NaturesBasket Coupons

NaturesBasket Coupons

Active NaturesBasket Discount Coupons for February 2019 About NaturesBasket With the growing palate preference of the Indian consumers, we are ready to embrace sophisticated and exotic tastes from around the world. We’re travelling more than ever before, and as we take a bigger place on the world stage, we want to explore everything it has to offer. So we bring you the very best in service, quality and of course, international cuisine selection- a huge variety of delicious cheeses of all kinds from France and Italy, fresh and spicy ingredients from Thailand, amazing handcrafted ham and salami from Europe, oils and vinegars from the Mediterranean, most exotic and fresh organic produce and a cellar that boasts of the worlds best collection of wine & beer. In addition, we are powered by a team of noted food experts who search for the best and newest food products from around the globe. To make your journey through this gourmet destination even more mouthwatering, our uniquely knowledgeable and passionate staff will answer any questions you have, and can help you put together a gift hamper or an expertly selected cheese or meat platter for your special occasion.
Our instore culinary workshops by renowned chefs and food experts are much celebrated. These mouthwatering sessions ensure that foodies across India celebrate fine food at its’ very best! About Deals4India – Start your online shopping here & save money! Deals4India.in is completely free online shopping cashback website, providing Online Deals, Discount Coupons & Deals Discussions in Online Deals Forum. It is the best place to get best additional cashback on all of your online purchases, find amazing Online Shopping Deals & Online Coupons of leading e-commerce stores in India.We provides hottest and Best deals, offers, coupons on various products available across different online stores like Amazon, Ebay, Flipkart, Myntra etc.If you talk about online shopping, people usually get many links and offers for one product so got confuse that which offer or deal is the best for that product.We at deals4india.in, bring you the best online deals and latest discount coupons at one place and help online shoppers to decide the best products. Our Aim is to create a one-stop location when you plan to go online shopping.We are the ONLY site in India to offer Best Online Deals, Price Comparison, Forum Discussions, Coupons & Additional Cashback together. This makes us the cheapest way to shop online in India. Hence, always come to Deals4India.in before you want to shop for anything, and get the lowest price in India along with Additional Cashback! About Deals4India.in

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Wildlife SOS, The Last Animals, TripAdvisor, Thomas Cook, STA Travel, Elephant Rides, Vote for this year’s Elephant Pendant & ‘Trust of The Town, A Benefit for Elephants’ is announced in this Week’s ‘Elephant in the Room’

