes in different parts of the country, always bringing alive some familiar childhood memories and evoking nostalgia.Looking to recreate the same aromatic spread but in cleaner environs, JW Marriott Chandigarh is hosting a 10-day food festival celebrating the street foods of India at The Café@JW, the all-day dining restaurant of the hotel. PHOTOS BY SUMIT KUMAR
A team of chefs have drawn authentic recipes from the bylanes of Indore, Chennai, Lucknow and Amritsar. So diners can relish lip-smacking favourites like Khaman Chaat from Indore, iconic Tundey Kebab with Warqi Parantha from Lucknow, Vegetable Kurma from Chennai and Amritsari Phirni all under one roof.
“The Street Food of India festival is designed specifically for the cosmopolitan diners of the tricity as it explores a unique diversity of flavours from across the country. Each city in our country has a distinctive character and culture, the most vivid illustration of which is its street food. Rich in flavours and abundant use of local produce and spices, street food in India is a treasure of priceless recipes, many of which have been preserved and cherished for over a century now. Others have evolved over the years, customised according to the likes of people, as delightful fusion recipes,” remarked Chef Naveen Handa, Executive Chef, JW Marriott Chandigarh.
Food from Indore, for instance, has been influenced by Rajasthani, Gujarati and Maharashtrian cuisine. At the food festival, one can enjoy coconut stuffed patty known as Khopra Patties. The flavours of freshly grated coconut in Khopra Patty with potato, crushed peanuts and green chillies are mouth-watering. There’s also the Indori Pineapple Sev, which is a fusion of traditional Ratlami Sev and the sweet and tangy flavour of pineapple. It teams best with the Indian Kombucha or Kanji Wada. From Lucknow, the chefs are rolling out the delicately spiced Nihari, a tender lamb dish cooked over low heat to infuse the curry with the flavours of the meat. Another delectable Lucknowi street food favourite is the tangy and spicy Khasta Kachori served with Bhaaji, a popular evening snack in the region. The street food from Chennai, on the other hand, represents the street food from different corners of South India with favourites like the stuffed Kuttu Parantha in vegetarian and non-vegetarian variants, Panyaram as well as Dosa and Kurma. A must try from the Chennai kitchen is Kozhukattai, a tempting festive dessert which pairs coconut with jaggery.
Characterised by traditional flavours and recipes with a distinctive Punjabi touch, Amritsari live counters will feature traditional street favourites like Pithi Poori, Aloo Launji and the quintessential Amritsari Phirni.
The food festival, on till June 24, is open for dinner only from 7:30 pm onwards and is priced at Rs 1,800 per person, including taxes.

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Bamboo

9 Credits Description
Bamboo is a member of the grass family, Poaceae, which is one of the largest plant families, and to humans perhaps the most important, as this family includes agricultural grains such as wheat and rice, as well as sugar cane. The Poaceae comprise about 600 genera and perhaps ten thousand species of grasses, which include among them bamboo’s more than 90 genera and more than 1200 species.
The tall species of bamboo are by far the largest members of the grass family, with the younger tips of some of those species growing more than 1 meter per day toward their ultimate height of more than 30 meters. As with all bamboo, the growth to maximum height and width is completed within one growing season. In subsequent years, the wood will harden and sprout more branchlets and leaves from the nodes in the stem, often starting at some distance up the culm (stalk) from the ground level.
Most bamboos are evergreen , but some have deciduous leaves.
The range encompassed by the many bamboo species extends from high mountains to low-lying tropical regions. Bamboo occur across East Asia, from 50°N latitude on Sakhalin Island in the Sea of Okhotsk, west to the Himalayas and Pakistan , and south as far as northern Australia. [1] . They also occur in sub- Saharan Africa , and in the Americas, where their range extends from the southeast of the U.S. to their most southerly limit at 47°S latitude in Chile . [2] Major areas with no native bamboos include Europe, north Africa, western Asia, Canada , most of Australia , and Antarctica .
Many bamboos grow as an understory in a forest whose canopy is formed by deciduous or coniferous trees (or both). The forests frequented by the giant panda in China, for example, are old growth forests with a canopy of both deciduous and coniferous trees, and an understory of bamboos, whose shallow root systems tend to occupy different soil terrain than the deep roots of the canopy trees.
