MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL BRINGS CHEF HESTON BLUMENTHAL TO INDIA FOR THE THIRD INSTALLMENT OF MASTERS OF MARRIOTT

MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL BRINGS CHEF HESTON BLUMENTHAL TO INDIA FOR THE THIRD INSTALLMENT OF MASTERS OF MARRIOTT

MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL BRINGS CHEF HESTON BLUMENTHAL TO INDIA FOR THE THIRD INSTALLMENT OF MASTERS OF MARRIOTT Chef Blumenthal will be in Mumbai and Delhi to curate signature culinary experiences for guests MUMBAI, 15 APRIL 2019 – Marriott International Inc. is all set to bring down the master of scientific cooking, Chef Heston Blumenthal to India this week as part of their Masters of Marriott program, presented by American Express. Chef will be visiting Mumbai and Delhi and hosting an array of distinctive culinary experiences in the country. During his time here, chef will be revealing the secrets behind his distinguished multi-sensory culinary creations, sharing insights on his acclaimed cooking techniques and unveiling one of his signature dishes. The arrival of Chef Heston Blumenthal with Masters of Marriott is yet another initiative taken by Marriott International to celebrate the pursuit of consistent innovation and excellence in the world of F&B. While in India, Chef will be curating meal experiences using some of his signature cooking techniques in Mumbai at JW Marriott Mumbai Sahar on 20 April 2019 and in Delhi at JW Marriott New Delhi Aerocity on 21 April 2019. Commenting on his upcoming visit to the country Chef Heston Blumenthal said, “I am really excited to visit India for Masters of Marriott with Marriott International. I look forward to discovering the culture and enjoying the cuisine. The country’s diverse culinary strength has always amazed me and I can’t wait to experience some authentic Indian dishes. While in India, I will also be curating dinners in Mumbai and Delhi that will include few of my signature dishes.” Commenting on the association with Chef Heston Blumenthal, Neeraj Govil, Area Vice President, Marriott International, South Asia, said, “We are delighted to associate with the culinary alchemist, Chef Heston Blumenthal and we look forward to his arrival in India with Masters of Marriott. With F&B continuing to be one of our greatest strengths, the association between global chefs and our culinary experts at Marriott ensures that an array of enriching experiences await our guests and culinary enthusiasts wherever they go.” Manoj Adlakha, CEO – American Express Banking Corp., India, elaborated on the brand’s association with the initiative, “At American Express, we are passionate about providing memorable experiences to our Cardmembers. Our Cardmembers are highly engaged with elevated food and dining platforms, so we focus on enabling access to new and exciting culinary events. We are thrilled to partner with “Masters of Marriott” and bring Chef Heston Blumenthal to India for the first time ever! Making it even more special, Chef Heston will curate a Private Centurion Lunch in Mumbai and Delhi as a personalized event for our Cardmembers.” Launched in early 2019, Masters of Marriott is a pursuit of excellence in the field of gastronomy. Through this initiative, Marriott International Inc has hosted legendary chefs such as Marco Pierre White and Julien Royer in India. In the coming months, the brand will continue to host such exclusive experiences for its guests, including ticketed events, masterclasses and meet-and-greets with globally renowned culinary experts. Guests can book seats for the culinary experiences curated by Heston Blumenthal via Book My Show using the below links:

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German cuisine a treat for travellers – The Journal Pioneer

German cuisine a treat for travellers Postmedia News Service Published: 1 hour ago
Eating in Germany is a big part of the fun of travelling there. Ingredients are wonderful (especially if you eat with the season), traditions are prized, “modern German cuisine” is giving old dishes tasty and entertaining new twists, and small, creative foodie places are thriving in every city. And here’s even more good news: Eating well in Germany is an amazing value — cheaper than in France, Britain, Italy or Scandinavia.
Get ready for surprises on the menu. Even in small-town Germany, restaurants are challenging the notion that German food is all schnitzel and noodles. An influx of immigrants, a new generation with more adventurous tastes, and a desire for healthier options means the German food scene is more than meat and potatoes.
Of course, you’ll still find get a healthy dose of meat-heavy menus. The classic dish in Germany is sausage — hundreds of varieties of bratwurst, and Weisswurst, and Bruhwurst (oh my!). It’s a fast, tasty staple of the Germanic diet. Most restaurants offer it (often as the cheapest thing on the menu), but it’s more commonly eaten at take-out fast-food stands. You may even see portable human hot-dog stands — cooks in clever harnesses that let them grill and sell hot dogs while standing under an umbrella.
Many traditional eateries also serve some kind of meat on the bone, such as pork knuckle or shoulder, which has been boiled or roasted until tender. It goes down well with a big mug of beer. Another ubiquitous meat dish is schnitzel (a meat cutlet that’s been pounded flat, breaded and fried). And you’ll often see stuck on the beginning and end of menu items a form of the word braten (which can mean “roast” or “grill” or “fry”) — as in Bratkartoffeln (pan-fried potatoes), Schweinebraten (roasted pork) or Bratwurst (grilled sausage).
Each region of Germany has its specialties, and smart travellers know the best values are generally the local favourites. In the west, where Germany shoulders up to France, look for the Alsatian Flammkuchen, a version of white pizza, on a thin, yeastless dough; the classic version is topped with bacon and onions.
In the east, where Germany neighbours Poland and the Czech Republic, you’ll find Konigsberger Klopse, meatballs with capers and potatoes in a white sauce, and Senfeier, hard-boiled eggs in mustard sauce served with potatoes. Up north in Berlin, Stolzer Heinrich (grilled sausage in beer sauce) and Currywurst (basically grilled pork sausage smothered with curry sauce) reign supreme.
Though it’s tasty, traditional German food can get monotonous. All schnitzeled out? Thankfully, Germans are health-conscious and quite passionate about choosing organic (bio) products: Bio fruits and vegetables, and even bio bread, ice cream and schnitzel.
Germans make excellent salads (and not just of the potato variety). Most menus feature big, varied, dinner-size salad plates. Besides gruner Salat (your basic mixed salad based on lettuce), you’ll likely come across options ranging from Greek salads and bean salads to gemischter Salat — a mixed salad of lettuce, fresh and (often) pickled veggies and a tasty dressing. In May and June, Spargel — big white or green asparagus — is ubiquitous.
The trend toward variety is particularly noticeable in Berlin, which hosts a world of ever-changing restaurants. While the city abounds with traditional German eateries, Berliners consider this cuisine old-school; when they eat out, they’re usually not looking for traditional local fare. Nouveau German is California cuisine with scant memories of wurst, kraut or pumpernickel.
As one of Europe’s primary melting pots, Berlin makes it easy to find sushi, Peruvian, Cuban, Thai, Georgian, Indian, Argentinian, and lots of Vietnamese cuisine. In recent years, Berlin’s Michelin-star restaurants and fancy steak houses have attracted attention from celebrities and travellers who appreciate finer dining. The result: From simple to sophisticated, Berlin’s food scene has something for every taste bud — and budget. Be adventurous.
Ethnic restaurants provide a welcome break all over Germany, and they’re generally good value. A freshly baked pizza, a Turkish sandwich, or a rice or noodle dish will cost you $5-8, and can be packed up to enjoy on a park bench. Germanic cuisine is also inexpensive, by European standards. It’s easy to eat a meal for $12 or less. For smaller portions, order from the kleine Hunger (small hunger) section of the menu. A Schnellimbiss — or simply Imbiss — is a small fast-food take-out stand where you can get a bratwurst or other grilled sausage (usually about $3, including a roll).
Don’t discount the chance to splurge on fine dining in Germany. With cooking shows as popular on German television as they are here at home, Germans are now taking their food as seriously as their neighbours in France and beyond. Whether you’re a foodie, a vegetarian or a hard-core carnivore, Germany now offers a world of flavours to satisfy every kind of traveller.
By Rick Steves
Copyright Postmedia Network Inc., 2019 More Living stories

