Moringa Tea: Fat Loss, BP Control And More Incredible Benefits Of The Drink

Moringa Tea: Fat Loss, BP Control And More Incredible Benefits Of The Drink

Moringa Tea: Fat Loss, BP Control And More Incredible Benefits Of This So-Called ‘Miracle Tea’ Moringa Tea: Fat Loss, BP Control And More Incredible Benefits Of This So-Called ‘Miracle Tea’ NDTV Food Desk | Updated: May 31, 2019 16:46 IST Moringa Tea Benefits: This drink is made from leaves of moringa Highlights Moringa or drumstick tree has a number of edible parts Moringa leaves are turned into powder form and used in tea Moringa tea has a number of incredible health and beauty benefits
Moringa or drumsticks have been used in the regional cuisines of Southern Indian states for millennia, but the world is only now warming up to it. From ‘miracle herb’ to ‘superfood’, Moringa oleifera has been felicitated with a number of titles and phrases, making the western world go gaga over it. The plant has been converted to powders which can be added to teas and coffees and which are now being used in countless classic recipes of main dishes and condiments. It’s safe to say that moringa is enjoying its spot under the Sun and is being actively incorporated in the diets of people around the world. Although some health experts may be more skeptical than the rest of the world about these ‘magical’ qualities of moringa, it seems like it is here to stay as a health food.
Moringa tea is just one drink that this superfood craze has spawned. The tea that is prepared from the leaves of moringa or drumstick tree is now a popular beverage with several food and drinks manufacturers cashing in on the trend. Moringa tea is fast becoming a popular choice among ‘health freaks’ and the drink is also said to have several health benefits for us. Let’s look at some incredible health benefits that moringa tea is known for. Moringa Tea is prepared from the leaves of moringa or drumstick tree Moringa Tea Benefits 1. Fat Loss
Moringa is known to be rich in a number of essential vitamins and minerals and is also said to help mobilise stored visceral fat. The tea is rich in antioxidants , which are primarily the polyphenols or plant compounds in it. According to the book ‘How To Lose Back Fat’ by Cynthia Trainer, “Moringa tea is shown to have a weight loss effect. Energy production takes place instead of fat storage… the leaves are low-fat and nutrient-dense and can be easily viewed as alternatives to high-calorie foods.”
Also Read: Pesto Mania: From Moringa Pesto to Spinach, Peanut Butter and More! 2. Blood Pressure Control
Moringa tea, which is prepared from dehydrated and ground moringa leaves, is said to help in blood pressure control as well. This has been credited to the presence of quercetin in it, which is said to reduce blood pressure. Additionally, it may also help BP patients fight inflammation, due to its anti-oxidative abilities. Moringa tea may help control blood pressure 3. Blood Sugar Control
Moringa leaves may also help people suffering from diabetes, as it contains the antioxidant chlorogenic acid, which is also present in coffee and that is said to keep blood sugar levels in check. Additionally, it is said to be rich in Vitamin C, which has been shown to reduce blood sugar and blood pressure in patients of Type-2 diabetes.
Also Read: How To Use Drumsticks? 4. Fights Cholesterol Build-up
Moringa oleifera may also help reduce levels of cholesterol , thereby potentially helping heart patients and lowering risks of heart diseases. 5. Beauty Benefits
The powerful antioxidant abilities of moringa mean that it may also help improve quality of your skin and hair, by fighting inflammation and oxidative stress in the body. Antioxidants may help keep toxins at bay and potentially clear the skin. Moringa Tea: It may have a number of health benefits How To Make Moringa Tea At Home
Moringa powder is widely available online and in grocery stores nowadays. It can be boiled in filtered water and then passed through a sieve to get a bright green tea, which is the moringa tea. However, if you don’t trust brands and packaged powders, then you can also make moirnga powder at home. All you need to do is get your hands on some fresh moringa leaves, dehydrate them and then grind them to make a powder. Alternatively, you can just clean the leaves and boil them in water for a few minutes to make moringa tea.
If you suffer from any chronic conditions, then make sure you consult a dietitian or your doctor, before adding this tea to your diet.

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A summer odyssey through England and Wales