Elephants in India who are exploited for the tourism industry lead miserable lives of constant fear. For hours on end, these highly social animals are forced to carry tourists around on their backs under the scorching-hot sun – even when they’re exhausted or in pain.
Over 100 travel companies – including TripAdvisor, Thomas Cook, and STA Travel – have taken a stand against this abuse by refusing to offer elephant rides. Now, we need your help to keep the pressure on India’s Minister of Tourism to ban these cruel rides.What some tourists don’t realise is that these animals are commonly torn away from their families, tormented and beaten into submission, and denied adequate nutrition. Elephants deserve to be with their families in their native habitat, not held captive and exploited in the name of entertainment. Please send the Minister of Tourism a quick message calling for an end to inhumane elephant rides in India. The Last Animals. For many Americans, wildlife trafficking can seem faraway and vague. It’s something that happens in Africa, China, and parts of southeast Asia, and only rarely might it touch our everyday lives. Of all the problems we face as a society today, the illegal wildlife trade might seem like one that the average concerned citizen would be least likely to impact.
But as nine states have already recognized, it is an issue that can hit unfortunately close to home, and it’s one that deserves attention from state governments, local businesses, and consumers everywhere. Because while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service focuses most of its law enforcement power on items entering the country, for goods that are smuggled in, there’s an urgent need for state and local law enforcement to turn their attention to intrastate trade.
Asian songbirds and a bald eagle feather bustle recovered during Operation Jungle Book. Photo by USFWS.
In 2017, New Mexico came close to adding its name to this list of (then six) states that had passed their own trafficking bans. Whereas many of these state-level bans have focused on just elephants or rhinoceros or a handful of other high-profile species, New Mexico’s ban cast a much wider net.
Steve Oberholtzer, USFWS Special Agent in Charge, Office of Law Enforcement discussing the ivory trafficking with reporters. Photo Credit: Gavin Shire / USFWS
The Convention for International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) was established in 1975 through international treaty aimed at protecting imperiled plants and animals across the globe. The body continues to meet every three years and maintains three lists (or appendices) of species across the globe. Appendix 1 is reserved for the most imperiled species, and New Mexico’s ban would afford protections to the 1,200 species currently on that list.
And as much as any state, New Mexico has an important role to play. According to a study that Defenders conducted in 2015, from 2004–2014 El Paso, Texas and Nogales, Arizona were two of busiest ports of entry for illegally trafficked wildlife goods. Unfortunately, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service does not have any agents posted at New Mexico’s two ports of entry, essentially making our state a blank spot on the map for traffickers and necessitating that New Mexico’s law enforcement help fill this gap.
However, the bill was pocket-vetoed by then-Governor Susanna Martinez after passing both the Senate and the House. However, a nearly identical bill has been reintroduced this year as SB 38 and in late January, will begin navigating its way through New Mexico’s legislature once again.
With a new governor in office, the bill’s supporters are confident about its chances in 2019, but we also aren’t taking anything for granted. We know there are many environmental issues that both advocates and legislators will be working on, and it’s important that supporters of the bill make their voices heard to ensure it remains a priority.
A Chinese soft-shelled albino turtle and box turtles recovered during Operation Jungle Book. Photo by USFWS.
To this end, Defenders hosted two film screenings in Santa Fe and Albuquerque of The Last Animals, the award-winning documentary by photojournalist and director, Kate Brooks, which documents how the trafficking crisis is driving the extinction of elephants and rhinoceros. Since 2001, Brooks has worked in Pakistan, Iraq, and Lebanon documenting those ongoing wars, and she brings the gritty aesthetic those experiences instilled in her to this film.
At times the film can be difficult to watch, but it provides an honest and raw depiction of the dire situation facing these iconic species. From the front lines embedded with a unit of park rangers in the Democratic Republic of Congo to the streets of Vietnam to zoos and reserves from the Czech Republic to San Diego, Brooks’ film provides an honest look at the many fronts on which conservationists, researchers, and scientists are working diligently to preserve these species.
A king cobra, found inside a chip can, recovered during Operation Jungle Book. Photo by USFWS.
Unfortunately, as good as they can be, documentaries on topics like climate change, poaching, trafficking, or many other environmental subjects can often leave audiences feeling hopeless and depressed. But for us, one of the best parts of hosting these screenings was the ability to help turn our activists’ despair into action.
At each screening, in addition to providing information about the bill, Brooks, who has remained dedicated to the issue despite completing the film more than a year ago, set-up a web portal that allows New Mexicans to send a message directly to their state senator and representative requesting their support for SB 38, the Wildlife Trafficking Act!
New Mexico | The Last Animals
The illegal wildlife trade is a multi-billion dollar business and the fourth most lucrative transnational crime after… thelastanimals.com Additionally, those who were interested, signed-up to receive updates on the bill as well as information about other events and campaigns.
This Wednesday, SB 38 was read into New Mexico’s Senate and referred to its first two committees. Buoyed by a couple years of experience, a group of dedicated activists, our inspired sponsor, Senator Mimi Stewart, and a new governor, we’re hopeful that this is our year!
Recently we told you of an elephant by the name of Luna who needed immediate help. We didn’t know much about her, only that she was very sick and in agony. Your response of kindness and concern was very touching and enabled us to begin our efforts to bring her some relief.
Saturday, right before we were going to start our travels, Luna was unable stand up after laying down to sleep. Our team quickly hired a crane to assist her to her feet. Shortly after, we made the hard decision to immediately load her on the truck and begin the journey to the hospital.
We knew the journey would be a difficult one but also essential that we get her the medical help she desperately needed.
At one point in the journey, it was very apparent that Luna urgently needed some rest. So we stopped the ambulance and allowed her to lie down and relax. As we feared, she was unable to get up on her own. Our team brought in a crane and in the middle of the night to lift her to her feet again.
We gave her a little bit of time to recover from the ordeal of trying to stand, then we again loaded her on the ambulance to complete the journey.
And finally…she has now arrived at the hospital. It has been an ordeal, but we have her where she can be looked after and kept comfortable. For photos of her journey please click HERE .
She is both sick and weak and will receive around the clock emergency care. We hope you will consider becoming a monthly supporter to help her. It is possible she will be hospice care, we don’t know yet. However, we would like to believe that with love, food and medical attention…she will have a long life ahead of her to enjoy.
Thank you for supporting Luna’s journey and recovery.
Holly has been receiving care at our elephant hospital for one month! She’s made incredible progress. We want to share with you some of our favorite photos from the last four weeks as well as some details of her treatment. Thank you for making her recovery possible! Click HERE to read more! Now we would like your help in making one more decision. Help us choose what will be engraved on her pendant.
Click HERE to place your vote! Once again, thank you for everything you’ve done to help Holly and for your input in our poll.
Last month we asked you to help us decide on which elephant should be on our 2019 pendant.
Over 1200 people weighed in on this decision and although it was a difficult choice, Suzy was the elephant chosen.
Every year we ask you to choose one of our rescued elephants to adorn our commemorative pendants. Since 2015 we’ve created pendants for Raju, Suraj, Mohan, and Laxmi. This year, you can help us choose between three loveable ladies, Suzy, Asha, and Holly.
Click HERE to vote!
These collectibles will be available during our spring online auction event (details below). Our annual Bid to be Wild auction goes live, April 29 – May 10. We’re looking to expand our catalog of unique items that come to us from all over the globe. If you’re interested in making a donation of a gift card, merchandise, themed gift basket, or even a few nights stay at your vacation rental, we’d greatly appreciate it. Your gift helps save wildlife! Contact auction@wildlifesos.org for more information.
Speaking of our annual auction… we are now accepting entries from all of our Young Artists out there! This was a huge hit last year and we were overwhelmed by the amazing artwork that the next generation of wildlife supporters sent in. Check out the entry guidelines for more information. Last but not least, if you’re planning to travel in 2019, our third annual Tusk of the Town event will take place in Salt Lake City, Utah on Thursday, August 8 . Our founders Kartick Satyanarayan and Geeta Seshamani would love to meet you on this fun-filled night of entertainment, Indian-inspired cuisine and beverages, a silent auction, and more! Tickets are on sale now at www.tuskofthetown.org . You can help India’s wildlife by supporting the auction, taking the pendant poll , or attending the event in Salt Lake City .
Don Lichterman Sunset Corporation of America (SCA) Sunset TV Sunset Television Network Sustainable Action Network (SAN)

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Humour: Whims and woes of the homesick Indian traveller

