My Tryst With Food And Travel: Kutchi Shami Kebab / Gujrati Kutchi Memoni Style Shami Kabab

My Tryst With Food And Travel: Kutchi Shami Kebab / Gujrati Kutchi Memoni Style Shami Kabab

My Tryst With Food And Travel CULINARY ADVENTURE IN YOUR KITCHEN AND BEYOND Sunday, 24 March 2019 Kutchi Shami Kebab / Gujrati Kutchi Memoni Style Shami Kabab It’s been a dream to walk through the pristine white sands of the Rann of Kutch, a salt marsh in the Thar Dessert spanning across the Western Indian State of Gujrat. In the moonlight soaked pearly sands I wish to stand with both my feet buried in the sand, gazing at the starred canopy above, listening to the buzzing, humming sound of the nocturnal dessert creatures, letting the cool dessert breeze play hop scotch with my tresses. Then as from a nearby tent the aroma of delicious food will slowly start enveloping the night air, my growling tummy will keep nudging my entire being to uproot my feet from the sand and walk towards the scent of decadent food. Ah, I keep dreaming of this all the time. Someday I will tick off this dream of mine, fulfil my desire to savour the delectable cuisine native to this area. Till then let my kitchen be my wish fulfilling magic wand, where at least I can dish out at least a few of those Kutchi delicacies till the time I can actually make my culinary trip to the Rann of Kutch. The Kutchi dish which has made a permanent home in my kitchen menu is the Kutchi Shami Kebab or the Gujrati Kutchi Memoni Style Shami Kabab/ Kebab. Ingredients 500 Gms Chicken Mince / Keema 1 Tbsp Oil

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Homemade Baby & Toddler Food (Idiot’s Guides)

WarezSerbia » Ebooks » Homemade Baby & Toddler Food (Idiot’s Guides) Homemade Baby & Toddler Food (Idiot’s Guides) Homemade Baby & Toddler Food (Idiot’s Guides) by Kimberly Aime, Natalie Weiss English | November 3, 2015 | ISBN: 1615648569 | 192 pages | AZW3 | 11 Mb Store-bought baby food is expensive and can contain artificial ingredients you don’t want your baby to consume. And as a baby grows to be a toddler, it can be difficult to find nutritious and easy-to-fix foods that they will eat. Idiot’s Guides: Homemade Baby & Toddler Food comes to the rescue with the solution to feeding dilemmas for parents of babies and toddlers from 6 to 24 months:*100 recipes for appealing baby and toddler cuisine, from purees to finger foods to table foods even the pickiest toddlers will eat. *More than 100 full-color photos of finished dishes, preparation steps, and more. *Nutrition and development information, plus meal plans for five different stages from a registered dietitian. *Advice for encouraging picky eaters to try new things. Illustrated how-to steps for frequently used techniques. *Information on baby-led weaning, food allergies, and other high-interest topics. DOWNLOAD Homemade Baby & Toddler Food (Idiot’s Guides) Direct Download Feel free to post your Homemade Baby & Toddler Food (Idiot’s Guides) Download, torrent, subtitles, free download, quality, NFO, Uploaded.net, ul.to, FileJoker, Rapidgator, Nitroflare, Filefox, Turbobit, Keep2Share, Uploadgig, 1fichier, Uptobox, ClicknUpload, Openload, Streamango Watch HD Movies Series Stream Online, free premium downloads movie, game, mp3 download, crack, serial, keygen, or whatever-related comments here. use only English, Owners of this website aren’t responsible for content of comments. Dear visitor, you are browsing our website as Guest. We strongly recommend you to register and login to view hidden contents. Related Downloads to Homemade Baby & Toddler Food (Idiot’s Guides): 201 Organic Baby Purees The Freshest, Most Wholesome Food Your Baby Can Eat! Ebooks | Tamika L Gardner, “201 Organic Baby Purees: The Freshest, Most Wholesome Food Your Baby Can Eat!” 2012 | pages: 240 | ISBN: 1440528993 | EPUB | 2,4 mb … Indian SuperMeals Baby & Toddler Cookbook Ebooks | Indian SuperMeals: Baby & Toddler Cookbook by Zainab Jagot Ahmed English | ISBN: n/a | e-ISBN: 1780255349 | ASIN: B0091WB3ZE | 2012 | EPUB | 167 pages | 14,3 MB … The Baby Sleep Book [Audiobook] Ebooks | Robert Sears, William Sears, Martha Sears, James Sears, James McKenna, Coleen Marlo (Narrator), “The Baby Sleep Book: The Complete Guide to a Good Night’s Rest for the Whole Family: The Sears Parenting Library” ASIN: B07MKL9WVZ, ISBN: 1982614080 | … Food Allergy Adverse Reaction to Foods and Food Additives Ebooks | Food Allergy: Adverse Reaction to Foods and Food Additives By Dean D. Metcalfe, Hugh A. Sampson, Ronald A. Simon, Gideon Lack 2014 | 624 Pages | ISBN: 0470672552 | PDF | 15 MB … Baby Signing 1-2-3 The Easy-to-Use Illustrated Guide for Every Stage and Every Age Ebooks | Nancy Cadjan, “Baby Signing 1-2-3: The Easy-to-Use Illustrated Guide for Every Stage and Every Age” 2007 | pages: 306 | ISBN: 1402209789 | PDF | 5,9 mb … Sue Bryce Photography – Photoshoots: Father & Daughter (toddler) Ebooks | Sue Bryce Photography – Photoshoots: Father & Daughter (toddler) 12m | Video: .MP4, 1280×720, 24 fps(r) | Audio: AAC, 48000 Hz, 2ch | 107 MB Genre: eLearning | Language: English … Leave Comment

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Why Pakistanis are the most happy nation in South Asia?

