Most Wanted List and Mother's Day Outing

Most Wanted List and Mother’s Day Outing

Who knew?!
I had no idea my way of devoting a container to each of my projects was a thing called boxing. I came across it on Ann Wood’s Blog and realized that is what I am doing and it is a way of lessening anxiety about having more than one project on the go at a time. I would definitely fit that category of stressing about it.
Here is what Twyla (love saying that name!) Tharp in her book The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It For the Rest of Your LIfe has to say about boxing…
“The box makes me feel organized, that I have my act together even when I don’t know where I’m going yet. It also represents a committment. The simple act of writing a project name on a box means that I’ve started work”
I found that interesting.
I actually felt overwhelmed in the sewing room one day last week. I got very down on myself about my lack of finishes to show for the time invested. Normally that aspect of the process doesn’t bother me. In the end I questioned whether I should be looking at some of the pro type blogs where those talented folks have, if not two, then always one finish every single post.
But the upshot of that little bout had a positive outcome- it spurred me to look through my unfinished shelf. I pulled out these little applique blocks I made in 2016 and never sewed into anything useful .
They are designs from this book, Inspired By Tradition by Kay Mackenzie.
I experimented with fusible applique and enjoyed hand stitching a blanket stitch around them at the time. ( But decided in the end that I prefer using freezer paper overall for applique.)
I squared them and sewed them together in an effort solely to make myself feel better. To feel like I was accomplishing something. A summer runner for the sofa table.
Having a complete rethink of that yellow and blue border …too much/too busy. What do you think? Now looking at these more subdued/neutral type fabrics. Decision making, duh!
On a more satisying note, I got out and about in the local town recently.
I had a lovely day at the spa for Mother’s Day. Younger daughter and I had facials, pedicures, drank mimosas and relaxed. I’m not one for a lot of fooling with me from other people but I have to admit I loved every minute. It is also enjoyable to know such a facility exists ten minutes from the house in the little nearby town, so we promised ourselves to go more often.
We also visited the very well stocked Granary where all manner of health food, baked goods and grooming items are available.
Where I bought this, Vegenaise mayonnaise…so surprised to know it is available locally. It is quite tasty.
And ended the day with excellent Indian food from another local spot, Sagar Indian Cuisine , which I’m so happy to support. The naan bread too was a real treat.
Nice to know shopping, eating out and entertainment is on our door step; we don’t have to go into Ottawa for it which is a good thing as we get older.
What’s on your want list?
I want to join this group on Facebook… the Twinkle Twinkle Challenge- Het Klossie with Marijke Tabak . You might remember the Lily Challenge from last year. This year she has designed a star block also to be made with scraps and is free for members.
I need to settle on which kind of frame or holder I want to buy for my stitchery projects. The hoops I use are hard on the material and also hurt my left hand to hold for any length of time. I’ve looked at lap stands but they are pricey; lately I’ve been eyeing this one. It receives wonderful reviews so I think this is the one I’ll go with. Q-Snap Needlework frame which gets a consistent 5 stars from stitchers on Amazon .
This list is to be continued.
Meanwhile, everything is rosy in our garden…well not literally (will be a while yet before we see roses!) but figuratively for sure.
Hope for you all too!
Check out lots of positive/thankful Thursday things at Not Afraid of Color and It’s A Small Town Life .

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Qureshi KL, Indian Restaurant Bukit Kiara