Soft bamboo shoots, stems, and leaves are the major food source of the giant panda. Gorillas and elephants in parts of Africa forage on bamboo shoots when they are in season. Other animals that depend on the bamboo forests include the clouded leopard ranging from Nepal to southeastern China, the red panda on the forested slopes of the Himalaya Mountains, the ring-tailed lemur of Madagascar , cassowaries (large, flightless birds) found in Northeast Australia and New Guinea , and rhinoceros hornbill birds of Malaysia , Borneo , Sumatra, and Java . Traditional uses
A western person who observed the many uses made of bamboo more than 100 years ago in China has recorded for posterity a glimpse of just how remarkably versatile bamboo is: A Chinese bamboo book , unfolded.
“Ode to Bamboo”
A man can sit in a bamboo house under a bamboo roof, on a bamboo chair at a bamboo table, with a bamboo hat on his head and bamboo sandals on his feet. He can at the same time hold in one hand a bamboo bowl, in the other hand bamboo chopsticks and eat bamboo sprouts. When through with his meal, which has been cooked over a bamboo fire, the table may be washed with a bamboo cloth, and he can fan himself with a bamboo fan, take a siesta on a bamboo bed, lying on a bamboo mat with his head resting on a bamboo pillow. His child might be lying in a bamboo cradle, playing with a bamboo toy. On rising he would smoke a bamboo pipe and taking a bamboo pen, write on bamboo paper, or carry his articles in bamboo baskets suspended from a bamboo pole, with a bamboo umbrella over his head. He might then take a walk over a bamboo suspension bridge, drink water from a bamboo ladle, and scrape himself with a bamboo scraper (handkerchief). [3] Cuisine Edible bamboo shoots.
The shoots of bamboo, new culms as they first emerge from the soil, are called in Chinese, zhú sǔn (simplified: 竹笋; traditional: 竹筍) or simply sǔn (笋). These are edible, used in numerous Asian dishes and broths, and are available in supermarkets in various sliced forms, either fresh or canned. Bamboo shoot tips are called zhú sǔn jiān (竹笋尖) or simply sǔn jiān (笋尖).
In Indonesia , the shoots are sliced thinly and then boiled with santan (thick coconut milk) and spices to make a dish named gulai rebung. Other recipes using bamboo shoots include sayur lodeh, a vegetable dish mixed in coconut milk, and lun pia (sometimes written lumpia ), which is fried, wrapped bamboo shoots with vegetables. Note that the shoots of some species contain toxins that need to be leached or boiled out before they can be eaten safely.
Pickled bamboo, used as a condiment, may also be made from the pith of the young shoots.
The sap of young stalks tapped during the rainy season may be fermented to make a sweet wine, ulanzi, or simply made into a soft drink. Zhúyèqīng jiǔ (竹葉青酒) is a green-colored Baijiu Chinese liquor that has bamboo leaves as one of its ingredients.
Bamboo leaves also are used as wrappers for zongzi, a steamed dumpling typical of southern China that usually contains glutinous rice and other ingredients.
The empty hollow in the stalks of larger bamboo is used for cooking food in many Asian cultures. Soups are boiled and rice is cooked in the hollows of fresh stalks of bamboo directly over a flame. As well, steamed tea is sometimes rammed into bamboo hollows to produce compressed forms of Pu-erh tea.
In Sambalpur, India , the tender shoots are grated into julliens and fermented to prepare kardi. Also synonymous with bamboo shoots, the name is derived from the Sanskrit word for bamboo shoot, karira. This fermented bamboo shoot is used in various culinary preparations, notably amil, a sour vegetable soup. It is also made into pancakes using rice flour as a binding agent, along with spices and condiments to prepare a side dish in the local main meal. The shoots that have turned a little fibrous are fermented, dried, and ground to sand-size particles to prepare a garnish known as hendua.
Bamboo has gained increasing popularity in the culinary world as a material for cutting boards, as bamboo cutting boards are hard enough to withstand years of knife abuse, yet are more forgiving to the knife blade and cause less damage to the edged utensils over time than cutting boards made of other materials. Medicine
Bamboo is used in Chinese medicine for treating infections. It is also a low calorie source of potassium . In Ayurveda, the Indian system of medicine, the siliceous concretion found in the culms of the bamboo is called banslochan. It is known as tabashir or tawashir in Unani-Tibb, the Indo-Persian system of medicine. This concretion, called in English, “bamboo manna,” is said to be a tonic for respiratory diseases. This concretion, which was earlier obtained from the species Melocanna bambusoides, is very hard to get now and has been largely replaced by synthetic silicic acid. In most Indian literature, Bambusa arundinacea has been shown to be the source of bamboo manna. [4] Construction Bamboo scaffolding can reach great heights.
