Meet Rutgers' Newest Faculty, 2018-2019

Meet Rutgers’ Newest Faculty, 2018-2019

Meet Rutgers’ Newest Faculty, 2018-2019 Meet Rutgers’ Newest Faculty, 2018-2019 March 8, 2019
Rutgers faculty are accomplished teachers, researchers and scholars who think beyond disciplinary boundaries and care deeply about the students they teach, mentor and advise.
Meet some of the new members who joined the Rutgers community across Camden, Newark, New Brunswick and Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences bringing diversity, vision, extensive scholarship and wide-ranging real-world experience to the classroom in our series.
Understanding Morality, Bad Behavior and Unethical Leadership
Professor, School of Management and Labor Relations , Rutgers-New Brunswick
When Rebecca Greenbaum graduated from college in 2003 with a degree in finance she got a job and the experience she needed to know just what she didn’t want to do.
She was 22, processing car insurance claims, listening to those who were injured in crashes and spending most of her time at body shops in Florida developing damage estimates. She gave it a couple of years.
Then Greenbaum went back to school, got a master’s degree in human resource management and a doctoral degree in business administration from the University of Central Florida.
Today, the professor of human resource management at the School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR) at Rutgers University-New Brunswick researches behavioral ethics and morality with a focus on unethical leadership, organizational justice and workplace deviance.
“These unethical leaders have a bottom line mentality,” says Greenbaum, whose work was inspired by some less than ideal bosses she encountered before going back to graduate school. “They cut corners, change performance numbers to look more successful and don’t really think they are hurting anyone.”
Greenbaum, who joined the faculty last semester after spending nine years at Oklahoma State University, teaches a course on ethical leadership to graduate students and one on organizational behavior to undergraduates. What she wants her students to understand is that you can’t stretch the truth and rationalize unethical choices and think that it’s not a big deal.
People may be able to get away with isolated cases of unethical conduct often because after feeling guilty or ashamed they change their ways to protect their reputations. But ethical behavior left unchecked often results in progressively worse offenses that are much more difficult to hide.
In extreme cases such as the Wells Fargo scandal, unethical conduct can result in financial penalties, lost employment, damaged reputations and legal charges, she says.
“What happens is that the leader creates a culture that is passed on to employees that says it doesn’t matter how you get to where you need to go as long as you get there,” says Greenbaum. “Then it becomes a vicious cycle where employees think it is okay to lie to customers in order to close a deal.”
Greenbaum decided early on that academia was a path she wanted to take. As an undergraduate she was impressed with the lifestyles of two of her professors because they were able to combine family and work.
“Probably the best advice I got was from them when they told me to go out and work after college,” she says. “I realized after my job in insurance that I didn’t like a constrained organizational setting and I realized that finance was really not for me.”
That’s when she switched from finance to management with a focus on human behavior because she was intrigued by what makes people do bad things and the detrimental effect it can have on individuals and organizations.
Greenbaum, born in New Hampshire and raised in Vero Beach, Florida, came from a working class family. Neither her mother nor her stepfather graduated from high school. So advice about college or a career path came mostly from her older sister, friends and acquaintances.
Today, the mother of four children, ages 4, 5, 7 and 9, lives with her husband and children in Metuchen. Her husband, Ryan – who was the one positive outcome of the insurance industry job – also teaches at SMLR.
In her spare time, she likes to read non-fiction. Her most recent pick, She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity by Carl Zimmer.
“Non-fiction seems more efficient and useful,” she says. “I’m learning while enjoying myself and sometimes it gives me interesting insights on my own research.”
On a personal note: Rebecca and Ryan Greenbaum started their courtship as a result of a workplace softball team in Florida. The team was supposed to meet at the batting cages to practice but at the last minute none of the others could make it. So it was just the two them. Greenbaum says her husband insists that he didn’t have it planned but she thinks otherwise. Whatever is the case, it worked – three years later they were married.
Working at the Intersection of Art and Social Change
Salamishah Tillet Faculty Director of the New Arts Justice Initiative at Express Newark; Henry Rutgers Professor of African American and African Studies and Creative Writing; Associate Director of the Clement Price Institute on Ethnicity, Culture, and the Modern Experience , Rutgers-Newark
Salamishah Tillet’s work is driven by her belief that art is a powerful catalyst for social change.
One of most important cultural critics of our time, Tillet uses her platform in multiple media outlets, including The New York Times , The Atlantic and The Guardian , to expose racism and misogyny while advancing the #BlackLivesMatter and #MeToo movements.
Since joining Rutgers University-Newark last fall, the celebrated author and activist is elbow deep in her newest passion project as the faculty director of the New Arts Justice Initiative at Express Newark.
The university-community collaborative serves as a vehicle for students, faculty and residents to promote positive transformation in the city, with New Arts providing support for emerging artists and activists as they explore themes of race, gender, sexuality and the value of art in public spaces.
“We can have legislative changes, but you can’t do much without changing people’s hearts and minds,” said Tillet, who is also the Henry Rutgers Professor of African American and African Studies and Creative Writing and associate director of the Clement Price Institute on Ethnicity, Culture, and the Modern Experience. “Art is the way to get people to that reality.”
She should know. Two decades ago, she turned to her craft to heal herself after a sexual assault – and wound up healing national audiences in the process. Her journal and portraits taken by her sister, Scheherazade Tillet, a Mason Gross School of the Arts graduate, became the basis for “Story of a Rape Survivor (SOARS),” a multimedia experience featuring musicians, dancers and stage performers. The sisters toured colleges across the country in the early 2000s with “SOARS,” working to create empathy for survivors and rally against rape culture.
“We used storytelling, art and dance to explore this difficult subject and found it to be effective not just for victims, but bystanders and allies as well,” Tillet said.
Building on “SOARS” success, the Tillet sisters cofounded the Chicago-based nonprofit A Long Walk Home in 2003, where they use art to empower young people to end violence against girls and women. The national platform has received numerous accolades, including from feminist icon Gloria Steinem, who described it as “a gift” that “beautifully blends art, policy and grassroots organizing to empower our most vulnerable and voiceless Americans.”
Art and activism permeates all of Tillet’s roles at Rutgers-Newark, including her undertakings at the Price Institute. In February, she played a primary role in curating the Marion Thompson Wright lecture, The Erotic as Power: Sexuality in the Black Experience, which resonated with a large, youthful audience. Every day, Rutgers prepares students, contributes to communities, provides exceptional care for patients, stimulates the economy, and delivers results for New Jersey. Tillet says she was drawn to Rutgers-Newark by the energy and excitement of being at a university that actively positions itself as an anchor institution to its community. “I’ve long been committed to trying to understand how art, activism and social justice are related to each other and can activate each other,” she said. “Newark is a city that has vibrantly cultivated those conversations, while Rutgers-Newark is trying to ground those connections for its students, our city, and beyond.”
Under the tutelage of Professors Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Werner Sollors, Tillet earned her Ph.D. in the History of American Civilization and A.M. in English and American Literature from Harvard University and her Masters in the Art of Teaching from Brown University. She has her B.A. in English and African American Studies from the University of Pennsylvania where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa and Magna Cum Laude and was mentored by Professor Farah Jasmine Griffin.
She has received accolades for her book Sites of Slavery: Citizenship and Racial Democracy in the Post-Civil Rights Imagination and is currently working on two more projects. The first, In Search of The Color Purple , due out this fall, is a meditation on the lasting appeal of Alice Walker’s novel and protagonist Celie’s feminist awakening.
Tillet’s other endeavor, All The Rage: Mississippi Goddam and the World Nina Simone Made , explores how the civil rights icon’s music, anger and frustration with racism and sexism travels through the 20th century. The Simone project presented an opportunity for Tillet and her sister Scheherazade to once again tag-team a powerful subject matter. Their trip to Simone’s birthplace in Tryon, North Carolina, helped frame Tillet’s narrative and resulted in Scheherazade’s photo exhibit Little Girl Blue: A Sojourn to Nina Simone’s Childhood Home , now on view at Express Newark.
The New Arts Justice Initiative is the next frontier for Tillet. The opportunity to guide it, she said, and take an active role in shaping the community she calls home, is a key reason why she is at Rutgers-Newark, which she sees as an institution with a strong commitment to social justice and its host city.
“As a resident of Newark, I’ve been able to see the city go through a variety of social and economic changes,” she said. “As a scholar and as a writer, I’m interested in how you really make a difference in the community in which you live. So considering that combination, it is a great fit for me.” The Art of Treating Employees Well Professor, School of Management and Labor Relations , Rutgers-New Brunswick
A bad dorm assignment and a flair for desktop publishing were precursors of Michael Sturman’s more than two-decade long academic career, researching individual job performance and compensation to figure out the best way to keep employees productive and committed.
“I remember I needed something to do when I got to Cornell as a freshman, so I knocked on the door of an academic guru of job performance and compensation and told him that I would work for him for free and help him with his presentations,” says Sturman, who recently joined the faculty at the School of Management and Labor Relations as a professor of human resource management. “Even though I was a freshman, I ended up jumping over grad students because I knew how to use different fonts, shadows and bullet points, and in the early 1990s that was a real competitive advantage. He needed my services, and that worked well for me.”
After Sturman earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations, he began his academic career studying job performance, compensation systems and human resource analytics. His worked ended up focusing on the hiring and compensation practices of frontline employees who deal directly with a paying public.
Sturman has been in academia his entire life. After graduating from Cornell, he joined the staff of Louisiana State University as an assistant professor for three years before returning to Cornell’s School of Hotel Administration for the next 18 years prior to his new stint at Rutgers. He never worked at a hotel front desk, but researching the line-level employees made him understand that motivating and developing employees, and figuring out the best way to compensate them through pay and benefits, is critical to keeping guest service workers – the people who make or break the business – from souring.
“Human resources in general is a great field to study because so many companies do it so badly,” says Sturman, who has authored three books on managing hospitality organizations. “Part of the reason is that dealing with people can be so messy. But it doesn’t have to be. There are ways to do it that are good for the employee and the company.”
The 47-year-old father of five doesn’t take himself too seriously. In class, he uses quotes from movies to make points to students, and he admits that Straight Man – a novel in which the protagonist, an English professor at an underfunded West Central Pennsylvania state university, threatens to kill a duck a day until his department receives funding – is his favorite book.
On a personal note: Sturman married his high school sweetheart who helped get him through French, which he hated. They met in jazz band at a New York State high school, and he still plays rhythm guitar, saxophone and piano. He loves music, he says, and jokes that he hasn’t been able to form a band at Rutgers because his new department isn’t prioritizing the hiring of musical talent.
“A bunch of us at the hotel school at Cornell had a band,” Sturman says with a laugh. “We’d get together at my house to practice and did an event at the school’s bowling alley. But I think it was as much about the drinking and eating as the music.” – Robin Lally Telling the Story of Marginalized Communities
Jack Tchen Inaugural Clement A. Price Chair in Public History and the Humanities and Director, Price Institute , Rutgers-Newark
If there’s one thing Jack Tchen wants his students to take away from this article it’s this:
“I’m an anchor baby.”
“Please, make sure you put that in there,” said Tchen, a world-class scholar, curator, organization-builder and long-time NYU history and urban studies professor who joined Rutgers University-Newark this fall to lead the Clement A. Price Institute on Ethnicity, Culture and the Modern Experience and serve as the Inaugural Clement A. Price Chair in Public History and the Humanities.
His parents arrived as refugees from China in the early 1950s after the “repeal” of the Chinese Exclusion Law. Still, the United States capped entry of those of Chinese heritage at 105 people per year.
“That law was a part of the longstanding Anglo-American fear of ‘yellow peril,’” he said. “My parents learned of a landmark 1898 Supreme Court ruling in United States vs. Wong Kim Ark that ruled any baby born on U.S. soil was a citizen. So that was me.”
He makes a point of sharing this personal information to show the connection between anti-immigrant and racist sentiments then and now have shaped who are welcomed and who are not welcomed to enter and stay in the United States.
“Birthright citizenship is exactly what Trump is trying to repeal now,” he said. “That attack against the promise of ‘equal justice for all persons’ under the Fourteenth Amendment is a critical though often forgotten part of our nation’s civil rights history. I’m part of that history – we all are.”
Tchen’s academic and curatorial pursuits stem, in part, from his experiences growing up a racialized minority in the Midwest – where he was the only non-English speaker in kindergarten – and seeing that pattern of white Protestant’s others in the New York metro region. He’s spent the better part of four decades studying how intersected racial categories morph over time, unearthing and archiving the experiences of various marginalized communities – Asian, black, Italian, Irish, Jewish and indigenous among them – which he says have been glossed over by American history.
At the Price Institute, he established the New York Newark Public History Project to challenge those accounts of history. Among the stories being examined is “The Indian and The Puritan,” a statue created by Mount Rushmore sculptor and known KKK sympathizer Gutzon Borglum in 1916.
“It is so easy to supersede the history of the Lenape people from this region with that of the colonists. With this project, we will replace the myths of our past with the truths of European diseases, violence and claims of colonial property rights – all of this should be basic public knowledge,” he said. “And we’re supporting the newlyformed United Lenape Nations Project to archive and tell their own history and make their own culture.”
At Rutgers-Newark, the chance to work at the most diverse university in the country committed to social justice is what draws him to the Brick City each day.
“That’s why I feel close to the students I work with here at Rutgers-Newark,” he said. “I really identify with them and love researching the past, present and future collaboratively.”
Fun Fact: “I would love to be a blues harmonica player, but I have no musical talent whatsoever,” Tchen said. “I sing flat, and my ear doesn’t exist for that.” – Lisa Intrabartola
In 1997, the Clement A. Price Institute on Ethnicity, Culture, and the Modern Experience at Rutgers-Newark was founded to foster research and programming in the arts and humanities that emphasizes intercultural understanding. The institute hosts annual programs, such as the Marion Thompson Wright Lecture Series , a conference established in 1981 that explores themes related to increasing historical awareness in Greater Newark. The institute is named for the late Clement A. Price, a Rutgers-Newark distinguished professor and Newark city historian committed to social justice and civic engagement in the communities in which he lived and whose teaching and research focused on African-American history and culture, urban and social history, and American race relations. Helping Nurses Harness Their Political Power Dean and Professor, School of Nursing-Camden
The career of the new dean at the School of Nursing-Camden was shaped by military service and her desire to work toward social justice and equity.
In high school, Donna Nickitas participated in a program assisting nurses in a busy New York hospital. She shadowed members of the profession who cared for the most at-risk and vulnerable patients in the community.
“Those nurses sincerely treated these individuals with dignity and with respect – that always stayed with me,” Nickitas said.
The experience inspired her to become the first in her family to go to college and enter the health care field.
After receiving her bachelor’s degree, Nickitas wanted to see the world outside of New York, so she joined the U.S. Air Force Nurse Corps. But, instead of traveling the globe, she was assigned to Rapid City, South Dakota.
However, her time in the military provided an opportunity to fine-tune her advocacy and leadership skills. She eventually climbed the ranks from second lieutenant to major.
“Somehow I survived the brutal winters and learned about becoming a servant leader, an astute team member and a fierce advocate for my patients who were often miles from home, family and friends,” she said. “My service with the U.S. Air Force Nurse Corps taught me that I was never alone and all I had to do is ask when I needed help. Now, that is a lesson worth remembering.”
At Rutgers, she wants to help nursing students in Camden understand the intersection of policy, economics, legislation and health care and how they can use their voice as professional nurses to help influence regulations and standards that shape their practice.
“It is not enough to know what nurses do, but also to know what nurses know,” she said. “In other words, nurses must see and care for the whole person. The sum of nursing knowledge involves more than the parts of providing direct physical, emotional and spiritual care. It means seeing the whole person and making sure all individuals have access to quality care – caring that is governed by the New Jersey State Nurse Practice act as well as other state and federal standards, laws and regulations.”
Under her leadership, partnerships with other Rutgers units are thriving, including a study abroad program that gives students the opportunity to experience new perspectives in the field.
Nickitas recently joined Rutgers students, faculty and administrators on a trip to Varadero, Cuba, as part of a collaboration between the two countries. The purpose of the trip was to sustain international relationships and advance interdisciplinary programs as a way of highlighting global concepts with local applications.
While there, Nickitas says that she saw many parallels to her own research. She witnessed how Cuban citizens worked around embargoes to introduce measures for community development and economic sustainability.
“I learned quickly that world policies and politics are not always what you see and hear from news and social media outlets,” Nickitas said. “It was clear to many of us how local politics guide and direct everyday life.”
She examines similar themes in her book, Policy and Politics for Nurses and Other Health Professionals: Advocacy and Action , which was recently released in its third edition. The work highlights what nursing professionals need to know to make a difference for their patients outside the exam room.
“It discusses a variety of topics, including an update on the Affordable Care Act and enhanced primary roles for nurses, and how nurses can harness their political power so that they can influence health policy,” Nickitas said.
On becoming an urbanite: Growing up in an Italian-American family, Nickitas counts food and family among her core values. Now, as a recent transplant to urban Philadelphia from suburban Connecticut, she can share the region’s rich cuisine and culture with her adult children. She counts water ice among her favorite treats, further cementing her status as a Philadelphian. – Carissa Sestito