Go to England and Wales for the cricket, but stay on for the sights at the World Cup’s 10 venues. The entire cricketing world will be there this summer: the Barmy Army, baggy greens, calypso crew and our boys and girls in blue. But amidst the jubilation and vocal despondency that such jamborees bring, there may be moments when you yearn to be far from the madding crowd
London
Even this glittering, busy venue of 10 matches, including the packed final, has its oases of calm. A mere deuce ball’s flight from The Oval is the London Eye. The queue to board it is orderly and once the 135m-wheel starts turning, you are in the clouds, looking down on a tranquil yet clearly teeming London. If your ride’s at night, it is even more ethereal; twinkling quietly like the Thames below. Back on the ground, and for a change of pace, there are enticing road shows, street-food stalls, and pop-up exhibitions all the way along the embankment, till you arrive, in a matter of minutes, at that other place of profound peace and eternal rest—Westminster Abbey. If its soaring spires and celebrated rose window appeal to the art lover in all of us, our inner bookworm is bound to savour a hushed sit-down in Poets’ Corner, where the bones of English literature’s who’s who are interred.
Once rejuvenated, roll on down to the South Bank for a spot of rambunctious Shakespeare at the lovingly reconstructed Globe Theatre. Or take a stroll through these riverside lanes of galleries (including the Tate Modern), wine bars, restaurants and the Southbank Centre itself, with all the art and culture it has to offer. You could even board the Golden Hinde, Francis Drake’s famous galleon; salvaged, rebuilt and still roguishly manned. A saunter away is the wonderful whirligig of the Borough Market, with every manner of person scoffing all kinds of cuisine—from roast hog to oysters to dosa—under its vaulted Victorian glass and iron roof.
If it’s the hurly-burly at Lord’s Cricket Ground from which you need a breather, then the best place is verdant Regent’s Park. Have a picnic while you watch the swans weaving through the weeping willow. When your little grey cells are refreshed and ready, visit The Sherlock Holmes Museum next door, to mull over mysteries worthy of Sherlock (like, is that really Mrs Hudson you spy in the corner?). With time in hand—during an obdurate century from the opposition, for example—you might want to explore The British Museum, and The British Library too. From Baker Street, these are no more than two-three Tube stops away.
Nottingham
From Trent Bridge, there are trams and buses aplenty but you can also walk to the centre of this merry city, home of Robin Hood. Stop at a fête at Old Market Square, in front of majestic Council House, then hurry on to some of the most interesting pubs in the country. Beside Nottingham Castle is the oldest pub in England, Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem, where returning Crusaders gathered to gab about their glory days, like cricket fans after a match. Down the hill, opposite the Galleries of Justice, a museum that was the old gaol, is the picturesque Tudor tavern Cock & Hoop. This pub with a difference is always packed, but pleasantly, with its literary events a huge draw in this
Unesco City of Literature. The Pitcher & Piano pub, just up the street, is in an old church; magnificent to look at, and as full of spirits as when it was a very different house of worship.
That many of these pubs are partially housed in thousand-year-old man-made caves, or sit atop them, using them as cellars for their stocks, make them unlike any other in England. And a nocturnal tour that sets out from Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem on the trail of Nottingham’s ghosts takes time out to delve into this netherworld too.
Pubs for Medieval Crusaders to hub for the Caped Crusader, Nottingham has it all; and if Robin Hood doesn’t impress, Batman will! When film director Christopher Nolan chanced upon the grand Gothic pile of Wollaton Hall, he knew it would have to be his Wayne Manor in Batman Returns. Despite exuding the brooding aura of the Dark Knight’s lair, it is miles more inviting in its green, rolling grounds dotted with deer, cream tea at the converted stables, and the occasional fair.
Cardiff
This city’s beautiful, humming harbour is also its cultural heart. A 5-minute ride from the central railway station by bus or cab is the iconic Wales Millennium Centre, home of the opera and other theatrical marvels. Catch a matinee and have dinner at a range of restaurants looking out to the sea. Dip your toes in after, on a boat trip across Cardiff Bay, to the centre, where Cardiff Castle promises music in its gardens all summer long. From The Killers to the Manic Street Preachers, they have all the scarily-named (but musically sound) bands you might want to hear!
Another boat ride away is the Norwegian Church, where author Roald Dahl was baptized; this whitewashed steepled building on a bluff is now an arts base in his honour. But for the landlubbers with children, there’s also Techniquest; a large and engaging science activity centre, a stump’s throw from the harbour, which is guaranteed to keep your inner child occupied too.
Bristol

The city of the grand old suspension bridge that Victorian engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel built has another of those nicely restored docklands that Britain does so well, with vibrant shops, bars, art venues and restaurants. And down a back street, on College Green, the only statue of Indian reformer Rammohun Roy in the UK, standing proud outside the Bristol Cathedral. Sati-abolitionist Roy died in Bristol, and his ornate memorial in Arnos Vale Cemetery remains a place of peace in this booming city.
Another serene little gem in a cobbled Bristol lane is the Red Lodge Museum on Lodge Street, a perfectly preserved historic home where you can spend all the time you need exploring the rooms and their exhibits, or just gazing out of its wide sashed windows at the lush green gardens beneath, without interlopers shaking you out of your Tudor daydream. But for history going back to the dawn of man, and an otherworldly atmosphere like no other, take a tour bus to the Unesco World Heritage site of Stonehenge an hour and a bit away, where the giant standing stones breathe a magic that can still hold you in thrall.
SOUTHAMPTON
The desi connection truly comes into play at The Rose Bowl, where India kick off their campaign. Southampton is Titanic City; not in its size but in its link to that ill-fated liner, because it was from here that it set sail. To learn more about it, head to the SeaCity Museum with its replica ship and tear-and-seawater-soaked stories from survivors. The maritime theme continues at Buckler’s Hard, an 18th century shipbuilding village, half an hour from SeaCity, where you can wander through fragrant apple orchards, espying old timber yards and shipwrights’ cottages, or take a breezy river cruise up to 800-year-old Beaulieu Abbey and its surroundings. It’s also a motorhead’s paradise, with the National Motor Museum, World of Top Gear, and monorail, all on the same site.
Taunton
This Somerset town is small and pretty. Elizabethan knot gardens, twee shops and churches, picture-book canals and narrow boats straight out of Jerome K. Jerome, are a sight for cricket-sore eyes, and well worth a ramble on a clear day. If you have been on your feet a tad too long, board the toy train that runs through Vivary Park, to appreciate the award-winning floral displays, Victorian bandstand and bowers. With time at your disposal and an interest in the equine, you could trek through Quantock Hills on sturdy guided ponies, and be back in time for tea. Or hire a car from Taunton to get to Stonehenge in the same time it takes from Bristol, with a possible and very picturesque detour to Salisbury, with its legend-rich cathedral and an ancient Roman fort, Old Sarum, on a hill.
Manchester

