Naan rising

Naan rising

What works: South Indian entrees and the kerala paratha are very good.
What needs work: The papadums were slightly bitter.
Tip: It closes between 3 and 5 p.m. Jacob Threadgill Chicken varutharachathu with basmati rice and garlic naan . Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, Naan Cuisine of India has been reborn at the former Ajanta Cuisine of India location and quickly become a hit in the Oklahoma City Indian community for providing dishes from the southern part of the country. Naan, 12215 N. Pennsylvania Ave., opened late last year and has replaced Ajanta’s buffet with lunch specials built around the standards of butter chicken, chicken tikka masala , chana masala (chickpeas) and tandoori chicken. I never ate at Ajanta, but I know that it served north Oklahoma City for decades and was likely many people’s first experience with Indian cuisine. Judging from many less than stellar reviews on Yelp, Ajanta’s consistency had fallen in recent years. After a pair of visits to Naan, I can say that it is likely a marked improvement for that area of the city and diners who might be craving a few Southern Indian dishes. India is a massively diverse country, but most of the U.S. Indian food at restaurants is limited to standards like tikka masala and vindaloo . “Most Indian restaurants serve what South Indians refer to as ‘North Indian’ food,” wrote Alan G. on Yelp. “Was excited to hear of an Indian restaurant opening up in OKC that offers South Indian food,” said Danny on Yelp. “… This is great for OKC as it fills a much needed void.” Naan offers its full menu at both lunch and dinner, which features north and south Indian dishes. The menu appears large, but it’s actually just split into different protein and vegetarian options with the same preparation options. It offers roganjosh , khomra , saag and kahdai from the north. Varutharachathu , kerala stew and Malabar curry are on the menu from the Indian state of Kerala, on the country’s southwestern coast that is famous for tropical Malabar Coast. Most of the Yelp reviews from Keralites expressed hope that the restaurant would add more southern dishes, but that will probably come with time. I was excited to check out Naan and used both my visits to try a few south Indian dishes for the first time. I went around noon on a Monday and found a solid lunch crowd there, many of whom were taking advantage of its lunch specials, which include naan and a samosa in exchange for smaller entrée portions. I told the server, who was also in charge of seating people, that I wanted to try something new. After initially ordering the chicken kerala stew, she came back a few minutes later to tell me that it was not available that day. Instead, I ordered the chicken varutharachathu , which is a stewed dish with coconut flakes blended in. click to enlarge Jacob Threadgill Malabar fish curry with kerala paratha , a layered flatbread from southern India It arrived after about 25 minutes with a side of basmati rice and a portion of garlic naan . The naan lived up as the restaurant’s namesake, but the varutharachathu was the real winner. It was solidly spicy, and the presence of whole cumin seeds in the slightly red sauce showed me that they’re making their own garam masala . The next time I order the dish, I will probably go with lamb only because Naan used chicken breast, which was slightly dry, even after cooking in the sauce. That’s a personal preference and nothing the restaurant did wrong per se; I almost always buy thighs over breasts when cooking at home. I returned a few days later late in Naan’s lunch service (it closes between 3 and 5 p.m.) and received swift and friendly service. I ordered Malabar fish curry with a side of kerala paratha instead of naan . I wasn’t familiar with the paratha , but it is native to southern India and similar to naan but layered and much thicker. I’m still thinking about it days later. As good as the naan was, I greatly enjoyed the kerala paratha . It was perfect for soaking up the tasty curry. Before the main course arrived, they brought out two papadums , a thin baked dough that is almost like a cracker. It’s served with three sauces: mint, tamarind and coconut chutney. I enjoyed all of the sauces, but I wasn’t as big of a fan of the papadum only because the whole cumin seeds in the dough were slightly bitter. The Malabar curry arrived with the fish covered in onions and peppers. I ordered it medium spicy and could’ve handled more. It was flecked with black mustard seeds, and the fish flavor went throughout the dish. As I mentioned earlier, I will return just for the kerala paratha . After I finished the fish, I kept dipping the dough into the sauce. Between the two dishes, I preferred the flavor of the varuthrachathu . Since I tried two south Indian dishes, I’m not sure how Naan’s other dishes stack up against other Indian restaurants in the metro area. A few of the Yelp comments mention that the tikka masala was too sweet for people’s taste. I’m very glad to have made the trek up to north Oklahoma City to check out Naan and try some south Indian dishes for the first time. It’s nice to have more options in the city, and my dreams the next few days will be as layered as the dough in the kerala paratha .

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Prashad At Home by Kaushy Patel-P2P

Warning! Do not download before hiding your IP with a VPN! Your IP Address is Your Internet Provider can see what you are downloading! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN! We strongly recommend using a reliable VPN client to hide yourself on the Internet. It’s FREE! Prashad At Home by Kaushy Patel-P2P 15:53
Since winning everyone over on Ramsay’s Best Restaurant, Prashad has grown in size and reputation, and so too has the Patel family. In this, their second book, Kaushy returns the focus to the heart of Indian home cooking. Traditional recipes have been simplified using readily available ingredients. These are the quick dishes that can be prepared in the evenings when you’re tired after work, meals to leave bubbling away while you relax at the weekend and feasts for special occasions – as well as everything you need to serve alongside: the breads, the rice and the chutneys. You’ll also find many recipes drawing influence from British, Chinese and Italian cuisines – a perfect combining of cultures in the kitchen. And, because Gujaratis are well known for their sweet teeth, there are plenty of snacks and treats too. Life is all about balance after all. Times have changed and what we eat should suit our lifestyle, but whether you have 20 minutes or two hours, cooking should be enjoyed, bringing both you and those you are cooking for pleasure. From bhajis to feast biryanis to beans on toast, Gujarati-style, here are more than 100 recipes to bring warmth, taste and texture into your home, all made with the Patel’s characteristic love and passion for vegetarian food. Prashad At Home: Everyday Indian Cooking from our Vegetarian Kitchen by Kaushy Patel- 10 MB