According to UN World Happiness Report, Pakistan is ranked 67 among happy nations in the world far ahead of arch rival India (140) and other South Asian Countries viz. Bangladesh (125), Sri Lanka (130), Nepal (100) and Afghanistan (115). Understandably, Indians on social media calling this report fake as they not ready to accept that Pakistanis are more happier than even Russians (68), Chinese (93),Turks (79) and Malaysians (80). But neither China nor Russia rejected it despite both nations are permanent members of UN. USA falls down 7 ranks from 2018 ranking also accepted it.This show why Indians are so unhappy as neither the leadership nor the key board warriors of country ready to accept the ground realities and rapid transformation of secular society into the fanatic Hindutva state. Secondly, the Indians for last 10-15 years become Pakistan centric and behaving like psycho when receives some good news from Pakistan. This kind of mindset was present 70 years ago and resulted in creation of Pakistan but at that time mostly present in certain section but now it trickle down and almost every Indian engulfed by it. You hardly find any Indian living in own country or abroad who not desperate to paint Pakistan or Pakistanis in negative sense. But i guess many in world also question why Pakistanis are so happy despite hardly any week pass and you not get the negative vibe from Pakistan in international media. There are certain reasons which intentionally or unintentionally missed by most of international publications
1. Pakistanis are not jealous of other nations achievements Pakistanis are definitely not angels when they are competing with each other for anything. Even most of times they hit other Pakistanis below the belt when they see he/she getting more attention, respect, wealth. Hoever, the same Pakistanis gracefully admire other nations achievements in education, economy, human rights, democracy etc. You hardly met any Pakistani in streets which not acknowledge West achievements and he also admire the recent economic growth of India and Bangladesh. Pakistanis are rarely critical of other nationalts especially when they are guests. They try to talk in most appeasing tone without any national and personal biase. If Pakistani differ with you then he tell you in plain words or through body language because they never hide their intentions and emotions. They least bother what is going in world but just want their country to be portrayed in positive manners. Little things make them happy such as a win in cricket match, good parade by armed forces, new song, viral video of some innocent child or animal etc.
2. Always have a support system around you
In Pakistan whether you are rich or poor whether you guilty or innocent whether you are healthy or sick whether you are successful or failure; there are always people who stand with you. Since childhood we are taught to stand with family and friends no matter how hard it would be morally, financially and socially. This support system has its own repercussions but you never feel lonely. This is probably reason why in Pakistan people emotionally not completely collapsed despite losing almost everything or everyone in life. This is reason why Pakistan fight back despite loss 70000 people in war on terror. Pakistan have millions of poor people but there are also millions who on daily basis give alms and food to these poor people. Families, relatives, friends, neighbours and even the strangers come froward to support others. This kind of strength hardly seen in most parts of world.
3. Wittiness and Optimism
Pakistani probably the most witty and optimist nation in world. The love cracking jokes even in the worst possible scenarios. They love to laugh even on pity things which even hardly notice by others. Pakistanis remain optimist about Pakistan and always believe good days are just round the corner. Off course, they are not realistic but realism gives you nothing but depression. If you can’t change anything then why to think about it and just enjoy what you have around is simplest motto opted by most of Pakistanis.
4. Free Spirits There are 4 military take over of Pakistan but still Pakistanis successfully bring back democracy without any blood bath. Even during martial law; Pakistanis never afraid of cracking jokes of military dictators. There is in build in Pakistan that they make fun of everyone and nobody is spare from mullahs to liberals, from generals to journalists, from politician to bureaucrats, from judges to commoners. This kind of freedom not witness in other South Asian Countries like India and Bangladesh; you can’t dare to make fun PM Modi and PM Hasina Wajid and off course their core supporters. In addition, Indians are doing flattery 24/7 to fellow Indians who achieve something in art, sports, politics and business. This make these high achievers the demi-Gods and Holly Cows. This makes India and Bangladesh countries where people and their voices are suffocated. There too many holly cows are created in both countries which expected to honoured. This is probably another reason why people are less happy in these countries compare to Pakistan. Pakistanis genetically never allow to be controlled by religious and liberal no fanatics and always came out their traps.
4. Diversity
Pakistan is much diverse country not in term of weather, geography but also culturally and linguistically. There are 75 languages spoken in Pakistan. Similarly, Pakistan has its own unique brand of culture which is actually amalgam of Arab, Persian, Central Asian, British, Turkish and Indian culture. Therefore, Pakistanis always feel linked with world especially with Middle East, Britain, Persia, Central Asia and South Asia. After China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), Chinese influence seems to be merging in it. Therefore, you will not feel bore while listening Pakistani music and eating Pakistani food. There is lot to offer for every one. This probably reason why Tourists love to spend time in Pakistan despite there are so many constraints in terms of security, visa and other facilities.The best thing the people of different areas of country feel proud of their values, cuisine, attire, language and still carry on with it.
5. Contentment
There is strong believe system exist in Pakistani society that this world is temporary and sooner than later you join the Creator. The real life and permanent life is ahead. This actually a great feeling when you are in stress. The loss of things or people or positions in this world is not the end and probably the just beginning of long journey. Religion is best therapy in Pakistan especially for those who are under immense stress. Religion is also a great source of strength as well. In Islam, suicide is the biggest sin as nobody allow to take his/her life which gifted to him none else but The Creator. Similarly, Islam has a very independent system of repent which don’t need the help of any solicitor. Islam encourages its followers to simply say sorry to Lord in privacy and promise to be good person in coming days. That’s all. You will be forgiven and Lord always ready to give you the chance rather chances. This probably one reason why Pakistanis come out from gloomy situations more strong and determined.