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Rembrandt Bangkok unveils a masterpiece of high altitude gourmet chill and charm

Rembrandt Bangkok unveils a masterpiece of high altitude gourmet chill and charm Recent launch of the venerable hotel’s new rooftop bar marks a renaissance of ‘mixed-marriage’ light fare dining 9 Apr 2019 at 10:55 0 comments WRITER: SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS – + In a stroke of nuanced culinary collaboration and mixological creativity, Rembrandt Bangkok Hotel has launched 1826, the hotel’s new rooftop chill bar that blends a menu of uniquely satisfying fusion bites with original cocktail creations and sensational sky-high ambience.
A venerated elder statesman of the local hospitality industry, The Rembrandt brings together the diverse cuisines of its popular Italian (da Vinci), Mexican (Mexicano) and Indian (Rang Mahal) eateries in creating these decidedly upscale, meticulously prepared and presented finger-food dishes.
With its co-mingled culinary influences, this selection of starter-portioned specialties offers a unique and ultimately rewarding challenge to guests’ gustatory perception, as the various cuisine pair-ups fuse into perfect partnerships of flavour.
Deliciously exemplifying this ‘palate parallax effect’ is Button and Chicks (230++), a chicken and mushroom bruschetta whose passport is stamped in Garam masala with mango and mint chutneys.
Similarly, the Lamb Kebabs (270B++) features finely minced Indian-spice seasoned mutton served in a half-avocado filled with guacamole dip.
The list of toothsome mashups continues with the poly-cuisine Burgers Harara (230B++). The vegetarian sliders of spinach, fresh cheese and potatoes with cumin and garam masala are presented in three variations of Camembert, green tomato and carmelised onion. Meanwhile, the Jalapeno Poppers (240B++) feature the mild/sweet Mexican peppers lightly battered and stuffed with cheese, with mint chutney and tamarind sauce on the side.
Other tantalising temptations (230-280B++) include Butter Chicken Pizza and Prawn Roti and further vegetarian options Desi Sushi (Indian-spiced veg) and puff pastry Paneer Vol-Au-Vent made with Indian-style fresh cheese.
And then there’s the view – a stunning 26-storey-high perspective that sweeps across Lake Rachada and the bustling Asoke junction, to the stylish residential towers and sea of twinkling lights along lower Sukhumvit Road.
The epic vista makes 1826 the perfect setting for sipping sundowners
(200B++/ea.), served 5 – 6:26 p.m. (that’s18:26 – get it?). Or try one of bar manager and ‘mad mixologist’ extraordinaire Stephen Pinto’s original-recipe creative cocktails (380-500B++), highlights of which include Tiramisu Martini (coffee & cacao bitters, Mascarpone foam), Hanging Garden of Kurseong (Earl Grey infused gin, spiced wine), Mumbai Mule (Ginger infused vodka, Indian spices) and The Undecided (barkeep’s fancy) for those simply overwhelmed by the dozen-plus choices on this inspired selection of tony tipple.
Upping the sophistication factor, an extensive selection of top-end clear spirits and single-malts is complemented by an impressive cigar list, ranging from a PDR ‘Gran Reserva’ Corojo (600B++/Half Corona) to the Cuban-sourced Cohiba ‘Siglo 4’ Habano (2,275B++/Robusto).
And despite all the detailed preparation behind this tour de force of F&B engineering and design, the folks at Rembrandt still found time to drop a Dan Brown-style easter egg into its very name, no less: 1826 = (soi)18 + (floor)26.
1826 at Rembrandt Hotel & Suites Bangkok, 19 Sukhumvit Soi 18.Phone 02 261 7100 or visit http://rembrandtbkk.com TAGS Do you like the content of this article? Like dislike 0 liked & 0 people disliked it Share this article

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Acts and Mission 4: Pentecost