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JW Marriott Hotel Jakarta to Unveil the New Sailendra Restaurant in April

by admin / 21 March 2019
The all-new Sailendra Restaurant is set to open its doors for the public after a major renovation in April 2019.
JW Marriott Hotel Jakarta is set to unveil the new face of the Hotel’s main buffet restaurant, Sailendra Restaurant, in the beginning of April, which will feature a new ambience that mixes in warmth, modernity and that familiar, much beloved home-feel, after undergoing its first major renovation.
Sailendra Restaurant first opened its doors in 2001, and is known for its comprehensive spread featuring a variety of both local and international dishes beloved by many food enthusiasts. Its signature dishes include the Marriott Burger and Singaporean Laksa, as well as Indian cuisine and even local delicacies, such as Nasi Goreng Sailendra, oxtail soup and Satay Rembiga. The Sailendra Restaurant’s culinary team created this one-of-a-kind condiment, Sambal Koja, as part of the ‘Sambal of Sailendra’ product range.
Patrons will get to enjoy most of Sailendra Restaurant when it fully unveils its new look next month, featuring the best quality ingredients from which its dishes are prepared, which are served with the friendly and professional service. One of Sailendra Restaurant’s more recent updates includes its launch of Sambal of Sailendra product range in late 2018, with its first variant being the one-of-a-kind condiment, Sambal Koja.
Sailendra Restaurant is located in the lobby of JW Marriott Hotel Jakarta, seats up to 263 guests, and features three private dining rooms for more intimate dining events. For more information and to make your reservations, call +6221579 . Post navigation

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Mysore Rasam with Lime Juice

Pinterest Mysore Rasam with Lime Juice
We already have a couple of different Mysore Rasam recipes , and today we are adding one of two Mysore Rasams that use lime juice for the souring agent, rather than tamarind. It provides a lightness of taste to the rasam, rather than the deep earthy flavours of tamarind, while still retaining the sour tastes so essential to South Indian food. We have a number of rasams that use lime , including the Mysore style rasam dishes.
Mysore Rasam comes from the city of Mysore in Karnataka, South India. It is one of the four dishes that are named after the city. The others are Mysorepak, Mysore Bonda and Mysore Masala Dosa. The defining features of Mysore Rasam are: The base of the rasam is toor dal. It uses a particular mix of spices – coriander seed, dried red chillies, and pepper corns. Bengal gram is also included in its spice mix. Usually, but not always, coconut is included in the rasam. You will see that the two recipes for Mysore Rasam with Lime Juice do not contain coconut. The rasam is thicker than many of the more watery rasam varieties.
Because this rasam is based on dal, when it is being served the Sambar is usually omitted, and the rasam becomes the showpiece of the meal.
The recipe is one of Meenakshi Ammal’s from her cook books Cook and See . One of our very special projects in the kitchen is to cook through these books, as they are very traditional Tamil recipes. You can find all of Ammal’s dishes that we have made here . Most of them are from Vol 1 so far .
Browse all of our Mysore Rasam recipes , all of our Lime Rasams , and all of our Rasam recipes . All of our Indian recipes are here , and our Indian Essentials are Early Autumn dishes . Mysore Rasam with Lime Juice
Source : adapted from Meenakshi Ammal’s Cook and See Part 1 Cuisine: Indian Prep time: 5 mins + 40 mins to cook the dal Cooking time: 10 mins Serves: 4 – 6 people, depending how you use it
ingredients

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45: CBD Edibles, Andy Hayler Restaurant Critic, Food Waste in Paris PGf+w

Alain Passard’s Vegetable Garden Party by Paige Donner (All photos © 2019)Ever wondered what the (not ‘a’, but ‘the’) famous French chef’s vegetable gardens look like? You know the chef I mean, the one whose 3-Michelin starred Parisian all-vegetable restaurant became world-famous precisely because of the chef’s skill with, and quality of, his vegetables.Of course I a […] Episode 44: Paris Restaurants, Le CBD Café Cookbook & Wines of The World by Barrère Capdeville by Paige DonnerToday’s episode of Paris GOODfood+wine from this early February springtime in Paris is all about restaurants and wines…and a brand new Cookbook! Click HERE to LISTENThe first segment features a longtime colleague of mine named Heidi Ellison who, after we worked together at the International Herald Tribune in the early 90’s (since r […] Episode 42: The Feast Is In The First Bite – Chefs Ludo Lefebvre & Nina Métayer by Paige DonnerClick on the Above Picture or HERE TO LISTEN TO THE PODCASTThe feast is in the first bite. I came across this phrase recently listening to a science program on the radio about how human taste buds function. It was scientifically explained that in fact with each subsequent bite of food, there is a diminishing sensory enjoyment insofar as the ta […] Episode 41: Natural Wines, Wine Calling and Sustainable Seafood podcast by Paige Donner by Paige DonnerLISTEN TO EPISODE 41 of Paris GOODfood+wine HERE Standard Definition: Natural wine is wine made with minimal chemical and technological intervention, both in growing grapes and making them into wine. The term is used to distinguish such wine from organic wine and biodynamic wine because of differences in cellar practices.This sort of sums up t […] Houndsley, Idéale & Île St.-Louis Île Saint-Louis, Paris We’ve pushed the clocks back – this weekend – and the Indian Summer temperatures in the 70’s that have spoiled us all Autumn-long disappeared this week, too, along with the daylight. Winter is fast approaching and with it, thoughts of holidays and the gift-giving season. Top on your lists, of course, is your beloved D-O-G ( […] Episode 40: Two Chefs on The PRASAD Project; Master Class in Austrian Wines by Paige DonnerSeason 5 of Paris GOODfood+wine is generously being brought to you by IoTShipping.Internet of Things = IoT IoTShipping tracks and traces your value assets using smart sensors that monitor temperature, geolocation and movement throughout the transport process. Two Chefs On The PRASAD Project and Austrian Wines with Willi KlingerFor October 201 […] Episode 38: Tribute Show To Bourdain and Gold, Best of Season 4 Paris GOODfood+wine by Paige DonnerThis episode of Paris GOODfood+wine is a tribute show to Anthony Bourdain and Jonathan Gold, both great figures in the world of culinary criticism and food journalism. who recently passed away. ON SOUNDCLOUD LISTEN NOW HERE This is what Bourdain said about Jonathan Gold: Bourdain wrote about Gold, who was then at L.A. Weekly. (Gold subsequent […] French Taste and Teppan At Aéroport Charles De Gaulle Paris by Paige DonnerFrench Taste by Chef Guy Martin (2* Michelin chef) is open for the summer business at the Charles de Gaulle airport, Paris’ main international airport. You can find this bistronomic restaurant in Terminal 2F. It is ideal for travellers seeking authentic French flavours combined with healthy recipes. This brasserie, restaurant and café all […] New French Chefs At The Eiffel Tower by Paige DonnerAnnounced by the French Press (Le Point) just hours ago, the Eiffel Tower, affectionately known by the French as La Dame de Fer, will have two new resident French chefs as of January 2019. Chef Thierry Marx, two Michelin stars, the Executive Chef of the Mandarin Oriental Hotel Paris and the founder of the Cuisine Mode d’Emploi(s) schools […] Huierie St Michel Paris & Menton (sponsored post)Infused olive oils is the specialty of this Menton-based, family-run olive oil presser. It was founded in 1896 but that hasn’t stopped them from evolving their tastes and products. These are some of its bestsellers. You can pick up gift products in the Marais at their Paris boutique located at 45 rue du Temple Paris 75004. Read more on […]