Big, busy and permanently wet, Manchester has plenty of exciting indoor venues for visitors, including some fine art and architecture at the Manchester Art Gallery and the Whitworth at the University of Manchester. The Salford area has a fabulous collection of paintings at The Lowry, and BBC MediaCity tours of beloved TV shows. Best of all, Old Trafford, the Manchester United Football ground is only a long pass away. And Etihad Stadium, the home of Manchester City, is not too far either. Both do entertaining, informative tours for lovers of the game. Plus, with so many football greats based here, you never know who you might run into!
Birmingham

Get away from the hubbub of this bustling city by visiting the vast, state-of-the-art Library of Birmingham, with its 10 floors of books, amphitheatre, wild-flower gardens, and panoramic viewing gallery. Yet, step outside and Brum’s contemporary energy grabs you again. Its city centre is jammed with shops, bars, restaurants and art spaces, from the massive shopping mall that is the Bullring to the electric, as well as eclectic, Birmingham Hippodrome, with shows—Royal Ballet to The Gruffalo to The Colour Purple—to impress everyone.
And if you like your chocolate enough to take a trip to the southern edge of the city, Cadbury’s Chocolate World in Bournville is every chocoholic’s dream; dishing up not just chocolate, but knowledge about it too.
Leeds
Not dissimilar to Manchester or Birmingham, Leeds is northern and thriving. It has both gracious classical architecture and a young cosmopolitan buzz, which is especially apparent if you catch the 20-minute train from the centre to the Bradford golden mile. Here, curry house upon curry house presents Britain’s modern multicultural face even as you stuff yours with the best of British fusion. An interesting hybrid of Western tastes (tomato soup in chicken tikka) and expat Asian ingenuity, it should set you up for an adventure back in time. From Keighley in Bradford, the Worth Valley steam engine sweeps through the glorious stretches of purple heather that are the Yorkshire moors, to take you to the postcard-pretty village of Haworth. You will find graceful antiquarian bookshops, charming tea rooms, and colourful confectioners in Howarth. As well as the Brontës, of course—all the lore, and the locations in which their lives and stories played out with such intensity.
Durham

This beautiful city, with its ancient university and cathedral, is the most northern venue of the tour. The university does an enjoyable guided amble of its grand premises, but you could do your own leisurely jaunt, up cobbled streets and down riverside walks, allowing you to take in more. With as many bijou boutiques and old-world pubs as it has flowering lawns, this compact, elegant city is a delightful stroll on a summer’s day.
For an immersive British experience unlike any other, however, head to Beamish Living Museum, less than half hour on the Waggonway, or Coast & Country, bus service from Chester-le-Street. In this vast park, whole neighbourhoods, main streets, farms and transport systems from the last two centuries have been recreated. Rebuilt brick by authentic brick from settlements reclaimed from the past, you will not only be able to wander (or hitch a vintage ride) through them, but sit in Georgian living rooms, attend Victorian school, drink in their World War I pubs, gobble great quantities of 1950s’ sweets, and even work on an Edwardian railway!
How better to end your whirlwind World Cup cricket tour of Blighty than in this perfect little replica of this small and splendid island?

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CARIBBEAT: Celebrity chefs share tips and dish out regional cuisine at free ‘Caribbean Week – New York’ cooking demonsrations