When treated, bamboo forms a very hard wood that is both light and exceptionally tough. In tropical climates, it is used in elements of house construction, as well as for fences, bridges, toilets, construction scaffolding, and as a substitute for steel reinforcing rods in concrete construction. When bamboo is harvested for wood, care is needed to select mature stems that are several years old, as first-year stems, although full size, are not fully woody and strengthened. Artwork Chinese bamboo carving, late Qing Dynasty .
Carving decorative bamboo artwork is a longstanding tradition in many cultures. The fiber of bamboo has been used for making paper in China since early times, and a high quality hand-made paper is still produced in small quantities. Coarse bamboo paper is still used to make Joss paper, or “spirit money,” which is burned in traditional Chinese funerals and in ceremonies to deities or ancestors on traditional holidays.
Bamboo wood is used for making knitting needles, and bamboo fiber can be made into yarn and fabrics. Bamboo fabric is notable for its soft feel and natural antibacterial properties. [5] Clothing made from bamboo fiber is popular for activities such as yoga . Bed sheets and towels made from bamboo have become luxury items. Sharpened bamboo is also traditionally used for tattooing in Japan, Hawaii, and elsewhere. Accessories
Bamboo canes are normally round in cross-section, but square canes can be produced by forcing the new, young culms to grow through a tube of square cross-section slightly smaller than the culm’s natural diameter, thereby constricting the growth to the shape of the tube. Every few days the tube is removed and replaced higher up the fast-growing culm.
Bamboo also is used as a shank extension on smoking pipes. Often a bamboo shank is added as a repair when a shank is cracked with use, or to repair a flaw during manufacture.
A variety of bamboo was one of about two dozen plants carried by Polynesian voyagers to provide all their needs when settling new islands. In the Hawaiian Islands, among many uses, ‘Ohe (bamboo) carried water, made irrigation troughs for taro terraces, was used as a traditional knife for cutting the umbilical cord of a newborn, as a stamp for dyeing bark tapa cloth, and for four hula instruments—nose flute, rattle, stamping pipes, and Jew’s harp. Recreation Bicycle frame made of bamboo (1896)
Some skateboard and snowboard deck manufacturers, as well as surfboard builders, are beginning to use bamboo construction because bamboo can be both lighter and stronger than traditional materials and its cultivation is environmentally friendly.
Bamboo is used also for making enclosures in fish farming, where cages can be made from a wooden frame and bamboo lattices. Bamboo is also used in the making of the high-end, lightweight fishing rods used in fly fishing . Musical instruments An angklung, a bamboo musical instrument from Indonesia.
Bamboo is used in making various musical instruments, such as the dizi , xiao, shakuhachi , palendag, jinghu, and angklung. The Bamboo Organ of Las Pinas, Philippines , has pipes made of bamboo culms.
In Indonesia , bamboo has been used for making various kinds of musical instruments, the most popular ones being kolintang and angklung. Especially for angklung, it is the pride and joy of the Sundanese people, and they have been safeguarding this tradition for centuries. Although, it is (to a lesser extent) also played by the Balinese, and later on spread to the neighboring countries in south east Asia.
A single shoot of bamboo can also be made into a didgeridoo , a wind instrument indigenous to Australia . Cultivation Bamboo foliage with black stems (probably Phyllostachys nigra ) Bamboo foliage with yellow stems (probably Phyllostachys aurea )
Many bamboos are popular in cultivation as garden plants, although care needs to be taken lest they take over the garden through their invasive behavior. They spread mainly through their roots and/or rhizomes, which can spread widely underground and send off new culms to break through the surface.
There are two patterns for the spreading of bamboo, “clumping” (sympodial), and “running” (monopodial). Clumping bamboo species tend to spread underground slowly. Bamboos are highly variable in their tendency to spread; this is related to both the species and the soil and climate conditions. Some can send out runners several meters in a year, while others can stay in the same general area for long periods.