Contact Acts and Mission 4: Pentecost
It is tempting to read books of the Bible as though they existed in isolation. However, to get the full value from them, we have to read them in the context of the whole canon of Scripture. This is particularly important with some of the pivotal events, such as the coming of The Spirit on the day of Pentecost.
The Story of the Bible has an interesting shape. It starts talking about the relationship between God and all of humanity, tracing creation and then the fall. Then for a long, long section The Story only concentrates on one nation, one people group. And then in Acts, it starts to broaden out again and by the time we reach the end, all of humanity will be included once more. I tend to visualise The Story by thinking of it being thick at both ends but thin in the middle.
When you look at The whole story in this way, something suddenly becomes very clear. At each of the transitions between thick and thin, there is a story about language. In Genesis 11, just before God calls Abraham there is the tower of Babel and then here in Acts we have the story of Pentecost and people miraculously hearing the story of Jesus in their own languages.
I don’t believe this is a coincidence!
Let’s take a trip back to the Tower of Babel. This incident occurred at perhaps the worst point in the history of humanity when the fall had reached its lowest depths and just before God started his rescue plan through Abraham. Humanity was concentrated in modern day Iraq and they realised that their lives were limited and that no one remembered them when they died. So, they set about building a huge tower to commemorate themselves. God had created humanity to find its eternal significance in relationship to himself, not through bricks and mortar and seeing the tower, God dashed it to the ground and then scattered humanity across the earth at the same time mixing up their languages so that people no longer had a common tongue.
Make no mistake about it, what God did at Babel was a judgement on humanity. But God is remarkable, and that judgement carried with it a huge blessing for mankind. Firstly, in scattering men and women around the earth He helped them fulfil one of His earliest commandments to us. But it is the language issue that I want us to think about. God confused human language so that mankind could never again unite to find a replacement for God, such as the Tower of Babel. But in mixing up the languages God gave to us one of mankind’s most precious gifts, the gift of language and culture.
Language and culture are wonderful. It is hard to separate one from the other, but they bring incredible richness to human existence. Just think about food for a moment. There are the great world cuisines; French, Chinese, Indian and Italian. But what about the humble British Sunday roast? Then there is sushi from Japan, banana foutou from Ivory Coast, hamburgers from the US and so the list goes on… Every country has its own favourite food and they are (mostly) delicious. Likewise, each culture has its own type of art; music, literature or sculpture. Every culture brings something unique to the sum total of human existence. One of the great wonders of our modern age is that we have access to so much different culture from around the world.
Of course, not everything about culture is worthwhile. A few years ago, we were returning from holiday in France on a cross channel ferry at the same time as hundreds of England football supporters were returning from a big match. A minority of the supporters drunk colossal quantities of beer on board the ferry, became very aggressive and generally made life unpleasant for the rest of the passengers. Football and large quantities of alcohol are a genuine part of English culture – but not a particularly attractive one.
The bottom line is that culture reflects the human beings who create it. We are created in the image of God and capable of amazing beauty and creativity, but we are fallen and capable of amazing depravity – our culture is just the same.
Just as each culture brings something new to humanity, so does every language. Each language is capable of expressing some things better than all other languages. Why else to coffee shops sell cafe latte rather than milky coffee? On a deeper note, each language has the ability to express itself in ways that other languages can’t quite manage. There are subtleties of meaning and inference that just can’t quite be transferred from one language to another without losing something. And this is really important because that means that each language can say things about God and is capable of praising God in ways that other languages can’t quite reach. When God multiplied the languages at Babel, He also gave us the possibility of understanding Him and praising Him in new ways. Babel was a judgement, but at the same time, God blessed humanity immeasurably and revealed even more of us to himself.
Which brings us to Pentecost. Sometimes people say that at Pentecost, God reversed the Tower of Babel, but that is exactly what He didn’t do. At Pentecost, God underlined the linguistic diversity that He introduced at Babel. Everyone in the crowd was able to understand the disciples speaking in his or her own language. The first miracle that the Holy Spirit did was to make it possible for the story of Jesus to be understood in many languages all at once. The Triune relational God did nor force conformity on his followers by making them all hear his message in one language, He encouraged diversity by allowing them to hear in their own language. From even before the Christian church was called Christian, it was multi-cultural and multi-lingual.
This theme of using different languages was later taken up by the Gospel writers, who wrote the stories of Jesus down in Greek. Jesus almost certainly spoke Aramaic when he taught, but the Gospel writers chose to record his words in Greek so that more people could understand them. Christianity does not have a sacred language, we don’t even have a record of Jesus words in the form in which they were spoken. The implications for this are enormous and reverberate down through history. Just compare Christianity to Islam for a brief moment. Islam has a sacred language, if you want to read the Koran or pray, you have to do so in Arabic. Effectively, all Muslims have to adopt a large slice of Arabic culture from the time of Mohammed. You see this in the way that many Muslims wear Arabic clothing, even if they are not Arabs, adopt Arabic names and so on. Christianity is simply not like that. You can pray in any language and the Bible is the most translated book in the world. There is no Christian equivalent of the pilgrimage to Mecca, where thousands upon thousands of devout Muslims all dress the same and go through the same rituals at the same time. The God of Christianity is a God of variety and the Gospel can be lived and experienced in every culture on the earth. If it couldn’t, then I’d be writing in Aramaic, which would be tough as I don’t speak it and most of you won’t read it.
There is one further important aspect to draw from this diversion into languages and cultures. If Christianity can be expressed in all languages and cultures, then it is also true that it doesn’t belong to any particular language or culture. No one can say that they own the Christian faith.
This post first appeared on Kouyanet back in 2010 Why not share this post?

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Swati Elavia named Small Business Person of the Year for Massachusetts

Swati Elavia named Small Business Person of the Year for Massachusetts By 198 Swati Elavia (Photo: Monsoon Kitchens website)
BOSTON – The Small Business Administration (SBA) has named Swati Elavia, President of Monsoon Kitchens the 2019 Small Business Person of the Year for Massachusetts.
Monsoon Kitchens earned the recognition for significant expansion and scaling distribution nationwide. Based in Shrewsbury, MA Monsoon Kitchens is an all-natural Indian food company serving a wide ranging portfolio of customers, including: universities, corporate cafeterias, military, casinos, cruise lines, and grocery stores.
“Monsoon Kitchens is poised for explosive growth after Swati completed the SBA’s inaugural Emerging Leaders Initiative in Worcester,” said SBA Massachusetts District Director Robert Nelson. “We are delighted to support the expansion goals of visionary entrepreneurs like Swati, who are building business development partnerships all across America. Congratulations to Monsoon Kitchens!”
Born in Agra, India – Elavia started Monsoon Kitchens after completing her Ph.D. in Nutrition in the US and gaining years of experience working at General Mills in Minneapolis as a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist. Elavia started off selling spices, sauces and chutneys; customers soon began asking her to produce ready-made appetizers. Elavia then partnered with a local restaurant to manufacture the food products and soon realized there was a market for authentic Indian cuisine in large scale food service industries. Over time, Monsoon Kitchens evolved into a full-fledged food wholesaler.
In 2016, Monsoon Kitchens received SBA financing from Leader Bank with loans in the amount of $100K and $25K; in addition to a revolving line of credit to continue expanding.
Today, Monsoon Kitchens continues to grow at a rate of about 20% in the most recent year, reinvesting profits into research & development, marketing and human capital – with a total of 7 employees now. Monsoon Kitchens continues to grow by working with contract manufacturers to make products; and national brokers and distributors to expand their reach. Recently, a line of retail products was launched that will help establish brand awareness with new consumers and lead to new sales revenue.
“Being successful at managing a small business is like raising a happy and successful family,” said Monsoon Kitchens President Elavia. “You must be fearless, honest, compassionate, supportive, respectful, critical and most of all happy all at the same time. Most importantly be flexible because as the saying goes – “if you are flexible you won’t get bent out of shape.”
In 2018, Elavia completed the SBA Emerging Leaders program along with the inaugural cohort of small businesses from central Massachusetts. Elavia gives back to her community by contributing money and resources to nonprofits and other charitable groups including: Sodexho Foundation, Pan Mass Challenge for Cancer Research, Dana Farber, and the Society for Hospitality and Foodservice Management.
The company was nominated by Sushil Tuli, President and CEO of Leader Bank. Swati will be honored at the annual SCORE Boston / SBA awards luncheon along with other 2019 Massachusetts Small Business Week winners at Assumption College in Worcester on Wednesday, May 8th, 2019.
The U.S. Small Business Administration makes the American dream of business ownership a reality. As the only go-to resource and voice for small businesses backed by the strength of the federal government, the SBA empowers entrepreneurs and small business owners with the resources and support they need to start and grow their businesses. It delivers services to people through an extensive network of SBA field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations. Share this:

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Why is coriander so incredibly divisive? – SBS