| New York Daily News | Jun 02, 2019 | 1:53 AM New York-based Haitian Chef Nadege Fleurimond, will be at Bloomingdale’s, 1000 Third Ave. (at E. 59th St.), from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday (Gracie Xavier) “Caribbean Celebrity Chef Cooking Demonstrations” — a free highlight of the Caribbean Tourism Organization’s Caribbean Week New York — returns this week to Bloomingdale’s department store and the Williams-Sonoma specialty store in Manhattan.
New York-based Haitian Chef Nadege Fleurimond, will be at Bloomingdale’s, 1000 Third Ave. (at E. 59th St.), from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday . Advertisement
A self-described “food entrepreneur,” Fleurimond — the owner of Fleurimond Catering in Manhattan — is the author of “Haiti Uncovered: A Regional Adventure Into the Art of Haitian Cuisine” and Taste of Life: A Culinary Memoir.”
She also runs an entrepreneurship coaching initiative helping adults and children fulfill their career goals.
Bloomingdale’s will also host Turks and Caicos Islands’ Chef Martin Wilkiens on Saturday , from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
At Williams-Sonoma, 10 Columbus Circle (at W. 59th St.), Chef Javon Cummins of Barbados will share his culinary expertise in a demonstration on Saturday, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
And a demonstration of classic Caribbean cuisine, by Chef James Murphy, takes place next Sunday at Williams-Sonoma, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
A high-end event of Caribbean celebrity chefs — Chef Shorne Benjamin (St. Lucia); Chef Javon Cummins of Barbados; Chef Samantha Davis of Jamaica; Chef Digby Stridiron of the St. Croix in USVI; and Chef Ariq Flax-Clarke of British Virgin Islands —will be held Wednesday at the historic James Beard House, 167 W. 12th St., in Manhattan, at 7 p.m.
For info on the free celebrity chef cooking demonstrations, the James Beard House event and the Rum and Rhythm benefit on Friday featuring award-winning St. Vincent and the Grenadines performer Skinny Fabulous, visit caribbeanweek.com . Controller’s Carib awards
The respected New York-based Carib New Inc. news operation, Brooklyn’s multifaceted Sesame Flyers International community organization and Mona Wyre-Manigo, president of the revered 84-year-old Harlem-based Antigua and Barbuda Progressive Society are the honorees selected for the city Controller Scott Stringer’s Caribbean Heritage Month Celebration program on Tuesday .
The event will be held at NYC Health + Hospitals / Kings County Hospital, 451 Clarkson Ave., in the second floor auditorium of the T-Building. Doors open at 6 p.m.
To RSVP, visit http://bit.ly/stringercaribbeanheritage2019 Advertisement
“These trailblazers have enriched New York through their entrepreneurship and advocacy on issues facing Caribbean Americans,” said Stringer of the honorees for his annual award.
New York Carib News publishers Faye and Karl Rodeny said they were “delighted and honored” to be selected for Stringer’s award. Founded in 1981, the well-read weekly paper has expanded a multi-media platform featuring the nycaribnews.com website. [More New York] Police seek suspect in Queens sex assault case »
“It means a lot to us to be recognized during Caribbean-American Heritage month, a proclamation we, among others, worked so hard to bring about,” said Rodneys in a statement, referring to the 2006 establishment of National Caribbean-American Heritage Month.
Curtis Nelson, executive director, Sesame Flyers International, said, “It feels really good to my entire agency to receive acknowledgment for all the hard work we’ve been doing throughout the years.” The organization has grown far beyond its roots in New York Caribbean Carnival to year-round organization providing needed educational and after-school programs.
President Mona Wyre-Manigo of the Antigua and Barbuda Progressive Society, feels the Stringer award can have a long-term impact.
“I hope this recognition inspires the next generation of Antiguans and Barbudans to walk through the doors of our headquarters, located at 12 W. 122nd St. in Harlem, and continue the legacy of their foremothers and forefathers.” Social workers set to ‘Mingle’
“Mix and Mingle” — “an evening of music, networking, and mingling” presented by the Caribbean American Social Workers Association on Thursday in Brooklyn — will celebrate Caribbean-American Heritage Month.
The affair will be held at Jammins Events, 1438 Utica Ave. (at Farragut Road), from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Donation is $20. For information, send email to , call (718) 922-0163. Or call Jammins Events at (718) 282-8041. Encouraging Guyana innovation
“Awakening the Jaguar: Guyana Innovation Prize Cocktail Reception” — a gathering of Guyanese cultural ambassadors, business leaders, philanthropists and others, will be held today in Brooklyn at the A.R.T./New York -LuEster T. Mertz South Oxford Space, 130 South Oxford St., from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Presented by the Guyana Economic Development Trust, the event will benefit the University of Guyana’s Guyana Innovation Prize Venture Fellowship encouraging the creation of “paradigm-shifting innovative enterprises” and celebrate innovation and entrepreneurship in the country.
Creating a non-contaminating organic crop fertilizer, methods of boosting students’ academic performance and the formulation of an natural, inexpensive product to fight fungal infections are some of the goals sought by fellowship winners. here will be hors d’oeuvres, an open bar, a silent auction, DJ music and networking at the event.
To attend the reception, purchase tickets at http://bit.ly/guyanainnovation2019 .
For information on the Guyana Economic Development Trust and country’s innovators, visit https://theguyanatrust.org/madeinguyana . ‘Eat Caribbean’ week returns (West Indian American Day Carnival Association)
The scrumptious Caribbean cuisine is focus of “Eat Caribbean NYC Restaurant Week,” which kicks off with a free special event Thursday at Footprints Cafe, 1521 Surf Ave. in Brooklyn, from 6 p.m. t 10 p.m.
Presented by the West Indian American Carnival Day Association, Caribbean Restaurant Week — coming June 16 through 22 — highlights a number of participating eateries, their menus and some special offerings.
To RSVP for the kickoff event, visit http://bit.ly/eatcaribbean2019 .
Visit http://eatcaribbean.nyc for more on the “Eat Caribbean” initiative. Haiti ‘Exchange’ B-day
The Haiti Cultural Exchange (HCX) is marking its 10-year anniversary with “Ayiti:?eXperimental (cq)Supper Club & Afterparty,” on Thursday in the Dumbo Loft, 155 Water St., in Brooklyn — launching a month-long series of events.
“Ayiti” is an amazing event — featuring a cocktail reception, a seated dinner catered by Grandchamps restaurant, an open bar sponsored by the Clairin (the Spirit of Haiti) rum company, a musical performance by Melanie Charles, and a dance party.
The month of activities includes three multidisciplinary mini-series on Haitian culture “through music, visual arts, and dance in various locations across the borough.” [More New York] Man shot in back collapses on Brooklyn street, blood-stained Air Jordans mark the spot » Advertisement Participating performers include Haiti-based artists Wooly Saint Louis Jean, BIC Tizon Difè, Jean-Aurel Maurice, and Pascale Monnin; and New York-based artists Melanie Charles, André Zachery, Nubian Nene, Tara Nicholas, Val Jeanty, and Brother High Rara.
For more information on Ayiti eXperimental, visit haiticulturalx.org/happeningnow . ‘Blue Food’ brunch
The name is in the title — “Caribbean Brunch and More: Blue Food New York 2019,” coming June 8 in Brooklyn, presented by Colin Wiliams Photography. [More New York] Gunman opens fire on cops after Queens car stop »
“My inspiration for Blue Food New York all started when I went to the Blue Food festival in Tobago, posted recently Williams on Facebook, referring to the two-decade-old Tobago Blue Food Festival and Cultural Fusion Weekend in his Trinidad and Tobago homeland.
Blue Food New York will be held at 33 Lafayette Bar & Lounge, 33 Lafayette Ave., from 11:45 am.m to 5 p.m. For advance tickets, send email to or call (646) 552-5521. Art show’s Grenada essence Artwork from Grenada-rooted artist Shervone Neckles. (Shervone Neckles)
“Provenance,” an exhibition of new works by Grenada-rooted artist Shervone Neckles began at the FiveMyles, 558 St. Johns Place, in Brooklyn, with an opening reception last Saturday. The show runs through July 7. [More New York] NYPD chief who died of 9/11-related cancer remembered at street renaming »
Centerpiece of the exhibition is a replication of her Grenada maternal family home, that dates back to the turn of the 19th century.
Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., or by appointment. Visit http://fivemyles.org or call (718) 783-4438 for information. Katra’s summer films
The Katra Summer Series is coming to the the Alamo Drafthouse Theater, 445 Albee Square, in Brooklyn on Tuesday with films from Jamaica, Africa, and Brooklyn-based African-American filmmakers. [More New York] Former Jets star Muhammad Wilkerson busted for drunk driving » And there’s a competition — with selections competing for the Audience Choice Awards valued at up to $4,000.
All guests are invited to attend a pre-party cocktail hour hosted by HiO City Point Store with free beer, wine, cocktails, soft drinks and appetizers from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Screenings and question-answer sessions will be held from 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. For information and a full schedule of films, visit katrafilmseries.com . Advertisement