Humour: Whims and woes of the homesick Indian traveller Here are some confessions of a tourist abroad and a traveller at home brunch Updated: Feb 03, 2019 00:03 IST Rehana Munir Hindustan Times When travelling abroad, it takes the author not more than two hours to crave Indian foods(Photo imaging: Parth Garg)
It is a truth universally acknowledged that Indians don’t travel well. I don’t mean Shashi Tharoor, who demanded reparations from Britain at the Oxford Union. Priyanka Chopra, who broke into an insular US TV industry. Or Cheteshwar Pujara, who made himself at home in Australia, scoring big runs in India’s historic Test series win in January. These intrepid travellers fill me with pride. Primarily because if you take me out of the land of my birth, I’m instantly rendered fangless, witless and cheerless. In fact, if I heard the title track of Swades (2004) at the immigration counter, I’d run out of the airport and back to my little flat like a woman possessed.
The 25°C world tour
I know I run the risk of being branded a nationalist when I say: There’s nothing like travelling in India. And yet I say it, snug in my sweater and socks in the Mumbai “winter”. The weather, to me, is the big challenge when you leave the tropics. And even close to the equator, the temperature falls to degrees that leave a true-blue Bambaiyya struggling. Whether it is a windy pier in Durban or an overcast day in Edinburgh, it would be safe to say I don’t acclimatise well. In India, be it in Kashmir or Himachal, I can add on the layers as if I were a Heston Blumenthal dessert, without any fear of judgment. In fact, just yesterday I enjoyed a fancy meal at a SoBo restaurant wearing a sweater plus a hoodie, with the hood flipped on. But I’m infinitely more conscious of my cavalier sartorial approach while away. I don’t acclimatise well [when I travel]. As temperatures fall, I add on layers as if I were a Heston Blumenthal dessert!
Then there is all the music and literature that celebrates the wisp of a wintry wind, the thrill of first snow and the chill of a plunge into an icy river. The antidote to these frozen enticements is invariably a glug of whisky or brandy, thawing the blood in the veins. In vain have I tried to apply these Hemingwayesque remedies. If a travel agency promised me a 25°C world tour, I’d grab it with my gloved hands at once.
Caught in a pickle
When it comes to food, I check the embarrassing Indian stereotype box once again. It takes me not more than two hours on new soil to crave dhokla and butter chicken, dosas and halwa. This, I realise, is not a purely biological response. I’m as fond of burgers, pasta and sushi as the next yuppie, but something about being in unfamiliar conditions makes me reach for the papad and the pickle in desperation. While my travel companions seek exotic cuisines and novel experiences, I scour the supermarket shelves for curries and powders, tearing up at the sight of a particularly appealing baigan or karela.
At the checkout counter, it’s another little skit, with my Indian currency mixing with ringgits or dollars. “Doing the math” has never been my strong suit. To do the math standing at a busy checkout counter, with impatient queuers and an unsmiling attendant, is a cliché that I’m doomed to inhabit my entire life. Shashi Tharoor, Priyanka Chopra and Cheteshwar Pujara are intrepid travellers who fill us with pride
#FeelingBlessed
Now in comparison, travel in India is a breeze. A gentle breeze … upon which wafts the smell of pakoras… which I can pay for in currency I understand. In this era of digital nomads and world citizens flitting between time zones and cultures effortlessly, I stand as an anomaly, that is for certain. But there is another element at work here. International travel has turned into a stage where we perform “the good life”. A social media event, garnering likes and wows, feeding into our sense of success and accomplishment. The hills of Meghalaya and the jungles of Coorg are all welcome, but they are just the fillers. The main event is the international trip. As if it isn’t good enough if you don’t need to switch currencies and accents.
My shortcomings as an international traveller don’t stop me from dreaming. I’d love to see the Northern Lights. Ride along the Amazon. See the seamier side of Tangier. But until these “main events” take place, there’s tiger spotting in Tadoba and entangling oneself in the grapevines of Nashik. Enjoying a junglee khichri in Uttarakhand or marvelling at the ruins in Hampi. I may be a tourist whenever a passport is involved, but I am a bona fide traveller on home ground.
From HT Brunch, February 3, 2019
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First Published: Feb 02, 2019 22:10 IST tags