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[nǐ hǎo] Shanghai Street Food Readies Itself For Summer Debut in Roswell

A new restaurant called Shanghai Street Food & Bar is planning a June debut in Historic Downtown Roswell. The restaurant plans to bring “Chinese-inspired cuisine” to downtown Roswell with a focus on the colorful and eclectic street food scene of China’s largest city. Shanghai will open at 108 Magnolia Street in place of Krespos Seafood House. Krespos, a Portuguese eatery which opened in 2014, had been for sale and a transaction closed earlier Tuesday.
According to Shanghai owner Aaron Smith, “The city of Shanghai is influenced by cultures old and new, of both the East and West. There is no better source of inspiration to create something in the area that’s truly never been done before.” Leading the culinary effort at the new restaurant is Robbie Pacheco, who most recently served as Executive Chef at Restaurant 356 at the Porsche Experience Center near Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.
Prior to joining Restaurant 356 last February, Pacheco served as Executive Chef at Bon Appétit Management Company, and before that at Wahoo! Grill in Decatur. Pacheco also served two years as Chef de Cuisine for Chef Asha Gomez at her now defunct Indian eatery Cardamom Hill in Berkeley Heights.
“I’ve always had a love for ethnic cuisine and have many memories eating in New York and Chicago’s Chinatown districts as a young chef. When I saw the opportunity to do a concept in Roswell, modern Chinese street food just made sense to me. It’s edgy, different, yet familiar. I don’t want all the pretentious vibe you might get from fine dining. I want to bring late night Chinatown to Downtown Roswell.” Pacheco, a graduate of nearby Roswell High School, plans to stay open late Friday and Saturday nights to satisfy what he and Smith see as an unmet demand for late night dining options in the Roswell community.
“Our goal is to bring you familiar flavors from far away in a setting that feels like home,” says Smith, a restaurant novice himself, but the son of a 20 year restaurant industry veteran. Smith, who until last month was Vice President of Ecommerce or Atlanta based Edible Arrangements, relocated to metro Atlanta five years ago and now lives in Roswell.
Among the menu offerings Pacheco and Smith are working on are house-made bao (Asian steamed buns) which they plan to offer with both dinner and dessert fillings.
In its current configuration, the 1,300 square foot restaurant has seating for 40 guests as well as a ten seat bar and an outdoor patio. The restaurant is housed in what was for many years the famous Roswell Tea House.
Steve Josovitz of The Shumacher Group, Inc. represented Krespos Seafood House in the sale and guided all parties to closing.
Are you excited for the addition of new ethnic dining option in Historic Downtown Roswell? What is your favorite Roswell area restaurant? Where is your current favorite place to get bao in metro Atlanta?
Please share your thoughts below

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Our House of Spice: Sibling Dynamics and Homestyle Indian Cuisine

Email The daughters of Indian immigrants to England, Julia and Nadia Latif spent their childhood in the East Anglian countryside. Their entrepreneurial venture exhibits the work ethic that defined their parents and grandparents’ struggle to raise a family in a new country. The Latif sisters had always dreamt of starting a business together. Before Our House of Spice , they both felt trapped in careers they were ambivalent towards. When they lost a close friend unexpectedly, they had a realisation that many entrepreneurs share: life’s too short. So, they handed in their notices. Without knowing what they would do exactly, they looked to what they loved for inspiration. Since then, they’ve been sharing the soul of homestyle Indian food with kitchens across Great Britain through their family recipes. Julia and Nadia communicate their experience of Indian food and the recipes they grew up on through their e-commerce spice mix business, Our House of Spice . Tharawat Magazine sat down with Julia Latif, Co-founder of Our House of Spice, to talk about how the sisters’ spice mix start-up came to be, what family had to do with it and how packets of spice have changed their lives forever. (L-R) Nadia and Julia Latif, image courtesy of Our House of Spice. How did you come to start a spice kit business with your sister?
Starting a business together as sisters was a recurring topic of conversation whenever Nadia and I met, though we weren’t sure what shape the business would take. Before we started Our House of Spice, we felt trapped by our jobs. I was working for a charity, and Nadia was working in finance. We sent text messages to each other every morning reiterating how miserable we were in our roles.
One day, a close friend passed away unexpectedly. We were forced to re-examine our priorities and came to the conclusion that life is too short to wait around for opportunities. The following day we handed in our notices. We knew we were going to go into business together but still weren’t sure about what we were going to do. We thought about what we love, what we feel authentic doing and how we could commodify those things.
Indian food is in our souls, so culinary was a perfect fit. We didn’t know whether it would work or not, but we felt compelled to try – not trying is worse than failing. Luckily, we haven’t looked back since.
One day, a close friend passed away unexpectedly. We were forced to re-examine our priorities and came to the conclusion that life is too short to wait around for opportunities. The following day we handed in our notices. Did you ever imagine you would one day be business partners when you were growing up?
Honestly, no. Because of a seven-year age difference, we weren’t very close when we were growing up. It’s not that we disliked each other; we just didn’t spend time together. However, when I got a little older, we became very close. I’m glad it worked out that way because some siblings who are close growing up drift apart as adults. Either way, I never thought that Nadia and I would be running a business together. The culinary world is extraordinarily competitive. How do you differentiate yourselves as a business?
We like to change stereotypes around Indian cuisine. As part of a lengthy development process, we put on curry nights where we spoke with consumers face-to-face. Many of them thought that Indian food was either incredibly spicy, terribly unhealthy or both. They were filled with misconceptions, which we found quite shocking. When you grow up as part of a tradition, culinary or otherwise, you sometimes take it for granted that others have an appreciation of your experience.
Indian food needs a spokesperson to shatter these misconceptions. It’s tasty, healthy and easy to make if you know what you’re doing. Having the right spices, of course, is crucial. Spice kit range, image courtesy of Our House of Spice. What was the next step?
Initially, we brought out a range of frozen ready meals prepared exclusively with local produce. Many of our first recipes worked with game.
We knew we needed to communicate our experience of Indian food and, in doing so, change our consumers’ perception of it. Luckily, people were receptive, and the business expanded from there. When did you make the transition from frozen ready meals to the spice kits you sell today?
Logistically, the frozen ready meal range was prohibitively expensive for some. At the same time, as there were only two of us in the business, we struggled to keep up with the demand. That’s when Nadia thought of spice kits because they lasted longer on the shelf. It was definitely the right way to go. We released them as a tester product first, and we built our range from there. How did you arrive at the current selection?
We listened to our customers and tried a lot of recipes – some more successful than others. We started to get a sense of what dishes people like. Our loyal customer base would follow us around the East Anglian countryside, so we knew there was a market. What challenges did you and Nadia face growing the business to its current position?
I won’t pretend that our relationship as sisters and partners is perfect. We’ve had to deal with a lot of problems, both internal and external, but they only make me more thankful we’re in this together. I don’t believe anyone can support you as well as a sibling can. Nadia knows what I’m thinking by the look on my face and vice versa.
Initially, we weren’t making money because we were reinvesting it in the business. We were tired. Our expectations needed adjusting. Despite our grand plans, the phone wasn’t ringing off the hook. When the uptake fell short of our dreams, we felt like nobody cared.
The harsh reality is that, in business, everybody is doing their own thing; people are busy. If you want to achieve sustainability, you’re going to have to fight for it – complacency isn’t an option. You have to develop a thick skin and focus on what you’re doing.
The harsh reality is that, in business, everybody is doing their own thing; people are busy. If you want to achieve sustainability, you’re going to have to fight for it – complacency isn’t an option. You have to develop a thick skin and focus on what you’re doing. Did people question your decision to start this business?
Of course they did. However, I have to say our support network, family and friends are amazing. They see everything, including the lowest points. How does your family’s history influence the business?
Our parents and grandparents were immigrants who arrived in the 1950s. When they came to this country, they had two children and 7 pounds sterling in their pockets. They did whatever they needed to get money, and they didn’t stop when they were tired. They only stopped when the job was done. Growing up, we heard stories about our grandfather selling saucepans door-to-door. That’s built into Nadia and me – you do what you have to do to look after your family. Julia and Nadia’s grandfather, image courtesy of Our House of Spice. Julia and Nadia’s grandfather, image courtesy of Our House of Spice. Did you develop a deeper understanding of each other when you went into business together?
We were surprised by our own and each other’s ability to assume professional personas, strategise, execute and achieve what we wanted to. Nadia’s remarkable skill in planning and streamlining logistics has been integral to our success. We’ve got very different personalities, which is an asset. If we were too similar, we would clash.