Why is coriander so incredibly divisive? (Alan Benson) Hate the herb? It could be your genes. Or it could be what your Mum cooked when you were growing up. By Tweet
For some, it’s a horrid herb that tastes like soap or dirt. For others, it’s an essential part of their favourite Asian and south American dishes.
Yep, we’re talking coriander. This pungent plant, also known as cilantro in some parts of the world, is not only one of the world’s most common herbs but one of it’s most versatile too. Originally native to regions of southern Europe, North Africa and Asia, its leaves, stems, seeds and roots are used right around the globe. If you’re a coriander lover, you can embrace it in everything from coriander pesto to this coriander curry .
North Indian coriander and mint chicken (chicken harra masala)
And did you know the flowers are also edible? Coriander grower Sarah Heath says they are her favourite part of the plant. We’ll get back to those very pretty flowers, and some tips from Heath on growing coriander, but let’s tackle the big question first: why is it so divisive – and can you learn to like it, if you are a coriander hater? It could be your genes…
Some people really, truly hate coriander. In fact, there’s a website entirely devoted to stories – and haiku – about just how much people hate the herb. “I would rather put a toothpick under my toenail and kick a wall than eat cilantro,” says one recent poster at ihatecilantro.com .
Research shows that what some people taste when they eat fresh coriander is decidedly unappealing. While most people love coriander for its fresh, bright citrus-y flavours (such as in the roast blue-eye with walnut and coriander sauce , below), others have a very different experience. If you’re one of them, you’ll know the feeling: an incredibly pungent, slightly bitter, soapy flavour. And it seems it’s to do with a difference in how we smell, which in turn influences what we taste.
Roast blue-eye with walnut and coriander sauce
As the Australian Academy of Science explains , when we eat, taste receptors on the tongue and smell receptors inside the nose together send signals to the brain. Differences in our DNA can produce slight differences in these receptors, and in the case of coriander, mean that some people might detect soapy-flavoured chemicals found in coriander, while others do not .
“Research has shown between 3-25 per cent of people, depending on cultural heritage, experience the soapy flavour of coriander,” explains Professor Russell Keast , from Deakin University’s ​Centre for Advanced Sensory Science.
“The current belief is the variation in what we experience, soapy versus coriander, is due to one olfactory receptor that recognises or responds to aldehydes, a class of chemical compound in foods. Some people have a variation of the receptor which means they experience soapy,” says Keast who says he does like coriander now but didn’t always. “When I was young, I didn’t enjoy coriander although it had nothing to do with a soapy flavour. I just didn’t enjoy it.”
One study that looked at the prevalence of coriander dislike among different ethnocultural groups in a group of 1600 Canadians found that the proportion of subjects classified as disliking the herb was 21 per cent for East Asians, 17 per cent for Caucasians, 14 per cent for those of African descent, 7 per cent for South Asians, 4 per cent for Hispanics and 3 per cent for Middle Eastern subjects.
The authors – who pointed out that more research was needed to see if these numbers would hold true for wider populations – wrote that while genetic differences were the likely explanation, “we cannot rule out the possibility of differences in exposure and use of cilantro in the traditional cuisines of different ethnocultural groups driving differences in preference”.
Or to put it simply, how much you like it could also be to do with whether you grew up eating a lot of it. Did your Mum or Dad dish up decicious dishes using coriander? Can you learn to love it?
“There is evidence that dislike is heritable, but perhaps only a small amount is due to genes – it has been estimated about 10 per cent,” says Keast. The rest, he says can be influenced by many factors – how much you’ve been exposed to it, culture, personality. Even the weather when you’re sitting down to eat can affect how much you like a dish, he says.
If you grew up eating dishes that included coriander, and associate it with happy memories or food you liked, then you’re much more likely to be one of those who enjoys it as an adult.
Chef, author and Outback Gourmet host Justine Schofield is one of those who used to hate it when she was a child but now loves it.
“I hated it because it had that soapy, very intense, strong flavour and I felt that it would overpower things. Growing up and broadening my palate, I’ve now embraced it and absolutely love it. I use it quite a lot in my cooking. Coriander definitely has its time and place in particular things and is definitely not good in certain things, but I do love it now,” says Schofield, who uses it in the barramundi salad she makes in episode 6 of Outback Gourmet.
Justine Schofield’s Vietnamese barramundi salad
If you don’t like fresh coriander, Schofield has a suggestion.
“Coriander seeds and ground coriander have a completely different flavour profile to fresh coriander. I know a lot of people that despise fresh coriander, but if you toast coriander seed and crush it and garnish something with it, like potatoes, oh my gosh. Roast potatoes with crushed coriander, so different. Because it has a lemony flavour as opposed to an intense, soapy … soapy’s not a good word if you like coriander, but that very intense, herbaceous flavour.
“What I do, it’s classic roast potatoes… So, I put lots of olive oil and the juice of one lemon, and crushed coriander, and then mix it together with your hands with lots of salt and then bake them. Desiree potatoes, delicious, or any waxy potatoes, so good!”
Keast suggests people who don’t enjoy the fresh leaves but want to see if they can learn to like it keep trying. Use small amounts in dishes you do like, or paired with ingredients you love, and you may help what he terms your “food liking system” to remember coriander as a positive thing. “But it may take a while and be unpleasant while you experiment!” Grow your own, and don’t forget the flowers
“By far it is the thing I’m asked most! ‘How do you grow Coriander’, says culinary herb educator and owner-operator Sarah Heath of Basilea Living Herbs and Edible Flowers in Queensland , who has just published a free small e-book about growing coriander on her website. “Mostly it’s because of expectations, people expect one plant to grow into little bushes like parsley and they aren’t the same at all.
“Many plants are needed and many plantings if you love your coriander, nitrogen-rich fertiliser, frequent feeding and regular chopping. Coriander is a short-lived annual, it needs to be cut and fed regularly and it’s okay if it flowers because the whole plant is edible, roots, stems, leaves, flowers and seeds.
Coriander microherb, seedlings and flowers at Basilea Living Herbs (Photographs: Sarah Heath)
Heath doesn’t usually eat coriander at home – but it’s not because she doesn’t like it. “My husband hates it; it runs in his family.
“Flowers are my favourite part, delicious and lace-like, perfect on a G&T or bridal cake or in a homegrown bunch of flowers.”
So there’s a thought, coriander haters – enjoy it as part of a bunch of flowers! And for everyone else, SBS Food has more than 600 recipes for delicious ways to embrace it, or if you’d like to try the middle ground, collections featuring ground coriander and coriander seed .
Join Justine Schofield as she cooks with coriander and other fresh ingredients in Outback Gourmet , with double episodes screening 7.30pm Sundays on SBS Food Channel 33 from 31 March, and then available on SBS On Demand . Embrace the coriander Prawn toast with yuzu mayonnaise, coriander and mint
This is a superb snack. Top each piece of toast with yuzu mayo and garnish with a fresh herb salad. Cajun fried chicken wings with coriander dressing
Make your own Cajun spice mix to add a touch of spice to deep-fried chicken wings. The extra spice mix can be stored in a jar in the pantry for up to 6 months. Corn with smoked paprika and coriander butter
A good, sweet end of summer corn cob just seems made to go with coriander. Here, I’ve jazzed it up with a little smoky paprika and chipotle, but you could simply chargrill the cobs and smother them with butter after they’re cooked for a different effect that still harnesses the flavour of the fire.

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8 Herbs and Spices to Keep in Your Kitchen

Source: Pexels
We’re all acquainted with the phrase ‘Spice it Up’ and how it can be used for multiple reasons and on occasions — here we shall only talk about one, Your Kitchen!
In most homes, kitchen is where the heart is at and spicing it up, quite literally, is always a good idea. Spices are, of course a great way to make scrumptious food, but at the same time can be extremely beneficial for your health. Research suggests that spices and herbs have been used to treat multiple ailments for hundreds of years in most parts of the world.
Here is our list of 8 spices and herbs that should definitely make way to your kitchen! Black Peppercorns
The good old salt and pepper combo is a must have for all of our meals. Well at least most of them. The slight pungency in taste and the raw aroma can make any recipe better, especially in case of an emergency. Let’s be honest all of us have last minute kitchen emergencies!
Much like most spices and herbs out there, black pepper too, has health benefits. Black Peppercorns help with digestion and also allow for better dental health. Go ahead and stock your kitchen up! Oregano
The herb of all dressings! Oregano is one herb that majority of people are familiar with but don’t necessarily have stocked at home. It is one of the most aromatic herbs out there and can make almost everything taste better — instantly!
Source: Pixabay
Please notice how we said almost everything since it might not apply to the Italian takeout in your fridge from last week! Jokes apart, Oregano is an absolute essential with the flavour it provides and the antioxidants it has. Antioxidants work in multiple ways to improve our health and are known for being a counter treatment to cancer . Cinnamon
Cinnamon is one versatile spice! The taste and texture is as such that it allows to be used for sweet as well as savoury dishes. I mean imagine the variety that the spice offers you. It can come handy when you are trying to make this recipe by Nonna Box for dessert or when you have to spice up your regular grilled chicken. Ceylon cinnamon, also known as true cinnamon, is known for its medicinal properties .
Not only does the spice allow you variety, but it also helps keep your health in check. Scientists have deduced that the spice is good for heart health and helps keep the cardiovascular system healthy. Cilantro/Coriander
Known by two different names across the world, Cilantro/Coriander is a fantastic seasoning option to have in your kitchen cabinet. From meat to salsa and even to pasta this herb is a great choice for seasoning.
Source: Pixabay
Even though the taste is not very significant the tantalizing savor and scent can change your dining experience. It looks pretty and tastes decent and more importantly — it turns your meal into a high-end experience within seconds.
You don’t want to miss out on something as multipurpose as Cilantro. Oh and it’s wondrous for your health too! Cayenne Pepper
This tiny bright red pepper can do wonders for your food as well as your health. Size, in this case definitely doesn’t matter, as it is the basic ingredient in a multitude of sauces and gravies. Cayenne pepper provides just that tinge and little bit of heat that can turn the dish around and make your taste buds happy!
Speaking of its health benefits, cayenne pepper has often been associated with a boost in immunity and isn’t that the core of everything health related? Cayenne pepper, powdered or otherwise, is a great addition to your kitchen directory owing to the amazing properties and its multiple health benefits. The pepper is also used as a treatment for headaches in some parts of the world. Peppermint
You can love it or you can hate it but you cannot deny the unique flavour that peppermint can add to your homemade meal!
It has one of the most distinct aroma out of all herbs and can be used for several kinds of foods and desserts. Toss that minty lemonade or go for a warm peppermint mocha right in the comfort of your kitchen by adding peppermint to your weekly grocery list.
Source: Pixabay
Need we add that it has health benefits too? Well okay if you insist. Peppermint leaves, in the form of tea, have been linked to a decrease in congestion and headaches. We all need that after a hard day at work, don’t we? Garlic Powder
It can be a problem to chop garlic to perfection every time it is your turn to cook at home. For ease and convenience, you can always get yourself dehydrated garlic powder that works just as well as the actual thing.
For anyone who cooks, it should come as no surprise that garlic is the main ingredient for several major recipes belonging from various parts of the world! Be it something along the lines of an Indian Curry or the Italian Agliata, Garlic is king! Of course, we weren’t going to stop before highlighting the health benefits! Garlic is rather efficient with lowering Cholesterol levels. Get yours now! Basil
The Basic Basil! We saved the best herb for the last. It is one of the most common herbs used around the globe owing to its intense flavour and persistent taste. Basil can be used in dishes like lasagne, pies, curries and even salads. What more can you ask for? It is commonly available, fits in with almost every cuisine in the world and does wonders for your inner system! The herb is extremely rich in antioxidants which is known to fight cancer and inflammation .
These aren’t just spices and herbs, they are super spices and herbs that make your food and your health better with every passing day! So jot down these essential spices before you head out for your next grocery trip. They will surely up your cooking game and let you boast about your cooking skills among your friends. That’s all from us, share your kitchen essentials with us if we missed them! Views: 13

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Dubai brunches you won’t want to miss