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An exclusive sneak peek at Delhi’s newest Qutub-facing restaurant

An exclusive sneak peek at Delhi’s newest Qutub-facing restaurant It’s all about the soul at ROOH, the capital’s pretty new dining spot Published: Mar 23, 2019 | 18:05:38 IST The sea bass, Alleppey curry, bone powder podi, kadambittu at ROOH
We arrive at this new sunlit spot in Mehrauli and are whisked inside to one of the three private dining rooms. At first glance, the white walls and cheerful blue doors of ROOH might put you in mind of Notting Hill. But look up at the copper-coloured ceiling or outside the balcony, where the Qutub Minar rises behind the foliage, and you know that this place might take a few cues from around the world, but its soul is distinctly Indian. The butter old-fashioned at ROOH
The brainchild of chef Sujan Sarkar, ROOH’s menu of international Indian cuisine is already a favourite in San Francisco. And Sarkar, an Olive Group alum, is no stranger to the capital. He has hits like Ek Bar in Defence Colony and a pop-up of his popular NYC Indian gastropub Baar Baar in Khan Market to his name. But this is different, he tells us as we try his take on pani puri: a pastry filled with a firm yet just-wobbly-enough tamarind jelly topped with edible flowers, which bursts in my mouth. “Indian diners are well versed with modern global dining trends, and you can’t fool them with any old thing,” says the veteran who shuttles between SF and NYC, and will be opening ROOH in Chicago soon, too. “They know exactly what they’re talking about, and they expect consistency. So while it’s nice to be all about locally sourced ingredients, we don’t believe that has to be our ethos. If you don’t get the highest quality of a particular ingredient here, what’s wrong with importing it from elsewhere? Suppose I want to serve a particular kind of fish, but it’s not in the fisherman’s catch of that day, I don’t want my diners to not get what they came for,” he adds, just as the next course of our tasting menu arrives. The fermented paratha, Mehrauli goat curd and tomato pickle
The liquefied anda bhurji in coriander oil topped with a red chilli thecha comes with a gorgeously golden piece of sea salt pao—soft, but also perfectly crisp on the edges, warm and fluffy. Other favourites, arriving in quick succession, are the duck galouti tart topped with gold foil and the fermented paratha with a chorizo-esque tinge accompanied by pickled tomatoes and goat curd. A classic North Indian dish turned beautifully on its head, it is paired with an exquisite gin and turmeric cocktail that looks and tastes like springtime in a glass. Cocktails, in fact, are a highlight here, with a basis in ayurvedic principles. The calorie-conscious will like the vodka with kale, cucumber and raw mango shrub, and there are a number of equally delicious mocktails. Compressed melon rose, melon & sea buckthorn rasam, coriander oil
Not all of the experiments hit the mark. If you get the compressed melon in coriander oil with fermented gooseberry, go easy with the sea buckthorn and tomato rasam, which overpowers other flavours. And while our batter-fried scallop is cooked to perfection, the rice Hollandaise sauce it comes with could do with some kick. The dessert is a bit of a mixed bag. While the chocolate and besan cake just doesn’t work (the besan needs more density and richness, and is far too sweet), the mango sphere with meringue, plated like a fried egg with its shell, works on both texture and taste. The dark chocolate, besan barfi with milk ice-cream
What is definitely genuine is the warmth of the service. Every single person, from Sarkar to Priyam Chatterjee, who will be helming the kitchen here, to operations manager Samrat Banerjee, was enthusiastic about our feedback and visibly passionate about every aspect of the restaurant – from the Jaipur tiles on the balconies and terrace to the playlist that they have planned (think Coke Studio but more ambient, to go with the area’s history and yet not distract from the food).
The truth about Delhi is that a Qutub-facing restaurant has almost become a cliché. They come and go, and there’s a new one every so often. But as we exit into the late-afternoon warmth and spot many of Mehrauli’s famous spring flowers that we tasted at ROOH, we can’t help but think that this could be the one that stays.
ROOH is slated to open on 26 March 2019. Address: Ambawatta One complex, H-5/1, Kalkadass Marg, Mehrauli, Near Qutub Minar, New Delhi – 110030. Price for two, Rs6,000 with alcohol

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EXOTIC TASTE OF MAURITIUS

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Mauritius: Your Strategic Regional Partner for Trade and Investment
Located just above the Tropic of Capricorn and on the eastern coast of Madagascar, the island of Mauritius is known for its fusion of cultures, exotic cuisines and beguiling green and peaceful environment. Since its independence in 1968, the Mauritian economy has diversified from a mono-crop sugar cultivation to a well-diversified agro-economy comprising of a wide range of agro products such as special sugars, fish, spices & herbs, canned food, speciality ethnic foods such as fruit pickles, a spectrum of pre-cooked snacks, bakery products and pasta amongst others. In line with its adherence to satisfy its trade markets, the products are manufactured under international quality and norms and are HACCP certified.
The Economic Development Board of Mauritius will lead a delegation of 8 operators at this year’s edition of Gulfood, who will be offering a unique opportunity to feast on the rich, melting pot of Mauritian cuisine and the taste of a tantalising mix of flavours. The staple dishes are based around rice and curries and utilize a range of spices brought to the island by the Dutch, the Indians, the English and the French.
Furthermore, a conducive & stable business environment, a sound political & financial jurisdiction and the ideal geographical proximity, makes Mauritius a safe trade and investment location. In addition to its extensive bilateral tax and investment treaties, Mauritius is party to a number of regional trading blocs, including SADC, COMESA, IOC as well as AGOA- USA, iEPA- EU, FTA-Turkey, PTA- Pakistan amongst others which makes the country an ideal platform for trade and investment.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BOARD, MAURITIUS
10/F, One Cathedral Square Bldg 16 Jules Koenig St, Port Louis, Mauritius T: 230-203-3800

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Learn to build your own tandoor oven…at a workshop right here in Dorset