Once a grove of bamboo is established, it may not be possible to completely remove it without digging up the entire network of underground rhizomes. If bamboo must be removed, an alternative to digging it up is to cut down the culms, and then repeatedly mow down new shoots as they arise, until the root system exhausts its energy supply and dies. If any leaves are allowed to photosynthesize , the bamboo survives and will keep spreading.
There are two main ways to prevent the spread of running bamboo into adjacent areas. The first method is rhizome pruning or “edging,” which involves removing any rhizomes escaping the desired bamboo area. Hooks, shovels, and picks are usual tools. The rhizomes are generally very close to the surface (just under a sod layer), so, if rhizome pruning is done twice a year, it will sever most, if not all, of the new growth. Some species may be deep running (beyond typical spade depth). These are much harder to control and deeper cuts will need to be made. Regular maintenance will indicate major growth directions and locations. Once the rhizomes are cut, they should be removed. If any bamboo shoots come up outside of the bamboo area afterwards, their presence indicates the precise location of the missed rhizome. The fibrous roots that radiate from the rhizomes do not grow up to be more bamboo, so they stay in the ground.
The second way is by surrounding the bamboo root mass with a physical barrier. Concrete and specially rolled HDPE plastic are usual materials. This is placed in a 60-90 cm (2-3 feet) deep ditch around the planting, and angled out at the top to direct the rhizomes to the surface. Strong rhizomes and tools can penetrate plastic barriers with relative ease, so great care must be taken. Bamboo entangled in barriers is much more difficult to remove than free-spreading bamboo. Barriers and edging are unnecessary for clump forming bamboos, although even they may eventually need to have portions taken out if they get too large. Bamboo in human culture Symbolism Bamboo, by Xu Wei in Ming Dynasty .
In Chinese culture, the bamboo ( zhú 竹), plum blossom ( méi 梅), orchid ( lán 蘭), and chrysanthemum ( jú 菊) (usually, méi lán zhú jú 梅蘭竹菊) are collectively referred to as the Four Noble Ones (四君子). These four plants also represent the four seasons and, in Confucian ideology, four aspects of the junzi (君子 “prince” or “noble one”). The pine tree (松), the bamboo, and the plum blossom ( sōng zhú méi 松竹梅) are also admired for their perseverance under harsh conditions, and are together known as the “Three Friends in Winter” (歲寒三友).
Bamboo’s long life makes it a Chinese symbol of longevity, while in India it remains a symbol of friendship. The rarity of its blossoming has led to the flowers ‘ being regarded as a sign of impending famine. This may be due to rats feeding upon the profusion of flowers, then multiplying and destroying a large part of the local food supply. The most recent flowering began in May 2006. Bamboo is said to bloom in this manner only about every 50 years. [6]
In Japan , a bamboo forest sometimes surrounds a Shinto shrine as part of a sacred barrier against evil . Also, bamboo ( také 竹) indicates something of the second rank, as a sushi set or accommodations at a traditional Ryokan inn. This comes from the Chinese phrase 松竹梅 (in Japanese, sho-chiku-bai ), where pine ( matsu 松) is of the first rank, and plum ( ume 梅) is of the third.
A Vietnamese proverb says: “When the bamboo is old, the bamboo sprouts appear,” the meaning being Vietnam will never be annihilated; if the previous generation dies, the children takes its place. Therefore the Vietnamese tradition will be maintained and developed eternally. Myths and legends Bamboo bonsai
Several Asian cultures, including that of the Andaman Islands, believe that humanity emerged from a bamboo stem. In the Philippine creation myth, the first man and the first woman came forth from a special bamboo stem that grew on an island created after the battle of the elemental forces (Sky and Ocean). In Malaysian legends, a similar story includes a man who dreams of a beautiful woman while sleeping under a bamboo plant; he wakes up and breaks the bamboo stem, discovering the woman inside. The Japanese folktale “Tale of the Bamboo Cutter” (Taketori Monogatari) , tells of a princess from the Moon emerging from a shining bamboo section. Hawaiian bamboo (‘ohe) is a kinolau, or body form of the Polynesian creator god Kāne Milohai.