Qureshi KL, Indian Restaurant Bukit Kiara Published on May 16, 2019
Words: Anna Chew Photos: Rich Callahan
If you’re looking specifically for Dum Northern Indian cuisine, Qureshi would be the place to go. The Qureshi brothers come from a family of royal chefs with a 200-year history and it is part of a chain of restaurants known for such cuisine. Opened in 2014 in Malaysia and nestled in a quiet corner of a golf course with beautiful views of the green, the air is thick with expectation and spices from the moment you step into the palatial-like setting of the restaurant. Qureshi Restaurant TPC Qureshi KL – Starters and Drinks
We open the meal with Papadum (RM15) served with mint chutney, a snack that is a little hard to hold back on once you start. Along with it came a Persian-Turkish Aperitif, Jalzeera (RM18) a tangy drink with cumin & fresh mint, black salt and spices. Meant to be a palate opener ahead of the feast, it is not commonly found elsewhere and just plain good. Qureshi is also known for their Lassi (RM20), creamy and not too sweet, it is a great way to cool down. Jalzeera & Lassi (tasting portions)
For starters for two, we had the Chaat From The Streets Of Mumbai & Delhi (RM60), the stuffed golgappas with tamarind sauce and yoghurt was just delicious, popping open the whole range of the palate. Pani puri accompanied by a spicy and sourish drink was an uplift of the roti we’re used to. Chaat From The Streets Of Mumbai & Delhi
Our personal favourite was the Samosa Jugalbandi (RM30), a duet of singhara and potlee samosas which was creamy and spicy heaven, balanced nicely with a tamarind sauce and the onion bhajia with chickpeas. A snack became elevated into a lovely dish! Samosa Jugalbandi Qureshi Restaurant – Sharing Platters
For those coming in a group, they have the Assortment of Kebabs (RM160) which comes with Tandoori Salmon Tikka cooked with Kashipur chilly, carom seeds and lemon juice, lightly spiced, Burrah Kabab; delicious tandoori lamb chops with spiced vinegar, potlee and Peshawari masala. The vinegar provides a nice marinade and the meat was well charred. The Murgh Malai Tikka, the corn-fed chicken was very tender, as expected of a place with such known history. The nice hint of cheese harmonized well with the nutmeg and cardamom spices. Grilled Rosemary Prawns with Goan pickle was reminiscent of assam prawns, while the Murgh Gilafee came in a roll, with minced chicken wrapped with peppers. It was very tender and tasty with just the right hint of spice. Their grilled meats are impressive, well-seasoned and with a good amount of char to bring out the flavours. Assortment of Kebabs
Qureshi also offers the Vegetarian Kebab Platter (RM70), good for five people. Please be cautioned that one can fill up on vegetables with this platter! It comes with dahi kabab, tandoori cauliflower dusted with cumin and charred, grilled potatoes, stuffed bell peppers and mushroom. The Portobello got high accolades from my fellow diners as did the peppers with a white mushroom stuffing; a lovely combination of fresh vegetable sweetness with cream and spice. Vegetarian Kebab Platter Qureshi – Main Dishes and Curries
Recommended to be eaten with their biryani and bread, we had the Lacccha Paratha (RM15). Made with whole wheat flour, beautifully layered and fired up in their tandoor oven, it is not as heavy or filling as a naan. For something different, there is the Almond Naan with Coconut and Raisin (RM18), fluffy as expected, and just right to soak in curries.
The Dum Lucknawi Biryani (RM55) is a must, sealed with roti and cooked in a clay pot over low fire. Known as the dum pukht cooking technique, the rice turns around with a soft texture. Not cooked with spices, it allows the curries and other dishes to take centre stage when eaten together. The lamb meat is well seasoned and soft. Served with raita, there is no particular overpowering taste, neither spice or ingredients – a well-balanced meal.
We sampled two curries, the Hyderabadi Nehari (RM55), with soft meats of the lamb shank and a nice red curry. Nehari style, it is cooked in oil, so don’t be alarmed when you see the layer on top of the gravy. Work past it for a lovely base that goes well with the biryani. Hyderabadi Nehari
Their Butter Chicken Masala (RM45) is delicious! The tomato cream base is flavoured with fenugreek, butter and yoghurt to take away the spicy edge. We couldn’t stop lapping up the curry with the roti. Vegetables in a Northern Indian restaurant are traditionally served seemingly blended or as mash. Do expect that along with a tasty mix of spices, which is what we had with the Guncha Wa Keema (RM30), cauliflower with onion and sesame. Butter Chicken Masala Guncha Wa Keema Qureshi KL – Desserts
The Qureshi Dessert Platter (RM50) comes with five desserts which can also be ordered on their own as full portions. The first on the platter is a Classic Rasmalai. This is a cottage cheese dumpling in saffron-reduced milk. The cheese is chewy with a light and sweet milky base and it’s topped with slices of almonds. Warm Carrot Halwa is made of grated carrots and spices and served nice and warm. The Pistachio Kulfee was notable with rosewater gifting a floral thread. The Gulab Jamun, a firm favourite, had a balanced sweetness and a refined texture. Lastly, and another hit, the Gulab Ki Kheer (RM20) with coconut chunks was light, despite the fact that it was rice with milk. Topped with dehydrated rose petals and coconut and cashew nuts, we dug in for seconds. Qureshi Dessert Platter
You can end the meal with Masala Tea (RM12 cup/25 pot). Expect strong tea, mild spices with a light milk base. Masala Tea
Reasons to visit Qureshi KL: drop-off-the-bone meat dishes; rich Indian food with mild but fine spices; relaxed and private dining location with lovely views of the golf course; a good assortment of vegetarian dishes – we particularly enjoyed the Vegetarian Kebab Platter; loved the Butter Chicken; sweet tooths should give the Dessert Platter a try. Qureshi KL Ground Floor, East Wing, TPC Kuala Lumpur, No 10, Jalan 1/70D Off Jalan Bukit Kiara, Bukit Kiara, 60000 Kuala Lumpur