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Maldives vs Sri Lanka comparison

Nature and animals
Maldives have no mountains, no hills and no rivers. We are talking of the flattest country in the world. Most islands can be crossed by foot from one side to another within a few minutes. Besides lizards, little iguanas, fruit bats, crabs and underwater animals you won’t find many wild animals on the Maldivian islands.
So if you are looking for an animal safari where you can observe wild animals, then Sri Lanka wins this battle.
Sri Lanka also has a bit of everything: mountains, tea plantations, beaches, tropical jungle, waterfalls, lakes and rivers, and also cities. I guess this one is easy. If you’d like to see land animals and different types of nature, then go to Sri Lanka. If you are into underwater world, choose Maldives.
TIP 1: Do you love animals as much as I do? Then you should definitely visit Udawalawe national park in Sri Lanka to get closer to wild elephants there.
People
When it comes to skin color, locals of both countries have it quite similar. Personally I had no problems with Maldivians, nor Sri Lankans. All the locals I met treated me in a nice way, I have to admit. Maybe I’d add that I found the Maldivians more shy, more modest, and more introverted. It might be because of the religion, or because on local Maldivian islands they are still less used to tourists than they already are in Sri Lanka.
As a solo female traveler, I felt very safe in both countries. I was not harassed at all which is a plus point for both destinations. Locals in both countries were very welcoming and made my days with hundreds of smiles.
Religion and clothing
Maldives are 100% Sunni Muslim country. Islam is the official religion mandated by law. Thanks to the religion, the locals cover themselves up. Women mostly cover hands and legs entirely, while men tend to walk wearing shorts and T-shirts with short sleeves without any problems. Tourists should follow Muslim clothing requirements on local islands (but in resorts it’s not necessary). Wearing just swimwear on local islands is possible only on designated Bikini beach (unlikely to resorts where it’s fine anywhere). Alcohol is banned for Maldivians and it’s difficult to get on local islands.
Sri Lankans are 70% Buddhist. Buddhism is followed by Hinduism, Islam and Christianity. In Sri Lanka you can choose your own religion. You don’t have to be that strict when it comes to clothes and wearing bikini is possible on any Sri Lankan beach. Tourists can wear shorts and tank tops on the streets, too. Alcohol is also easy to get around the island.
Food
In Maldivian resorts you might not get a taste of local cuisine at all. On local islands you might get luckier, especially in small restaurants called hotaus . Authentic Maldivian cuisine is a mixture of Sri Lankan, Indian and Arabic. The main ingredient of Maldivian cuisine would be sea food and fish, and also coconut milk. Then some local fruit (papaya, bananas, passion fruit, watermelon) and different green salads, aubergine, cucumber, pumpkin etc. The biggest producer of fresh fruit and veggies out of all the Maldivian islands is Thoddoo island where I spent 11 days. Most of other ingredients and especially on other Maldivian islands (with the exception of Thoddoo) have been imported from abroad.
Sri Lankan cuisine is similar to Indian, but maybe even more spicy and with more flavor. Or let’s say it’s spicy in a different way. Rice and curry with more different curries are one of the traditional meals. Then also roti, string hoppers, kottu, sambal, dhal etc. can be ordered in most restaurants and resorts. Almost all the traditional Sri Lankan meals are fried, tempered or deviled, so not very healthy, but OMG so delicious! I could not get enough of Sri Lankan rice and curry. And yes, they had a lot of vegan options as most meals are made of coconut milk instead of dairy.
Unfortunately, you won’t find many raw meals, except exotic fruit and smoothies in these 2 countries. I’d say that the ingredients used in Sri Lankan cuisine are more fresh and local, compared to mostly imported ones in Maldives. The same goes when talking of items sold at grocery stores. It’s easy to find healthy things, as well as natural cosmetics in Sri Lanka while in Maldives I found it more difficult. When speaking of food, Sri Lanka wins for me. However, you can get differnet kinds of cuisine in Maldivian resorts, so what I’ve just said might not be true for you.
Sri Lanka fresh fruit
TIP 2: Get a plate of food first and then head over to my article about vegan meals in Sri Lanka . I wish someone was making me those meals even outside of Sri Lanka. That’s how finger-licking Sri Lankan cuisine is 🙂
TIP 3: Sri Lanka is a very diverse country. I’d say it’s more similar to India than to Maldives, which is why it’s also called Little India . I also wrote an article where I discuss similarities and differences between Sri Lanka vs India .
TIP 4: Maldives are not a cheap destination to visit. But it also depends on where you stay at and what kind of activities you want to do. How much did I spend traveling around Maldives for a month ? You’ll be shocked!
Which country would you choose for holidays and why? Maldives vs Sri Lanka? Tell me your opinions in the comments below.