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Say Hello to Morocco through its Food

Say Hello to Morocco through its Food Posted on by Manjulika Pramod Have you heard of Morocco? Have you been there? How much do you know about Moroccan culture, history, food, tourism and more? A few days ago, when I tried to answer these questions for myself, I literally fell short of words. All that I knew was that the country shares it border with the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea and is home to the Grand Atlas Mountains, the Sahara deserts and the popular city of Marrakesh. Ummm…anything more….Not really. Well, if you ask me today, I know quite a bit. Trust me, the delicious Moroccan food made me sit up and read about Morocco diligently. Now, I can’t wait to travel there. Preview to Moroccan food festival. The Moroccan cuisine has too many flavors, layers and spices to itself. The Moroccans share our common love for food and patient cooking. It is evident in this rose shaped pastry (sweet) Moroccan Food Festival My ignorance was not meant to last long. The preview to Moroccan food festival at Ottimo at ITC Maurya was my first introduction to this country of many shades. The curated palette at the food festival introduced me to the cuisine, its history, some of the famous Moroccan cities, the use of spices, method of cooking and how Indian and Moroccan cooking share similarities . I also met the ambassador of Kingdom of Morocco in India and heard some local stories from him and his office staff. As they say, the best lessons are learned around dining table and indeed, the conversations that ensued were enlightening. Ever since, I have been reading about the country and being charmed every now and then. Morocco is the latest entrant to my “places to visit” list.
Moroccan cuisine is a delicious blend of Berber, Andalusian, Arab and Mediterranean cooking. Some of the popular dishes like Couscous, Tagine and Harira are Berber in origin. Rfissa is a very popular dish in Morocco. I quite loved it. A beautiful green tea setup. Moroccans are fond of green tea/mint tea and they prefer it with desserts. In the words of the Ambassador, H.E. Mr. Mohamed MALIKI , “Here comes Mesmerizing Morocco in Incredible India. Morocco and India have many things in common, especially culture. We share the love for food, for use of spices and elaborate cooking. Moroccans do not measure the ingredients when they cook, they use their hand which comes from experience. Just like Indian food, Moroccan food is also prepared patiently, with lots of love and dedication.”
Some of the dishes that he himself recommended were Chicken Tagine, Rfissa, Lamb with olives, Harira Soup, Khuboos, Moroccan green tea and the desserts. Some of the sweets that you must look forward to trying are Sfouf, Chebbakiya and Briwat. He also suggested that we try the Moroccan mint tea or green tea with the local sweets (pastries). The whole ambiance that was created was musical, festive and aesthetic, giving us a feel of Morocco. I am sure you wouldn’t like to miss an experience like this, if in the capital. Where can you have all of it?
At the Moroccan Food Festival in collaboration with the Embassy of theKingdom of Morocco!!
Dates: 22nd – 30th March for Dinner only
Venue – Ottimo at West View Kuboos -Moroccan bread! My plate has Tagine, sole fish, lamb made with prunes, some kebebs (meatballs) and rfissa. Hello Morocco (facts and figures). As much as I have been reading about the country, I am tempted to go. Morocco has 3500 km of coasts, 9 national parks, 31 medinas, 9 cultural properties listed as UNESCO worlds heritage sites and hundreds of historic monuments. It is a culturally rich and exciting place for tourists. This African country has been enriched by a variety of ethnicity and religions. The Berber, Arab, African, Muslims, Jewish, Christian make for its diverse cultural traditions and heritage. While Arabic is the chief language, the Berber language Tamazight is also an official language. If you have a history lover in you, Morocco will charm you with its old culture and character. It is made up of a beautiful blend of African, Arabic and European culture. While it is home to Sahara deserts, some of the most gorgeous beaches exist here. The landscapes are to die for. The traditional architecture of the mosques, the old houses, Medinas is mesmerizing. It offers captivating panorama, Mediterranean climate, both sea and the mountain, surrendering to the deserts. The oldest fossils of homo-sapiens were recently found in Morocco. Rabat is the capital of Morocco. The other popular regions are Tangier, Agadir, Marrakech, Casablanca, Dakhla, Laayoune and the Imperial cities, Quarzazate and Tarfaya. There are the Atlas mountains that you may have read in general knowledge books. The town of Agadir is known for its coastal beauty. The Rif Mountains are amazing. The culture of Kasba and Median are world-popular. Chefchaouen is the blue city of Morocco . It is known for its blue walls and buildings. The city of Dakhla also has special significance in the history of Morocco. Casablanca is sinly pretty. Overall, Morocco is authentic and is home to one of the biggest living cultures.
A bullet train named AL BORAQ, connects Tangier and Casablanca which covers the distance in 2 hours and 10 minutes instead of 5 hours. It runs at a speed of 320 kmph. Al Qarawiyyin University of Fes is the oldest University in the world. It was founded in 859 and is still functional. Moroccans are extremely fond of cinema. They make their own movies too and have a very creative in the space of art, music and films. Our Bollywood connect with Morocco has also been strengthening as some of the famous movies have been shot in some of its gorgeous landscapes. If you have something to share about Morocco or its food, do drop your comments below. Happy Eating and travelling!! Share this:

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SURINAME: THE FOOD

It’s time for spring break! Not that we’re really going anywhere, but I’m excited I can sleep in an extra hour for the next two weeks. And I finished my fundraising class last weekend, so now it’s time to finish up a few books that I had started. One of these days, I’ll catch up on sleep.
I dug right in and ate my meal before I even remembered to take this photo. But today was for cooking food from Suriname. I started out making Bojo Cake with Pineapple . It was fairly easy to make, but it’s not like a cake that most Americans are used to, mainly because of the cassava. In a large bowl, I used 4 c of tapioca (cassava) flour + 1 c all-purpose, ½ c grated coconut, 1 c sugar, 1 ⅓ c pineapple tidbits (keep the juice for later), 2 cans of coconut milk (I only had one can, so I used a canful of whole milk), ½ c pineapple juice (that I saved from the can), 1 tsp vanilla extract, 1 tsp almond extract (I used coconut extract because I couldn’t find my almond extract), 1 tsp cinnamon, ½ tsp of salt, half a stick of butter (melted), 3 eggs, ¼ c white rum (I used Bacardi), and ⅔ c rum-soaked dried cranberries (I hate raisins, so I used cranberries instead, but use whichever you want — even though soaking the cranberries in rum for a half hour creates a great cranberry-flavored rum that I sipped on all afternoon). Using a blender, I made sure that everything was smooth and poured it into a 13×9” cake pan and baked it at 350ºF for about an hour and 40 minutes. I keep forgetting that tapioca flour is going to set up differently than all-purpose. It’s far more dense and gooey, like the inside of pão de queijo. So, while the flavor was very good, the texture got me. I have a feeling that I’ll be the only one eating this.
It doesn’t look like much here, but this was amazing. I bet it would also be good with a little malt vinegar.
The main dish was Matjeri Masala . I used cod filets, which I don’t normally cook with but enjoy a lot. I heated my oil and fried my fish like I usually do it (dipped in egg and then panko crumbs), even though it didn’t fry up very good. I removed the fish and some of the oil, and fried up some onions and garlic in the same skillet. After that, I added in some garam masala powder and a couple Tbsps of ketchup and stirred everything around. Then I added the fish back into the skillet along with a cup of water, and a little salt and sugar. Covering the skillet, I let this simmer for about 10 minutes. I really liked this. It wasn’t heavy on the garam masala, but enough to really flavor it. I served this with some string beans that I simply boiled in a little salt and minced garlic.
Clearly the winner for tonight!
The other dish I made was called Surinamese-style Nasi Goreng . I first sauteed my onions and garlic before adding in some ground ginger, green onions, black pepper, sugar, and a vegetable bouillon cube. After a minute of letting all of that saute, I added in my cooked rice and stirred everything together, adding enough soy sauce (about 2 Tbsp) to make it all look brown. I let the rice cook for a few minutes longer, topped with some cilantro, and some fried eggs. I actually messed up on my fried eggs, so it ended up being scrambled eggs. It was all good. Everyone loved this recipe — they asked me which restaurant I got this from. Haha, jokes on them. It was good though.
This was one tasty meal, if I may say so myself.
I thought everything about this meal was good, and my husband thought so too. The kids were 50/50 about it. I could definitely tell the Indian/southeast Asian influence on the food. It’s a cuisine that I really like, so it was definitely ok by me. I guess I didn’t fully realize how much Indian influence has on Caribbean culture because of its history. I do know that I’m glad it’s there.
Up next: Swaziland (Eswatini)

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How to make Potato Ice Cream

POTATO ICE CREAM
A Recipe from POTATO DISHES compiled by the Pusa Institute Ladies’ Association
Recipe and Book Review by Vikram Karve
POTATO ICE CREAM – RECIPE
Boil one litre of milk on a gentle fire till it thickens and becomes half of the original quantity.
Boil a kilo of potatoes.
Peel the boiled potatoes – mash them nicely – and add a little water – make a pulp.
Pass the boiled potato pulp pulp through a sieve to make it even.
Add this even potato pulp to the thickened milk – and cook it for a few minutes.
Add a little pista and chironji chopped fine.
Stir in one cup of sugar (a bit more if you like your ice cream sweeter).
Bring the mixture to a boil.
Cool the mixture.
Add a few drops of fine essence of your choice.
Put the mixture into a freezer and allow the ice cream to set.
Then – Dear Foodie Friend – eat the Potato Ice Cream – and let me know how it tastes – for I don’t have the courage (and stomach) to try out this exotic “experimental” recipe and sample this wacky potato ice cream myself…!!!
BOOK REVIEW
This recipe is from a cute little book I discovered in my bookcase called POTATO DISHES compiled by the Pusa Institute Ladies’ Association and published by Popular Prakashan Mumbai in 1965 priced for a “princely” sum of Rs. 2.00 (Rupees Two only).
Yes, Dear Reader – you read right – the book costs Rs. 2 only – but that was 54 years ago in the year 1965 – it “cost” Rupees Two only…!!!
Dear Reader: Please see the picture of the book below.
I wonder how this delightful cookbook entered my bookcase – probably my mother may have bought it back then…!!!
Whenever I feel low – I leaf through my book shelves and pick out a cookbook.
I browse through the appetizing recipes – and in my mind’s eye I “eat” – and relish the yummy lip-smacking cuisine – my mouth waters – my troubles seem to go away – my spirits are lifted and I feel good.
Earlier – when I was in Mumbai – I used to rush out and actually eat the dish – or something similar in lieu – which further raised my spirits to a new high.
But now that I am languishing in the back of beyond – I just savour the scrumptious food in my imagination – which may be good for my weight – and morale too…!!!
It’s true – just the thought of good food can elevate you to a happy plane of living.
This 80 page book has a collection of 120 recipes arranged in 8 sections – all featuring the ubiquitous POTATO as the main ingredient – which were compiled during a cookery exhibition of potato dishes organized by the Pusa Institute Ladies’ Association in New Delhi.
Whatever potato delicacies you could imagine like the curries, koftas, dums, sukhas, rasedars, samosas, bondas, kachories, puris, parathas, snacks, pakoras, chips, chaats, cutlets, rolls and other run of the mill stuff – everything is there.
It’s the exotic – out of the ordinary – at times seemingly outlandish dishes – that make interesting reading.
Let’s have a look at section 7 – the “Cakes” section.
The recipe for Potato Ice-Cream – described above – the recipe for Potato Ice Cream features in this section – well – I didn’t know Ice Cream was a “Cake”…!!!
The Potato Chocolate Cake, Potato Soufflé and Potato Doughnut sound interesting.
In section 8 – they have incorporated and integrated potatoes into all the known Indian sweets – Rosogullas, Chum Chums, Gulab Jamuns, Jalebis, Kheers, Halwas, Pedas and Burfis.
I wonder how they will taste and I am tempted to try a few.
I tried a recipe called Alpama – a nice spicy and healthy savory – comprising cashewnuts, dals, suji, and of course the ubiquitous potato – served piping hot – it was delicious and invigorating,,,!!!
And while you try out the Potato Ice Cream – I’ll try something substantial like Potato Paneer or the Nargis Potato Kabab.
Till Next Time – Happy Eating…!!!
VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve
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© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
Disclaimer:
This story is a fictional spoof, satire, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh. This story is a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental. Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
Link to my original post in my Blog Academic and Creative Writing Journal Vikram Karve: http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2012/03/potato-ice-cream.html

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Happy National Reading Month 2019 (just a little late)!