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Indian Restaurant for sale West Torrens Area – Mile End | 1219856161

A business opportunity not worth missing.
Restaurant for sale.
Spectacular location which falls in the first suburb outside the city ring route. Just 2.6 km from the city centre.
Easy access from the main road and from the street as well. Lots of parking spaces available all the day around. Extra parking spaces also available for emergency or for staff at the backside.
Having seating capacity of 25 chairs inside. 3 tables with 6 chairs in total outside capacity during day time and it can be extended upto 5 tables with 10 chairs in total in the evening hours.
Total capacity during day time is 31 chairs. During evening hours is 35 chairs.
Kitchen is fully equipped as per the needs of Indian, Asian and Middle East foods. Can be transformed adequately for any other cuisine.
This restaurant is currently running as an Indian restaurant having a genuine and regular clientele and sale.
Registered with Uber Eats, Deliveroo, Menulog.
I and my team have nurtured this place with utmost care and keeping in mind the taste and requirements of the customers.
Only selling because of moving interstate otherwise would have never dreamt of selling this.
Full training would be provided to the future owners and staff. The current staff is efficient and friendly and can continue to work if the new owner is willing to continue with them.
Asking price is $25000 O.N.O
No time wasters please. Only genuine buyers consider this.

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‘The Swan seduced us with real French flare’