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Biryani: Ek Khoj

Search Biryani: Ek Khoj Did pulao and biryani travel from Delhi to the rest of India? Or are there ancient, local versions? brunch Updated: Feb 02, 2019 23:53 IST Hindustan Times The debate about whether biryani can be vegetarian is never ending(Getty Images)
Two weeks ago, I wrote a column on these pages about the bigotry and myths that have come to characterise our attitudes to food. I was gratified by the response that the piece generated on social media. But one aspect of the reaction struck me as particularly interesting.
Many people treated the piece only as one that distinguished between khichri and biryani. Which is not that surprising because any time I write anything about biryani, it gets an enormous response. Social media loves biryani and on Twitter, the debate about whether a biryani can be vegetarian just runs and runs. India has gone biryani crazy.
The responses to that column made me wonder how much we really know about the origin of biryani and its ancestor, pulao. Abhijit Iyer-Mitra tweeted to say that while he liked the piece, I should remember that pulao has been around in Tamil Nadu for centuries.
I checked my copy of K. T. Achaya’s A Historical Dictionary of Indian Food . Achaya walks a careful middle path: “The word is ascribed to the Persian and Arabic pilav , pulao and pallao , yet it would appear to have found its way long ago into both Sanskrit and early Tamil literature of the third to sixth centuries.”
But Abhijit went beyond linguistic similarity to argue that in ancient Sangam literature, there were references to a dish that involved the cooking of rice in meat stock. The dish was called Onnu Soru.
I asked Shri Bala, the Chennai-based food historian, if she agreed. Sangam literature is her speciality.
Well, she said, there was a one-pot dish called Kottan Soru. Soru means rice and Kottan meant a collection of things. She also pointed to Perun Soru, which was meat and rice, and corresponded roughly to what we call pulao today.
So was this an ancestor of the pulao? Or did the two dishes develop independently?
These are hard questions to answer. The Manasollasa (12th century) has a recipe for a dish in which pieces of meat were marinated in fruit juice, threaded on to skewers and then cooked on hot coals. Another recipe involved pounding pieces of meat till they became thin before cooking them with yoghurt. There are basic differences between a biryani and pulao, so clearly they are different dishes
Though the Manasollasa is a South Indian text, today’s North Indians will have no difficulty in recognising these dishes as kebabs and pasanda. So, were they really developed in North India as is generally believed? Did the kebab really come to us from central Asia?
There are no clear answers.
It is the same with ancient India. We know that the chicken was first domesticated during the Indus Valley Civilisation from where it went to Europe. But archaeologists have found ovens that look a lot like tandoors in Indus Valley sites. So did we send an early version of the tandoor to Central Asia? Or even: is tandoori chicken much older than we think? The Manasollasa, a South Indian text from the 12th century, has a recipe in which pieces of meat were cooked on coal (iStock)
When it comes to pulao, we must remember that until Alexander the Great arrived in India around 326 BC, nobody in Europe had heard of rice. It was Alexander’s Greek (or Macedonian, if you like) army that found rice in India and introduced it to the Western world.
But while the rice tradition in the rest of the world is relatively well documented, India has few records of how our great rice dishes developed. The Western view is that Arabs took rice all over the world. There is evidence for this. Paella comes from the rice dishes of Arab cuisine, and the Arabs planted rice in Spain. Even the Italians got their rice from Muslim travellers and traders, which is one reason why it only features in a few dishes (risotto, for example). K.T. Achaya’s book takes a middle path on the subject
But where did the Arabs learn about rice from? Anissa Helou in her definitive Feast: Food of the Islamic World , offers two possibilities. “Muslims may have first learned about rice from the Persians of the Sasanian Empire when they defeated them in 635 AD,” she says. The Sassanids were Zoroastrians (like our Parsis) and claim to have invented pulao and other rice dishes, which the Muslim conquerors made their own.
But there is another possibility, says Helou “They could have learned about rice in the Sind Province of India, which they conquered in 711 AD.” If she is right about the Sind connection, then perhaps the traditional view that Muslim kings came to India with pulao from Persia or Central Asia may have to be reconsidered.
They cooked pulao at the Delhi Sultanate but this could have come from merging their style of cooking with an Indian rice tradition. It is a moot point because I have never seen any research on that subject.
As for biryani, we have a recipe from Akbar’s court so we know that it was current then. But was it invented earlier? And was it created in India? Those who ascribe a Persian origin to the dish focus on linguistics; on what ‘birinj’ means in Farsi, etc. I am never fully convinced by linguistic explanations because Farsi was the court language those days and even if a dish was invented in old Delhi, it would still be given a Farsi name. Chef Imtiaz Qureshi, is the Avadhi cuisine expert while Food historian Sri Bala’s speciality is Sangam Literature
There are basic differences between a pulao and a biryani (the principal ones being that in a biryani, the meat and rice are cooked separately and then layered; a biryani is wetter and spicier, it is a main dish to be eaten on its own, etc.) so clearly they are two different dishes. Nor was our kind of biryani (wet meat cooked separately from the rice) found in the Arab world or Persia in that era. (Though Mohammed Althaf with whom I had a long Twitter exchange about this says that in Yemen, meat and rice are cooked separately and then assembled.) All this suggests that biryani was created in Delhi.
So, how did it travel all over India?
The usual explanation is that as the Mughal empire spread, biryani travelled with the army. It went to Avadh, where the cooks made it more aromatic and a little drier. And it went to Hyderabad where the sour flavourings of the Deccan were added.
So far so good. But even then, there are problems. Why is it called a pulao in Lucknow when it is clearly a biryani? Nobody has ever given me a good answer. The chef Imtiaz Qureshi was dismissive of the distinction. “We call it pulao,” he said. “Hotels call it biryani.” This doesn’t quite wash as an explanation. Paella comes from the rice dishes of Arab cuisine, and the Arabs planted rice in Spain (Shutterstock)
If any place has the right to call it a pulao, it is Hyderabad, where they make a version in which the meat and the rice are cooked together. But no, they insist that it is a biryani.
And how did the biryani reach the rest of India? One of the country’s best biryanis is made on the Malabar Coast. It has very little in common with Avadh or Delhi biryani. It tastes different and it looks different (no basmati). But it is recognisably a biryani – meat and rice cooked separately.
The standard theory is that biryani travelled to such places as Calicut from Delhi. But did it, really? And why is the rest of the cuisine relatively uninfluenced by North Indian flavours? Why did they only adopt biryani?
Ask a local and he will tell you that his ancestors have been making this biryani for centuries, long before they had heard of the Delhi Sultanate, let alone the Mughals. One of India’s best biryanis is made on the Malabar coast and tastes different from Delhi or Avadh biryani (Shutterstock)
This may or may not be true, but Malayalis are hard pressed to explain why, if it is their own dish, they use the term biryani. And yet, it is true that they had few contacts with Delhi. In fact, they had much more to do with the Middle East because of ancient trading sea routes dating back to before the birth of the Prophet.
Honestly, I have no answers, just lots of questions. I am not entirely convinced by the pulao-came-with-the Delhi-Sultanate theory and I am even less convinced that every regional Indian biryani is descended from the biryani of the Mughal court.
Could it be that Indians have a tradition of cooking meat and rice together and that, at some point in time, we began to club all these different dishes together and used pulao and biryani as generic terms?
Now that India has gone biryani mad, some food historian should find us the answer.
From HT Brunch, February 3, 2019
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First Published: Feb 02, 2019 22:12 IST tags