Happy National Reading Month 2019 (just a little late)! March is National Reading Month! Shara (Mrs. LeValley) and I love to read! There are books everywhere in our home. Our goal every year is to each read a minimum of fifty-two books – one for each week of the year. Not only do we read lots of books, but we each record them in a journal. I don’t write anything about the book; just title, author, number of pages, and where the book came from (my personal library, public library, borrowed book). I have a record of every book I have read since January 2005, with one major exception – we moved to our current home in 2011 and I didn’t record anything from we packed up and moved in March of that year until January 2012. I’m bummed that I don’t have any records from that time… Even with that missing nine months, I have records of over eight hundred books, including thirteen so far in 2019. What do I read? A little of everything – biography, history, science fiction, fantasy, mystery, historical fiction, and more. I especially read books about science, nature, and the outdoors (including hiking, fishing, and hunting stories). Here is my nearly complete list of the science, nature, and outdoor books that I have read since 2005 (minus the missing months of 2011 – plus I think I may have forgotten to write down a few others ). These books have been grouped into rough categories in no particular order. Many books could easily fit in more than one category. Books that have been boldfaced are either ones that I particularly liked or thought were important. Alaska/Canada One Man’s Wilderness by Sam Kieth and Richard Proenneke Alaska’s Wolf Man: The 1915-55 Wilderness Adventures of Frank Glaser by Jim Rearden Shopping for Porcupine: A Life In Arctic Alaska by Seth Kantner Standing Ground: Alaska Stories, Police Tales, and Things I’d Rather Not Talk About by Alan L. White Fifty Miles from Tomorrow: A Memoir of Alaska and the Real People by William L. Iggiaruk Hensley Tide, Feather, Snow: A Life in Alaska by Miranda Weiss First Wilderness: My Quest in the Territory of Alaska by Sam Keith Yukon Alone: The World’s Toughest Adventure Race by John Balzar Winterdance: The Fine Madness of Running the Iditarod by Gary Paulsen Red Summer: The Danger, Madness, and Exaltation of Salmon Fishing in a Remote Alaskan Village by Bill Carter Braving It: A Father, a Daughter, and an Unforgettable Journey into the Alaskan Wild by James Campbell Death on the Barrens: A True Story of Courage and Tragedy in the Canadian Arctic by George James Grinnell The Alaskan Retreater’s Notebook: One Man’s Journey into the Alaskan Wilderness by Ray Ordonica Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage by Brian Castner Arctic/Antarctica Being Caribou: Five Months on Foot With an Arctic Herd by Karsten Heuer South With the Sun: Roald Amundsen, His Polar Exploration and the Quest for Discovery by Lynn Cox The Last Light Breaking: Living Among Alaska’s Inupiat Eskimos by Nick Jans Roald Amundsen by Tor Bomann-Larsen White Eskimo: Knud Rasmussen’s Fearless Journey into the Heart of the Arctic by Stephen R. Brown The Last Imaginary Place: A Human History of the Arctic World by Robert McGhee The North Country Open Horizons by Sigurd F. Olson Woman of the Boundary Waters: Canoeing, Guiding, Mushing, and Surviving by Justine Kerfoot The Grand Portage by Walter O’Meara The Long-shadowed Forest by Helen Hoover We Took to the Woods by Louise Dickinson Rich At Home in the Woods: Living the Life of Thoreau Today by Bradford Angier and Vera Angier The Meaning of Wilderness by Sigurd F. Olson Chips from a Wilderness Log by Calvin Rutstrum Birds/Birdwatching To See Every Bird on Earth: A Father, A Son and a Lifelong Obsession by Dan Koeppel The Ardent Birder: On the Craft of Birdwatching by Todd Newberry and Gene Holtan The Ghost With Trembling Wings: Science, Wishful Thinking, and the Search for Lost Species by Scott Weidensaul Out of the Woods: A Bird Watcher’s Year by Ora E. Anderson Of a Feather: A Brief History of American Birding by Scott Weidensaul All Things Reconsidered: My Birding Adventures by Roger Tory Peterson Hope is the Thing With Feathers: A Personal Chronicle of Vanished Birds by Christopher Cokinos Wesley the Owl: The Remarkable Love Story of an Owl and His Gir l by Stacey O’Brien The Verb ‘To Bird’: Sightings of an Avid Birder by Peter Cashwell A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birders and Their Quest To See It Al l by Luke Dempsey Birdology: Adventures With a Pack of Hens, a Peck of Pigeons, Cantankerous Crows, Fierce Falcons, Hip Hop Parrots, Baby Hummingbirds, and One Murderously Big Living Dinosau r by Sy Montgomery Crow Planet: Essential Wisdom From the Urban Wilderness by Lyanda Lynn Haupt Gifts of the Crow: How Perception, Emotion and Thought Allow Smart Birds to Behave Like Humans by John Marzluff and Tony Angell Feathers: The Evolution of a Natural Miracle by Thor Hanson Life Birds by George Levine H is for Hawk by Helen MacDonald Ravens in Winter by Bernd Heinrich Falcon Fever: A Falconer in the Twenty-first Century by Tim Gallagher The Final Frontiersman: Heimo Korth and His Family Alone in Alaska’s Arctic Wilderness by James Campbell One Wild Bird at a Time: Portraits of Individual Lives by Bernd Heinrich The Most Perfect Thing: Inside (and Outside) a Bird’s Egg by Tim Birkhead Lost Among the Birds: Accidentally Finding Myself in One Very Big Year by Neil Hayward Nature/Ecology/Natural History Swampwalker’s Journal: A Wetlands Year by David M. Carroll Natural Coincidence: The Trip from Kalamazoo by Bil Gilbert Why Moths Hate Thomas Edison edited by Hampton Sides Wintering by Diana Kappel-Smith Teaching a Stone to Talk: Expeditions and Encounters by Annie Dillard Return to Wild America: A Yearlong Search For the Continent’s Natural Soul by Scott Weidensaul Northwoods Wildlife: A Watcher’s Guide to Habitats by Janine M. Benyus Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder by Richard Louv It’s Raining Frogs and Fishes: Four Seasons of Natural Phenomena and Oddities of the Sky by Jerry Dennis The Eternal Frontier: An Ecological History of North America and Its Peoples by Tim Flannery Wilderness Ethics: Preserving the Spirit of Wildness by Guy Waterman and Laura Waterman My Story as Told by Water: Confessions, Druidic Rants, Reflections, Bird-watching, Fish-stalkings, Visions, Songs and Prayers Refracting Light, From Living Rivers, In the Age of the Industrial Dark by David James Duncan Squirrels at My Window: Life with a Remarkable Gange of Urban Squirrels by Grace Marmor Spruch Life Counts: Cataloguing Life on Earth by Michael Gleich, Dirk Maxeiner, et al A Trail Through Leaves: The Journal as a Path to Place by Hannah Hinchman The World Without Us by Alan Weisman The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild by Craig Childs Looking for Hickories: The Forgotten Wildness of the Rural Midwest by Tom Springer Ecology of A Cracker Childhood by Janisse Ray Life in the Soil: A Guide for Naturalists and Gardeners by James B Nardi The Search for a Sense of Wildness by Michael P. Ausema Stalking the Plumed Serpent and Other Adventures in Herpetology by D. Bruce Means Where the Wild Things Were: Life, Death, and Ecological Wreckage in a Land of Vanishing Predators by William Stolzenburg The Snake Charmer: A Life and Death in Pursuit of Knowledge by Jamie James The Wild Places by Robert MacFarlane Watchers at the Pond by Franklin Russell Dry Storeroom No. 1: The Secret life of the Natural History Museum by Richard Fortey A Year in the Maine Woods by Bernd Heinrich One Square Inch of Silence: One Man’s Search for Natural Silence in a Noisy World by Gordon Hempton ans John Grossman Mean and Lowly Things: Snakes, Science, and Survival in the Congo by Kate Jackson The Book of Yaak by Rick Bass Summer World: A Season of Bounty by Bernd Heinrich Every Creeping Thing: True