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Lewes restaurant gets new look, menu as 2nd Street Tavern

The Buttery, one of Lewes’ most recognizable restaurants, has been revamped and renamed.
The longtime eatery at the corner of Second Street and Savannah Road owned by Wilson Gates and family members was rechristened the 2nd Street Tavern on May 1. The family has owned the restaurant since 2016.
The Buttery has been a part of Lewes since 1994 when then longtime owners John Donato and Twain Gonzales created a thriving business, featuring fine French cuisine, at the former New Devon Inn, now the Hotel Rodney.
The eatery, featured in magazines such as the now-defunct Gourmet and Bon Appetit, eventually outgrew its site.
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In 1999, The Buttery moved from its home to what is known as the Trader mansion off one of the town’s main thoroughfares in the historic district. The partners brought in Lewes architectural designer John Lester to help restore the Victorian gingerbread, a landmark built about 1894.
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The old Ristorante Zebra in Rehoboth, which featured this dish, Tagliatelle Zebra, has closed. It will soon become an Italian seafood eatery operated by Big Fish Restaurant Group. Alex Ruoff photo Fullscreen The Pines is a new coastal tavern on Baltimore Avenue in Rehoboth Beach. It had formerly been the home of Hobos restaurant. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Hummus three ways is a dish on the menu now at The Pines in Rehoboth Beach. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen A multi-layered dish at The Pines in Rehoboth Beach is the gingseng and tea-brined grilled pork chop ($31) with apple and juniper spelt pilaf, kimchi carrots and huckleberry gastrique. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen A Playa Bowls acai bowl with nutella. A new location is opening soon on Rehoboth Avenue in Rehoboth Beach. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Steamin’ Blues Crabhouse takes over the spot at First Street and Baltimore Avenue in Rehoboth Beach which had formerly been the home of Jake’s Seafood House. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Clams and housemade linguine ($19) at The Pines in Rehoboth is served with black and “white” pasta as well as seafood sausage, sea beans and tasso butter. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen The Buttery in Lewes has been renamed 2nd Street Tavern. It has a new look and new menu. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen The Buttery in Lewes has been renamed 2nd Street Tavern. It has a new look and new menu. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen The Buttery in Lewes has been renamed 2nd Street Tavern. It has a new look and new menu. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen The Buttery in Lewes has been renamed 2nd Street Tavern. It has a new look and new menu. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Buy Photo Ben Wang and his wife Brea, who operated the Sandy Pony Donuts and Wang’s World food trucks in South Bethany Beach, have opened a Sandy Pony Donuts and acai bowl shop in downtown Bethany Beach. They will no longer operate the food trucks. Jason Minto, The News Journal Buy Photo Fullscreen Rise Up is a new coffee roastery coming soon to Rehoboth Beach. It’s located off Rehoboth Avenue next to the traffic circle. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Nalu is a new Hawaiian-theme bar and grill that has opened on Rehoboth Avenue, just steps away from the Rehoboth Beach boardwalk. There’s another Nalu in Dewey Beach. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Nalu is a new Hawaiian-theme bar and grill that has opened on Rehoboth Avenue, just steps away from the Rehoboth Beach boardwalk. There’s another Nalu in Dewey Beach. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Nalu is a new Hawaiian-theme bar and grill that has opened on Rehoboth Avenue, just steps away from the Rehoboth Beach boardwalk. There’s another Nalu in Dewey Beach. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Nalu is a new Hawaiian-theme bar and grill that has opened on Rehoboth Avenue, just steps away from the Rehoboth Beach boardwalk. There’s another Nalu in Dewey Beach. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Breakfast Guru is a new Rehoboth Beach restaurant on Wilmington Avenue. It’s open daily from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Buy Photo Investor Dr. Vinay Hosmane, Chef Gyanendra “GG” Gupta and investor Dr. Mark Boytim stand on the porch of their soon-to-be Indian restaurant on Savannah Road in Lewes. The 1899 Victorian house has been repainted and the restaurant will be called Raas. Staff photo by Taylor Goebel Buy Photo Fullscreen Nina Maddox is the new executive chef at Crust & Craft, a wood-fired pizzeria in the Midway Shopping Center in Rehoboth. It’s owned by SoDel Concepts. PAMELA AQUILANI Fullscreen Playa Bowls, which has a location in downtown Newark, is opening a new site on Rehoboth Avenue. Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Chaps Pit Beef has opened a franchise in Rehoboth Beach. The eatery was founded in Dundalk, Maryland Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Chaps Pit Beef has opened a franchise in Rehoboth Beach. The eatery was founded in Dundalk, Maryland Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Chaps Pit Beef has opened a franchise in Rehoboth Beach. The eatery was founded in Dundalk, Maryland Patricia Talorico Fullscreen Interested in this topic? You may also want to view these photo galleries: Replay 1 of 24 2 of 24 3 of 24 4 of 24 5 of 24 6 of 24 7 of 24 8 of 24 9 of 24 10 of 24 11 of 24 12 of 24 13 of 24 14 of 24 15 of 24 16 of 24 17 of 24 18 of 24 19 of 24 20 of 24 21 of 24 22 of 24 23 of 24 24 of 24 Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Last Slide Next Slide Earlier, it had been a private home of a sea pilot and the longtime home of the Trader family, who own a jewelry store in town. It also had been a boarding house and home to an antique shop.
When a pipe burst in the restaurant in December 2018, The Buttery was closed for repairs.
Extensive renovations were required, so the Gates family decided to change to a more casual concept. Gone are the heavy draperies and the old name. The restaurant has reopened with new flooring, a new bar area and a revamped seating area for patrons to enjoy drinks and snacks. The corner round table overlooking Savannah Road and Second Street now has a cool chandelier that looks almost like a glass octopus. It’s a place to be and be seen.