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CRAZY Taco Eating Challenge | Best Mexican Street Food | EatTreat

Here are some more Mexican restaurants in Delhi besides The Fat Cat Bistro: https://eattreat.in/delhi/maps/best-mexican-restaurants-in-delhi-7
And here’s why we love The Fat Cat Bistro: https://eattreat.in/delhi/restaurants/fat-cat-bistro-delivery
Also, check out EatTreat’s awesome food review series – Served – where we review the most iconic restaurants & even hidden gems: http://bit.ly/ETserved
And, don’t miss these inspiring & unheard food stories on The Rasoi Project, which will definitely warm your heart: http://bit.ly/therasoiproject
More about The Fat Cat Bistro & its soft tacos: Situated in Malviya Nagar, The Fat Cat Bistro delivers hygienic comfort food in a jiffy straight to our doorstep. Since they serve a variety of cuisines including Indian, American, Mexican, Spanish, Brazilian and Italian, we are certainly spoilt for choice when it comes to selecting our meals! The Fat Cat Bistro has a massive menu for you to choose from. Since they believe that health comes first, there is a whole range of salads to choose from. The Greek Salad, Panzanella Fat Cat Way and Mr. Chow’s Special Salad come highly recommended because they offer health, without compromising on taste. If Mexican food is your preference, they also serve some delicious tacos like the Senorita Taco and the Taco Pedro.
Besides their tacos, they are also known for their Berry Pulao, Margherita Pizza, Mutton Cutlets, Penang Curry, Pork Chops and more!
Address: Ground Floor, C-116 Panchsheel Vihar, Khirki Main Rd, Malviya Nagar, New Delhi – 110070 Price for 2 – Rs.800
So, when are you heading to this Mexican restaurant to satisfy your taco cravings?
More about Challenge Accepted: Rohit & Abhishek are 2 Delhi dudes who are big time foodies & office buddies. They love to explore different food spots in the city & challenge each other in fun (but difficult) food challenges. These funny food challenges are a test to see who makes it to the end and who messes up (literally!). And they really, really hate that painful punishment right in the end. BUT, when such food challenges come their way, there’s only one thing they say: CHALLENGE ACCEPTED! That’s the beauty of an EatTreat Food Challenge!
We, at EatTreat, love a good food challenge. Be it catching food with our mouths or eating a whole watermelon without using hands. Or even making Ranbir Kapoor guess Mumbai street food, we’ve done it all. If it’s funny, it’ll be on EatTreat’s Challenge Accepted.
So stay tuned and stay connected with us on all our other platforms: Like our page on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EatTreatOnline Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/eattreat/ Bookmark our Website: https://eattreat.in/

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Simple and Easy Indian Style Raw Vegetable Salad

Salad is a dish usually made from vegetables and served in small pieces as raw or cooked. A salad can be served during a meal either at the beginning as an appetizer salad or as a side dish. Salad can also be served as a main course but such salad contains food with high protein such as meat, fish or egg. Sweet salads that contains fruits , cream, honey etc. are served after meal as a dessert salad.
We like to have side salads with our meal and the most common side salad dish at our home is tomato, onion, green chillies and ginger salad. Sometimes I add cucumber in it. We don’t use olive oil in salads. Instead of olive oil we use mustard oil, as mustard oil can be consumed as raw. We can say mustard oil is the Assamese version of olive oil. But mustard oil has a strong smell and taste which everyone may not like to or able to consume it as raw.
As the season of beetroot, carrot and spinach are on, I tried to make a side salad dish with these vegetables. The colour of this salad dish was so appealing and the taste was also very good. I served them with rice as a side dish. Now let’s jump to the ingredients and method of preparation of this salad.
Simple and Easy Indian Style Raw Vegetable Salad
📎 Course : Side dish 📎Cuisine : Indian 🔪Preparation Time : 15 minutes ♨Cooking Time : 0 🕞Total : 15 minutes
🍴Servings : 4
INGREDIENTS:
1/2 cup finely chopped beetroot 1/2 cup finely chopped carrot 1/4 cup chopped spinach 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tbsp olive oil / mustard oil 1 pinch of black pepper Salt to taste Little chopped coriander leaves for garnishing METHOD:
In a bowl mix together finely chopped beetroot, finely chopped carrot, chopped spinach and coriander leaves. Add pinch of black pepper and salt. Squeeze some lemon juice. Add olive oil or mustard oil. Mix well. Serve as a side dish at lunch or dinner.