Home » Food Reviews » Dubai brunches you won’t want to miss Dubai brunches you won’t want to miss Posted on 09.04.19 by jane There is no debate – brunching really is one of Dubai’s favourite hobbies. And with the variety of themes and cuisines, concepts and settings available, there will be a good range of brunches that satisfy even the most fussy ones at the table.
But how do you find your own brunch that = bae?
We’ve rounded up a list of our favourite weekend feasts, tried and tested by us, to suit hungry families looking for the right bite, those with a particular craving, those seeking dancing-on-the-tables and raving, and of course, us brazen epicureans with a ravenous appetite.
Dukesy Family Brunch at West 14 th Steakhouse
Recently re-branded as a Royal Hideaway hotel, does Dukes give us the regal treatment?Its West 14 th Steakhouse’s nobly overlooks an infinity pool, facing the calm blue waters off Palm Jumeirah and the rising Dubai skyline.
As well as the shimmering sea, a live New York jazz duo that adds to the summer vibe. Welcome drinks are served to our table while attentive staff take us through the buffet set-up. It’s an atlas-worth of global options, from traditional Arabic dishes to sushi, finger-licking butter chicken and fresh seafood. Pasta is cooked up to your taste, while a grilling station offers a wide selection of smoky prime meats prepared exactly as you prefer.
Ticking off the family element is a buffet just for kids and supervised play area, while the whole family gets access to the hotel’s pool, beach and lazy river, so make sure to pack your swimwear.
Fridays, 1pm-4pm. AED 315 per person with soft beverages; AED 399 with house beverages and AED 160 per child aged six-12. Dukes The Palm, a Royal Hideaway Hotel. 04 455 1111.
Big Brunch from Katsuya by Starck at Jumeirah Al Naseem
The new launch of the Big Brunch from Katsuya by Starck promises an incredible range of signature dishes, outstanding mixed drinks and great vibes – and it certainly delivers.
We’re ushered through a busy dining room, past live sushi rolling and into some of the comfiest booths we’ve ever sat in. Brunch opens with a phenomenal range of starters and sharing platters (we hugely recommend the creamy rock shrimp and the spicy albacore with crispy onions), Katsuya takes you on a journey of Japanese specialities including robata grill options, miso-marinated black cod and soy-basted tenderloins. The only let-down was the standard brunch fare desserts.
The restaurant is well-lit with great views across Jumeirah Al Naseem’s dining hub to create a relaxed and airy atmosphere. Given the quality of food and service, we thought the price was reasonable and will undoubtedly create a loyal following in Madinat Jumeirah’s lively brunch scene.
Katsuya by Starck, Jumeirah Al Naseem Hotel, Jumeirah Beach Road. AED 350 with soft drinks, house beverages AED 450, sparkling AED 550. Fridays 12pm-4pm. 04 419 0676.
Soirée, Latest Recipe, Le Meridien Mina Seyahi Beach Resort & Marina, Dubai Marina
Sitting on the terrace of this seaside hotel, surrounded by palm trees festooned with lights, we feel very much all is well with the world.
The particular part of the planet this Thursday brunch represents is France, as if we were in any doubt, after being served a bowl of warm, melted brie. If the bread accompanying isn’t enough, inside the restaurant there’s a huge selection of different loaves.
Other starters meander through Continental Europe, with oysters, saffron arancini balls, mini chicken pies, mussels, scallops and prawns with roast potato and beetroot – a combination we weren’t sure would work, but we couldn’t stop ourselves going in for more. Cheeses range from soft and stinky to hard and strong, paired perfectly with a good spread of European cold cuts.
More substantial scoffs touch on the cuisine of across the Chanel – we tuck into roast beef with vegetables and mashed potato. A platter of desserts ends our Francophile experience – lemon meringue, coffee cake and chocolate macarons crowd for attention to win our cœur.
Thursday, 7pm-10pm. Le Meridien Mina Seyahi Beach Resort & Marina, Dubai Marina. AED 199 with soft drinks, AED 299 selected beverages, AED 99 kids aged six to 12. 04 511 7373.
Brunch Out Loud, Lucky Voice, Grand Millennium Dubai Barsha Heights
There’s plenty to sing about at this lively Friday brunch. Resident DJ Jonno Blandford, games, fun inflatables and lip synch battles make the afternoon fly by.
From our table on the upper deck, we have a great view of the action (and a decent excuse not to be dragged up on stage).
The food’s generous but not chart-topping unless you’re a big fan of fried finger eats – cheese, chicken wings, shrimps and hash browns. Mini burgers and pizzas for the main courses continue the fast food fix. Finish it all up and there’s ice-cream for afters.
If you’re not already in a carb coma, after brunch every group gets an hour of complimentary karaoke.
Lucky Voice, Grand Millennium Dubai Barsha Heights. 1pm-4pm. AED 195 food and soft drinks, AED 295 house package, AED 350 sparkling. 800 58259.
The Britannia Brunch , The Restaurant, Address Downtown
The Dubai brunch brigade has sampled a handful of Brit-themed spreads in the past, but The Restaurant in The Address Downtown takes the concept upmarket – as you might expect.
For a start, next to a miniature red phone box you’ll find freshly shucked oysters; among the breads and well-curated salads a Union Jack-decorated mini Mini Cooper ensures you’re clear on the theme.
Mini burgers, delicately flavoured meat skewers and chicken lollipops beckon beside the open kitchen, but be careful not to fill up too early as this savvy brunch shows its true quality by moving on to family-style table service.
As the afternoon slips by, soundtracked by vintage tracks from Talk Talk, Blur, The Blow Monkeys and other bands that’ll have you digging deep into your sonic memories, shareable mains arrive in the shape of moist roast chicken, lamb with roast vegetables and trimmings including a plump Yorkshire pudding, impossibly good Shepherd’s Pie, salmon en croute and silky mash potato.
The result is a belt-testing blast of British comfort food, underlined by a dessert selection of Eton Mess, perfect lemon meringue pie, possibly the best sticky toffee pudding you’re likely to taste this far from the UK and a winning apple crumble.
The Restaurant, Address Downtown. Every Friday, from 1pm to 4pm. AED 295 per person including unlimited soft beverages; AED 395 per person with unlimited house beverages. 048 883 444.
Toshi in the Grand Millennium Dubai
Usually, if we’re booked for brunch at the Grand Millennium, Lucky Voice is our destination. But this time the karaoke bar doesn’t get a look in.
Tochi’s new Friday buffet brings together flavours from Japan, China, Singapore, Myanmar, Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. If that sounds like a lot of food, then it is. From live cooking stations making sushi, to crispy vegetable tempura, grilled chicken satay, vegetable tempura, fresh seafood, plus hot and cold soups and papaya salad.
Live music keeps the atmosphere up as our table splits up to tackle the vast spread, pausing only to scope fabulous view to the Arabian Gulf. A few laps of the buffet leaves us with space to fill in the dessert room. Here the Asian influence is held back for an assortment of mousse, gâteaux, fruits and cheesecake that finishes off any plans for a tuneful afterparty.
Check out Toshi’s excellent weekly theme nights if you can’t make Fridays.
Toshi in Grand Millennium Dubai, Barsha Heights. Fridays, 12pm-4pm. AED 299 per person with water and soft beverages and AED 349 per person with three hours of free-flowing house beverages. 04 4234111
Family brunch at Movenpick Ibn Battuta Gate
A room dedicated to carbs, specifically pasta and pizza, isn’t even the best thing about the Movenpick Ibn Battuta Gate brunch . Here chefs from the hotel’s Sicilia restaurant will cook your favourite pasta with a fresh cream or tomato sauce.
On Fridays, Al Bahou meeting hall is where all the hotel’s restaurants come together.
Cheese also gets a dedicated area, decorated like a rustic market. Find it next to the traditional European meats. There’s a great choice of salads and seafood too. Shanghai Chic brings the Asian flavours with dim sim, duck and rice dishes. Chor Bazaar is also here, serving Indian dishes from a tuk tuk.
We end up with the archetypal Dubai brunch plate of an odd but delicious assortment – beef, chicken satay, roasted beetroot, roasted parsnips, glazed carrots and gravy.
The highlight for us is a play area for kids with games, bouncy castle and ‘secret’ room where sandwiches, juices and finger food await them. It’s a great place to have a meal and keep them entertained.
Al Bahou at Movenpick Ibn Battuta Gate. Fridays, 12.30pm until 4pm. From AED 295 with soft drinks, AED 395 house and AED 595 bubbles. Children under six go free and under 12s are 50 per cent off. 04 444 0000.
Le Petit Brunch, Aubaine
French bistro Aubaine branches out into brunch at its new City Walk branch. There’s a tongue twister for you, but this family friendly Friday offering is pretty simple – a buffet of cold cuts, cheeses, breads and pastries, one à la carte main course from a choice of four and your choice of hot beverage. There really is something for everyone – whether you want to indulge in the decadent desserts and pastries or opt for healthier dishes. There’s even a chocolate fountain, but it’s too early for us, so we feast on smoked salmon and croissants stuffed with cheese. Mains is a nicely-presented avo on toast, which is fast becoming the ‘club sandwich rule’ for judging breakfast spots in Dubai.
Ample free parking, great service and value for money makes this an ideal weekend brunch spot, especially if you have children since the restaurant even offers complimentary live entertainment, with face painting and balloon art appealing to little diners on our visit.
Aubaine, City Walk, Al Safa. Every Friday from 10am-2pm. AED 120 for adults/AED 40 for children. 04 510 8391.
The Saturday Roast, The Daily, Rove Dubai Marina Living in a city with the culinary diversity of Dubai, there are few tastes of home we find ourselves craving. But a great value, tasty, authentic, British roast dinner – is a rare find indeed.
We heard that Rove Dubai Marina was serving up a weekend roast deal that smacked of Union Jack. So we find ourselves sat amongst the eye catching wall-mounted objet d’arts , of The Daily – the hotel’s all day dining restaurant.
AED 99 gets you either roast chicken or beef, roast potatoes and vegetables, baked broccoli and cauliflower gratin, gravy, bread sauce and something that is arguably more British than tutting internally when the person you hold the door open for doesn’t say thank you . Yorkshire pudding. A real national treasure.
The deal also includes a dessert (bread and butter pudding) and a glass of grape / bottle of hops / soft drink).
There are two of us plate testing, so we are able to try the chicken and beef. Both excellent efforts, plump, juicy, flavourful, they’re reminiscent of a strong UK pub Sunday special. The gravy was thick, swimming with roast jus flavours – and importantly for Brits – is served in adequate proportions . The vegetable gratin is an excellent inclusion, rich, perfumed – we could eat a bowlful. Confession time, we did eat a bowlful.
Service was friendly and prompt, and our dessert was certainly one of the highlights too – a pinch of school dinner, a sprinkle of something many dimensions beyond that . When you consider the excellent value, it’s a meal that would have scored full marks had they nailed the Yorkshire puddings. They came close. But alas – a tad dry and a fraction too crispy. We’ll be back though.
AED 99. Served between 12pm-5pm, Saturdays only. The Daily, Rove Dubai Marina. 04 241 9400.
Lapita Daycation Brunch, Dubai Parks and Resorts
Lapita is the Polynesian themed hotel at Dubai Parks and Resorts. The hotel’s Friday brunch picks up the tahiti tiki torch, and applies the same South Pacific twists to proceedings, along with a keen family focus .
The brunch package includes pool (which, dad newsflash, itself includes a lazy river ) access for the whole day (10am-6pm). So following a quick pre-brunch dip we head out to sample the grand international buffet. The Kalea restaurant’s main dining area is tweaked with island chic, like an upturned ships hull – we have to restrain ourselves from bursting into an impromptu Moana recital.
The quality and range offered by the buffet is excellent. There’s an extensive kid’s food section and you’ll also find plenty of bounty from both land and sea at the grilling station. The marinated lobster was a particular plate real estate claimant for us, as was the genuinely creative salad section.
But the food isn’t what sells this brunch to us. It is the package as a whole . It’s the family entertainment, the pool access, little detailed touches like the presentation of a (plastic) flowery lei (a type of Hawaiian garland) on arrival, the walkable proximity to four theme parks AND then the food as a part of all that.