0 comment THE first I ever knew of the Swan at Tetsworth’s existence was in November 2017, when Oxfordshire Fire and Rescue Service put out a press release saying they had been called to a major fire there.
The blaze, which was later discovered to have been sparked by a faulty fridge, destroyed the kitchen of one of Oxfordshire’s most highly-regarded French restaurants.
Over the next eight months, proprietors Antoine Chretien and Camille Veron rebuilt.
In July last year they were at long last able to host their grand reopening party, giving the invited guests a tantalising taste of their new chef, Jonas Lodge. In pictures: The Grand reopening of the Swan at Tetsworth
However, just weeks later, Jonas and the Swan parted ways, leaving Antoine and Camille to find another new chef.
Finally, this spring, nearly 18 months after the fire, the Swan was able to rise again from the ashes, with the website now boasting a menu lovingly prepared with top local ingredients by their ‘chefs’ plural.
When you go to the Swan, you feel like you have travelled back to the golden age of England that Nigel Farage dreams of at night: as you turn the corner into the village of Tetsworth you are greeted by an enormous village green, permanently bathed in late-afternoon sunlight, where villagers play ball games and lie on the grass like a scene from a PG Wodehouse novel.
The Swan itself, with its beautifully-tended garden, glows orange and well-heeled punters in cars more expensive than my house pull regally in and out of the car park. Read also: Le Manoir – is ‘the most expensive restaurant in Britain’ worth the money?
Unable to resist the rays of the setting sun, we start off in the garden with appropriately French Ricards and cheese board (£14) decorated with figs, dates and leaves.
The secret weapon is a camembert soaked for several days in calvados which, as Antoine explains to us, is a matter of personal pride, as both the cheese and the brandy come, like him, from Normandy.
After we order our food we are brought yet another amuse bouche – a complimentary quartet of smoked salmon brioche triangles which are lighter than air.
Just as the sun is setting on old England, our waitress informs us that dinner is served so we file into the rustic dining room, where couples chat quietly at bare wooden tables under the rather magnificent chanedlier, through which the last rays of daylight are refracted into a hundred tiny rainbows on the wall.
To start, I go for the Queen Scottish scallops, sweet potato puree, tomato and coriander with lime salsa (£14). Review: The new Yummy Thai restaurant, Wantage
Looking back, I’m not sure the dish was quite what I expected – the potato puree certainly wasn’t made of orange sweet potatoes as I’d imagined, though maybe they just meant ‘a potato puree that is sweet’, which it was; the lime salsa came in delicate drops and the decorative tuiles weren’t mentioned on the menu at all. As such it was all a bit more traditional than I’d imagined, but very nice all the same.
One of our party daringly went for the pate de foie gras (to loud tuts from other quarters) with caramelised orange, citrus sauce and ginger bread (£17) which I was lucky enough to get a taste of – this looked like an oil painting and turned out to be extremely sweet but melt-in-the-mouth.
For my main course, I went for the special – moules mariniere covered with cream and served with chips (I didn’t ask the price, sorry). These were again nice and subtly seasoned – a subtlety possibly wasted on those of us who eat Indian curries and sticky Thai takeaways at every opportunity.
My carnivorous companion who had devoured the foie gras went for the smoked local beef fillet with grilled asparagus, morel and more foie gras served with pomme de terre sarladaise (£25) and immediately declared it the best piece of beef he had eaten in five years.
Elsewhere at the table the tarte fine of seasonal vegetables and the bouillabaisse were demolished in contented silence.
Somehow still raring to go, we let ourselves be seduced by the dessert menu.
My eye was seized by the spiced poached pineapple, white chocolate mascarpone, mango coulis and sable Breton – a sort of French shortbread (£9).
What I had imagined was a big ring of golden-brown pineapple covered in a rich sauce with piquant tropical tangs and a heavy chocolate side.
Yet again, what I got was a more sophisticated dish – squeaky-clean stacks of fruit and compact little whorls of cheese.
If you like refined French cuisine, then the Swan is the perfect night out. If, like me, your tastebuds have been spoilt by years of spicy curries, you might find yourself occasionally reaching for the salt and pepper.
The thing that you will love is the place itself: Antoine and Camille are excellent, attentive hosts and all of the staff are friendly, natural and happy to chat. The relaxed atmosphere alone, like going over to a friend’s house for dinner, is reason enough to go back time and again, and we will.

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Take Your Taste buds on a World Tour at Friday Release

Home / Cities / Kolkata / Take Your Taste buds on a World Tour at Friday Release Take Your Taste buds on a World Tour at Friday Release
Ambrosia,a bollywood themed restaurant at Salt Lake Sector 1,announced the introduction of “Global Cuisine” to their menu in Friday Release in the presence of Supratik Ghosh, Managing Head and Motilal Das, Head chef of Friday Release along with some eminent personalities like Masterchef Priyanka M., Jessica Gomes Surana,Principal of Loretto Convent and Indroneel Mukherjee, the famous designer. It is all set to revive your mood by bringing a wide array of global cuisines like Thai, French, Italian and American under one roof.
“There is no love sincerer than the love of food “-George Bernard Shaw. Keeping this thought in the mind, Friday Release has come up with some mouth-watering desserts like Chocolate praline mousse and Strawberry mille feuille. Veg items include Cream of broccoli soup, potato bhravash, penne pasta with vodka sauce etc. and some equally non-veg dishes include Chicken Empanadas, Spaghetti with meat ball. People can enjoy this exquisite menu at Rs. 1500 for two plus GST from 12noon to 11pm. Specializing in Indian street food with a twist besides regular Mughlai, Continental and Chinese dishes, the interiors of the restaurant has features from the film world, which is perfect for every occasion and to have a good time with your family and friends.

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Several Waiter Job Opportunities – K Hotels Entebbe