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Who are we …

Context: Self explanatory! Disclaimer: All the characters are imaginary, and any resemblance with people living or dead is purely coincidental. Let me tell you a story: This Friday (01 Feb 2019), I don’t know, somehow, I wanted to get some food at 06:00. It’s bit unusual. I usually have my dinner at 07:30 or so. I was walking down the corridors, saving myself from everything beautiful, shying away from the eyes (I get carried away if I look someone in their eyes). So, I was with one of person who works in the same research group: very sorted person, let’s call him Mr.X. But, I was more interested in the food. He comes from Nepal: the land of Himalayas. My home, in India, is barely 30 miles away from his. When the skies are clear, which rarely is, one can see few peaks. Anyway, he knows how to cook few things (Nepal/Tibetan cuisine) that we Indians love (Indians love anything spicy: it doesn’t matter where that comes from. May be because there’s so much diversity in the country to an extent that the language/dialect changes every 50 miles or so. I know six regional languages, and few foreign languages, including Spanish and English). Anyway, I was trying to persuade him to cook something for us (me and few others). I was trying to learn something from the master, Mr.X, the art of cooking Momos — dumplings, but with that Tibetan touch. So that, someday, in future, I could cook the same for my wife. (The world is so diverse. We need to take the best from every part, learn something from everyone). Anyway, I was passing through the corridors at around 06. I in a dark-navy blue and white striped sweater, and she in three shades of moon, as usual, as beautiful as ever. I looked, she looked, and …. When, I came back to the lab at around 08, she was still there, which is bit unusual, because everyone has to have their dinner at 07 or 08. Anyway, I somehow felt tides in my favor. As she was returning back home, I almost ran to her — I have never done that in my entire life, and I hope I don’t have to do that for anyone except her (It’s bit embarrassing from my viewpoint, to have been let down. But, I don’t know how many times, have I let her down on various occasions unknowingly). Here’s how the conversation would have been: Ms. Y: Hey … Me: Hola! …. …. Me: Don’t you know what I want to say? Ms. Y: What? Me: No, no, no. You don’t know what I want to say Ms. Y: Hmmm Me: I want to say something. Do you want to go somewhere? (I can have my dinner twice) Ms. Y: Bus … I have to catch the bus But anyway, just the first line of the aforementioned conversation took place. I kept on looking at her. She didn’t look back, may be because girls are bit mean to people they find peculiar, and they have multiple eyes, and she had to catch the bus. May be some other day, or may be some other life.
Since the last months
I don’t know how things have carried so far
Sometimes I feel everything was pure luck
That two people were at the same place, in the same age group,
in the same corridors, in the same parallel universe
I don’t know how
But I know He doesn’t play dice
(May be it’s not just a chance)
Strange are the ways of my love!
What can you hope to find when love is totally blind?
It is just a state of mind
that knows neither smooth nor rough tides!
Anyway, related to the aforementioned events: Last night, I was watching a documentary “Fyre festival” on Netflix over at Mr. X’s house where he actually cooked Momos for us. The CEO of Fyre-a mobile app, a barely 24 year old kid, dropout from some XYZ university in the freshmen year, supposedly, convinced the so called “media influencers” and the so called “Instagram celebrity” to publicize the event. Thousands of people turned up, everyone paying nearly 8000$ for a week long event — how much money do you have to earn to actually spend on such crap. Anyway, the event was a pure disaster. The CEO didn’t knew when to pull the plug. “We should know when to pull the plug”. The organizers claimed “unique experience of your life, blah blah blah” (From my person experiences, on my travels to Japan, Scotland, Thailand, Himalayas, etc., I have realized that there’s a lot more you can appreciate about people and life in general, if you walk the streets with the people in their own country. And you don’t need to be with thousand others to appreciate the essence of that country or town. You don’t have to have 100s of loudspeakers. You need to be with yourself: that’s the whole point of travelling). The more horrible thing is: People do actually believe in such craps. People actually believe that they are “successful” if they happen to have “a million” followers on social media. My definition of “success” is different. G.B Malik (ECE, University of California Berkeley) puts it as: Often if you succeed means that you have set your sights too low. You need to dream big. The value of any great institution (here, you) can be created, realized, and perceived only in the long term. Focus on creating your long term value. Don’t be short-sighted. (I have far too many examples to back up these statements, but I come from a bit modest family. Complacency is dangerous!) “Success is not a million followers, or anything of that sort. It’s the journey through which we realize the self, … success is a continuous journey, and there’s a place even beyond the stars” Do not get lost in the world of social media, etc. Everyone has different set of skills. Think of everything in a long term. I have seen lot of brilliant people (some of them, my own batchmates, working for every fortune 100 company: some of us even got offers even without being properly interviewed). But that’s not important. As Peter Thiel puts it: “Brilliant thinking is rare, but courage is in even shorter supply than genius”. Perseverance is more important than intelligence in the long term. Success is built on lot of failures, and lot of courage. But, all along the life, work should be valued more than the results thereof. Everyone lies on a Gaussian distribution: with some mean and some standard deviation. No one is absolute genius. You might not be as prolific as many of your colleagues. But that doesn’t matter. Let me rephrase the previous paragraph from Peter Thiel’s perspective (Zero to One). I re-emphasize: I am quoting Peter Thiel. There are four kinds of people: a) Definite Optimist, b) Indefinite Optimist, c) Definite Pessimist, and d) Indefinite Pessimist. People of 1950-1960s U.S were definite optimists. They looked towards the future optimistically and they worked towards achieving their dreams. People of the present day U.S. look towards the future optimistically, but they hardly work towards achieving their dreams. As a result, they feel entitled. People in China are definite pessimists: they are working towards the future. Everyone says they are going to be the next superpower. But, they don’t believe it. As a result, they have major notorious developments. The fourth ones are indefinite pessimists : Europeans (forever on vacation). One should aim at becoming definite optimist. You have a goal and dream. Go and get it. As Larry Page puts it: Overall, I know it seems like the world is crumbling out there, but it is actually a great time in your life to get a little crazy, follow your curiosity, and be ambitious about it. Don’t give up on your dreams. The world needs you all! Even if a dream gets shattered in the evening, weave a new one by the next morning. The possibility of a dream come true makes life much more interesting. I reiterate: “Success is not a million followers, or anything of that sort. It’s the journey through which we realize the self, … success is a continuous journey, and there’s a place even beyond the stars” What did I learn from the Fyre documentary: We should know when to pull the plug. I will leave you with one of the most prolific poems written by the 18th century sufi poet: Bulleh Shah — he has literally inspired a generation of poets, may be even, Tagore. Note: the poem is translated. The translated poetry loose its essence.
Who am I?
I know not who I am
I know not who I am
Neither am I the believer in mosque
Neither am I into the rituals of the non-believers
Nor the pure among the impure
Nor do I exist in the religious texts
Neither am I opium, nor in the liquor
Nor in the drunkard’s wasted intoxication
Neither am I in happiness, nor in the sorrow
Neither am I clean, nor am I filthy
Neither am I of this water, nor am I of this land
Neither am I in fire, nor am I in this air
Neither am I from the religion that they gave me
Nor was I born out of Adam or Eve
I am not the name that I assume
From beginning to end, I have tried understanding myself
None other, have I ever known
I am not just another wise one
Who is the one standing here ?
I know not who I am
I know not who I am
I am neither awake, nor in a sleeping daze
Neither am I from the land of innocents
Nor am I the one standing in the wall’s shadow
Who is the one standing here ?
I know not who I am
I know not who I am
– From the pages of my diary …