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Best Indian Restaurants in London

Best Indian Restaurants in London The spiciest spots in town 0
Us Brits love a good curry. Thankfully, we’re spoilt for choice here in London: the Indian food scene is thriving, with a wide mixture of Michelin-starred eateries and casual dining spots to choose from. Here’s our pick of the best… Gymkhana
London’s fine dining Indian scene is better than ever thanks to the arrival of restaurants like Gymkhana. A year after opening it was awarded with a Michelin star, and if you go there you’ll quickly see why. An elegant dining room from the team behind Trishna and Hoppers, the restaurant is inspired by Indian gymkhana clubs, where high society types meet to dine, drink and socialise. Most importantly, the food really is top notch, with a focus on bold, intense flavours: highlights include paneer tikka with cashew nut and corn chaat, Bengali mustard salmon and guinea fowl with Benne dosa. Amaya
Situated in the heart of Belgravia, Amaya is one of London’s most glamorous Indian restaurants, attracting smart crowds day in day out. Widely spaced, polished wood tables and low lighting make for sleek surroundings, made even better by impeccable service. A restaurant that’s hold onto their Michelin star for over a decade is a promising sign, and luckily Amaya doesn’t disappoint. Unconventional for a fine dining restaurant, dishes are served tapas-style and designed to be shared. Though the menu is seasonal and changes often, it features a mixture of sophisticated meat, fish and vegetarian dishes, such as smoked chilli lamb chops, grilled duck breast, char-grilled aubergine, beetroot chop and griddled sweet potato with tamarind and yoghurt. Dishoom
Since the first café opened in Covent Garden back in 2010, four more branches of Dishoom have opened – yet somehow all of them still draw in big queues. All branches have a similar vibe, with interiors inspired by Bombay brasseries, with retro design features, low-level lighting and vintage magazines covering the walls. Everything is delicious, but there are some things you’ve got to try, such as their famous House Black Daal, the okra fries and the lamb biriyani. Well worth the wait.
Cinnamon Kitchen
The newest branch in Vivek Singh’s empire, Cinnamon Kitchen Battersea is a laid-back alternative to its fine dining sibling, The Cinnamon Club. Found within up-and-coming Battersea Power Station, it has more of an edgy vibe than the others, set in an exposed brick arch with a metal cage structure in the middle. Like Vivek’s other restaurants, the restaurant specialises in modern Indian cuisine, but here street food dishes take centre stage. The Bombay platter makes a great starter, featuring a vada pa (a fried potato cake in a bun), chilli-coated paneer, and a tapioca cake. Vegetarian offerings are particularly good at Cinnamon Kitchen – we highly recommend the kale and quinoa kofta, and the spiced chickpea gnocchi is delicious. Kahani
A new addition to London’s Indian food scene, Kahani is an unassuming, sophisticated spot hidden away behind Chelsea’s Cadogan Hall. It’s headed up by Peter Joseph, previously at Tamarind – the first Indian restaurant in the world to earn a Michelin star – who describes the food as ‘lighter, modern Indian food.’ Grill is the prime focus here, with a mixture of meat, seafood, game and vegetable dishes cooked either on a robata grill or a tandoor. Go hungry, and however full you are you must order the melting chilli chocolate dome pudding. Kricket
Kricket has come a long way since its humble beginnings. It was born in a 20-seat shipping container in Pop Brixton, but after gaining legions of fans opened its first bricks-and-mortar restaurant in Soho two years later. Founders Will Bowlby and Rik Campbell have since opened two more branches, one back in Brixton, and the newest in White City’s Television Centre. The menu is all about small sharing plates, and although it changes regularly there are some staples, like the samphire pakoras and the Keralan fried chicken. Their Indian-inspired cocktails are also very popular, particularly the Moondate, made with ginger vodka, date marmalade and date & cinnamon syrup. Indian Accent
The original Indian Accent in New Delhi is widely regarded as one of the best restaurants in the world, so the excitement surrounding its London opening last year is no surprise. It’s right at home on Mayfair’s Albermarle Street, a culinary hub filled with top-end restaurants like Gymkhana and Isabel. With its plush interiors, Indian Accent is equally decadent – with a menu to match. Dishes are flavoursome and creative, such as applewood smoked bacon kulcha bread, ghee roast lamb with roti pancakes, and beetroot chops with peanut butter and goat cheese raita. If you fancy a bit of indulgence, their seven-course tasting menus are particularly impressive, with separate vegan and gluten free menus available.