Tales of Faintly Repulsive Wildlife by Richard Conniff The Founding Fish by John McPhee A Reenchanted World: The Quest for a New Kinship With Nature by James William Gibson Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America by Douglas Brinkley Footnotes on Nature by John Kieran Why We Run: A Natural History by Bernd Heinrich The Path: A One-mile Walk Through the Universe by Chet Raymo The Wild Marsh: Four Seasons at Home in Montana by Rick Bass Water: A Natural History by Alice Outwater The Forgotten Pollinators by Stephen L. Buchmann and Gary Paul The Mountains Next Door by Janice Emily Bowers Still Life: Adventures in Taxidermy by Melissa Milgram The Snoring Bird: My Family’s Journey Through A Century of Biology by Bernd Heinrich Why I Came West by Rick Bass Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat: Why It’s So Hard to Think Straight About Animals by Hal Herzog The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating by Elizabeth Tova Bailey Kingdom Under Glass: A Tale of Obsession, Adventure, and One Man’s Quest to Preserve the World’s Great Animals by Jay Kirk Wading For Bugs: Exploring Streams With the Experts edited by Judith L. Li and Michael T. Barbour The Big Swamp: A Wildlife Biologist’s Lifetime of Adventures by Raymond D. Schofield Life Everlasting: The Animal Way of Death by Bernd Heinrich Time and Tide in Acadia: Seasons on Mount Desert Island by Christopher Camuto Rambunctious Garden: Saving Nature in a Post-wild World by Emma Marris The Forest Unseen: A Year’s Watch in Nature by David George Haskell Dirt Work: An Education in the Woods by Christine Byl Eating Dirt: Deep Forests, Big Timber, and Life with the Tree-Planting Tribe by Charlotte Gill The Endangered Species Road Trip: A Summer’s Worth of Dingy Motels, Poison Oak, Ravenous Insects, and the Rarest Species in North America by Cameron MacDonald Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout by Philip Connors A Sand County Almanac: With Essays on Conservation from Round River by Aldo Leopold Beyond Walden: The Hidden History of America’s Kettle Lakes and Ponds by Robert M. Thorson Keith County Journal by John Janovy Jr. Island Year by Hazel Heckman A Sting in the Tale: My Adventures with Bumblebees by Dave Goulson A Buzz in the Meadow: The Natural History of a French Farm by Dave Goulson The Prophet of Dry Hill: Lessons From a Life in Nature by David Gessner Theodore Roosevelt in the Field by Michael R. Canfield The Urban Bestiary: Encountering the Everyday Wild by Lyanda Lynn Haupt Once They Were Hats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver by Frances Backhouse Under the Stars: How America Fell in Love with Camping by Dan White The Carry Home: Lessons From the American Wilderness by Gary Ferguson Bog tender: Coming Home to Nature and Memory by George Szanto The Eternal Frontier: An Ecological History of North America and Its Peoples by Tim Flannery The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man’s Love Affair with Nature by J. Drew Lanham Hawk’s Rest: A Season in the Remote Heart of Yellowstone by Gary Ferguson Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses by Robin Wall Kimmerer The Pine Barrens by John McPhee Becoming Teddy Roosevelt: How a Maine Guide Inspired America’s 26th President by Andrew Vietze The Lost Species: Great Expeditions in the Collection of Natural History Museums by Christopher Kemp The Snow Tourist: A Search for the World’s Purest, Deepest Snowfall by Charles English Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction by Mary Ellen Hannibal Hiking Naked: A Quaker Woman’s Search for Balance by Iris Graville Saving Tarboo Creek: One Family’s Quest to Heal the Land by Scott Freeman The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier Healthier, and More Creative by Florence Williams The Power of a Plant: A Teacher’s Odyssey to grow Healthy Minds and Schools by Stephen Ritz The Naturalist at Large by Bernd Heinrich The Art of Naming by Michael Ohl Buzz: The Nature and Necessity of Bees by Thor Hanson The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Century by Kirk Wallace Johnson Apocalyptic Planet: Field Guide to the Everending Earth by Craig Childs The Ninemile Wolves by Rick Bass Nature Wars: The Incredible Story of How Wildlife Comebacks Turned Backyards Into Battlegrounds by Jim Sterba Trees/Plants/Gardens Beautiful Madness: One Man’s Journey Through Other People’s Gardens by James Dodson The Trees in My Forest by Bernd Heinrich The Wild Trees: A Story of Passion and Daring by Richard Preston People With Dirty Hands: The Passion for Gardening by Robert Chotzinoff American Chestnut: The Life, Death, and Rebirth of a Perfect Tree by Susan Freinkel The Man Who Planted Trees: A Story of Lost Groves, the Science of Trees, and a Plan to Save the Planet by Jim Robbins Wood: Craft, Culture, History by Harvey Green Lab Girl by Hope Jahren Unearthed: Love, Acceptance, and Other Lessons from an Abandoned Garden by Alexandra Risen Nature’s Temples: The Complex World of Old-Growth Forests by Joan Maloof The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate: Discoveries from a Secret World by Peter Wohlleben Urban Forests: A Natural History of Trees and People in the American Cityscape by Jill Jonnes The Wood for the Trees: One Man’s Long View of Nature by Richard Fortey Witness Tree: Seasons of Change with a Century-old Oak by Lynda V. Mapes The Ghost Orchard: The Hidden History of the Apple in North America by Helen Humphreys The Man Who Climbs Trees by James Aldred The Long, Long Lif of Trees by Fiona Stafford Geology/Geography On the Map: A Mind-expanding Exploration of the Way the World Looks by Simon Garfield Rising From the Plains by John McPhee Coming Into the Country by John McPhee Annals of the Former World by John McPhee The Ground Beneath Us: From the Oldest Cities to the Last Wilderness, What Dirt tells Us About Who We Are by Paul Bogard Stories in Stone: Travels Through Urban Geology by David B Williams The Map That Changed The World: William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology by Simon Winchester Farming/Rural Life A Country Year: Living the Questions by Sue Hubbell The Last American Man by Elizabeth Gilbert See You in a Hundred Years: Four Seasons in Forgotten America by Logan Ward Clearing Land: Legacies of the American Farm by Jane Brox Heirloom: Notes From and Accidental Tomato Farmer by Tim Stark Clabbered Dirt, Sweet Grass by Gary Paulsen It’s a Long Road to a Tomato: Tales of an organic Farmer Who Quit the Big City for the (Not So) Simple Life by Keith Stewart Ripe: The Search for the Perfect Tomato by Arthur Allen Claiming Ground: A Memoir by Laura Bell Wisdom of the Last Farmer: Harvesting Legacies From the Land by David Mas Masumoto Mostly in Clover: Growing Up in Rural Ontario. A Boy Now a Man Recounts His Memories by Harry J. Boyle Little Heathens: Hard Times and High Spirits on an Iowa Farm During the Great Depression by Mildred Armstrong Kalish Folks, This Ain’t Normal: A Farmer’s Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People, and a Better World by Joel Salatin Cabin: Two Brothers, a Dream, and Five Acres in Maine by Leo Ureneck Triple Ridge Farm by Ruth Fouts Pochmann Battlefield: Farming a Civil War Battleground by Peter Svenson The Shepherd’s Life by James Rebanks More Scenes From the Rural Life by Verlyn Klinkenborg Farm: A Year in the Life of an American Farmer by Richard Rhodes Cabin Lessons: A Nail-by-Nail Tale: Building Our Dream Cottage from 2x4s, Blisters, and Love by Spike Carlsen Growing A Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life by David R. Montgomery Craeft: An Inguiry into the Origins and True Meaning of Traditional Crafts by Alexander Langlands The Dirty Life: A Memoir of Farming, Foods, and Love by Kristin Kimball Logging Hard Maple, Hard Work by John Gagnon McTaggart’s Red Keg: Logging From A-Z