Malaysia's Most Unique Restaurants

Malaysia’s Most Unique Restaurants

Tired of frequenting the same places for date night? Bookmark this page right now for the most exceptional and unique dining experience in Malaysia!
Malaysia’s Most Unique Restaurants Jeff’s Cellar, Ipoh International, Pork-Free
With a setting within a limestone cave, Jeff Cellar’s isn’t just Malaysia’s most unique wine bar – it is also the best of its kind globally. You are invited to immerse your palate in the exotic flavors of organic and rare wines within the confines of chill, intimate cave interiors and refreshing natural coolness.
Unique wine and dine experience at Jeff’s Cellar, Ipoh.
Photo by The Banjaran.
Jeff’s Cellar
1, Persiaran Lagoon, Sunway 3, 31150 Ipoh.
Website : https://www.thebanjaran.com/cuisine/jeffs-cellar/
Phone : +605-210 7777
Email : tbhr.pomelo@sunwayhotels.com
Pia’s The Paddy, Langkawi Local, Western, North Indian, Halal
Located in the scenic Ulu Melaka and overlooking the paddy fields fronting the majestic Gunung Raya, this uniquely beautiful dining spot serves everything from Western, Northern Indian to local fares and dining experience is heightened through its open-air seating.
Dine in a unique Kampung setting at Pia’s The Paddy, Langkawi.
Photo by Pascal1812.
Pia’s The Paddy
Jalan Ulu Melaka, Kampung Padang Gaong, 07000 Langkawi, Kedah.
Website: https://www.facebook.com/pg/Pias-The-Padi-185372104940500
Phone: +012-493 3713
Dining In The Dark, Kuala Lumpur Western, Pork-Free
Located along the vibrant Changkat Bukit Bintang, Dining In The Dark aims to elevate the appreciation for food through a unique approach: dining without sight. This enables the taste, smell, touch and sound senses to be more acute. Employees here are visually impaired and menu will not be revealed until after the meal is served, hence the name “Surprise Menu”. The varying taste and texture will definitely delight your mind and palate.
Drop by and dine in total darkness for a memorable sensory experience!
Enjoy a meal in total darkness at Dining In The Dark, Kuala Lumpur.
Photo by Dining In The Dark.
Dining In The Dark KL
50A Changkat Bukit Bintang, 50200 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Website : https://dininginthedarkkl.com
Phone : +603-2110 0431
Email : customerservice@dininginthedarkkl.com
BBQ Lamb KL Kemensah, Ampang Asian, Arabic, BBQ, Halal
Experience a different kind of dining here, where you are invited to soak your feet in the river and breathe fresh forest air as you dine. Famous for its smoked duck and set lunch, you are encouraged to make your reservation one week in advance. Ps. ATV or quad biking is also available nearby!
Dip your feet into the water as you dine at BBQ Lamb KL Kemensah, Ampang.
Photo by hannadarwish87.
BBQ Lamb KL Kemensah
Jalan Taman Zooview, Ampang 68000 Malaysia.
Website : https://www.facebook.com/pg/Bbqlambklkemensah
Phone : +60 12-211 4100
Dinner In The Sky, Kuala Lumpur Western, Halal
As suggested by its name, DInner in the Sky allows diners to enjoy their meal while being lifted 50m up in the air by a crane. Strapped to a seat on a suspended platform, treat your palate to five-course meal prepared by the chefs at Hilton Kuala Lumpur and treat your sight to the Kuala Lumpur city skyline.
Dining on a suspended platform? Yes, please!
Photo by Dinner in The Sky Malaysia
Dinner In The Sky
231, Jalan Bukit Bintang, Imbi, 55100 Kuala Lumpur.
Website : https://www.dinnerinthesky.my/
Phone : +016-299-1396
Email : info@dinnerinthesky.com.my
Plane In The City, Kuala Lumpur Fusion, Pork-Free
You can now be hungry and adventurous at the same time! Board the Boeing 737 for a remarkable 90-minute journey where you get to wine and dine, stick your head out of the Pilot’s cockpit, tread across one of the wings, and spend precious time with your loved ones.