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From Hamilton to Bahrain – young chef shares his secrets

16:14
Joel Miller proves no dream is too big for an aspiring chef from Hamilton, New Zealand. He now cooks for the royal family in Bahrain.
For as long as he can remember, Joel always wanted to be a chef. Apart from lunchtime, his food tech class was the only thing keeping him at high school. Then in 2013 he met internationally recognised Michelin star chef Josh Emett at his restaurant, Rātā in Queenstown.
“I was already a huge fan and couldn’t wait to get a photo for my profile picture. But I also wanted to ask what advice he had for an aspiring chef, and he said, ‘the best advice I can give you is to study cookery at Wintec, my old stomping ground in Hamilton, and then come and talk to me when you’re done’.
“So, I took his advice and that’s exactly what I did. In 2014, at the age of 16, I left high school after achieving NCEA Level 1 and 2 to follow my passion for cooking and enrolled in the Certificate in Cookery Level 3 at Wintec. I then went on to study the Certificate in Cookery Level 4 the following year,” says Joel.
During those two years Joel learnt many valuable skills that prepared him for the workplace.
He was also presented with opportunities to further his learning, including competing at Waikato Culinary Fare, and the WorldSkills competition.
“To me there is nothing quite like competing. You can work in any kitchen, but at the end of the day the pressure you compete in, you either thrive in it or you just don’t,” he says.
Joel finished his study at the end of 2015 as a qualified chef and graduated with Excellence from Wintec in 2016, along with the London City and Guilds Medal of Excellence Award in Cookery. He was 18-years-old and ready to take on the world.
Conveniently, Madam Woo by Josh Emett had just announced they were opening in Hamilton and Joel knew he had to work there. That photo Joel took back in 2013 came in handy for the front of his CV and helped land his first dream job at the new restaurant.
Joel explains: “My time at Madam Woo was amazing. I was fortunate to have trained under Jane Leong, Executive Chef of Madam Woo. Jane’s family’s recipes and flavours were behind this new restaurant. I also got to work side by side with Josh in the kitchen, a person I admired. I felt a great sense of accomplishment to get to this stage, but why stop there I thought?”
Life’s opportunities can often be about who you know, and Joel’s former Wintec tutor, Amy Opperman was the link between an Executive Chef in Bahrain and the opportunity of a lifetime.
“There were many supportive tutors at Wintec who helped me hone my skills and develop my passion, but Amy continued to support and inspire me after I graduated. She was the one who helped make it all happen.
“She knew I had potential and a bright future ahead of me with a passion for travel and an urge to work overseas. So, she approached me with a job opportunity as a chef for the royal family in Bahrain.
“The first thought I had was, where the heck is Bahrain? I literally had to Google the country I now live in. The ball started rolling and after a few skype interviews and a couple of months later, I packed my life into 30kg and away I went on a one-way ticket to the other side of the world.”
Moving to a country he had never heard of didn’t faze Joel though.
“I wouldn’t say I was nervous about moving to a country I knew nothing about. I always try and turn whatever nerves I have into excitement for the opportunity.”
He said arriving in Bahrain was a major culture shock: “The biggest challenge was seeing sand everywhere – there wasn’t a piece of grass in sight – along with the language barrier. Everyone speaks Arabic and I was an English-speaking Kiwi.
“But when I arrived at the Palace, where I now work, it was just breath-taking! We have eight kitchens, 60 chefs, and a total of 400 staff on the grounds. I work as one of the four exclusive chefs in the International Kitchen.”