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Brighten up winter with new street food vendors at Trinity Kitchen

Brighten up winter with new street food vendors at Trinity Kitchen By 0 10
Brand new arrivals Big Dub of Love, Bueno Burgers and Feral Food Store are all set to arrive at Trinity Kitchen, along with returning favourites Dapur Malaysia and Eat Like a Greek.
Taking residency for the next seven weeks (from February 4 th ), the street food vendors will be offering delicious, unique dishes, designed to brighten up any winter blues.
Big Dub of Love is crossing over the Pennines in their VW camper van to serve up salt and pepper steak and halloumi bites, which have been customer favourites since 2014. Their signature dish – The Big Dub Burger – features a beef patty with chorizo, Mexican cheese, crispy onions and gherkins, all on a squid ink brioche bun.
Feral Food Store was voted by Buzzfeed as one of the ‘Top 12 Festival Foods To Try Before You Die’ and will be bringing delicious deep-fried vegan dishes to Trinity Kitchen, such as roast cauliflower steak burgers, buffalo smoked tofu wings and southern fried seitan burgers with tomato and pomegranate salsa. These dishes are designed to make the most ardent meat eater think twice.
Meanwhile, Bueno Burgers has united Latin American flavours with Yorkshire beef patties. The Chilean Burger – a beef patty topped with Spanish chorizo, guacamole, beef tomato and traditional Pebre sauce – will definitely tickle people’s taste buds.
Dapur Malaysia is returning to brighten up shoppers’ lunch hours with their vibrant Malaysian street food. The team takes inspiration from their mother’s cooking and their time growing up in Malaysia, drawing on Malay, Chinese and Indian cooking techniques and recipes. Try the beef or chicken rendang, which is stewed in 18 different spices and served with coconut rice.
Also returning to Trinity Kitchen due to popular demand is Eat Like a Greek , which is bringing its fresh, healthy and unique Mediterranean cuisine back to Leeds. The family business uses locally-sourced meats, and their seasonings and oils come straight from their farm.
Dan Wharton, Marketing Manager at Trinity Leeds, said: “What better way to beat the wintry weather and brighten the season up than with our fantastic new street food vendors.
“We are thrilled to be welcoming Big Dub of Love, Bueno Burgers and Feral Food Store along with returning vendors Dapur Malaysia and Eat Like a Greek, with an incredibly tempting line-up, bringing a wealth of flavours from all over the world.”
With a concept that is completely unique to Trinity Leeds, Trinity Kitchen rotates several new food retailers every few weeks, offering visitors a vibrant mix of restaurants, bars and street food vans.
The new arrivals will be at Trinity Kitchen trading alongside permanent outlets Chicago Rib Shack, Pho, Rola Wala, Tortilla, Absurd Bird and Pizzaluxe.

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Indian pasta mkt to witness 17 CAGR until 23 due to demand from youth