on the Tittabawassee in Michigan by Irene M. Hargreaves and Harold M. Foehl “Daylight in the Swamp”: Lumberjacking in the Late 19th Century by Robert W. Wells Timber! The Bygone Life of the Northwoods Lumberjacks by John C. Frohlicher Food In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto by Michael Pollan The Earth Knows My Name: Food, Culture, and Sustainability in the Gardens of Ethnic Americans by Patricia Klindienst Empires of Food: Feast Famine, and the Rise and Fall of Civilizations by Evand D.G. Fraser and Andrew Rimas The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals by Michael Pollan Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life by Barbara Kingsolver The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food by Dan Barber The Mushroom Hunters: On the Trail of an Underground America by Langdon Cook A Really Big Lunch: The Roving Gourmand on Food and Life by Jim Harrison 100 Million Years of Food: What Our Ancestors Ate and Why it Matters Today by Stephen Le American Terroir: Savoring the Flavors of Our Woods, Waters, and Fields by Rowan Jacobsen The Scavenger’s Guide to Haute Cuisine by Steven Rinella The Traveling Feast: On the Road and at the Table With My Heros by Rick Bass Mountaineering/Adventure Tracks: A Woman’s Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback by Robyn Davidson Foot by Foot Through the USA by Winfield H. Line and Francis R. Line Seaworthy: Adrift with William Willis in the Golden Age of Rafting by T.R. Pearson A Sense of the World: How A Blind Man Became History’s Greatest Traveler by Jason Roberts Touching My Father’s Soul: A Sherpa’s Journey to the Top of Everest by Jamling Tenzing Norgay w/ Broughton Coburn Halfway to Heaven: My White-knuckled – And Knuckleheaded – Quest for the Rocky Mountain High by Mark Obmascik A Splendid Savage: The Restless Life of Fredrick Russell Burnham by Steve Kemper Breaking Trail: A Climbing Life by Arlene Blum Paddling/Canoeing/Rafting Canyon Solitude: A Woman’s Solo River Journey Through Grand Canyon by Patricia C. McCairen From a Wooden Canoe: Reflections on Canoeing, Camping, and Classic Equipment by Jerry Dennis An Adirondack Passage: The Cruise of the Canoe Sairy Gamp by Christine Jerome Canoeing With the Cree by Eric Severeid One Incredible Journey by Clayton Klein and Verlen Kruger The Survival of the Bark Canoe by John McPhee Cold Summer Wind by Clayton Klein Portage Into the Past: By Canoe Along the Minnesota-Ontario Boundary Waters by J. Arnold Bolz The Last Voyageurs: Retracing LaSalle’s Journey Across America: Sixteen Teenagers on the Adventure of a Lifetime by Lorraine Boissoneault Waterwalk: A Passage of Ghosts by Steven Faulkner Hidden Nature: A Voyage of Discovery by Alys Fowler Hiking/Walking A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson A Season on the Appalachian Trail by Lynn Setzer Walking My Dog, Jane: From Valdez to Prudhoe Bay Along the Trans Alaska Pipeline by Ned Rozell The Marches: A Borderland Journey Between England and Scotland by Rory Stewart AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller Alone Together: My Adventure on the Appalachian Trail by Wally Miars Paleontology/Archaeology Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors by Nicholas Wade Atlas of a Lost World: Travels in Ice Age America by Craig Childs Finders Keepers: A Tale of Archaeological Plunder and Obsession by Craig Childs My European Family: The First 54,000 Years by Karin Bojs The Lost World of the Old Ones: Discoveries in the Ancient Southwest by David Roberts Michigan/Great Lakes Walking to Mackinac by David E. Bonior The Superior Peninsula: Seasons in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan by Lon L. Emerick The Living Great Lakes: Searching For the Heart of the Inland Seas by Jerry Dennis The Fourth Coast: Exploring the Great lakes Coastline From the St. Lawrence Seaway to the Boundary Waters of Minnesota by Mary Blocksma Graced by the Seasons: Fall and Winter in the Northwoods by John Bates Great Lakes Nature: An Outdoor Year by Mary Blocksma River of Iron by David Lee The Wolves of Isle Royale: A Broken Balance by Rolf O. Peterson Lake Country: A Series of Journeys by Kathleen Stocking An Uncrowded Place: The Delights and Dilemmas of Life Up North and a Young Man’s Search for Home by Bob Butz Great Lakes Country by Russell McKee The Turn in the Trail: Northwoods Tales of the Upper Great Lakes by Walt Sandburg Native American Rez Life by David Treuer Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community by Brenda J. Child Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer Masters of Empire: Great Lakes Indians and the Making of America by Michael A. McDonnell Wilderness Empire by Allan W. Eckert Hunting/Fishing/Trapping Ghosts of Tsavo: Stalking the Mystery Lions of East Africa by Philip Caputo Fly-fishing the 41st: Around the World on the 41st Parallel by James Prosek Trout Madness by John D. Voelker (Robert Traver) On The Run: An Angler’s Journey Down The Striper Coast by David DiBenedetto Trout Eyes: True Tales of Adventure, Travel, and Fly Fishing by William G. Tapply Kerplunk! by Patrick F. McManus The River Home: An Angler’s Explorations by Jerry Dennis The Fish’s Eye: Essays About Angling and the Outdoors by Ian Frazier A Place on the Water: An Angler’s Reflections on Home by Jerry Dennis Hunting From Home: A Year Afield in the Blue Ridge Mountains by Christopher Camuto American Buffalo In Search of a Lost Icon by Steven Rinella West With the Rise: Fly-fishing Across America by James Barilla The Sporting Road: Travels Across America in An Airstream Trailer – With Fly Rod, Shotgun, and a Yellow Lab Named Sweetzer by Jim Fergus Colter: The True Story of the Best Dog I Ever Had by Rick Bass Fur, Fortune, and Empire: The Epic History of the Fur Trade in America by Eric Jay Dolan Fool’s Paradise by John Gierach The Everlasting Stream: A True Story of Rabbits, Guns, Friendship, and Family by Walt Harrington At the Grave of the Unknown Fisherman by John Gierach Still Life With Brook Trout by John Gierach Death, Taxes, and Leaky Waders: A John Gierach Treasury by John Gierach The Old Man and the Boy by Robert Ruark Remembrances of Rivers Past by Ernest Schwiebert The Fragrance of Grass by Guy de la Valdene Meat Eater: Adventures From the Life of an American Hunter by Steven Rinella Afield: American Writers on Bird Dogs edited by Robert DeMott and Dave Smith Upland Autumn: Birds, Dogs, and Shotgun Shells by William G. Tapply Fishing the River of Time by Tony Taylor Use Enough Gun: Ruark on Hunting Big Game by Robert Ruark Every Day Was Special: A Fly Fisher’s Lifelong Passion by William G. Tapply Charley Waterman’s Tales of Fly-fishing, Wing-shooting, and the Great Outdoors by Charley Waterman On the Water: A Fishing Memoir by Guy de la Valdene Red Stag: A Novel by Guy de la Valdene Brown Feathers: Waterfowling Tales an Upland Dreams by Steven J. Mulak The Longest Silence: A Life in Fishing by Thomas McGuane Outdoor Chronicles: True Tales of a Lifetime of Hunting and Fishing by Jerry Hamza A Fly Fisherman’s Blue Ridge by Christopher Camuto Midwest Meanders by Tom Huggler This Reckless Breed of Men: The Trappers and Fur Traders of the Southwest by Robert Glass Cleland The Ghosts of Autumn: A Season of Hunting Stories by Joel Spring A Fly Rod of Your Own by John Gierach Jill and I and the Salmon by Jack Russell Moose in the Water Bamboo on the Bench: A Journal and a Journey by Kathy Scott What the River Knows: An Angler in Midstream by Wayne Fields Salmon On A Fly: The Essential Wisdom and Lore from a Lifetime of Salmon Fishing by Lee Wulff A Rough-shooting Dog: Reflections From Thick and Uncivil Sorts of Places by Charles Fergus A Hunter’s Fireside Book: Tales of Dogs, Ducks, Birds & Guns by Gene Hill My Secret Fishing Life by Nick Lyons Covered Waters: Tempests of a Nomadic Trouter by Joseph Heywood Posted by