Due to privacy and contractual reasons, Joel can’t go into much more detail, but what he can say is: “I’m very lucky to work in a place that doesn’t have a budget, it’s a chef’s dream and certainly not the norm. But I do have to work six days a week and very long hours.”
He is required to cook a wide variety of food and cuisines, including Indian, Arabic, Egyptian, Lebanese, French, Italian, and the list goes on. This is helping develop his craft.
During his first year at the Palace, one of Joel’s adapted recipes featured in The New Zealand Chef: Fourth Edition, and he has since been able to travel solo to London, to personally cook for some of the royal family.
“This is one of the reasons that attracted me to accepting the job. I want to see as much of the world as possible, mainly because I want to eat my way around the world.”
Joel has just started his third year in Bahrain and says he has certainly grown as a person and chef since he arrived as an eager 19-year-old.
“I was forced to grow up instantly. I went from living in New Zealand with my family, where I hadn’t even experienced flatting before, to setting up my own apartment in a foreign country.
“Living overseas, away from friends and family, can be very lonely at times, but you just have to think about your future and the big picture and push through it,” says Joel.
When asked what advice he would give to his younger self, Joel said: “I would tell him, you’re not going to get anywhere in life unless you put in the hard yards now. Fortunately, I think I did just that, and that hard work has got me to where I am today.
“I was also given some great advice from a top chef, and that was ‘to save your money and eat at as many high-end places as you can, as this will help train your palate’. By putting this into practice, I have been fortunate enough to travel, dine at, and meet some of the world’s top chefs.
“Learn from creative people. Be a sponge,” says Joel.
Read this story online: https://www.wintec.ac.nz/about-wintec/news/article/2019/05/16/from-hamilton-to-bahrain-young-chef-shares-his-secrets

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Taco Bell signs Burmans as India master franchise, eyes 600 outlets in 10 yrs

May 16, 2019 SHARE
Mexican cuisine chain Taco Bell , a part of Yum Brands Inc, Wednesday announced Burman Hospitality as its master franchise partner in India, with plans to open 600 outlets by 2029.
According to a PTI report: Taco Bell, which currently has 35 outlets in India, also expects the country to become its largest market outside North America in terms of both restaurant count and revenues going forward.
“In terms of restaurant count India today is set to be one of our top three markets outside the US. In the near term, as we move forward India stands to move up as in terms of being one of our largest markets, in terms of restaurants count and potentially in revenues as well,” Liz Williams , President, Taco Bell International told PTI.
Bullish on the Indian market, she told PTI, “Today we don’t release separate revenue figures for the international business for specific markets but with that kind of growth you can imagine the revenue contribution.”
Taco Bell currently operates 500 restaurants nearly across 30 countries outside the US. The expansion plans for Taco Bell in India have been timed to ride on the growing awareness of Mexican food among consumers here, she further said.
“We feel like it is the perfect time…Consumers are becoming more aware and they have the interest and appetite to try Mexican cuisine. We think it is a great fit with the Indian consumers, coupled with brand positioning together with the Burman group,” she was further quoted by PTI as saying.
Taco Bell had entered India in 2010 and opened six stores. Later on, it partnered with the Burman family.
Elaborating on the expansion plans, Gaurav Burman , Director, Burman Hospitality told PTI, “We are building one new store every 10 days. At the end of the year you will see us go past 60 stores and then we will continue to build progressively after that.”
The chain currently has presence in 11 Indian cities and by the end of the year it will have presence in 16 cities, he added.