Charlotte Eve and Kate Edwards tell Joanna Davis about their one of a kind workshop – which will teach people how to build tandoor ovens to cook mouth-watering Indian cuisine.
NOTHING tastes quite like food cooked in the great outdoors.
But how about taking a step up from the bangers and burgers we’re so used to on the barbecue?
Charlotte Eve and Kate Edwards of Lyme Regis are stepping the nation’s love of outdoor cooking up a notch with the launch of their unique tandoor oven building workshop.
They begin one day workshops in June which will teach people how to build a tandoor oven in their back garden to cook delicious Indian food in.
These will be the UK’s first ever tandoor oven building workshops.
They are aimed at curry lovers, who can take their cooking up a gear and build their own earthen tandoor oven. Curry is still the UK’s favourite dish, so the workshop will be a must do course for any foodie in 2019.
Course tutor Kate Edwards has built award-winning cob houses, studios, sculptures and bread ovens and now she’s perfected the art of sculpting an authentic, giant, earthen tandoor.
Kate said: “Your finished tandoor is also a beautiful sculptural feature for your garden. And everyone is drawn to it at a party – keeping warm by the tandoor fire whilst inhaling the spices and baking dough.”
Charlotte, a professional chef, explains: “It’s basically sculpting your oven using clay and sand – it’s cheaper than bricks, more sculptural and cooks more authentic wood fired bread and pizza. The original tandoors were also made of the same material.”
Charlotte has spent months perfecting her naan bread recipe and cooking in giant tandoors, using recipes and advice she’s collected from friends and relatives across India. She’s determined everyone enjoys the ultimate authentic lunch when they come on the course.
She said: “This course isn’t just about building a tandoor. It’s about eating as well and relaxing in an idyllic location beside the Jurassic coast. Whether you are passionate about outdoor cooking or you fancy a unique, hands-on and delicious day out this course is designed for anyone who loves eating!”
Charlotte and Kate founded cobcoourses.com 15 years ago, in which they taught thousands of people how to build their own wood fired pizza ovens using the traditional method of cob building.
Kate, who teaches on the workshop, explains: “I’ll show people how easy it is to build a tandoor with the earth – it’s the traditional way of doing it and it creates the most aesthetic looking oven for your garden. We believe this original type of tandoor definitely makes the best tasting Indian food. The wood fired tandoor cooks food at such an intense heat and so quickly, the end results are truly mouthwatering and quite different from anything you’ve probably tasted before this side of Bangalore!”
Charlotte and Kate’s pizza oven and house building workshops have been featured on BBC One, Channel 4, BBC Radio 2, The Guardian, Sunday Times, BBC Good Food Magazine, Delicious Magazine, Country Living and many other publications. But their tandoor workshop is an entirely new venture and never done before in the UK.
Tandoor oven workshops in 2019 are on Saturday June 8 or Friday June 28. Places are £160 and include a mouthwatering tandoor cooked curry lunch. To book contact Charlotte and Kate at cobcourses.com or phone 01297 444275.

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Just Melanie: Sunday Stealing: Thoughts Provoked, Part The First