Soft drink package AED 295, house beverage package AED 395, premium beverage package AED 495. 1pm-4pm. Kalea, Lapita Hotel, Dubai Parks and Resorts. 04 810 9999.
Le Brunchette, venues around Dubai
Can’t decide when or where to brunch? Voila , Le Brunchette. Find this pint-sized blow out at 20 bars around Dubai during December – with McGettigan’s JBR, La Petit Belge, and Belgian Beer Café all involved. Specially created for those of us whose social calendars overload during the festive season, Le Brunchette is a great excuse to dedicate some downtime to a drink or two.
Timings differ around the venues, but all offer two hours of free-flow Belgian hops and a sharing platter of classy finger food. We appropriately enough earn our La Brunchette stripes at Café Artois, the terrace section of Bridgewater Tavern, in the JW Marriott Marquis, Business Bay. We’re served juicy beef cuts, thick slices of bread, crispy nachos and barbecue chicken. It’s all honest pub food, done well.
The Bridgewater Tavern is open 4pm-12am weekdays and from 12pm on Saturday, but we’d recommend going in the evening, as it’s the perfect spot to look over the thunderous and illuminated Dubai Canal waterfall. #DATENIGHT
1st-30th December. 20 locations around Dubai. AED 180 per person for two hours of free flow and a sharing platter.
Trader Vic’s at The Hilton Dubai Jumeirah
Take it to the tropics with the Cheeky Tiki Brunch at Trader Vics. OK, the views outdoors are over the Arabian Gulf, but with a silk lei of flowers round our neck, a band strumming away and Trader’s signature beverages abounding, it really does feel like we’re on a Polynesian holiday .
A set menu is brought to the table. It’s a light and dare we say healthy spread of cucumber and ginger gazpacho, a platter of sushi, salad rolls and grilled seabass, which means we have even more room to pull our deckchair up to the dessert counter and savour chocolate fountains, churros and crepes.
No spoilers, but have a camera ready for the special fire and ice dessert! Even if you Bora Bora one.
Friday, 12.30pm-4pm. Trader Vic’s JBR, Hilton Dubai Jumeirah. Food and drinks, AED 325 per person. 04 318 2530.
Salt & Pepper Restaurant at Al Bandar Rotana
A good brunch can be like an adventure and the Al Bandar Rotana promises to fulfil our Friday wanderlust by taking us around the world in 80 bites.
Enter the restaurant’s all-day diner and start your journey at a sign directing diners to the cuisines of Egypt, UK, Japan, Italy and more . We embark at the sushi bar, watching the chef preparing rolls and sashimi. Fill up on Mediterranean and Arabic stations dishing out mixed grills and Levantine staples tabbouleh and hummus. We also stamp our passports on Mexican dips and Asian noodles fresh from the wok.
Each station has an accompanying dessert and we’re drawn back to the Middle East for ma’amoul cookies and syrupy kanafeh.
If you’re there with little travellers, they get their own wayfaring themed fun and games that Phileas Fogg would approve of at this no-frills, family-friendly offering.
Fridays, 12.30pm-4pm. Al Bandar Rotana, Baniyas Road, Baniyas. 04 704 2222. AED 200 for soft drinks; AED 300 house beverages; children six-12 AED 80. Under sixes free .
Qasr Al Sultan Boutique Hotel
Up for a road trip? What about fuelling up for brunch at a new-ish hotel near Dubai Parks and Resorts?
In keeping with Qasr Al Sultan’s ideology of traditional local hospitality, the focus for our Friday feasting is on Arabic food. The spread still yields a great deal of choice and there’s something for everyone on the varied line-up. We love the Egyptian and Lebanese spread of mains from filling freekeh grains to bright green molokhia leaves and fish with olives.
Get interactive at the live grilling station, where you can choose the protein or veg to be grilled and delivered to your table. No pasta here, but those craving carbs should turn their attention to doughy manakish pulled fresh out of the oven . Desserts are well-represented as well, with kanafeh and creamy Umm Ali pudding scoring highly on our glutton meter.
Snagging a taxi afterwards can be tricky, but with a varied programme of live entertainment (also on an Arabic vibe), some educational dioramas and outdoor activities for kids, this brunch is worth appointing a designated driver for.
Fridays, 12.30pm-4pm. Qasr Al Sultan Boutique Hotel, off the E11, near The Outlet Village. AED 195 soft drinks; AED 295 with house beverages; children over six half price and under sixes eat for free. 800 85826.
Sevilles at Wafi
Chefs stir a giant paella as street performers circulate. We raise a glass to the weekend and ask if we’re really in Dubai. Sevilles’ Thursday drunch brings the best of Spain to Wafi’s rooftop.
Wooden seating around a grassed area adds to the casual Continental feel – this is the kind of gathering you don’t have to dress up for, in fact, for this al fresco setting, we’d recommend leaving the heels at home.
Welcome drink in hand, we wander round live cooking stations, at the heart of which is a 1.6 metre paella cooked on an open fire pit. Attentive staff make sure we enjoy a steady flow of tapas, fresh ceviches and traditional Spanish beverage. There’s a separate area for the country’s meats too.
Stations could be closer together, but we’re happier to exercise our legs on the dance floor to beats from DJ Adrian La Bomba. Performers switch up regularly and we’re lucky enough to see energetic acrobat Luis Malabara .
Thursdays, 8pm-12am. AED 250 soft beverages; AED 350 house; AED 450 premium packages. Pyramids At Wafi, Umm Hurair 2. 04 324 4777.
Brasserie 2.0, Le Royal Meridien Beach Resort & Spa
As any good Stark will tell you “winter has come,” but unlike the unfortunate souls of Westeros, our winter translates into the reclamation of good vibes in the great outdoors. So naturally we choose an al fresco terrace perch for this decadent dining experience.
There’s plenty of seating inside too, within easy dashing distance of the expansive international buffet. Round one begins with gloriously prepared seafood, freshly shucked oyster, sushi, and fish grilled to order right before our eyes .
Brasserie 2.0 has a reputation for providing an exceptional feast for meat lovers, and as well-seasoned carnivores ourselves, we can confirm it’s a reputation fairly earned. As veterans of the brunch game, we also use the dual plating tactic – to sample classic cuts from several continents – kebabs and chops, patties and shanks, as well as plenty of alternatives for those looking for a more meat free munch. We are keen on the freshly made Italian pizza and objet de dim sum – both of which seem to radiate an authenticity, not often seen in buffets of such varied cuisine.
The service is excellent; a battalion of servers is assigned to each table, armed with military efficiency, courteous smiles and fingers permanently clamped on the rapid fire refill trigger.
Next up, operation ‘storm the desserts’. Gelato, crêpes, a chocolate fountain, ice cream, gâteaux, candy floss, pastries, fruit, cakes of every conceivable kind. It’s a familiar sweet line-up for buffet brunches, but is exceptional in size and quality.
Brasserie 2.0’s Friday brunch is an endless journey of choice, and a firm favourite of ours amongst Dubai’s premium brunches.
Every Friday 1.30pm-4.30 pm. Brasserie 2.0, Le Royal Meridien Beach Resort and Spa. AED 450 with soft drinks, AED 595 house, AED 795 bubbly; kids five-12, AED 230. 04 316 5550.
Thela Baar Brunch at Bar Baar
Coming from Mumbai, we have high standards for Indian street food, but one sip of the paani puri water later and we know the Majestic Hotel’s social hub’s newly launched brunch was worth the wait.
Four stalls are laid out with the essentials for chaat – samosa and dahi bhalle in one, ragda patties in another, keema and bheja pav, lamb chops, home-made Indian-style burgers and so on. For the less adventurous, there are salads that run the gamut from a Caesar to coleslaw.
Choose from 40 different mains and desserts , which are cooked on demand so everything arrives super fresh and there’s less wastage. Falooda makes us super nostalgic and chai ice cream is the sweet perfect something to end the meal.
Drinks were the only downside – we were expecting some wacky and inventive takes on street eats here too, but there are only the usual suspects on display. However for the price point of packages, we really can’t grumble.
Over 21s only. Fridays from 1pm-4pm. Food only, AED 99. House beverages AED 199 and premium AED 249. Bar Baar, Majestic Hotel, Al Mankhool Road, 04 501 2631
Liwan, Swissôtel Al Ghurair
Parents, want a brunch where the kids are entertained while you can relax? We are actually jealous of how much fun our little dining companions have at the Playhouse Family Brunch. While we work our way round an admittedly delicious buffet, they’re learning to cook, flipping out on a bouncy castle, having their faces painted and tucking into their own mini spread of sandwiches, hot dogs and chicken nuggets. There’s even a popcorn machine . If we didn’t have our own ice-cream corner, piles of Swiss chocolates, Thai curry station and barbecue, we’d be very jealous.
Swisshotel is unlicensed, so they take real care over the soft drinks. We sip watermelon juice and ginger – a refreshing change from the usual fizzy pops!
Fridays, 12.30pm-4pm. AED 160 adults, AED 80 children aged six to 12. Under fives eat for free. Swissôtel Al Ghurair, Deira, near Fish Roundabout. 04 293 3000.
Backyard Brunch, FireLake Grill House & Cocktail Bar
Grills are fired up for brunch at the new Radisson Blu Hotel, Dubai Waterfront. Its FireLake Grill House & Cocktail Bar pays homage to Minnesota, North America’s ‘Land of 1000 Lakes,’ though it’s a stretch of Dubai Canal that we overlook here, albeit to the energetic Americana of band Down Home, who please us with a plethora of Johnny Cash hits.
A fug of barbecue smoke hangs over the terrace, but before we meet the meat, there’s a fruit de mar platter of mussels and crab, and a mini menu of 10 small plates to plough through . From these, crab croquettes are a hit, though we can’t taste the promised pickled jalapeños in the mayo. Huevos rancheros are special too, with fried organic eggs sending a stream of golden yolk over smokey beans and guacamole. We’re encouraged to re-order and offered a choice of topped flatbreads, but it’s not our first time at a rodeo and we leave space for the live cooking stations.
At these we help ourselves to gigantic prawns in a spicy salsa and coal grilled vegetables nestled in chunky stewpots, as the chef carves a huge chunk of smoked and charred flank steak . Like any good barbecue, there’s a plentiful amount of condiments to sauce up the servings. Again you can make endless trips to here and the ‘slurp stations,’ though over-indulged brunchers may prefer table service.
Dessert is laid out in its own room and although nothing really adheres to the American cook-out theme (we’d love to see warm S’mores on the menu), there’s a delicious smorgasbord of chocolate bark, Snickers cake, brownies and meringue. Kids also get their own supervised area to play in, though they’re perfectly welcome out on the terrace and eat for free if they’re under six.
Every Friday, 12.30pm-4pm. Radisson Blu Hotel Dubai Waterfront, Business Bay. AED 250 with soft drinks; AED 395 for the house package; AED 450 for sparkling. AED 95 for children aged 6 to 12. 04 249 7800.
The Lion by Nick and Scott at The H Hotel
When you’ve got one of Dubai’s best restaurants under your belt, taking on a British-style pub is something of a curveball. But that’s what Nick Alvis and Scott Price – they of folly by Nick & Scott fame – have done with The Lion.
Based in The H Hotel, Sheikh Zayed Road, it ticks plenty of boxes: cool but unpretentious décor, strategically placed screens for key sporting action and quality pub grub . The fine dining duo have put a gentle upward spin on some Brit favourites, available all week but also via a flexible three-hour brunch package on Fridays.
The set menu that begins with a sharing platter featuring surely Dubai’s best Scotch eggs – taste bombs with a quail egg at heart, lifted by wholegrain mustard dipping sauce – and veal sausage rolls of light pastry and finely herbed meat, enough without their BBQ dip. Silky chicken liver pâté comes with chutney and really good toast and lime and chilli-marinated chicken wings hit a different level.
Mains options include Angus burger in a sourdough bun with ranch dressing and veal pancetta, and fish & chips with chunky chips and crushed peas. Beef in Murphy’s pudding with mash and gravy won our vote; a pub classic done well – only slightly let down by mash that would have enjoyed a tad more butter.
For dessert you choose from sticky toffee pudding and a deconstructed apple crumble. Bathed in perfect vanilla custard, this bowl of comfort food vanished in seconds.
All the nourishment is complimented by a “wash it down” drinks list that includes some canny mixed beverages, and a resident DJ. Right now, show Lion staff your taxi receipt and and it will be deducted from your bill.