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Taco Bell names Burman Hospitality as master franchise partner

NEW DELHI: American quick service restaurant chain Taco Bell is set to scale up its presence in India nine years after it opened its first store to serve Mexican food, such as tacos and burritos, in the country.
Taco Bell, part of American food services company Yum! Brands Inc., is planning to open 600 restaurants over the next 10 years, to make India its largest market outside the US. Taco Bell finds more acceptance among India’s urban consumers for cuisines beyond just burgers and pizzas, top executives at the Mexican food chain said.
On Wednesday, Taco Bell announced Burman Hospitality Pvt. Ltd as its master franchise partner for India, making the New Delhi-based company the largest Taco Bell franchise globally by store count. Since 2015, Burman Hospitality was Taco Bell’s local partner. To be sure, Yum! Brands also runs the KFC and Pizza Hut restaurants in India via its local franchise partners. Between the two brands, they operate over 800 restaurants.
When it had first started selling Taco’s in India in 2010, its presence remained sparse. “We were just testing the market the, since the category was nascent,” said said Ankush Tuli, managing director, Taco Bell, Asia Pacific and Middle East.
But Taco Bell’s presence in India is still limited, largely because of the unfamiliarity of the Tex-Mex cuisine among consumers.
“If you look at chicken and pizza they are two very familiar categories to the consumer and that helped both KFC and Pizza Hut with their explosive growth, not only in India, but all over the world. The Mexican category is a relatively new category for consumers and I think the Indian consumer has shown us they are ready for it,” said Liz Williams, president, Taco Bell International.
In 2018, India’s quick service restaurants market was estimated at ₹ 32,880 crore. Most people consume north Indian food while eating out or ordering in, followed by Chinese and south Indian, according to the findings of the India Food Services Report 2019 released by the National Restaurant Association of India (NRAI). While, cuisines such as Japanese and Mexican still have few takers, their market is expanding.
The country’s underlying demographics makes India a massive opportunity and makes us bullish on the category, said Tuli.
For now, Burman Hospitality will control store launches before sub-franchising the brand to other local partners. “We are waiting to scale up to at least 100 before we do that,” said Gaurav Burman, director, Burman Hospitality.
In 2015, it roped in Burman as its key partner, scaling the brand to 35 outlets. Subsequently, the chain revamped some of its new stores, as part of its efforts to make the brand more contemporary. In India, it revamped the menu, added alcoholic drinks, opened large format stores in busy locations and even offered on-table services.
Going forward, Tuli added that the chain could expand in formats such as in-line restaurant, stand-alone outlets, and or kiosks in food courts.
The brands’ plans to rev up store expansion comes as it is looking East to draw more sales and profit for its brand.
Earlier this year, the company made public its plans to expand Taco Bell across Asia as part of its plans to expand beyond home market US—also its largest, Williams had told Reuters in January.
Globally Taco Bell is YUM!’s smallest brand after KFC and Pizza Hut. The Mexican food chain is present in 28 countries and has over 7,100 restaurants, a bulk of them in the United States.
In India, YUM! has largely focussed on scaling its Pizza Hut and KFC brands over the last two decades. It runs these brands largely via two franchisees in India—Ravi Jaipuria-owned Devyani International and Sapphire Foods India. Sapphire Foods was formed by a consortium of funds led by Samara Capital, which bought part of Yum! Brands’ franchise business in India for ₹ 750 crore in 2016.

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Taco Bell: Taco Bell names Burman Hospitality as exclusive national franchise partner,

New Delhi: Yum Brands Inc-owned Mexican cuisine chain Taco Bell named Burman Hospitality as its exclusive national franchise partner on Wednesday, a deal that makes Burman Hospitality one of the largest Taco Bell franchisees globally by store count. So far, Taco Bell’s 35 stores in India were operated as a mix between Burman Hospitality and its own equity stores.
“We expect India to be operating over 600 outlets by 2029, making this market the largest outside of the US,” Taco Bell Corp international president Liz Williams, currently on an India visit, told ET.
Taco Bell is Yum India’s newest and smallest brand. Yum-promoted Pizza Hut and KFC operate a combined 800-plus outlets in the country. The Southern California headquartered Taco Bell debuted in the Indian market in 2010, and tied up with Burman Hospitality in 2015.
Burman Hospitality director Gaurav Burman said investments on stores would be in the range of Rs 3 crore each. “As part of the master franchise agreement, Burman Hospitality will create employment for over 20,000 people including entry level team members, restaurant management, and store positions. We will create additional jobs in multiple outsourced functions across partner companies in functions like IT, finance, supply chain and maintenance,” he said.
Taco Bell Asia-Pacific managing director Ankush Tuli said India is a “massive opportunity market” for the brand. “While the core cuisine remains global, the menu has been localised for Indian consumers,” Tuli said.
The Indian restaurant industry employed 7.3 million people in 2018-19, and the organised food services sector contributed Rs 18,000 crore in taxes in 2018-19, National Restaurants Association of India (NRAI) said in its Food Services Report released last week. The report estimates the Indian food services market at Rs 4,23,865 crore in 2018-19, forecasted to grow 9% to reach Rs 5,99,782 crore by 2022-23.
RELATED So, what is urban India eating? Zomato just gave you every detail Food Services , Taco Bell , Yum! Brands , Pizza Hut , kfc , Burman Hospitality