An ancient Vietnamese legend tells of a poor, young farmer who fell in love with his landlord’s beautiful daughter. The farmer asked the landlord for his daughter’s hand in marriage, but the proud landlord would not allow her to be bound in marriage to a poor farmer. The landlord decided to foil the marriage with an impossible deal; the farmer must bring him a “bamboo tree of one-hundred sections.” The benevolent god Bụt appeared to the farmer and told him that such a tree could be made from one-hundred sections from several different trees. Bụt gave to him four magic words to attach the many sections of bamboo: “Khắc nhập, khắc xuất,” which means “put in immediately, take out immediately.” The triumphant farmer returned to the landlord and demanded his daughter. The story ends with the happy marriage of the farmer and the landlord’s daughter. Science
The Song Dynasty (960-1279 C.E. ) Chinese scientist and polymath, Shen Kuo (1031-1095), used the evidence of underground petrified bamboo found in the dry northern climate of Yan’an, Shanbei region, Shaanxi province to support his geological theory of gradual climate change. [7] Innovative uses
With perhaps a billion people in the developing world dependent on bamboo in one way or another, bamboo has often in the twentieth century been associated with poverty. That old image is being displaced in the twenty-first century by the new image of a versatile plant offering essential survival values for even the most advanced countries, as all are increasingly forced to grapple with the issue of environmental sustainability. Here, bamboo is in a class by itself.
Bamboo offers unique economic and ecological values as a commercially grown source of wood products adaptable to a multitude of construction uses and competitive with conventional hardwood and softwood construction materials in terms of price and performance. As a woody, perennial grass, bamboo offers strong environmental values that cannot be matched by hardwood and softwood products because bamboo can be harvested as a mature plant on a cycle varying from 3-7 years, while leaving in the ground the root system that can grow a new crop over another 3-7 years. The dense root system holds the soil in place even after the crop is harvested and the relatively light weight of a mature bamboo stalk in comparison to timber means that the bamboo harvesting equipment can be less disruptive of the ground surface than timber harvesting equipment.
The South American country of Colombia became a global-level center of innovation of bamboo construction after the 2000 World Expo in Hannover, Germany, where the most-visited pavilion was a large bamboo structure designed and fabricated in Colombia. Several German academic institutions collaborated in testing the pavilion’s construction quality and in the end certified it as being fully safe and sound. The pavilion received more than 6 million visitors during the 5 month Expo. It was subsequently disassembled and then reassembled and permanently mounted back in Manizales, Colombia, in the heart of the country’s coffee growing area, which was the area responsible for originally funding the building as part of a larger effort toward sustainability inspired by the Zero Emissions Research and Initiatives (ZERI). The architect, Simon Velez, has become a leader in a global movement to establish bamboo as primary construction material throughout the world. People have gone to Colombia to study with him then take their new knowledge and expertise in building with bamboo back to their home country.
Modern companies are attempting to popularize bamboo flooring made of bamboo pieces steamed, flattened, glued together, finished, and cut, and the effort is succeeding in the U.S. and Europe. National and state level bamboo associations are proliferating and affiliating under the umbrella of the World Bamboo Organization, which declares its mission to be that of promoting and supporting the use of bamboo as a sustainable and alternative natural resource. Interests of the organization’s members range from growing bamboo in gardens to growing it as a commercial product, processing it into an effective construction material, building bamboo homes and buildings, and as well living in a bamboo house. The first decade of the twenty-first century has been a period for bamboo to pass through all the tests for gaining international building code certification for use in the manufacture of such products as chipboard, plywood, I-Beams, and other bamboo structural materials. A factory in Vietnam was the first to gain international building code certification for its full range of building products, while the first company in the U.S. offering building code approved bamboo homes was based in Hawaii. Taxonomy of Bambuseae
The Bambuseae comprises around 1,200 species , distributed into numerous tribes, subtribes, and about 91 genera : Dendrocalamus spp.