The Lion, The H Hotel, Sheikh Zayed Road. Three hours from 2pm-2am Fridays. AED 250. 04 359 2366.
Brothaus, Steigenberger Hotel Business Bay
The Brothaus’ brand new Friday brunch has finally arrived and we are hoping to be oompah-ressed. There aren’t many German bakery-bistros in Dubai, which is a shame, because they’re a spectacularly good way to get your daily dose of carbs and meat, at either breakfast or lunch.
Like the layout, the vibe is poised and chilled – a thick wedge of Brandenburg charm. The dining ritual begins with a gourmet coffee and a suitably casual amble through the fresh market counters. We pile up our plate with freshly baked bread, yogurts, confiture, fruit and nuts.
After a healthy start, we return to the mock market stalls with an empty plate and a perceived right to hit the cheese and cold cuts hard. The European meat and cheese selection is strong, so too the hummus, but we force a slither of will power to intervene and stop us from filling up the plate again. We still have flammkuchen (a sort of Alsace version of pizza) and à la carte mains to come.
The flammkuchen is an authentic flame-licked mouthful of mountain food. A ski trip for the mind. The choice between mains is similarly polar, you can head north to breakfast, as we did with a classic and perfectly realised eggs benny (eggs benedict). Or you can head south to their lush lunch options, offering scrummy salmon, beef, chicken and vegetable dishes.
For your brunching convenience, Brothaus offers several different packages. The Full Frankfurt (AED 145) includes the starter buffet, a main course, one coffee or tea and access to the juice counter. Half A Hamburg (AED 75) gives free rein on the market stall buffet. A kids’ package is available for AED 45 and adults can bolt on four beverage for AED 100.
The brunch takes place between 10.30am and 3pm on Fridays. Brothaus, Steigenberger Business Bay. 04 369 0000.
Traiteur, The Promenade, Park Hyatt Dubai
Traiteur is a brunch that comes with a prestigious reputation that carries to its new home at creek-side dining village, The Promenade a stone’s skim from its old address.
Three outlets – NOÉPE, Brasserie du Park and seventyseventy – contribute with their own cuisine and ambient charm. The focal point is the open kitchen, where chefs prepare much of the food before your eyes. On the buffet you’ll find Gallic classics from land and sea, crudités, starters, principle plates and palate cleansers.
The food is an intrinsically good gallop through some of French cuisine’s landmark dishes. From rotisserie poultry and pin-precision roasted poussin, to the provincial crusted lamb racks and tenderloin so soft and tender it could be cut by human finger. The net-fresh seafood is a further triumph – expertly shelled crab, dreamy creamy langoustine and a submarinal garden of delicious ocean molluscs.
Assuming there is room left in your stomach for dessert, welcome to your gastronomic Everest. There is a Charlie and the Chocolate Factory-style room dedicated to gateaux, macarons and glooping chocolate fountains, and a small village of cheese available to peruse. We can confidently say Traiteur is the best brunch we’ve ever done – the laid back atmosphere, live music, great service and spectacular food is a must for any residents who want to spoil themselves or impress the tourists in tow. The only slight reservation you might have about booking immediately is the price.
Fridays, 1pm-4.30pm. Soft drinks AED 495 per person; beverage packages from AED 695-AED 895. Kids below six dine for free; six-12years AED 247.5. The Promenade, Park Hyatt Dubai. Call 04 602 1814.
The City Brunch, The Market, Hilton Dubai Al Habtoor City
Some brunches favour gimmicks and even leave you hungry. But The City Brunch puts the focus on stuff that really matters, namely good food and refreshments in a very family-friendly environment.
Set in The Market at Hilton Dubai Al Habtoor City, this Friday feast excels on several levels, especially if you’re a parent. A kid-dedicated area bounces with music, supervised activities, a giant playpen, face painting, drawing desks, a movie corner, a PlayStation – even a cooking class. Little brunchers also have their own buffet of healthy snacks and desserts.
The more adult aspect is across the lobby in the main restaurant. Drawing on key outlets in the Al Habtoor City hotel trio, it’s like a taster board across 17 different stations.
Think foie gras, six cuts of steak with a bewildering 30 sauces and eight mustards, New York strip and moist short rib, potatoes prepared a dozen different ways, barbecue bites from the hotel’s pool lounge, Firefly. There’s Insta-loving sushi and sashimi from V Dubai’s Namu, plus an artistic bread section and more-ish shish tawook. Be indecisive at multiple smoked salmon choices, French oysters and lobster – and 40 camera-ready desserts. Then there are those gooey cheeses…
The biggest surprise, perhaps, is the price, when lesser brunches can nudge the AED 500 mark.
Hilton Dubai Al Habtoor City. 04 435 5577. Every Friday, 1pm-4.30pm. AED 300 soft drinks; AED 425 house beverages and AED 625 for sparkling French grape. Kids aged five to 12 years join in for AED 150. Under fives eat for free.
So Cho, Dubai Marine Resort
Dubai Marine Beach Resort has a number of bars and restaurants and if you venture past the usual favourites, you will find So Cho; a trendy Japanese restaurant and bar lounge overlooking the ocean that ranks high on our brunch scale.
One piece of advice is, go hungry! Dishes keeps coming to our table and drinks are replenished throughout the evening. Quality mostly matches quantity with the highlights being the ceviche, tempura, gyoza and edamame, served with ginger and sesame seeds; a welcome change from the plain salted variety. Perhaps they could reduce the number of dishes on offer to make those served the best possible?
Fridays, 8pm-12am. AED 165 for food and soft drinks, AED 250 with open bar. 04 346 1111. Dubai Marine Resort, Jumeirah.
Hive at Warehouse, Le Meridien Dubai Hotel & Conference Centre
Buzz along to the bee-themed brunch at Hive. This popular Friday treat has been ‘bee-vived’ into a relaxed, fun and buzzy brunch where you certainly won’t get stung.
We dig into a un-beeelievable line up of barbecue buffet, including a fabulous range of spiced fish, barbecued chicken, sweetcorn and grilled brie. The salad bar has all the staples of cold cuts, sushi, pasta and seafood. If that all sounds too virtuous, flutter on over to the desert section and ask the chef to whip up some fresh crepes, with choice of strawberry and chocolate sauces.
Bench-style seats outside is ideal for groups who want to go al fresco, or if you feel chilly, ask to sit inside. If you would like to bring your children, we recommend booking a table outside. Guests of all ages will love the entertainment – dancers, a singer and ‘bees’ teetering around on stilts.
AED 259 with unlimited food and house beverages, from 1pm to 4pm. Kids six-12 AED 150. Under sixes are free. Le Meridien Dubai Hotel & Conference Centre, Garhoud. 04 217 0000.
The Meydan Family Friday Brunch
So here’s what we’ve learnt this weekend, don’t dismiss a family brunch if you don’t have kids. Kids or no kids, this brunch is a fabulous way to catch up with your mummy and daddy friends.
Grown ups can choose from a generous spread of live food stations, serving Japanese, Asian, Indian and British food. Whether you want a simple smoothie, oysters and bubbles or a good old roast dinner, it’s all here in the hotel’s Farriers restaurant.
For kids, there’s a fully supervised play room, packed with activities and child-friendly food. Little guests eat for half-price too and toddlers go free. If you’re blessed with a nanny, they can eat for free to.
Fridays, 12.30pm- 4pm. AED 290 soft drinks, AED 400 with house beverages. F ree for c hildren under four and one nanny per family, AED 160 for five to 12 year olds. The Meydan Hotel, Meydan. 04 381 3111.
Fumé, Pier 7
A classy brunch for a reasonable price? We’re left pleasantly surprised by this upmarket choice of comfort food brought straight to our table.
Generous portions from an extensive set menu set this laid back, good-value brunch a step above the rest. We particularly like the lamb chops, Angus beef hamburger and ubiquitous mac and cheese. Smaller plates of fried calamari with chilli sauce and buttermilk chicken nuggets really hit the spot and just when we think we’re full, a rich tiramisu coaxes us into one more spoonful.
Friendly staff are always looking to fill up your cup and bring extra dishes. Fridays at Fumé are busy, but not crowded and it is the perfect place to spend quality time with friends – and kids, who get their own play area – in a relaxed environment.
Fridays, 12pm-4pm. AED 199 including house and mixed beverages. Pier 7, Marina. 04 421 5669.
The Garden Brunch, Al Forsan, Bab Al Shams Desert Resort and Spa
Though the arid UAE land might not lend itself to bounteous options for our table, this is not reflected at the new Friday Farmers Brunch at Bab Al Shams’ Al Forsan restaurant. It is however, not the crops of the soil that satisfy the most at this (loosely) farm-inspired feast, but the fruits of the sea. The offering includes excellent gravlax, fresh mussels in a pot with accompaniments and pink shrimps ceviche in half a coconut.
Do save space for the 18 hours braised BBQ beef ribs and our personal favourite, the savoury waffle on braised beef brisket with a poached egg. To some the mixture of sweet and savoury is a sickly combination, but we relished the calorific compilation.
Many will know Bab Al Shams as a weekend getaway spot, being as it is, just far enough away from the city to escape but near enough not to be a hassle. The brunch certainly feels like a great family escape; a range of activities keep your mini-me in check and a clown bumbles around creating balloon animals, while a miniature pony attracts an excited queue. It’s British village fête Arabian style!
Lastly, when you’ve had your fill don’t forget to join other merry brunch goers taking their turns to lift farm produce in hope of winning lunch, dinner or pool access in the ‘guess the weight’ competition. Friday, 1pm-4pm. AED 365 soft drinks and AED 545 with house beverages. Under fours and one nanny per family goes free, AED 182.50 for five-12 year olds. 04 809 6194. Al Forsan, Bab Al Shams Desert Resort and Spa.
Zuma, DIFC
Everyone’s go-to luxury brunch. Regulars know the score – Japanese dishes done very well, with a fantastic spread of sushi, sashimi and robata and superb à la carte options. The award-winning restaurant ends its Friday offering on a sweet note with a “deluxe dessert display” of banana cake and yuzu tart with soya milk ice cream.
AED 225 for kids under 12; AED 450 soft drinks package; AED 595 house beverages; AED 655 bubbly. Fridays, 12.30pm-4pm. Gate Village 06, DIFC. 04 425 5660.
Dubai Week dined as guests of the venues. Prices may have changed due to VAT – please check directly. Related Posted in Food Reviews , Great Reads | Tagged 2 for 1 brunches , Address Downtown. , affordable brunches in Dubai , Al Bandar Rotana , Asian brunch , aubaine , Bar Baar brunch , best brunch in dubai , best brunches in Dubai , best value brunch dubai , Big Brunch from Katsuya by Starck at Jumeirah Al Naseem , bogof brunches , Brasserie 2.0 , Bridgewater Tavern , British brunch , British food , Brunch , brunch in Bur Dubai , Brunch Out Loud , brunch with kids , brunches , brunches at Citywalk , brunches in Dubai , brunches near me , brunches to try , brunches with kids , brunches with pool access , brunching , bubbly , Business Bay , Café Artois , Cheeky Tiki Brunch , citywalk , daycations daycation in DUBAI UAE , dinner buffet in dubai , drunch , dubai brunch deals , Dubai events , Dubai Marina , Dubai parks and resorts , Dubai-based activities , Dukesy Family Brunch , entertaining brunches in Dubai , evening brunch , family brunch , Family brunch at Movenpick Ibn Battuta Gate , family brunches , family brunches in Dubai , family friendly brunch , FireLake Grill Radisson Blu , French brunch , French brunches , friday brunch deals dubai , Friday brunches in Dubai , Grand Millennium Dubai , Grand Millennium Dubai Barsha Heights , Hilton Dubai Jumeirah , Indian street food , Jumeirah Al Naseem , JW Marriott Marquis , Lapita , Latest Recipe , Le Brunchette , Le Meridien Mina Seyahi Beach Resort & Marina , Le Petit Brunch , Le Royal Meridien Beach Resort & Spa , Liwan , lucky voice , Majestic Hotel , new brunches , new brunches in dubai , Qasr Al Sultan Boutique Hotel , Rove Dubai Marina , Salt and Pepper Brunch , Saturday brunches , Sevilles at Wafi , Soirée , Spanish brunch , street food brunches , sushi brunch , Swissôtel Al Ghurair , The Daily , The Restaurant , The Saturday Roast , Things to do in Dubai this week , Thursday brunch , Toshi in the , Trader Vics , what to do in Dubai this weekend , what’s on in Dubai | Comments Off on Dubai brunches you won’t want to miss Discover more…