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Stressed out? Here’s how you can chill out on the weekend

Travel Stressed out? Here’s how you can chill out on the weekend From a fun staycation to feasting on great food or pampering yourself at the spa, enjoy the good life at this five star hotel in town 22 Mar 2019 by Melissa Chew Image: 123rf
After a hectic work week, we all really look forward to the weekend. But have you ever found that your precious weekend passes by all too quickly and you feel like you didn’t get much out of it? One way to get out of that situation is to plan something substantial.
Whether you want a lazy Sunday brunch with the family, a fancy dinner with a special someone, a spa date for some Me time, drinks at a cool lounge, or a fun family staycation, you can find all these at the Pan Pacific Singapore, which offers a variety of great options.
1. Sunday brunch with the family
Check out the Sunday brunch at Pan Pacific Hotel’s Edge restaurant with unlimited Veuve Clicquot Champagne (for the adults) to accompany a buffet feast of roasted meats, fresh seafood on ice, local delights, pastas, a Swiss Cheese Fondue Station, a whole selection of delectable desserts and much more. For the entertainment, a live band is on in sessions throughout the brunch and there’s also some entertainment for the kids with a roving balloon artist and a cotton candy machine for a sugar high. $74 per child from six to 12 years old, $148 per adult including soft drinks, and $208 per adult including unlimited Veuve Clicquot Brut Yellow Label pours.
2. A fancy dinner
The dining options at Pan Pacific are stellar. A go-to location for good food from different culinary cuisines. Sitting amidst a sprawling Japanese roof garden, Keyaki is a favourite for its on point, perfectly presented Japanese fare. The Tepanyaki and sashimi here is to die for, by the way. There’s also Hai Tien Lo for award-winning Cantonese food and Rang Mahal that serves fine Northern Indian cuisine.
3. Spa date with yourself
There’s nothing quite like the tranquility of a spa and an invigorating treatment to set you right and St. Gregory spa is a go-to. You can go for the beautifying facials or stimulating body treatments ala carte – from a milk bath to a tui na massage, a mud wrap to a foot reflexology massage, an oxygen facial to a detox scrub. From $70 for a 30 min foot massage to $400 for the Perfect For Two package of a full body massage and milk bath for two.
4. Drinks at a cool lounge
You cannot miss the hotel bar, Atrium. It is situated on the ground floor in the middle of the hotel and features seating pods floating over a reflection pool. The 44-meter long bar is also the longest bar in Asia, and it serves up premium beers, wines, cocktails and spirits . A great lounge to kick back and relax over drinks and also the perfect place for its Instagrammable backdrop.
5. A fun staycation
If you have young kids, check out the hotel’s Great Fun-mily Escapade Package. More than just an extra cot bed for the kids and some token amenities, the themed rooms are complete with fun, colourful bedding, a teepee tent, bath toys, colouring pencils and books, bathrobes and bedroom for the kids, and activities too. Stay over a weekend on this package and children can go on a treasure hunt on the lifestyle floor on level four where they can redeem a surprise treat upon completion too. Package price starts from SGD510++ per night for two adults and two children under 12 years old.

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