Aloha and welcome back! I just woke up from a much-needed nap, so maybe my post won’t ramble all over the place as is my usual custom!
Here’s some news: as of late Friday afternoon, Team Odette is (are?) officially under contract to buy a house! It’s big, beautiful and really sprawling. Plenty of room for us and our abundance of freakin’ STUFF. Wanna see a couple quick previews? ‘Kay:
This is part of the outside of lovely house-to-be in Kimberly, Idaho, just outside of Twin Falls.
Here is one view of the kitchen about which I am supremely ecstatic.
And that’s the opposite view of the kitchen and dining room, with a glimpse at one of THREE fireplaces in the home. Squ !!
Did I mention I’m excited?!!
Okay. I’ll stop there and move along to Sunday Stealing. Sorry! Link up here if you’d like to join us today!
~*~*~*~*~
These are from a site called Thought Provoking Questions..
1. When was the last time you tried something new?
Well, the other day we used a Groupon for a new restaurant, Mount Everest Momo Café. They serve Himalayan, Nepali, Tibetan, and Indian cuisine. Rob went and picked out what we ate: the Momo special, which had two momo (dumpling-like foods) each of vegetarian, chicken, pork, and yak. I ate the first four listed, and he ate the yak and pork. We also got a side order of naan, which was out of this world! Fortunately, I have another Groupon for the same place, so we’ll get something a little different next time. I can’t wait!
2. Who do you sometimes compare yourself to?
Well, I do find I compare myself to both my late mother and to my teenage daughters the most, although I am a competitive person and compare myself to pretty much everyone. I’ve always put my mother on a pedestal since she died early in my childhood, but only now through therapy am I realizing that she was perfectly human, and therefore perfectly imperfect, and I can stop judging myself for not living up to the standard I’ve felt she set for me.
As for my daughters, they are vastly different in personality, like night and day. Chloë and I feel each others’ feels so completely, and we have a very deep bond. Sophia and I, as well as Jack and I, also have that bond, but it’s different for each kid. So I kind of compare the relationships more than myself with each kid. Does that make sense, or was it a whole lot of mumbo-jumbo? 😂
3. What’s the most sensible thing you’ve ever heard someone say?
Well, this one amuses me:
But I’m also tickled by this one (and many others):
4. What gets you excited about life?
When my five natural senses are titillated, I find myself thoroughly exhilarated. Like this gorgeous black and white calla lily display, for instance, or for that matter any bouquet from The Bouqs . I’d buy flowers from them weekly if I could afford it! (Have you heard of them? I won a $50 bouquet from them once, and it was stunning. I’m thinking of starting a once-a-month flower subscription to The Bouqs when we get settled into the new house!)
… or the smell I love the most, citrus fruits! ♥ Mmm, so fantastic and fresh!
… or what about beautiful and classical, or fun and lively, or any other kind of music that moves us? Sometimes music can be so electrifying, amirite?!
… Furthermore, what about all of the gustatorial pleasures of the earth? For instance, I pulled a few pictures of some of the decadent food and drink we had on our European cruise (which you can read about here), and it gives me a bit of a thrill, even now that it’s more than a decade later, to imagine the tastes of these again. I had the sangria in Barcelona, Spain; the “Sprite” was from Nàfplio, Greece; the pizza was eaten in Dubrovnik, Croatia; and the pistachio-spiked cannoli were eaten at a restaurant on the top of Mt. Etna in Sicily!
…And as for the sense of touch, I could say something like the physical connection with my husband or hugging my kids, of course, but I feel like that’s a gimme. Instead, this one of our five sense invokes the sensuous experience of knitting with the fine cashmere yarn produced by Iris Schreier of Artyarns, a luxurious fiber art company and probably among the top of my faves! I used their #3 cashmere in the fuschia colorway for the “Wisp” scarf, above, that I made myself just over 11 years ago. So soft and delicious! When the kids and I drove up from Virginia Beach to Jamestown, New York, the following winter to visit my sister and her family, Stacey was gushing about how much she loved it when she saw it (and felt it!) on me. So I took it right off and gave it to her. Now that I’m writing about it again, I’m feeling the itch to make myself another one! That idea certainly gets my juices flowing. 😉
The Trevi Fountain in Rome, Italy
I could name a plethora of other things that make life worth living for me, so maybe I’ll just list a few but without the graphics: falling in love; traveling and seeing ancient architecture like Rome’s fountains and the Colosseum; standing in holy places like Vatican City (even if it doesn’t align with my own spiritual journey); meeting people from all over the world and getting a wide-eyed view of the United States from them as well as direct insight into their cultures; skipping and laughing with one or more of my children…
Oh. Apparently I could go on and on about this question! And that is a good thing, really – at least for me if not for you – so I can refer to this when I’m sinking down into the deep depressive states of my bipolar disorder. I’ll just have to pull up this post and remember all the things, such as these, that bring me joy. ♥
5. What life lesson did you learn the hard way?
It’s only recently that I’ve realized my usual “fight or flight” response is flight, and so I end up running away from my problems all over again. Thinking back, I’ve been doing this since at least the age of 15 or 16. Thankfully, I’m working on my life history in intense therapy with a highly-qualified therapist, so I’m aiming for the heart of the beast now. Finally.
Also, this is a good lesson to learn:
6. What do you wish you spent more time doing five years ago?
Laughing!! We were smack-dab in the middle of when Hubs was going through his brain tumor & surgery stuff, and that was definitely not a fun time.
7. Do you ask enough questions or do you settle for what you know?
Enough questions? Are we discounting the idea of too many questions? I’ve been told by several teachers and professors that I was going into the right line of work, as a scientist, because I have the natural inquisitiveness of a child. I’m always asking questions. I laugh and say, “Sorry, I’m just nosy,” when I feel like I’m doing it too much, but honestly I just really like finding things out. People, things, events, facts… they interest me!
8. Whom do you love and what are you doing about it?
In addition to a mighty bunch of great friends, I love these kiddos of mine (gratuitous photo of them as much younger kiddos below) –
I love these kids!! And…
…and, I’m pretty much cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs for this silly man!
What I’m doing about it is working on improving myself more and more, physically, mentally, and emotionally, so that I can be the best mom, wife, and friend I can be!
9. What’s a belief that you hold with which many people disagree?
I’m not touching that with a 10′ pole! No way.
10. What can you do today that you were not capable of a year ago?
I can see and understand a lot more things about myself that I just couldn’t see this time last year – or maybe ever?
11. Do you think crying is a sign of weakness or strength?
Neither; it’s a sign of being human. Of being alive. Of being a sentient creature.
12. What would you do differently if you knew nobody would judge you?
I’d express my sillier, goofier side more in public.
13. Do you celebrate the things you do have?
Oh, most definitely! I’ve talked about many of my rich blessings already on this post. Plus I have loads of delicious yarns with which to knit, and occasionally crochet. I do try to keep the positive perspective!
14. What is the difference between living and existing?
I seem to be a bit of a Meme Queen, so that’s how I’ll sum up my feelings on the matter:
15. If not now, then when?
Now. Definitely, now.
16. Have you done anything lately worth remembering?
Well, we celebrated our twin boys’ 16th birthday two days ago, the same day our offer was accepted on a new house, so yeah! I guess so!
17. What does your joy look like today?
Pretty calm, quiet day. My body let me sleep in today, well past noon. We’re all sitting around, relaxing, binge-watching NCIS: Los Angeles , and canoodling with our various pets. Paco and Tapi (our puppies, above) are going back and forth between Sophia and me. Chloë is petting her gorgeous cat, Pepper (also above). And Jack is cuddling with his Rex rabbit, Mocha, who is crazy-soft. He feels like velvet!
18. Is it possible to lie without saying a word?
Of course it is.
19. If you had a friend who spoke to you in the same way that you sometimes speak to yourself, how long would you allow this person to be your friend?
Hopefully not very long. I’m very hard on myself, all the time. Cruel, even. I’m working on that.
20. Which activities make you lose track of time?
Many things, but most of all, communing with nature. If I didn’t have to live in a house, I wouldn’t. I guess technically, I could do without a house, but none of the rest of Team Odette would go along with that!
~*~*~*~*~
That was fun. But long! Phew! I’m glad y’all stopped by. I actually wrote it down on my “To-Do” list to come around and visit all of you, but it may take me the full week. I hope I accomplish it, because I miss doing that! ♥
Fin.
This is the part where you leave me a witty comment! 😉