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Cashier Job in Kenya

Position: Cashier – Indian Cuisine Restaurant Location: Mombasa – Kenya Industry: Hospitality Our Client, a first theme and the finest modern Indian restaurant in Kenya is urgently looking to hire a versatile, intelligent and energetic Restaurant Cashier with passion for delivering outstanding service. He/she will be responsible for providing customers with fast and friendly service in foodservice to maintain the restaurant’s energy and help in our Client’s mission of providing each customer with excellent customer service and other matters by performing the following duties; Essential Duties & Responsibilities: · Receive bills from the guest table, receive cash or credit card, process payment and give change if needed · Handle guest complaints with follow up to ensure guest satisfaction · Settle all guest checks in the computerized system and maintain accountability for all financial transactions · Perform daily cash reconciliations and prepare cash for deposit · Verify register and complete the appropriate paperwork at closing · Ensure all credit payments for companies are documented, signed by the manager, and customer information taken down · Appeal to impatient or irritated customers, especially during rush hours · Maintain complete knowledge of point-of-sale and manual systems and procedures. · Post in detail register totals, receipts, shortage, overage and refunds · Prepare and balance cash register; prepare cash for the following business day · Maintaining high hygiene standards at the cashier station · Perform any reasonable duties as required from time to time in order to contribute to the achievement of business Key Competencies & Qualifications: · Diploma in Food & Beverage Service or any other related field from a recognized institution · CPA II, Proficiency in MS Office Suite and/or Accounting applications will be treated as an added advantage · At least 2 years of experience in a similar role in a busy high-end establishment or proficiency in a similar task · Experienced in restaurant POS software/system · Ability to run accurate food service transactions · Familiarity with menu costing procedures · Incredible customer service skills & the ability to help maintain a customer focused culture · Ability to work a flexible schedule of nights, days, weekends, and holidays · Ambitious and driven by over exceeding customer expectations · Excellent interpersonal skills If you’re up to the challenge, kindly send CV and cover letter only to recruitment@linkarkconsultants.com before close of business 12th April 2019. Clearly indicate the position applied for and expected salary on the subject line.

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Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line – An Affordable, Fun & Tasty Cruise

Tweet Share Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line – An Affordable, Fun & Tasty Cruise
We are a fan of cruises, but these new humongous boats and long durations are too much for us. We were looking for a bit of a mini cruise and we found an awesome one with Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line, the only provider of two-night cruises and Cruise & Resort stays to Grand Bahama Island year-round from the Port of Palm Beach. We were impressed with the reasonable cost, wide range of tasty cuisine as well as the entertaining shows and ridiculously fun games cruisers can join in. If you are looking for an affordable mini cruise this a really fun ship to literally jump aboard. Rates start at just $169 per person for an interior cabin and $189 per person for an ocean view cabin, based on double occupancy.
Bahamas Paradise Cruise offers a wide range of tasty food options from a deep buffet, sit down fine dining options as well as premier dining options at The Rock Grill , Admiral’s Steak & Seafood and The Bull Gourmet Burgers . We really enjoyed The Rock Grill were 800 degree lava stones are used to cook scrumptious steaks, lobster and seafood. The scallops are truly grilled to perfection right in front of you and all the selections were fresh and able to be doused in 3-8 different lovely sauces. the Peanut sauce is truly divine! Make sure to save loads of room for dessert, because the churros, cheesecake and mousse are all Must Devours! If you are a Burger fan then this cruise has you covered. We were able to try all the burgers at The Bull Gourmet Burgers and enjoyed them all! Burgers definitely taste better when you eat them overlooking pristine and serene water.
The cruise is also taking conscientious eaters into consideration with the debut of six new Chinese, Indian and Vegan menus, available for groups upon request on board both Grand Celebration and Grand Classica . Two new Chinese menus celebrate the arrival of Chinese New Year on February 5, while two new vegan menus and two new Indian menus offer healthy, unique and globally-inspired options. You also receive all the cute towel animals cruise lines have become famous for from your room attendant who is still always the sweetest person on the ship!
Besides the food we l ved the Martini Bar and the dozen or so exquisite martinis we kept trying as well as the 2 shows on the ship. Both had amazing singers and dancers signing your fave songs nonstop. We also must insist that you participate in the fun games late night at the lounge. Playing this crazy game was definitely the highlight of the ship producing laughs and memories we shall never forget. This cruise was so much fun
Bahamas Paradise Cruise is offering a collection of new activities, packages and promotions for anyone looking to escape their daily routines and instead take the time to savor what truly matters. With offerings such as a new booking option that allows guests to finance their cruise with affordable monthly payments and fun excursions like swimming with adorable pigs in crystal-blue Bahamian waters, Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line is giving families and friends endless opportunities to experience a quick, affordable and unforgettable cruise with loved ones this year at a moment’s notice.
Uplift
Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line’s new partnership with Uplift offers affordable monthly financing plans for travelers, allowing guests to take the spontaneous getaway they’ve always wanted. Booking a BPCL cruise using Uplift is an easy, four-step process. After guests decide when they wish to travel and in what room type, they will choose “Pay Monthly” and complete an easy, commitment-free application to receive a loan decision and fixed monthly payment amount within seconds. The process is complete once guests finish booking their trip with their first month’s payment. Travelers can take advantage of Uplift whether booking online or via phone.
Swimming with Pigs
Appropriately in time for the Chinese New Year of the Pig, Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line invites travelers to take advantage of this unique opportunity to frolic in the crystalline sea with the famous swimming pigs of The Bahamas. Sure to steal hearts are Missy, Mya, Pinky, Peppa and Wilbur, adorable and very friendly pigs who love to paddle around in the shallow turquoise waters. After basking in the gentle waves and interacting with these intelligent creatures, visitors can enjoy a relaxing day on the sun-drenched beach. With transportation, a beach chair and Wi-Fi included, as well as lunch and drinks available for purchase on-site, this excursion makes it easy for cruisers to claim their slice of paradise.
Choose Your Own Adventure packages
Adventure lovers can now experience deep-sea fishing , scuba diving amidst vibrant reefs and bicycling the island’s stunning landscape with Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line’s new two-night bundle packages and tours. Guests can also bring their personal bicycles aboard the ship at no extra charge to explore Grand Bahama Island with their friends, bike club or bike association at their leisure.
Ladies Night Out The ideal getaway for girlfriends of all ages, Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line is offering a special Ladies Night Out package once a month onboard the Grand Celebration . Complete with special amenities and programming including brand gifts, martini tasting, blackjack class, scavenger hunt, music and dancing, karaoke, late night entertainment and more, this fun-filled package, retailed at $199, is being offered for only $49 per person.
Fit Bodies Inc.
After a very successful launch in 2018, Bahama Paradise Cruise Line and Fit Bodies, Inc. , the most extensive teaching exchange program for fitness, yoga, tennis and wellness professionals in the world, have announced they will continue their partnership in 2019. Fitness lovers can enjoy a variety of exceptional workout experiences like yoga and Zumba to revitalize and recharge on their cruise to and from Grand Bahama Island.
Solo Traveler Program
Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line is the only cruise line to offer no single supplement for solo cruisers , making it more affordable than ever for solo travelers to get a Grand Bahama Island getaway all to themselves. Solo cruisers can experience the fun and relaxation of a Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line vacation with plenty of opportunities to both make new friends and savor some much-needed ‘me time’, all without the worry of having to incur the double occupancy price.
By offering this collection of new activities, packages and promotions, Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line is making it easier than ever for vacationers of all ages to get away, their way, with a fun, affordable and customizable cruise experience. Of course, all passengers will be able to enjoy the collection of hallmark experiences the cruise line has to offer including testing their luck at the casino, Vegas-style shows, special spa treatments, a variety of fine dining and casual restaurants, children’s programming and more.
For more information on Bahamas Paradise Cruise Line or to book a cruise , please visit here or call 800.995.3201. Two-night cruises start at $152 per person, based on double occupancy, in an ocean-view stateroom.

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Indian Chef for Owner House in Dubai

Search for the best Hospitality Jobs Indian Chef for Owner House in Dubai Hozpitality Consulting Job Ref:
Our client’s owner house is urgently looking for a chef who is specialist in Indian and Iranian Cuisine.
Total salary is AED 6000,- per month with accommodation, duty meals and medical insurance provided. Living in the owner housing area and the rest is as per UAE Labor Law.
The job role will also include washing and cleaning the kitchen area as well.
Ideal candidate should be available locally due to food tasting is required to be done part of the interview process.
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