Indian pasta mkt to witness 17% CAGR until ’23, due to demand from youth 12 : 00 PM [IST] The Indian pasta market is forecast to register a CAGR (compound annual growth rate) of about 17 per cent between 2018 and 2023 on account of the growing demand for pasta, especially from the young population, and changing preferences of Indian consumers, along with the developing taste for different global cuisines.This was among the findings of a report titled India Pasta Market By Product Type, By Shape Type, By Distribution Channel, Competition, Forecast and Opportunities, 2013-2023, which was released by research-based global management consulting firm TechSci Research recently.Moreover, the increasing household disposable incomes of the middle-class population, coupled with the rising western influence, is resulting in a higher demand for packaged and ready-to-eat food products, which is consequently expected to propel growth in the Indian pasta market during the forecast period.Region-wise, West India is the largest consumer of pasta in the country, owing to the large urban population base and rising population of working women. Bambino Agro Industries Limited, Nestlé India Limited, ITC Limited, Savorit Limited, FieldFresh Foods Private Limited, MTR Foods Pvt Ltd, and Borges India Private Limited, among others are some of the major companies operating in the Indian pasta market.Among product types, ready-to-cook pasta accounts for the majority share in the Indian pasta market, and is expected to remain the dominant segment through the forecast period. The advent of the e-commerce sector has created new routes for manufacturers to reach their customers. Online sales channel has enabled companies to widen their distribution reach and serve their customers even in the farthest of regions. Further, the rise in the number of tech-savvy people, coupled with the hectic lifestyles, especially of the urban population, is anticipated to boost the sales of pasta through the online sales channel. Nevertheless, store-based sales channels would continue to dominate the Indian pasta market during the forecast period.“The shift towards packaged food products is increasing in India, owing to the rising population of working women and the busy lifestyle of urban population, which are positively influencing the country’s pasta market,” said Karan Chechi, research director, TechSci Research.“Moreover, pasta manufacturers are focussing on the expansion of their product portfolio and are introducing pastas of different shapes in the Indian market. Additionally, the introduction of pasta variants made from whole wheat, quinoa and gluten-free ingredients that cater to the health-conscious customers is further expected to fuel growth in the coming years,” he added.“Rural India accounts for majority share in the country’s total population, and with 80-85 per cent of the pasta consumption being accounted for by urban India, the rural segment offers enormous growth potential for the pasta players operating in India,” Chechi said. The report has evaluated the future growth potential of pasta in India and provided statistics and information on market structure, size, share and future growth. It was intended to provide cutting-edge market intelligence and help decision makers take sound investment decisions. Besides, the report also identified and analysed the emerging trends, along with essential drivers, challenges and opportunities present in the Indian pasta market.

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Dining Hall Menus Expand

Dining Hall Menus Expand NYU Dining has made changes to dining halls to accommodate those with different tastes and dietary restrictions. Arin Garland, Dining Editor Print Bibimbap from the Global Street Food stand at The Market Place at Kimmel. (Staff Photo by Arin Garland)
Coming back from break, you may wonder why your favorite quesadilla spot at the Kimmel Market Place or Mr. Bing at Palladium Dining Hall has abruptly disappeared. Over J-term, NYU Dining sent out an email listing the additions to the various dining halls around campus, such as a new street food station at Kimmel, a new Chinese option at Palladium and halal options at Lipton Dining Hall and Jasper Kane Cafe.
The Global Street Foods station made its debut at Kimmel this January, replacing the quesadilla and burrito station. With a different selection of international cuisine every day, the station focuses on offering NYU’s diverse student body foods that feel like home. Throughout the week, they offer bibimbap, curry fish with aloo gobi, bratwurst and more.
While some are excited to see a larger array of options, some of the meals are unable to satisfy those with more refined palates.
“I found today’s Kimmel street food station kind of ridiculous,” CAS first-year Rawit Assamongkol said. “It was a version of the halal cart. Except a meal swipe costs like $10, so I don’t even know why I got it. And the halal carts — any of them — taste better.” The Market Place at Kimmel made a few changes in food options for global street food. (Staff Photo by Arin Garland)
Consisting of protein on top of rice slathered in sauce, halal is one of several options that the station offers. While many of the dining hall additions are interesting, the food has not evolved much in taste. For example, the bibimbap at Global Street Food consists of a mix of greens, rice, an egg, your choice of meat and spicy pepper sauce. Many of the flavors fall flat.
Taste aside, the concept of the street food station has piqued the interests of those who like global cuisine. Rory Meyers College of Nursing sophomore Dior Sadler is one such student.
“I think it’s good they added something else because a lot of Indians or Bengali people didn’t really have an option of what to eat here,” she said. “It sounds interesting, I would try it.”
Steinhardt graduate student Meredith Lopez said it was an improvement from the previous station.
“I never went because it’s not really something I enjoy,” she said, referring to the Mexican food station.
However, Lopez said she would be interested in trying the new options available.
Palladium added a Supreme Hot Bowl station, replacing Mr. Bing. According to the email NYU Dining sent over break, it consists of “made-from-scratch Chinese cuisine.”
“Although I feel people did enjoy Mr. Bing, I personally like the bowl station better because there’s more of a variety of the type of protein you can choose,” LS first-year Yesenia Leon said. “I think toward the end of the semester, Mr. Bing tried to implement bowls but they decided to completely shift over once we came back.”
The hot bowl station is also more accomodating for vegetarians and vegans. At the station, they offer beef, teriyaki chicken, orange chicken and tofu, as opposed to Mr. Bing, which offered fewer options.
Lipton, which serves vegan and vegetarian options, now also serves halal food certified by the HFSAA. Coinciding with NYU’s mission to accommodate its global community, Lipton is now officially a place where those with various dietary restrictions can come eat. Jasper Kane in Brooklyn is also expanding its vegan options, featuring more kosher meals and halal catered by local Halal Food Standards Alliance of America-approved restaurants.
NYU dining has 19 locations across campus that are all constantly seeking to accommodate the preferences of its diverse community. Overall, while the changes that NYU Dining made over break are a big step toward creating a more inclusive environment, there hasn’t really been an improvement in taste.
A version of this article appears in the Monday, Feb. 4, 2019, print edition. Email Arin Garland Advertisement

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