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Review of the reviews

Angelina, London E8
Jay Rayner for The Observer visited Angelina despite the “acute flashbacks” he suffered when told it was a fusion of Italian and Japanese food; it took him right back to the “unmitigated disaster” that was Shumi in 2003.
Luckily for him, and us, Angelina avoids any such disaster: it “feels like a beautifully intentioned, low-key experiment”. In fact, “it’s like being invited round for dinner by your mate; the nerdy one who can really cook”.
The decor is where the “most overtly Japanese elements” can be found, while the food gently recognises the similarities between the two cuisines (rather than attempting Shumi-esque Italian sushi or risotto served with chopsticks). “For surely tempura and fritto misto are two preparations with the same intent? Aren’t sashimi and crudo close relatives?”
Risotto “studded with dense, oily pieces of unagi – barbecued eel” was a “plate of loveliness”, artichokes came with breaded, deep fried pork and a “dark Japanese-style, sweet-and-sour sauce so that you are now thinking about tonkatsu… of the minor miracles of Japanese cooking”; the wine list is entirely Italian.
Angelina is a “sweet venture” serving “Italian food, with intriguing Japanese grace notes. This time round I give thanks that there appears to be space in the market for something so curious and thoughtful.” Quinlan’s, Killarney
After a perfect score for Endo at Rotunda last week, could any restaurant ever prove as perfect for Giles Coren? Well, in a word, yes. In this week’s Times magazine, he gives the same perfect score to a fish supper in Ireland.
A “glorious chowder” to start made his “little heart… pitter-patter with excitement”, Portmagee crab claws in garlic butter with “lovely cakey” soda bread made it go “boom, boom, boom”. Tiny squid rings came with ” with “proper old-fashioned chippy chips, thick and stubby like a fisherman’s fingers”.
Incredibly, he decided that he had room for some fried fish, and went to watch his whiting being cooked; it was “glorious… a quite perfect piece of whiting”.
“And so, again, 10 out of 10 for everything. Because whatever the expectations of your guest, that is the score you deserve when you fulfil them entirely.” (30/30) Top Cuvee, London N5
The new neighbourhood wine bar in Highbury had Jimi Famuwera from The Evening Standard feeling “pronounced, irrational envy”, because he doesn’t live 10 minutes up the road. Top Cuvee comes from an ex-Naughty Piglets chef and drinks experts from Dinner in Melbourne and Three Sheets, and has already established itself as an “instant neighbourhood hit”.
Looks-wise, Top Cuvee has a “relaxed culinary hipness that plenty of us will recognise”, but the team bring “a new energy, a flavourful wallop and a playfulness to this recognisable formula”.
“A couple of slight disappointments” aside, the food was “properly, blissfully good”; chef Dan Miller has a “dynamic way with voguish vegetables”. Dishes included sweet potato, blue cheese and sage croquettes with “pungent, yielding centres”, a “turbochatrged” house terine and “fantastically sloppy burrata”.
Jimi’s companions drank some “interesting reds” and the meal was finished with simple, but skilfully produced, desserts and “what felt like an almost criminally low bill”. (9/10) Rovi, London WC1
Marina O’Loughlin in The Sunday Times ate at Ottolenghi’s new-ish Fitzrovia restaurant: “it is impossible to overstate how much Yotam Ottolenghi has changed the way we eat”.
Her meal, full of those now-ubiquitous ingredients we’d never heard of pre-Ottolenghi (“pomegranate syrup, barberries, za-atar”), was “not just dinner — this is good enough for my last supper”.
Her tweet on the review sums it all up: “it’s a rave. And those lobster crumpets… yes, yes, YES”. Fare, London EC1
David Sexton reviewed Fare for The Evening Standard this week, a new Clerkenwell joint from the folks behind Sager + Wilde; he describes it as “a bit of everything”– there’s coffee in the morning, all-day pizzas and evening wines and cocktails on tap (all with accompanying, and duly named-checked, bits of kit).
Located on “the street level of the big mid-century warehouse block”, with the kitchen “discreetly visible through a window”, Fare also serves up a “straightforward” modern British menu downstairs; “pleasant enough, unremarkable food, carefully adapted to this locality: thoughtfully modernised but not fanciful, a touch earnest, virtuously sourced, suggestive of sustainability”. Wines (all natural) are “fairly priced”.
Returning another day for the pizza, David had a “good sourdough pizza with blobs of Cantal cheese, honey vinegar and black pepper” and enjoyed people-watching –“they’re interesting, the customers here, frontier people, not the full Shoreditch hipster but far from Islington bourgeois, just right for conditions here on the border”. (***) Kool Cha, Boxpark Wembley
Ailis Brennan writing for The Evening Standard visited Rohit Ghai’s street food venture at Wembley’s “corrugated steel-clad street food market”– she thought, as many did when it was announced not long after the opening of Kutir, that “it’s not where most people imagined Ghai heading next”.
KoolCha (“the name is wordplay on the restaurant’s feature ingredient, kulcha, Indian flatbread that is typically stuffed and sold as a street-side snack”) actually takes up three units at Boxpark, and has 60 covers – Ghai is “not exactly peddling a hot dog cart” here. It’s still “casual enough for passing football fans”, though – Ailis recommends checking what’s on at Wembley before going, to avoid her experience of “a full house of fans visiting the largest capacity football stadium in the UK” on the Jubilee line.
Small plates, thali-style “combo meals” and kulcha options are available – no proper tandoori oven (due to fire regulations) means the breads “are without the smoky charred flavour that one would hope for or, indeed, expect”, but are great when “reimagined in grilled sandwich form” (via a panini maker); “the pressed paneer wrap is a highlight of the meal”.