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How to spend 48 hours in Bristol

News How to spend 48 hours in Bristol Thinking of visiting for the weekend, or taking on the role of tour guide? Check out our itinerary here Share Clifton village and suspension bridge in Bristol at sunrise (Image: Getty) Get the biggest Daily stories by email Subscribe Thank you for subscribing We have more newsletters Show me See our privacy notice Could not subscribe, try again later Invalid Email
So you’ve arrived in Bristol and you’ve got a weekend to fill, or perhaps you’ve been here a while and you’ve got friends visiting for a couple of days.
There are 48 hours to fill, and you’re not quite sure to start – a city like Bristol with all its diverse neighbourhoods can feel overwhelming to say the least and with so much culture and history on offer (not to mention the incredible food), it’s hard to know where to start.
Luckily, we at Bristol Live have you covered with a 48-hour itinerary that will give you a tantalising taste of West Country life. Morning Inside Bristol Cathedral
If you’re here for a weekend break there’s a good chance you’ll be staying close to the city centre, so why not start the weekend with a wander around the beating heart of the city.
With its sweeping lawn and stunning architecture, we recommend starting in the College Green area of the city.
If culture is your thing, the ancient Bristol Cathedral is a wonderful place to begin your journey of discovery – with almost 900 years of history there are plenty of secrets to uncover and stories to hear. Admission is completely free, so whether you’re popping in for a look or planning on spending hours meandering the pews, it won’t affect your wallet. Read More Glastonbury Festival 2019: Field of Avalon announces huge lineup including Bananarama, Beans on Toast and Frank Turner
You’ll find the stunning Park Street opposite, with its eclectic collection of vintage shops and boutiques. Depending on how early you set out, it’s well worth a wander – you’ll find stores packed to the rafters with one-offs that could become your latest wardrobe staple.
To get a sense of the city centre head back down the hill toward the harbourside area where you’ll likely find a range of street stalls selling anything from books, to records, to handcrafted goods – as well as a range of food pop-ups perfect for a pit stop.
Head over the road toward the old city to get a sense of historic Bristol, you’ll find winding streets and impressive period building aplenty. The real jewel in the crown however is St Nicholas Market – full to the brim with hidden treasures and unusual wares. Whatever you’re looking for, or even if you’re not looking for anything at all, there’s sure to be something that’ll take your fancy. Lunch St Nicholas Market
So it’s not exactly a hidden gem (most weekdays you’ll find it teeming with hungry office workers grabbing lunch), but St Nicholas Market doesn’t just cater to those looking for beautiful jewellery or unusual gifts – it’s also a go-to for a great lunch.
Ask any Bristolian within a mile and they’ll most likely advise you to try Eat A Pitta’s renowned falafel delights. Drop by for pittas or mini lunch boxes filled to the brim not only with freshly cooked falafel, creamy hummus, tangy salads, and delightful chickpea dishes – all at a price that won’t break the bank either. Read More Eat a Pitta is closing its Broadmead kiosk for a month so it can be expanded
If wholesome vegetarian fare isn’t your bag there are plenty of other options – whether it’s authentic Indian food at Spice Up Your Life, Iberian-inspired eats at Portugese Taste, or a meat extravaganza at Grillstock. If you’re looking for something sweet to finish, be sure to check out the incredible cakes on offer at Ahh Toots too. Afternoon ss Great Britain in Bristol
What better time than a Saturday afternoon to head down to the waterfront?
Wander down to the Arnolfini and cross the water to find yourself immersed in the historic harbour, with it’s functioning cranes and criss-crossing rail track you’ll get a real sense of the industrial history of the area. Its central position means that more often than not it’s packed to bursting, so on a sunny day it’s an ideal place to do some people watching too.
You’ll soon find ourself at the doors of the M Shed, a museum like no other with a unique insight on the history and culture of the city. With free entry, take your time to wander the exhibits, try your hand at the interactive displays, and learn more about the legacy that makes Bristol a place like no other. With a collection of trains, boats, and cranes to ride, it’s a particularly brilliant place to keep kids (of all ages) entertained. Read More Bristol Airport to get three new routes as easyJet announces expansion
Still got an appetite for dipping your toe into Bristol’s maritime history? You’d be a fool to miss a trip to Brunel’s SS Great Britain.
As the city’s foremost tourist attraction there’s plenty to discover on one of the world’s most important historic ships. Lovingly restored and with dozens of incredible exhibits and activities, it’s easy to while away the afternoon aboard one of Bristol’s most iconic symbols. Dinner Cargo in the sun
After such a packed afternoon, it’s likely you’ll be desperate for a bite to eat, and fast. Luckily you’re on the doorstep of Cargo – home to a host of independent retailers and full of some of the city’s finest culinary destinations.
Built into a stack of shipping containers, the stunning restaurants are all on the small side so be sure to book in advance. Read More Redland pub The Clyde takes down ‘heartless’ sign after someone living nearby complained
You can take your pick of where to head, but we highly recommend Root for tapas-style vegetarian cuisine like you’ve never seen before, Woky Ko for a unique take on some of our favourite Asian dishes, or Pigsty for a host of pork-based delights. Evening King Street
One thing’s for sure in Bristol – you’ll never be stumped for something to do come nightfall.
Once you’ve had your fill at dinner, the vibrant King Street with its delightful cobbled streets and packed pubs is surely the place to head for a few drinks, whether you’re tucked away in a cosy corner or out enjoying the fresh air on the benches that fill the street.
From there the night is yours – Bristol is renowned for its music scene and there are a range of incredible venues such as The Louisiana, the O2 Academy, and Thekla that’ll more than likely have something to take your fancy. Read More How to spot ‘fake’ five-star reviews on Amazon
If it’s a big night out you’re looking for, the city is home to Motion – recently ranked as one of the world’s top nightclubs, or if that sounds a little intense there are plenty of smaller clubs such as Mr Wolf’s that are sure to appeal.
Theatre or comedy more your thing? You could always try the Hippodrome for a taste of the West End right here in the West Country, or make a beeline to the Old Vic for a high-end theatrical experience in one of the country’s oldest theatres. If you’re looking for something a little quirkier, head to the Tobacco Factory on North Street, or the Wardrobe Theatre in Old Market for a taste of the unusual. Morning Ashton Court (Image: BristolLive)
There are few things more enjoyable on a Sunday morning than a breath of fresh air and a good old fashioned ramble through a country estate.
Here in Bristol you have your pick, but we recommend jumping on a bus to the magnificent Ashton Court to while away the morning – grab a light bite and a mug of something warm in the café and then set out on a spectacular round route of the estate.
Whether you want to take a closer look at the majestic house, wander through the woodland, or run free across open fields, Ashton Gate has it all. If you’re up for it, you could wander down to Leigh Woods – and enchanting taste of the countryside within a hop, skip, and a jump of the city centre. Read More First look inside Bristol’s new steak restaurant Bar + Block in King Street
From Ashton Court it’s easy to stroll down to what must be Bristol’s most iconic sight, the Clifton Suspension Bridge with its jaw-dropping views over the Avon Gorge.
Take in incredible views of the city as you cross, from the splendour of Clifton to the faraway sprawl of South Bristol, and wander over to the elegant terraced houses and open space of Clifton Village. Brunch The Ivy Clifton Brasserie
After a robust morning walk it’s likely you’ll be feeling more than a little peckish. Luckily a good brunch is never too far away up in Clifton, so there are plenty of places to get your fill.
If you’re looking for a touch of class, head to The Ivy Clifton Brasserie, enjoy a chilled-out bite to eat against the floral backdrop of The Primrose Café, or head to trendy favourites such as Steam on Whiteladies Road. Read More Free Oowee burgers are being handed out in Bristol this week – here’s how to get one
Whatever your taste, you’re sure to find something to during after a wander around the cobbled street of one of Bristol’s most exclusive neighbourhoods. Afternoon Stokes Croft (Image: James Beck)
Whether it was smoked salmon or a decadent pancake stack, you’ll be fully fuelled for an afternoon of exploring Bristol’s streets.
We recommend ducking into some of the rambling antique stores in Clifton, or maybe exploring the inspiring Clifton Arcade for original artwork or hand-picked jewelery, before setting out on a walk across town.
It may be useful to have Google Maps at hand as you make your way through the leafy residential streets of Clifton and Redland, before reaching the rather different neighbourhood of Stokes Croft. Read More Huge street art festival Upfest bringing new event to Bristol
You would be a fool to visit Bristol and not take a look at some of the incredible street art filling the neighbourhood – including of course a number of Banksy’s originals. There’s even an app available to download that’ll help you make the most of your visit, and ensure you leave no artistic stone unturned.
Stokes Croft is also home to a thriving community of independent businesses and eateries, so there’s plenty to explore and enjoy if you’re looking for a pit stop or two along the way. Dinner Pieminster in Stokes Croft
Luckily, you won’t have to search far and wide for a dinner option – Stokes Croft has more than its fair share of options that reflect the diversity of the city.
The ever-popular Caribbean Croft is a must-visit for hearty West Indian flavours, as well as a cocktail or two, or if it’s comfort food you’re looking for, make a stop at the Bristol institution Pieminister for pie and mash (or almost any side that takes your fancy). Read More ‘Beyonce’ of politics Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez ‘invited to appear at Glastonbury Festival’
Whatever you’re looking for, you’ll find it during a short wander of the neighbourhood – from vegan fare at Café Kino to authentic tapas at Poco Tapas Bar. Evening The Watershed
It’s been a jam-packed weekend, and after a day on your feet you’ll probably be searching for somewhere to sit back and relax.
We recommend making your way back into the city centre to visit the renowned Watershed cinema, a haven for independent film lovers and a wonderful place to sit back with a glass of wine too. Read More Everything you need to know before your trip to Bristol Zoo
Whether you’re looking for a fascinating documentary or a cutting-edge thriller, there can be no better place to end your weekend on a high. Like us on Facebook