Dine in a plane at Plane In The City, Kuala Lumpur.
Photo by Plane In The City.
Plane In The City
231, Jalan Bukit Bintang, Imbi, 55100 Kuala Lumpur.
Website : https://www.planeinthecity.com/
Phone : +03-2282-6413
Email : info@planeinthecity.com
Le Petit Chef, Kuala Lumpur Italian, French, Steakhouse, Southwestern, Pork-Free
Le Petit has chosen Malaysia as its first base in Southeast Asia, where it present its innovation dining experience through 3D project mapping technology. You can watch a small animated chef captivatingly preparing your meal on a plate placed in front of you. The meal is a harmonious combination of sight, sounds and taste – brought to you by Michelin-starred chef, Jeff Ramsey.
Let the world’s smallest chef prepare your meal for you at Le Petit Chef, Kuala Lumpur.
Photo by Le Petit Chef.
Le Petit Chef – Elements
Hive, Unit H-G-11, Trec, 438, Jalan Tun Razak, Kuala Lumpur.
Website : https://www.elements.my/le-petit
Phone : +03-2282-6413
Email : info@elements.my
Whimsy, Kuala Lumpur Fusion, Pork-Free
Whimsy is the first-of-its-kind multi-sensory fine-dining experience, giving Malaysia’s culinary landscape a rare, unique touch. Bringing together award-winning chefs from across the globe, it incorporates 360 projection technology for creative culinary like never before.
Excite your senses at Whimsy Malaysia!
Photo by Whimsy Malaysia.
Whimsy Malaysia
Skyland, 231, Jalan Bukit Bintang, Imbi, 55100 Kuala Lumpur
Website : https://whimsy.com.my/
Phone : +6016-2991455
Email : info@whimsy.com.my
Nam Heong, Ipoh Chinese, Non-Halal
Have you ever been served by a mechanical waitress? You can now, at Nam Heong! Robots are programmed to transfer food to the tables on designated tracks, and you will be required to pick the dishes from the tray. They are also able to greet customers in both English and Cantonese, and their purpose is mainly to improve efficiency while cutting waiting time. Nam Heong currently has 8 robots in its Ipoh branch and 2 at Da Men Mall, Selangor.
Let these robotic waitresses serve you at Nam Heong.
Photo by Nam Heong.
Nam Heong Ipoh
Block B, 2-15, Ipoh Soho, Jalan Sultan Iskandar, Ipoh.
Website : http://www.namheongipoh.com/
Phone : +05-246 0521
Email : customerservice@namheongipoh.com
Ice Cafe, Penang Dessert, Halal
How does dining in Malaysia’s first ice-themed cafe sounds to you? Said to be kept at a temperature of between 8°C to 10°C, the cafe comes with igloos and ice beds, and features an ice-themed menu such as its signature snowflake ice bowls. Drop by if you need a break from the heat!
Have you eaten in the cold? You can now!
Photo by Ice Cafe, Penang.
Ice Cafe, Penang
193 Lebuh Victoria, George Town, Penang Island.
Website : https://www.facebook.com/pg/IceCafe17
Phone : +04-262 1193
Email : info.icecafepg@gmail.com
Atmosphere 360 International, Buffet, Halal
A revolving restaurant 282m above ground level, Atmosphere 360 is located at the top of Southeast Asia’s tallest tower – Menara Kuala Lumpur. Its modern atmosphere comes with a starry fiber optic illuminated ceiling and offers a breathtaking view over the KL city. Staffed by seasoned culinary artists, this unique dining spot in Malaysia serves both buffet and ala carte items, as well as specialty cocktails.
Dine at the tallest restaurant in Southeast Asia at Atmosphere 360.
Photo by Atmosphere 360.
Atmosphere 360
Menara Kuala Lumpur, 2, Jalan Puncak, 50250 Kuala Lumpur.
Website : http://atmosphere360.com.my/
Phone : +03-2020 2121
Email : info@atmosphere360.com.my
Heli Lounge Bar Bar Snacks, Pork-Free
The Heli Lounge Bar might look ordinary at first glance, but get ready for a whole new experience when you order a drink and climb a few short flights of stairs to reach the very top – the helipad. Here, you will be greeted by the amazing and uninhibited 360° view of the city skyline – the perfect vantage point to witness firework displays on special occasions, or just to get a bird’s-eye view of the flashing city lights on a typical working day.