It’s not “Michelin-star quality food, but it is tremendously cheap” and “boisterous appetites are sufficiently catered for”– football fans would be “hard pressed to find a better match day meal in the capital”. (****) The Feathered Nest, Oxfordshire
Grace Dent in The Guardian was in Oxfordshire, in the “heavenly” Cotswolds, visiting The Feathered Nest, an “exquisitely restored malthouse”.
Don’t come here expecting pub grub: chef Kuba Winkowski does “fancy fine dining over several courses”, from pre-dinner snacks to “non-surprise surprise petit fours “. “Produce is exemplary, flavours paramount.”
Comparisons to both The Ledbury and Fera at Claridge’s appear; the food was “faultless” and “wonderful”, but Grace was left cold by issues mostly caused by under-staffing. “Such places require a squadron of top-level staff working in nigh-eerie harmony, leaving no knife unswapped, no glass unfilled, no dietary quibble uncherished.” At £90 for six courses (plus hefty supplements), you’re certainly paying for the squadron, but The Feathered Nest “has an eighth of the staff it needs”.
“By course five… a sense of cabin fever that I often experience during fancy dinners takes hold.” (17/30) Baptist Grill, London WC1
“From the Gothic confines of the Baptist Union of Great Britain has risen L’oscar hotel” with “richly eccentric” decor (it’s all black, gold and purple); inside “you’ll find the Baptist Grill and an opportunity to get a rather good steak”, declares William Sitwell for The Telegraph .
The menu is as “theatrically splendid” as the decor; he ordered octopus carpaccio, then suffered “massive order envy” as his children ordered crab (“a really wonderful dish”) and agnolotti. A shared 40oz ‘Mini Axe’ (tomahawk steak) “was a fabulous piece of meat and with the trimmings arrived like a sultan and his entourage”. He drank a rare Rhône valley red with it, “worth ploughing through women and children to get to”. (****) The Swan Inn, Esher
Keith Miller for The Telegraph on Saturday was in deepest Surrey, “classic commuter-belt ­terrain, extra-urban yet sub-rural”, to “dive headlong into the delights of José Pizarro’s new tapas-tastic pub-restaurant”.
“Outside, it retains its resolutely non-gastro appearance”; inside “is a masterclass in what the Italians call cucina povera “. There’s “no elaborate Basque-style pintxos, no Ferran Adrià-inspired molecular gastronomy” here.
“We loved our dinner”– anchovies were “perfectly poised between sweet, acid and salt”, padrón peppers were “pungent and firm and the colour of a vintage racing car” and the pork was “immensely good quality” and “beautifully cooked”. There were sherries, Pizarro’s own red wine and a “fantastic Spanish cheese board” too.
It may be “a little on the spendy side” but the patrons of Claygate can afford it. Umi, Edinburgh
There are many “subterranean delights” in Edinburgh; Gaby Soutar for The Scotsman investigated the latest underground offering, ” slotted under… Chinese restaurant, Ping On, in Stockbridge”.
“It has a relaxed vibe… though the menu is slightly more experimental” than sibling venues in the city; gyoza were “fancier than your average dumpling… all five connected by a fan of crispy batter that was as lacey as Mary, Queen of Scots’ cuffs”, the edamame came with truffles, and hamachi carpaccio was “beautiful”. No 1 The Grange, Edinburgh
Also in The Scotsman , Catriona Thomson gave a quick historical geography lesson before introducing her review of No 1 The Grange in Edinburgh. It suited the “globetrotting” menu (with some Scottish touches like breaded haggis balls).
Inside, exposed stone walls and retro leather bus seat sofas “go together to create the all-important relaxed atmosphere of a gastropub”.
Bao buns with kimchi and enoki fritters gave “pan-Asian satisfaction galore”, and the Sunday roast (served with “all of your five a day on a plate”, plus Yorkshire pudding) was “a massive waistline increasing quantity of grub”. In fact, everything came in “generous portion sizes, do remember that it’s good to share.” (80%) And also…
The Financial Times reviewer experienced “five-flavour Michelin-star extravaganza” at Restaurant Sat Bains, “umami, salt, sweet, sour and bitter dishes all star on the chef’s Japanese-inspired menu”, while Tim Hayward declared Kym’s to be “an almighty curate’s egg”: “I’d do anything to eat the sea bass again – well, anything except go back to the restaurant” Onima, London W1
Tom Parker Bowles for The Mail on Sunday ate “modern Greek food at its very best” at glitzy Mayfair newcomer Onima. It’s a shame that his lunch there (accompanied by Giles Coren and two charity auction winners) was so “bum-clenchingly expensive”. Presumably that’s why it only got three stars…
The decor “isn’t bad looking, in a slick, expensive, marble-and-mirrors Mayfair way”, the cooking is “really rather good” and ” the sommelier knows his stuff”.
Saganaki (fried cheese) was “flawless”, Sicilian red prawns were “sweet and blissfully rich” and tonnarelli cacio e pepe pasta was “exceptional. Unforgettable. Although at £19, it’s peasant food at oligarch prices.” And if even TPB finds the prices “difficult to digest”, then Onima is perhaps best left to the “jet-set, fat-watch-wearing pan-global hotchpotch” it was designed for. (***) Baity, Manchester
Daisy Jackson of The Manchester Evening News was in Didsbury for the already-legendary hummus at newcomer Baity; it was “velvet-smooth and so densely comforting it should be prescribed as an anti-anxiety med”, although she was disappointed by the accompanying flatbread.
Baity is a “light and airy” spot with “a large olive tree standing proudly in the window”. There’s just four main courses, lots of small dishes, three desserts and only “soft and hot drinks” available.
Daisy enjoyed the “significantly spicier” version of patatas bravas (“devoured in seconds”) and the kunafa cheesecake (“classic New York-style baked cheesecake beneath a layer of sunny orange pastry threads… and a soaking of rose syrup”).
“An excellent addition to this bustling strip in Didsbury Village.” More from Hardens