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Indian School Of Hospitality Enters Agreement With At-Sunrice Globalchef Academy

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The Indian School of Hospitality (ISH) announced the signing of an agreement with Singapore based At-Sunrice GlobalChef Academy. This is the second international tie-up for hotelier-entrepreneur and industry leader, Dilip Puri’s higher education institute, with the school also holding the official academic accreditation of world leaders in hospitality education École hôtelière de Lausanne, Switzerland. This is the first academic partnership At-Sunrice GlobalChef Academy has entered into within the Indian market.
This agreement envisages a collaboration which will see the two institutes working together to bring new standards of excellence to culinary education within the country and bring more awareness towards the potential of pursuing careers in the culinary world. Through this collaboration, the two schools will engage in student exchange programs, knowledge transfer, articulation, internship and placement opportunities, and guest faculty exchange for special masterclasses and workshops. In addition to this, the second phase of the partnership will see a collaboration between the two institutes on a cross-disciplinary startup lab for food entrepreneurs as well as a digital learning platform for culinary training.
The first step of this collaboration is an 18-month programme, of which students will spend the first 9 months within the Indian School of Hospitality, before completing the rest of their studies in At-Sunrice along with 6 months of overseas industrial attachment within Singapore itself, earning a Singapore Workforce Skills Qualifications (WSQ) upon graduation. They will then further have the opportunity to continue their studies at partner universities in Hong Kong, Australia, the United Kingdom and America and obtain a degree qualification.
Speaking on the partnership between the two schools, Dilip Puri, Founder & CEO, ISH , stated, “I’m delighted to have our institute join hands with At-Sunrice – an institution with learning philosophies, excellence and accomplishments we greatly respect and admire. We look forward to this collaboration contributing immensely to the education of students from both schools and help them learn more about the cultures and culinary diversity of both countries and the larger ASEAN region”.
Renowned as Singapore’s leading culinary arts institute, students of At-Sunrice learn from international and experienced faculty and benefit from some of Asia’s most prestigious placements. Students of the 18-month programme will be learning how to master Asian and Western cuisines under the guidance of At-Sunrice multi-ethnic faculty and will go on to join alumni and industry network that boast renowned culinary entrepreneurs and Michelin Star-studded chefs.
Dr Kwan Lui, founder At-Sunrice GlobalChef Academy said, “Culinary education incorporates science, arts, craft, gastronomy, profession and business which are today more than ever driven by design, technology, cultures and sustainability. With ISH, we are very pleased to offer an integrated international opportunity for young and passionate Indian culinary students to pursue high-level skills and work experiences in Singapore, a world food capital”.
At-Sunrice GlobalChef Academy is an EduTrust certified institution offering open access pathways into nationally-recognised diplomas, with the vision to advance foodpreneurship, culinary arts and the F&B profession with integrity and meaning. Founded in 2001, the institute has been cultivating global chefs and F&B professionals in an experiential environment of culinary authenticity, best-fit apprenticeship and innovation for the last two decades. Share this article:

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Indulge In A Sweet Decadence This Easter At The Leela Ambience Gurugram

Shatarupa Ganguly Events , Food The divine festival to commemorate the resurrection of Jesus Christ, Easter is celebrated with much fervour and warmth around the globe. Comparatively a newer merrymaking in India, Easter eggs and Easter bunnies are a common part of the festivities. Spectra at by The Leela Ambience Gurugram has have especially curated an exclusive menu for Easter keeping in mind the Indian flavours. What To Expect? An Easter brunch is all about family get-togethers, with treats for kids and family members. Bring along your family, extended family and friends to spend some quality time with your loved ones. The skilful chefs at Spectra will prepare some traditional delights like roasts, carvings, signature sushi and sashimi station, Indian and international cuisines, hot cross buns, chocolate eggs and many other delicacies. What You’ll Love? Noted for their premier service and a splendid array of Indian and international delights, Spectra at The Leela Ambience Gurugram is here to introduce some palatable traditional Easter delights. For the little ones? There will be a special Easter egg hunt with grand giveaways! Don’t forget to try their dessert section offering some sinful indulgences. Bottom Line
Explore the diversity of food-traditions this Easter with the experts themselves.
Where | Spectra – The Leela Ambience Gurugram Hotel & Residences
When | Sunday, 21st April, 12:30 PM – 4 PM
Meal For Two | ₹6,000

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NYC’s Finest Culinary Talent Aims to End Childhood Hunger at the Brooklyn Expo Center this April