Duty Station: Entebbe, Uganda About US: K Hotels is a newly-opened intimate boutique hotel in Entebbe town, within close proximity of the Central Business District, with convenient access to all parts of the city, and essential social amenities, like shopping centres, prime residential, international diplomatic neighbourhoods, and international schools in the heart of the Entebbe city. K Hotels is known to have East Africa’s most prestigious and well-furnished modern hotel with 48 luxury rooms and exceptional amenities. It is owned by K Holdings Entebbe Limited. Job Summary: The Waiter will be providing excellent wait service to ensure satisfaction. Taking customer orders and delivering food and beverages. The incumbent will be making menu recommendations, answering questions and sharing additional information with restaurant patrons. Key Duties and Responsibilities: • Profound knowledge of menu. • Should be able to take accurate food and drink orders using a POS system and communicate order details to the kitchen staff as needed. • Assist diners with ordering by answering menu questions or making recommendations. • Stay up to date on any menu changes and daily specials • Check in with diner’s to make sure they are enjoying their meals and correct any problems • Should maintain a neat and clean dining area. • Serve food and drink orders to guests. • Present and pour wine selections with the appropriate stemware • Clear away dirty plates, glassware, flatware and linens and clean tables after diners have finished • Deliver checks and process bill payments. • Inform guests about restaurant customer loyalty program, or any other specials and promotions. Qualifications, Skills and Experience: • The ideal candidate for the Waiter job must hold a Certificate or diploma in catering and hotel management or its equivalence. • Two years’ experience in a 4 or 5 star hotel or busy restaurant • Good proficiency of English language. • Speed and accuracy. • Knowledge about using the POS. • Ability to sell to customer needs and flexibility. • Team player. • Should have basic skills on using the POS. system • Knowledge of the Indian cuisine is an added advantage. NB: The Waiters will be working in shifts How to Apply: All suitably qualified and interested candidates are encouraged to send their cover letters and updated CVs with passport-size photo via email to ugandanjobline@gmail.com with the subject line quoted as “Waiter.” Please kindly indicate where you currently stay in the cover letter. Deadline: 8th June 2019 For more of the latest jobs, please visit http://www.theugandanjobline.com or find us on our facebook page https://www.facebook.com/UgandanJobline

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The newly opened ‘Ginger’ brings back the relaxed fine dining experience to Lucknow

Lucknow The newly opened ‘Ginger’ brings back the relaxed fine dining experience to Lucknow Ginger is bringing the classic fine-dining experience back in vogue and we are all for it. It is opening tomorrow i.e 2nd June! 01 Jun, 2019 at 13:12 PM
Lucknow as a city has been going through a tremendous change lately, the city is evolving, shedding the unnecessary and taking on to new things. Yet, there are classics that would forever remain unmatched and untouchable. In a whirlwind of cafe and pub culture, fine dining is something that Lucknow, it seems, doesn’t have enough of.
Fret not, to take us back to our comfort zone and bring back the classic fine dining experience, a new restaurant- Ginger has popped up in Lucknow’s Gomti Nagar.
Ginger is a fine dine restaurant with a classic vibe and elegant decor. The colour scheme is subtle, the decor minimalistic yet chic, making the restaurant an ideal spot for people who’re looking to have a good meal and want no muss-no fuss around it.
The restaurant will remind you of all the beautiful places you see on television, people minding their own businesses, no one to blow sheesha smoke up your nostrils and most importantly, no chaos or clutter.
Ginger is one of the few fine-dining places in Lucknow that offer a varied range of cuisine. You will find an assortment of pastas, pizzas, burgers, Asian, Chinese, as well as Indian.
We would recommend you try the Chinese and the Indian food here, it will be a revelation. Do try the chilly paneer pizza, grilled chicken seekh, stuffed tandoori mushrooms, Sichuan pepper paneer, prawns salt and pepper with the house speciality pan fried noodles.
We would also recommend the special Tangri Joshila and the Amritsari paneer from the Indian main course, as the two dishes distinctly stand apart.
The newly opened restaurant will transport you back to a simpler time, when going out would essentially entail having a meal at an amazing restaurant and not worrying about much else. So head to Ginger, celebrate, chill and eat, the only three things that matter. Happy Munching.