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Winners Of The Living Foodz Epicurean Guild Awards 2019 Have Been Announced

Winners Of The Living Foodz Epicurean Guild Awards 2019 Have Been Announced Home » World » India » Mumbai » Winners Of The Living Foodz Epicurean Guild Awards 2019 Have Been Announced Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)
A night dedicated to the stalwarts of the food and beverage industry was held on the 14th of March at Sahara Star Hotel in Mumbai. Witnessing LFEGA 2019 (Living Foodz Epicurean Guild Awards) were some popular names like Maria Goretti, Prahlad Kakkar, Zeba Kohli, Camelia Panjabi, AD Singh, Atul Kasbekar, Sam Balsara, Chef Pankaj Bhadouria, Chef Ajay Chopra, Amrita Raichand, Chef Rakesh Raghunathan, Chef Ranveer Brar and many more. The awards this year, in its third edition have had new categories, a pan-India approach and a celebration of individuals. And The Winners Are
The night was full of entertainment and pomp whilst announcing the deserving winners. There was a marvelous performance by the Terence Lewis’ Dance Group that portrayed the kitchen flame on stage. There was also a rib-tickling stand up act by the comedian Azeem Banatwalla. As for the award ceremony, the category of ‘Cuisine’ had awards like Traditional Indian, Progressive Indian, Emerging Indian, Seafood, Chinese, Multi-Asian Cuisine and Italian. The LFEGA awards under the ‘Experiences’ category had Nightlife, Best Indian Wine, Best Indian Craft Beer, New Restaurant of the Year, The Oyster Club, Most Inclusive F&B Establishment, Most Innovative Restaurant Concept and Iconic Restaurant. The third category was of ‘Individuals’ that had Lifetime Achievement Award, Chef of the Year, The Changemaker, Food Entertainer and the Best Food Instagrammer.
“I am happy to be associated with LFEGA yet again, a platform that recognizes the innovators in the fine-dining and nightlife space along with their contribution to the industry. It has been a gratifying experience to identify those who have contributed so much to the culinary journey of the country,” said Chef Manu Chandra, Co-Curator, LFEGA. Amit Nair, Business Head at Living Foodz said, “Through LFEGA our aim is to discover culinary spaces and individuals that have changed the hospitality scenario in India. This year we have added new categories and we have not only categorized awards for restaurants but also individuals and experiences. Chef Manu Chandra and our talented jury members have done a spectacular job and creating this evening with them has been truly inspiring.”
The telecast for the award show will be on the 30th of March at 8:30 PM on Living Foodz. For the list of winners scroll down:-
Cuisines:
Best Traditional Indian Restaurant: Karavalli- The Gateway Hotel, Bengaluru
Best Progressive Indian Restaurant: Indian Accent, Delhi
Best Emerging Indian Restaurant: Oota Bangalore, Bengaluru
Best Chinese Restaurant: Yauatcha, Mumbai
Best Multi-Asian Restaurant: Pan Asian- ITC Maratha, Mumbai
Best Italian Restaurant: Vetro- The Oberoi, Mumbai
Best Seafood Restaurant: Bastian, Mumbai
Experiences:
Iconic Restaurant: Bukhara-ITC Maurya, Delhi
Best Nightlife Experience: The Hong Kong Club- Andaz Delhi
New Restaurant of the Year: The Smoke Co., Bengaluru
Best Innovative Restaurant Concept: Masque, Mumbai
Best Indian Wine: SETTE by Fratelli
Best Indian Craft Beer: White Rhino IPA
Recognizing the Oyster Club:

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Action-packed week at QIFF

A A Following the dazzling opening ceremony on March 20 and a fun-packed weekend, the 10th edition of Qatar International Food Festival (QIFF) continues until March 30, attracting food lovers and fun seekers residing in and visiting Qatar. Festival-goers have the chance throughout this week to “enjoy food, festivities and tantalising experiences” with celebrity chefs from 3pm to midnight, Saturday-Wednesday, and from 3pm to 1am on Thursday and Friday, according to a press statement. Kicking off this week, visitors will see seven celebrity chefs in the Cooking Theatre today, including Fatafeat’s Salma Soliman, Kuwaiti chef Jameela Allenqawi and famous Indian chef Saranch Goila. Tomorrow, Zarmig Haldjian, chef Hasan and Jason Atherton will also join the live cooking theatre. On Tuesday, festival-goers can watch the best of Arabic cuisines from Noora al-Kuwari, Tasneem al-Nasrallah and chef Belkhams with Rusly Ahmad introducing Sri Lankan cuisine to the platform. On Wednesday, Stephane Bucholzer of W Hotel will demonstrate his exclusive recipes and, to wrap up the week, Food Network’s popular celebrity chefs from South Africa Jenny Morris and Siba Mtongana will join the cooking theatre on Thursday. Culinary aspirants can also join their favourite celebrity chefs from Fatafeat and Food Network for cooking masterclasses taking place at Education City’s Chef’s Garden restaurant. Registration is free and can be made by contacting Chef’s Garden restaurant directly. Mtongana’s masterclasses take place on Wednesday (March 27) at 1pm and Friday (March 29) at 10am; the Morris masterclasses take place on Tuesday (March 26) at 12noon and Friday (March 29) at 1pm; Soliman’s masterclasses take place on Tuesday (March 26) and Wednesday (March 27) at 10am. People can also take advantage of the weather and the outdoor Qatar International Food Festival 2019 and work on their photography skills with advanced photography workshops led by professional food stylist and photographer Mohamed al-Ansari on March 28, 29 and 30 from 5.30pm until 8.30pm at Education City’s Oxygen Park. Those interested can register now at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/59262152694 Festival-goers can skip the parking and get to Oxygen Park by using Uber. The ridesharing service is offering 50% off on four rides to users using the promocode QIFF2019.

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