Brooklyn NYC’s Finest Culinary Talent Aims to End Childhood Hunger at the Brooklyn Expo Center this April On April 17, some of the city’s best culinary minds will come together in support of the fight to end childhood hunger across the country during Taste of the Nation’s charity event. Tiffany Cordero tcordero094@gmail.com
On April 17, some of the city’s best culinary minds will come together in support of the fight to end childhood hunger across the country. New York City’s Taste of the Nation features dozens of the city’s best chefs, mixologists and sommeliers from restaurants including BAAR BAAR , Union Square Café , Pig Beach , Porchlight , The Clocktower , Death & Co and more, with 100 percent of proceeds supporting the No Kid Hungry campaign.
According the U.S. Department of Agriculture , an estimated 12.3 percent of American households were food insecure at least some time during the year in 2016. This means they lacked access to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members. The prevalence of very low food security is also unchanged, at 4.9 percent in 2016 and 5 percent in 2015. In addition to this, last year the federal poverty level was a salary of $25,750 per year for a family of four.
“A nationwide culinary series would not be complete without a NYC event featuring the dynamic food and culinary talents in the city. Nearly 1 in 5 kids in the state of the New York faces food insecurity, so it’s important that we raise awareness and the critical funds necessary to address the problem here in the state,” said Jessie Niewold, Director of Taste of the Nation for No Kid Hungry. “Last year was our first time hosting the event in Brooklyn, and we’ve been inspired by the interest and response from area chefs, beverage purveyors and community members.” Participating chefs at Taste of the Nation. Courtesy of Travis Keyes.
“The Brooklyn Expo Center is a great venue, and partner, allowing us the flexibility to create unique culinary experiences within the space that make Taste of the Nation different than other tasting events,” she added.
The No Kid Hungry campaign aims to tackle childhood hunger and food insecurity head on by hosting culinary events highlighting the nation’s finest talent in the food and drink industry, all united under one cause: ending childhood hunger. Since 1988, Taste of the Nation events have raised over $100 million towards this cause. Each year these events raise the critical funds needed to support No Kid Hungry’s work to ensure that all children in America get the healthy food they need, every day.
“Ending childhood hunger is a cause that unites us, and a problem we know how to solve. No Kid Hungry is fortunate to have the generous support of the culinary community, many of whom participate in events like Taste of the Nation to do their part to ensure every kid has access to three nutritious meals a day,” said Niewold.
At Taste of the Natation, guests will mix, mingle, and enjoy food and drink prepared by more than 40 top chefs and bartenders, an impressive list of talent curated by this year’s co-chairs, Amanda Cohen and Hillary Sterling . Courtesy of Baar Baar , a NYC restaurant changing the cultural landscape of Indian cuisine.
“Growing up with a father who was an agriculturist, I learned the value of not letting anything go to waste from a very young age. As a chef, seeing kids go hungry breaks my heart so when I came across an event like New York’s Taste of the Nation, I knew BAAR BAAR had to participate and support the cause,” said BAAR BAAR’s Chef Sujan Sarkar.
“Being able to give back to the community is very important to us at Death & Co. Annually we donate 1 percent of sales to local nonprofit organizations, and volunteering our time and donating product at Taste of the Nation is just another way for us to give back,” said Michael Shain, General Manager of Death & Co NYC . “Being able to help fight such a noble cause means the world to us, we are very excited to take action to fight child hunger.”
The event, which will be held at the Brooklyn Expo Center on April 17 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., offers an outdoor BBQ smokehouse activation which will showcase freshly smoked cuts of meat alongside outdoor games courtesy of Volo City. A secret speakeasy, so listen closely in the crowd for the password. The event also features the Giving Tree , an interactive raffle that gives attendees a chance to win unique prizes including exclusive restaurant experiences, hotel reservations, a farm-to-table field trip, in-home dinner parties, and more.
So, enjoy a great evening with the best eats and drinks NYC has to offer all while giving back.
Cover image courtesy of Travis Keyes.
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Why adventurous women are travelling solo in record numbers