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Georgia on my plate

The ethereal beauty of New Zealand A view of Tbilisi.
Every Georgian dish is a poem,” Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837) once asserted. At the Kindzmarauli winery in Kakheti Province’s Kvareli, 150 km to the northeast of Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, Pushkin’s words rang true. This lovely town in the lap of the Caucasus Mountains is famous for its wineries and centuries-old tradition of making wine. Advertising
Seated under a hazelnut tree, as we devoured the sumptuous Georgian spread placed before us, only the clink of wine glasses broke the silence as the three of us — my husband and I, and our guide — focused on feasting. The eclectic mix of dishes before us included mchadi, a pan-fried cornbread, in-house salad whipped with fresh tomatoes, cucumber and parsley, and bowls full of lobio, a red-bean stew, much like the Indian rajma. Baskets of warm shoti puris, traditional Georgian bread, sat alongside the fiery adjika, a brilliant red paste made from bell pepper, chillies, garlic and herbs. Most of the ingredients were either procured from the farm or foraged from the nearby forests. With such an introduction to the cuisine, it wasn’t long before we had swiped our plates clean and washed it all down with glasses of red wine.
The dry red wine that we sipped on was made from Saperavi grapes and matured in a qvevri — a large egg-shaped earthenware pot used for fermentation, storage and ageing of traditional Georgian wines. Qvevris are either buried below the ground or set into the floors of large wine cellars. Georgia’s 8,000-year-old tradition of making wine has been listed by the Unesco as an intangible cultural heritage. To delve deeper into the wine-making tradition, I signed up for a tour of the vineyard. Along with a bunch of other tourists, our guide led us into a marani, a traditional wine cellar, where several qvevris lay buried. Unlike a regular wine cellar with controlled temperature, these wines were left underground to mature on their own. In one corner lay instruments for cleaning qvevris, crushing grapes and stirring chacha — the traditional pomace brandy made from grape skin.
On the walls were photographs of men carrying wine in a bag made from cow skin, portraying the way it was transported in olden times. “The qvevris vary in size: volumes range from 20-10,000 litres,” said the guide, as she ladled a year-old red wine from the qvevri and offered us some. Before I left, I also got a hands-on experience in making churchkhela, a traditional Georgian candy made with grape must, nuts and flour. I was handed a string beaded with walnuts that I dipped in tatara, a mixture of flour, sugar and badagi (concentrated fresh grape juice) until they were evenly coated. It was then pulled out and left to dry on a wooden stand. Advertising
The next day, I drove out of Tbilisi to Gudauri, a skiing destination to the north of the Georgian capital. The view changed rapidly from concrete buildings to rural landscapes. Shepherds tending to their sheep, bee farms and apple and peach orchards lined the road, punctuated by houses overflowing with gorgeous blooms.
Rows of neatly lined jars of honey, homemade wine, pickled vegetables and chacha were on sale at the makeshift stalls along the road. We drove past green pastures until the highway ascended rapidly after Ananuri, a charming castle built in the 13th century. The Aragvi river coiled underneath, sunlight embellishing its waters with a bright gold.
At Gudauri, we paraglided into the snow-capped Caucasus Mountains and, later, drove up to the iconic Russia-Georgia Friendship Monument until we had to head back due to a landslide warning. We stopped at a local restaurant in the hamlet of Pasanauri, where the women taught me how to pleat khinkalis — Georgian dumplings stuffed with minced meat. With a rhythmic movement of their hands, they carefully wrinkled up the edges of the khinkalis into a frilly pouch. I enjoyed a delicious local fare of mkhvlovani, a spinach and cheese pie and khachapuri — a traditional Georgian dish of cheese-filled bread.
Overnight, at a homestay in Akhaltsikhe, I was treated to a supra, a home-cooked feast, by my Georgian host. The table groaned under the weight of traditional dishes like fried trout, sulguni (brined Georgian cheese), jonjoli (pickled bladderwort flowers) and a lobiani (red bean-stuffed bread). My eyes settled on a platter of smoked eggplant rolls stuffed with walnut paste. Though we were just three, it looked like the food was enough to feed a dozen more. We washed it all down with jugs full of wine. Best Of Express

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Maldives: Beyond the blue horizon- The New Indian Express

Home Magazine Maldives: Beyond the blue horizon
Malvides is the perfect beach destination to head to this summer without burning a hole in the pocket Share Via Email By Nivi Shrivastava
The island country of Maldives in the Indian Ocean is one of the most preferred destinations for an aquatic adventure. The white sand beaches, the lush flora and fauna, come together with great hospitality, scenic vistas, and delectable local cuisine. There is simply a lot to do and explore if you are a jet-setting millennial couple or a solo traveller looking for some unique experiences within a budget. According to the official Maldives tourism board, there are around 1,190 islands in the nation of which 188 are inhabited. The most commonly practiced religion in the country is Islam, and due to which alcohol and pork are strictly prohibited in the local islands permitted only in resorts with valid permits. While visa for tourists on arrival is free, carry some cash in USD or local currency Maldivian Rufiyaa (MVR), which is accepted at shops and hotels. The azure waters of the Indian Ocean are the biggest draw to Maldives but one can also do a bit of a detour and go island-hopping or plan an overnight stay at the lifeboats. There are local guides, tour operators and agencies that can help plan your trip, and you can mix and match the activities and accommodation depending on your budget. Established resort chains like Adaaran Group have multiple options starting from mid-level to high-end luxury accommodations on private natural islands. Each island is allotted for one resort and transfers from one island to another happen via speedboats or ferry. A private speedboat or seaplane transfer can cost you a fortune so opt for public ferry rides that are cheaper and used by locals. If you are looking for an authentic experience, opt for guest houses and budget hotels. Most of them are equipped with WiFi, include meals, AC rooms and clean drinking water. All resorts and guest houses conduct activities siuch as snorkelling, scuba diving, surfing, para-sailing, dolphin tours, romantic cruises, etc and have trained professionals to take you underwater. The streets of the capital, Male, are full of souvenir shops, handmade beauty products and sea-inspired products. The locals speak the Dhivehi language and dress in a traditional libaas during festivities. For sampling the local food, head to small roadside cafes such as Seagull Cafe in Male or Kaafu Inn in Guraidhoo Island and try delicacies such as Mashuni (a mix of coconut and tuna) served with flatbread called Roshi and Garudhiya (tuna broth), Rihaakuru (tuna paste). A fruit platter is served after every meal comprising tropical fruits like pineapple, coconut, papaya and watermelon. Make sure you pay attention to your guide’s advice and be in life jackets during sea transfers especially in turbulent weather conditions. If you are opting for experiences such as visiting a local home, it is advised to dress modestly and respect the indigenous beliefs. There are multiple untouched islands and beaches, where you can flaunt your swimwear or take a dip with your partner without disturbing the local sentiments. Holidays can be exhausting so it is recommended to keep an extra day to relax and do nothing but soak in the sun and take in the beauty of the Indian Ocean. Stay up to date on all the latest Magazine news with The New Indian Express App. Download now (Get the news that matters from New Indian Express on WhatsApp. Click this link and hit ‘Click to Subscribe’ . Follow the instructions after that.) TAGS

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