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When the sun set in the East – mumbai guide

Updated: May 14, 2019, 07:16 IST | Suman Mahfuz Quazi The food at a Kalina eatery is pocket-friendly, but a lunch with an East Indian home chef confirms that it can’t be termed ‘authentic’ Fish fry
For those who are aware of the cuisine and the community’s culinary traditions, it is hard to imagine East Indian food without visualising spongy fugias or a resplendent bowl of chicken moile. Even though our experience with the food has been fleeting, we have come to like it enough to crave the dishes.
So, when we heard that a nondescript East Indian joint in Kalina — that had shuttered a while ago — had re-opened in March, we couldn’t hold our horses; but we had to. For, each time we tried to order in, it was either closed or had run out of food. After multiple attempts, we finally manage to work things out. And on a balmy Sunday afternoon we invite East Indian home chef Alefiya Jane to sample the food with us in a bid to gauge authenticity, and to see if it was worth the wait.
Fugias
We call on the number and are let down once again when we learn that the only two East Indian dishes available are mutton sorpotel (R120) and fugias (R30 for 10). The lady on the other end is warm enough to share a host of other options, but it isn’t reassuring to know that a place that literally calls itself East Indian Fast Food has Chinese fare more readily available. We leave the puzzlement aside and call for a fish fry (R100 for 5 pieces), cheese balls (R10 per piece) and chicken spring rolls (R60 for two pieces) anyway. And after an unjustifiably long wait of one and a half hours, the food finally arrives.
By now, our tummies are growling and we can’t wait to dig to in, but one bite of the sorpotel and our appetite is gone. “The dish is too dry and lacks flavour,” Jane remarks. Our fellow diners nod in quiet agreement. We pick a piece of the fugias, a dish we absolutely love, but the overtly oily balls are already putting us off. Jane concurs and explains, “Fugias come from the word fugga, or balloon. You squeeze the dough into the fist of your palm, create an air pocket and dip the hollow ball-like formation on top in oil. So, if it isn’t spongy, it’s not a fugia. And these are very chewy.”
Mutton sorpotel
We move on to the cheese balls, an unpalatable serving of a doughy snack made with gram flour that tastes more like pakoda. The spring rolls, too, have an unpleasant sourness that’s most certainly coming from the stale carrots and capsicum. The fish fry has a nice green marinade, but is uncooked in parts and is perhaps only enjoyable,because everything else isn’t.
It takes a lot for us to say that we will not be ordering from this place again, because we had nurtured a keen curiosity for what could have been the perfect spot for some regional food indulgence, and that too, in the comfort of our home. But unfortunately, the sun has set on this East Indian kitchen, and if we are to again chance upon something more promising, be sure to read about it in these pages.
Alefiya Jane
At East Indian Fast Food, Kalina Santacruz East. Time 9 am to 11.30 pm (please call and check) Call 8879144274
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A walk through Mohammed Ali Road’s Khau Galli Related News

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hello
here is some local food restaurant which are around thamel or some minutes from thamel.
Bajeko sekuwa in shorhakhutte
Thakali Kitchen Z-street thamel
Ram’s kitchen ( Nepali and Indian Cuisine) Thamel
Glinche Restaurant Thamel
Bk’s fastfood thamel
Yang gling restaurant, kaldhara thamel.
If you like western or specialty kitchen then here are some focusing on Italian plus continental
La dolce vita restaurant thamel
Road House Cafe thamel
Mezza by Roadhouse King’s way
Enjoy your verity, your delicacies
have a good day.

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