Pin to Pinterest PIN Link Robyn Davidson’s nine-month journey across Australia’s deserted centre – in the company of just four camels and a dog – was later recounted in her book Tracks and a 2013 film of the same title. Photo: Alamy
Of course, women have been roaming the world for aeons. One of the earliest extended first-person travel narratives, says Carl Thompson, academic and author of Travel Writing and Women’s Travel Writings in North Africa and the Middle East , “is by a woman called Egeria and dates from 380AD. She seems to have been a Spanish nun, and she made a pilgrimage around key sites in the Holy Land and sent an account of them back to her community.”
But until recently, financial, social and cultural constraints have prevented most women from venturing forth unaccompanied. Female empowerment, especially in the workplace, is changing all that, says Carolyn Childs, futurist and founder of travel trend website mytravelresearch.com, with more women than ever before travelling alone for both business and pleasure.
“Of course, we’re seeing more solo households and the growth of trends like women buying their own diamond rings, so I think it’s no surprise that they aren’t waiting for a Prince Charming to share their holidays,” she says.
Such emboldened choices are reflected in the statistics. Three in five general inquiries received by The Classic Safari Company, which is the parent company of tour company Secret Women’s Series, are from women, says founder Julie McIntosh, while “99 per cent of our enquiries for solo travel are from females”.
This trend is reflected across the industry but doesn’t necessarily imply that women don’t want to travel with men. While couples travel is growing too, says Childs, women tend to now favour deeper immersion, more cultural connection and more positive outcomes for the communities they visit.
“Both genders are seeking to challenge themselves via adventure travel, but for women it’s often about confounding gender stereotypes and seeking empowerment rather than validation.” Advertisement
Operators have responded accordingly with impressive portfolios of women-focused tours and the uptake has been extraordinary. So popular were Intrepid’s women’s expeditions when launched last year, departures increased from four to 36 within just a few months. And it’s not only travellers who are benefiting from this revolution. Operators are growing their pool of female staff, with World Expeditions’ female guides on the Larapinta Trail increasing from just three in 2013 to 14 out of 24 today.
And the experiences of women from diverse communities across the world are being heard. “Our female travellers want to know the stories and hear about the struggles of women around the globe,” says Jenny Gray, Intrepid’s global product manager. “These expeditions allow [them] to enter private spaces and foster conversations that would be impossible in mixed gender groups.”
And so the world has become a woman’s oyster. It’s time to pack our bags and sally forth – no permission needed. THE DESTINATION Bulgaria and Greece
THE WOMEN-ONLY TRIP Women’s Own Adventure’s Bulgaria to Greece
Photo: Supplied
DURATION 15 days
THE EXPERIENCE Pair outdoor activity in Bulgaria’s Balkan Ranges and northern Greece with less vigorous pursuits such as cookery, pottery-making and visits to monasteries, villages and historical sites.
DON’T MISS Mingling with local ethnic groups on the narrow gauge rail journey through Bulgaria’s Rhodope Mountains to the city of Dobrinishte.
GO FOR IT Starts in Sofia, ends in Thessaloniki, departs June 12, 2019, from $3770. See womensownadventure.com.au THE DESTINATION East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory
Photo: Lirrwi Tourism
THE WOMEN-ONLY TRIP Lirrwi Tourism’s Gay’Wu – the Dilly Bag Tour for Women
DURATION Four nights
THE EXPERIENCE Learn about Yolngu women’s business while gathering pandanus leaves, weaving dilly bags and painting and dancing on traditional lands.
DON’T MISS The pre-dawn crying ceremony (Nathi) in which a Yolngu elder sheds tears for those who’ve died and chants thanks for all of creation.
GO FOR IT Starts and ends in Nhulunbuy (Gove), departs May to October 2019, from $2399. See lirrwitourism.com.au THE DESTINATION Uganda and Tanzania
THE WOMEN-ONLY TRIP Secret Women’s Series’ Wild at Heart
DURATION 15 days
THE EXPERIENCE Combine two iconic wildlife events – tracking gorillas in Uganda with female ranger guides and following the annual wildebeest migration in Tanzania – in a single luxury journey.
DON’T MISS Visiting a Ugandan village to see how women transform millet into porridge and bread and to hear stories about life as a Bakiga wife.
GO FOR IT Starts in Entebbe, ends in Arusha, departs August 18, 2019, from about $18,300, including one gorilla tracking permit. See classicsafaricompany.com.au THE DESTINATION Kenya
THE WOMEN-ONLY TRIP Intrepid Travel’s Women’s Expedition, Kenya
DURATION 11 days
THE EXPERIENCE Journey with East Africa’s first female overland truck driver Becky Kieha to lesser-known parks such as Samburu and Mt Kenya where female game rangers are evening up the gender balance in this male-dominated industry.
DON’T MISS Meet residents of a women’s-only settlement offering sanctuary to survivors of female genital mutilation, sexual assault and forced marriages.
GO FOR IT Starts and ends in Nairobi, departs October 12, 2019, from $3725. See intrepidtravel.com/au THE DESTINATION Red Centre, Australia
THE WOMEN-ONLY TRIP World Expeditions’ Larapinta Goddess Walk
DURATION Three days
THE EXPERIENCE Morning yoga and meditation sessions are paired with invigorating walks led by female guides along trails that wind through alluvial flats lush with bloodwoods and ironwoods.
DON’T MISS Sleeping in award-winning eco-tents that incorporate hot showers, delicious meals and off-ground beds.
GO FOR IT Starts and ends in Alice Springs, departures from late April to September 2019, from $1495. See worldexpeditions.com THE DESTINATION Croatia and Slovenia
THE WOMEN-ONLY TRIP Adventurous Women’s Jewels of the Adriatic
DURATION 16 days
THE EXPERIENCE Enjoy the region’s rich history and natural beauty and feast on gourmet food and wine at Lake Bled, the UNESCO World Heritage-listed Plitvice Lakes and along the Dalmatian Coast.
DON’T MISS Transforming ingredients from a farmers’ market into a traditional Istrian marenda (brunch) at a family farm on the tip of the Istrian Peninsula.
GO FOR IT Starts in Ljubljana, ends in Dubrovnik, departs September 19, 2019, from $5795. See adventurouswomen.com.au THE DESTINATION Portugal and Spain
THE WOMEN-ONLY TRIP Camino Ways’ Portuguese Coastal Camino
Photo: Supplied
DURATION Seven nights
THE EXPERIENCE Lifelong friendships are often forged along this final 100 kilometres of the Portuguese Coastal Camino route, which passes through historic settlements famous for hot springs, seafood and wine. Self-guided tours are also available.
DON’T MISS Mingling with pilgrims in the market town of Redondela where the Portuguese Coastal Camino merges with the classic Camino Portuguese.
GO FOR IT Starts in Baiona, ends in Santiago de Compostela, departs June 1 and September 14, 2019 (solo travel departure on 7 September 2019) from about $1300. See caminoways.com THE DESTINATION New York CIty
THE WOMEN-ONLY TRIP Travelling Divas’ New York, New Year’s Eve!
DURATION Seven days
THE EXPERIENCE Ice-skate in Central Park, shop the post-Christmas sales and dolly up for NYE at a fabulous salon before watching the Times Square ball-drop and welcoming in 2020 from a (warm) rooftop vantage point.
DON’T MISS Exploring the Fashion District in which your five-star digs, one-time hat factory Refinery Hotel, is located.
GO FOR IT Starts and ends in New York City, departs December 27, 2019, from $US4995. See travellingdivas.com THE DESTINATION Greece
THE WOMEN-ONLY TRIP Wild Women on Top’s Mt Olympus and Crete
DURATION 13 days
THE EXPERIENCE Fortified with hearty Greek cuisine, hike through Samaria Gorge (Europe’s longest), ascend several peaks, navigate coastal trails and – for downtime – wander the region’s narrow village streets.
DON’T MISS Summiting Greece’s highest mountain, Mount Olympus, then celebrating with a swim in the Mediterranean Sea.
GO FOR IT Starts in Athens, ends in Chania, departs September 13, 2019, from $4290. See wildwomenontop.com THE DESTINATION Norfolk Island
THE WOMEN-ONLY TRIP Sisterhood Women’s Travel’s Norfolk Island Discovery
DURATION Eight days
THE EXPERIENCE Perfect for those wishing to test the women-only tour waters, this journey includes a pre-trip meet-and-greet with the host and encompasses cultural and historical activities, moderate walking and a variety of food experiences.
DON’T MISS Tour the house of acclaimed Australian author Colleen McCullough, who lived on Norfolk Island for almost 36 years before her death in 2015.
GO FOR IT Starts in Melbourne or Sydney, departs November 15, 2019, from $3899. See sisterhoodwomenstravel.com.au
SALMA RAZZAQ, 46, MARKETING MANAGER, SYDNEY
What’s the best part of travelling solo?
I love the thrill of adventure that you get when travelling alone. That sense of exhilaration and freedom of doing whatever you want, and meeting new and interesting people. Otherwise, one’s own company becomes one’s fate!
What was one of your most memorable experiences?
On a road trip with three other girls along the Gibb River Road in Western Australia’s Kimberley, I was mistaken for an Indigenous person on account of my brown skin. There were looks of surprise from the locals when they heard my British accent! It was very funny, and a great ice-breaker.
What has been your favourite place to visit as a woman?
Surprisingly, I really enjoyed travelling alone in Morocco. People warned me to be careful in the souks but I found the experience – stopping by and drinking tea with tradesmen – the opposite. It was so pleasant and non-threatening.
ROBYN WOOTON, 69, RETIRED BIOCHEMIST, MELBOURNE
Why do you travel solo?
Initially, my solo travel was work-related and this gave me the confidence to also travel solo for pleasure. Unfortunately, my husband doesn’t travel overseas so I’ve travelled with female friends, my cousin, once with my mother or on my own.
What has been your favourite place to visit as a woman?