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Culinary veteran Basu new executive chef at JW Marriott Mumbai Juhu

Culinary veteran Basu new executive chef at JW Marriott Mumbai Juhu Wednesday, 26 June, 2019, 16 : 00 PM [IST] Our Bureau, Mumbai Abhishek Basu recently joined JW Marriott Mumbai Juhu, the JW Marriott Group’s flaghip property in India, as the new executive chef. With over 17 years of experience in the culinary industry, he brings to the role his expertise in food and beverage and culinary operations after a long spanning career in hospitality.He will lead the culinary team and will be responsible for pricing, cost planning, budget analysis and the curation of innovative menus across all the six specialty restaurants at the JW Marriott Mumbai Juhu.Prior to this, Basu worked with The Park Hotels in New Delhi and Chennai as the executive chef, executive sous chef and in various other roles. During his tenure he has also won numerous national and international awards for his restaurants.He has trained in authentic Italian cuisine under the prestigious Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, having learned from some of the most globally-renowned chefs.In addition to training in culinary arts, he has also received extensive managerial training in the past few years, and is well-versed in leadership and people management.He has recently gained industry recognition as Noteworthy Talent of the Year, awarded by BW Hotelier’s Indian Hospitality Awards, and has represented the Indian Culinary Forum at FHA (Food & Hotel Asia) 2018 in Singapore.He has been a part of various such forums in the past, and recently, was also a member of The Week Magazine’s jury, which picks India’s best restaurants.A pioneer in working with farmers in India and driving sustainability at the ground level, he was recognised by Incredible India – Ministry of Tourism, Government of India as the ambassador to curate a full vegetarian menu in Iceland to celebrate Mahatma Gandhi’s 150th birth anniversary.At the JW Marriott Mumbai Juhu, he will steer the hotel’s award-winning distinctive restaurants, along with the dynamic culinary teams of the hotel.His excellence in the food and beverage industry will further facilitate the hotel’s commitment and efforts towards extending world-class dining offerings to their patrons, and consequently enriching guest experiences.

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The UKs most accessible restaurants

There are so many UK restaurants, but when it comes to accessibility, not all establishments cater as they should. Finding a restaurant with good food and great accessibility can be a trial. So, we’ve teamed up with a leading Sheffield stairlift supplier , to take a trip through the UK to the best and most accessible restaurant in the UK.
Types of cuisine:Indian
London is home to seven Masala Zone restaurants. Delicious and genuine Indian cuisine is served up by fantastic staff within exciting interiors. All the key spices used in the dishes at this restaurant are picked from the best spice farms following India’s spice harvest and then shipped to the UK.
The rave reviews have been rolling in for years. The Daily Telegraph has rated it among London’s best restaurants, the Evening Standard sees it as one of London’s six best Indian restaurants, and the Zagat London Restaurants Survey saw it voted as London’s Most Popular Restaurant Group.
Accessibility: Other than the Masala Zone Soho branch, all Masala Zone restaurants have accessible toilets and wheelchair access.
Where to find them: Masala Zone can be found in seven locations in and around London:
Masala Zone Bayswater
Address: 75 Bishops Bridge Road, London, W2 6BG
Opening times:
Monday to Friday: 12:30pm – 3:00pm, 5:30pm – 11:00pm
Saturday: 12:30pm – 11:00pm
Phone number: 02072 210 055
Masala Zone Camden Town
Address: 25 Parkway, London, NW1 7PG
Opening times:
Monday to Friday: 12:30pm – 3:00pm, 5:30pm – 11:00pm
Saturday: 12:30pm – 11:00pm
Phone number: 02072 674 422
Masala Zone Covent Garden
Address: 48 Floral Street, London, WC2E 9DA
Opening times:
Monday to Friday: 12:00pm – 11:00pm
Saturday: 12:30pm – 11:00pm
Phone number: 02073 790 101
Masala Zone Earls Court
Address: 147 Earls Court Road, London, SW5 9RQ
Opening times:
Monday to Friday: 12:30pm – 3:00pm, 5:30pm – 11:00pm
Saturday: 12:30pm – 11:00pm
Phone number: 02073 730 220
Masala Zone Islington
Address: 80 Upper Street, London, N1 0NU
Opening times:
Monday to Friday: 12:30pm – 3:00pm, 5:30pm – 11:00pm
Saturday: 12:30pm – 11:00pm
Phone number: 02073 593 399
Masala Zone Selfridges
Address: Garden Cafe 4th Floor, Selfridges, 400 Oxford Street, London, W1U 1AT
Opening times:
Monday to Saturday: 9:30am – 9:00pm
Sunday: 11:30pm – 4:00pm
Phone number: Not available, though restaurant can be emailed via selfridges@masalazone.com
Masala Zone Soho
Address: 9 Marshall Street, London, W1F 7ER
Opening times:
Monday to Friday: 12:00pm – 11:00pm
Saturday: 12:30pm – 11:00pm
Phone number: 02072 879 966
Official website

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