Antarctica has held my heart since seeing the photos of a friend who travelled there more than 25 years ago. I’ve recently been on my third Antarctic voyage with Aurora Expeditions. The majesty of the icebergs and ice floes, the variety and quantity of wildlife plus the history draws me back.
Are there any destinations you’d avoid?
I check the government’s Smart Traveller website and register for countries where I plan to travel. Generally I adhere to warnings and don’t travel to countries in conflict or advised as unsafe. Why put yourself at risk when there are so many amazing places in the world to see?
MINDY LEOW, 39, SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT ADVISER, MELBOURNE
Why did you decide to take a women-only trip?
I chose Intrepid Travel’s women-only tour in Jordan because I wanted to have a special bonding experience with my mum for her 70th birthday.
What did you love about it?
Our women-only tour group meant our itinerary was customised so we could meet local women who are less accessible to regular tourists. We also had a strong, independent woman tour guide and were able to have open discussions about a Jordanian woman’s life.
What has been your favourite place to visit as a woman?
Iceland, because it felt safe even in very remote places.
Where are you heading next?
I’m likely going to Nepal next year with a group of women to build a house with Habitat for Humanity.
LOWRI WILLIAMS, 26, DISABILITY PROGRAM MANAGER, CAPE TOWN
How has solo travel changed you?
The first time I travelled alone to study in Lisbon for six months, I sat on the plane and cried myself to sleep. Now, almost five years later, I’ve moved to Cape Town [from Sydney] for two years to work for an NGO. I never would have had the courage to undertake this big life change if I hadn’t first undertaken solo travel. It has proven to me that I’m resilient and capable of great things.
What advice do you have for solo travellers?
I encourage every traveller to download offline maps app maps.me. It has hotels, hostels, restaurants, ATMs and you can search offline. Travelling is unpredictable and challenges arise. An experience I had in Budapest [arriving late with no accommodation] has meant that every time I enter a new country I’m prepared.
What has been your favourite place to travel to as a woman?
South Africa. The culture is deep and diverse, and there’s a sense of hope that enables creative entrepreneurship and innovation. As a solo woman, I’m aware of the safety risks and do everything in my power to mitigate these. However, these risks are outweighed by the numerous opportunities and activities in South Africa.
Where are you heading next?
[Right now] I’m undertaking a solo road trip through South Africa’s beautiful Garden Route. I’ve stopped in Hermanus, the best spot for whale watching in the world, and have thoroughly enjoyed being able to do a road trip on my own. Later in the year I plan a trek to see gorillas in either Rwanda or Uganda.
SUE FINN, MEDIA ADVISER, SYDNEY
Tell us about one of your most memorable experiences.
Last year, my sister and I celebrated her 50th birthday walking a 120-kilometre section of the Camino in Spain on a six-day, self-guided UTracks tour. We saw this trip as a great opportunity to escape the busyness and responsibilities of everyday life, to enjoy the freedom that independent travel brings and to simply enjoy each other’s company.
What has been one of your scariest moments on the road?
Due to unavoidable circumstances, a friend and I embarked at sundown on a 240-kilometre drive from Kununurra to Warmun in Western Australia’s remote Kimberley region. After half-an-hour it was pitch black, we had no mobile phone coverage and the only other traffic was the occasional road train overtaking us at breakneck speed. I was petrified of hitting a kangaroo or cattle and other wild animals wandering the highway. At one section, where a new bridge was being constructed, we detoured through a dry riverbed and back up onto the highway again. We arrived at our destination unscathed but exhausted [and] for the next week enjoyed adulation from the locals who referred to us as “those girls who drove from Kununurra in the dark”.
Where are you heading next?
Next year I plan to walk either a section of the Via Francigena or Ireland’s Ring of Kerry with a close friend, my fellow traveller on that “memorable” Kimberley road trip. When she turned 60 she walked the entire 800 kilometres of the Camino Frances, by herself. She’s a fabulous travelling companion and makes me laugh. We’ve enjoyed some crazy adventures together. FIVE TRENDS IN WOMEN-ONLY TRAVEL
WOMEN-ONLY HOTEL FLOORS
Rooms or entire floors reserved for women in countries such as the US and India provide an elevated sense of security along with female-friendly touches such as hair straighteners, make-up fridges and powerful hair dryers. (NB: women-only floors have been declared discriminatory in Denmark.)
SHEBAH
This Australian ride-share service available in most major cities and some regional centres aims to get women and children to their destination safely. Its female drivers retain 85 per cent of their fares. See shebah.com.au
WOMEN-ONLY CARRIAGES
India is famous for its women-only train carriages. These spaces not only enhance your sense of security, but also provide an opportunity to meet and mingle with local women using the same service.
WOMEN’S TAXIS
Womenstaxi.org is a global directory of companies in countries such as Britain, Lebanon, Mexico, South Africa and Iran which offer taxi services provided exclusively by female drivers for female patrons. See womenstaxi.org
FEMALE-FRIENDLY APPS
Apps have revolutionised travelling for women. Favourites include Tourlina ( tourlina.com ), which matches women travelling to the same destination; GeoSure ( geosureglobal.com ), which helps women and LGBTQI people safely navigate unfamiliar neighbourhoods; Flush Toilet Finder, which pinpoints public restrooms ( jrustonapps.com/apps/flush-toilet-finder ); and Lady Pill Reminder ( baviux.com/app/lady-pill-reminder ), a handy assistant in synchronising the contraceptive pill with changing time zones. FIVE GREAT FEMALE TRAVELLERS
NELLIE BLY
The American journalist is best known for her 72-day round-the-world journey in 1889 – by steamship and railroad – in which she broke the record set by Jules Verne’s fictional character Phileas Fogg in his book Around the World in Eighty Days . Bly (real name Elizabeth Cochran) was also a pioneering foreign correspondent and investigative journalist, reporting in particular on the lives of marginalised women.
JANE GOODALL
A thirst for adventure led primatologist Jane Goodall from England into the wilds of Africa in the late 1950s, where she spent decades researching chimpanzees. Today, the 85-year-old travels for about 300 days a year lecturing those who will listen on the harm human development has wrought on the planet. Goodall uses the inevitable airport encounters for good: she’ll only pose for selfies with fans if they promise to consider joining her NGO, Roots and Shoots. See rootsandshoots.org
DERVLA MURPHY
Photo: Alamy
In Full Tilt: Ireland to India with a Bicycle , the Irish travel writer tells of scaring off thieves in Iran with the pistol she’d taken along on her solo bike ride from Ireland across Europe, the Balkans, Persia and the Indian subcontinent. She later hit the road with her young daughter and travelled overland with pack mules in Ethiopia.
ROBYN DAVIDSON
The Queenslander’s nine-month journey across Australia’s deserted centre – in the company of just four camels and a dog – was later recounted in her book Tracks and a 2013 film of the same title. Davidson has spent the intervening years studying nomadic peoples in India, Tibet and Australia.
JESSICA NABONGO
Born to Ugandan parents in Detroit, Nabongo is well on her way to becoming the first black woman to visit every country in the world. The travel writer, podcaster and founder of travel company Jet Black (which encourages travel to countries in the African Diaspora) shares her wanderings – 165 nations and counting – on her Instagram account and blog, The Catch Me If You Can . See instagram.com/thecatchmeifyoucan ; thecatchmeifyoucan.com ; globaljetblack.com FIVE TIPS FOR MEN WHEN TRAVELLING WITH WOMEN
SHOPPING
“Let us shop!” declares Sarah Hoyland, director of The Classic Safari Company and its Secret Women’s Series subsidiary. Markets, souks, boutiques and factory outlets offer women an opportunity to indulge their (almost) universal love of shopping in exotic new locations. As Hoyland says, “no two black handbags are ever the same, so refrain from even asking why we would be looking at a new one in Jaipur, Marrakech, Buenos Aires or Cairo.”
ANSWERING NATURE’S CALL
Toileting in the great outdoors is not always an option for women, especially in conservative countries. Men should accept at the outset that finding a suitable toilet will probably be more time-consuming for their female companions than it is for them – and exercise the requisite patience.
ROLLING WITH THE PUNCHES
The best travel companion, man or woman, is someone who has a sense of adventure and curiosity, is a thoughtful traveller and can roll with the punches when things don’t go according to plan, says media adviser Sue Finn. “Whenever I travel with my husband, we have a pact that whatever happens – missed connections, queues, delays, crowds, getting lost, poor weather, bad food – we’ll take it all in our stride. And we do.”
REINING THINGS IN
Men can add a lot to the mix when travelling with women by simply being a cut-back version of themselves, says Marika Martinez, founder of Women’s Own Adventure. “They should try to stay a little more in the background and not take over. Women are generally less competitive than men so while men may race to be the first or the best, women take a slower pace and enjoy the journey. They also tend to help each other along the way, more so than men.”
STAYING HOME
Accept that sometimes women just don’t want to travel with you, especially on itineraries encompassing special interests such as design, gardens, food and shopping, says Carol Prior, founder of boutique travel company By Prior Arrangement. She says: “All-women trips are becoming much more popular now because women are more independent and enjoy travelling without their partners.” Prior’s advice to men? “Stay home and make sure you give us the credit cards!”

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