Climb onto a helipad in the heart of KL. Or better, dine on it!
Photo by CNN.
Heli Lounge Bar
34th Floor, Jalan Sultan Ismail, Kuala Lumpur 50450, Malaysia.
Website : https://www.facebook.com/Heliloungebar
Phone : +03-2110 5034
Email : ask@helikl.com
Veg Fish Farm Thai Restaurant, Ampang Thai, Pork-Free
Rejoice in authentic Thai cuisine prepared by experienced Thai chefs in an unusual but fascinating lush, cool forest setting. The restaurant serves organic vegetables and spring chickens that they cultivate on their own in order to ensure that diners consume only safe, clean and pesticide-free produce. Your only worry is deciding if you’d prefer to dine under the stars, by the pond or at the hut!
Beautiful, serene lake setting makes the perfect dinner spot.
Photo by Veg Fish Farm Thai Restaurant.
Veg Fish Farm Thai Restaurant
KM4, Jalan Hulu Langat, 68000 Ampang, Selangor
Website : http://vegfishfarm.com/
Phone : +6016-293 6493
The Restaurant at The Lakehouse, Cameron Highlands Continental, Buffet, High-Tea, BBQ, Steamboat
Go back in time into the Old World when you visit this charming restaurant located in the soaring highlands (at 1,000m above sea level to be exact) of Pahang. Whether you are indulging in its semi-continental buffet for breakfast, ala carte and tea for lunch, or steamboat or BBQ or dinner, you will definitely enjoy this relaxing oasis in the midst of a lush green haven.
Cool weather, good food.
Photo by The Lakehouse, Cameron Highlands.
The Restaurant at The Lakehouse
30th Mile Ringlet, 39200 Cameron Highlands, Pahang.
Website : https://lakehouse-cameron.com/restaurant/the-restaurant
Phone : +605-495 6152
Email : info@lakehouse-cameron.com
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The 20 best food festivals, for carnivores, chilli heads and craft beer connoisseurs

L ive music, great drinks and feasting under open skies: food festivals are a recipe for a memorable summer’s day. And this year’s epicurean calendar is more packed than ever, kicking off in earnest next month.
While music festivals such as Latitude are upping their gastronomic game to draw crowds, food-focused events are no longer just about the food – but also new experiences, stellar bands and top-notch entertainment (see Cerys Matthews’s expanding programme at The Good Life Experience, and the chart-topping acts at this year’s Foodies Festivals).
As well as offering opportunities to wander around the food stalls and watch cookery demos, they’re also catering to our desire to participate and learn. “Foraging and off-site tours have exploded: people want to get out into the wild, comb the hedgerows for their own cocktail ingredients, get stuck into debates and try, taste and cook for themselves,” says Aine Morris, chief executive of the Abergavenny Food Festival, who sees such events as “brilliant, joyous, convivial” vehicles to re-establish our connection with what we eat.
The ethics of food and farming are a hot topic this year, with Bee Wilson (author of this year’s bestseller, The Way We Eat Now: Strategies for Eating in a World of Change) headlining at Abergavenny. Vegans are increasingly well catered for (look out for meat-free vendors on the festival circuit, such as Buddha Bowl at Wilderness, Glastonbury and The Big Feastival, or for vegan chef Richard Buckley of Acorn Restaurant in Bath, who’ll be cooking at Ludlow Food Festival).
P lant-based food aside, there’s also a focus on provenance at Meatopia, the carnivore’s carnival, which is dedicated to high-quality, ethically sourced ingredients. “Festivals have come a long way from the days of vendors standing in a muddy field, with punters queuing for an overcooked burger,” says Midsummer House’s Daniel Clifford, who is eagerly awaiting The Big Feastival in August.
Ultimately, as Michelin-starred chef Josh Eggleton of Chew Magna’s Pony and Trap (who is appearing at Tom Kerridge’s Pub in the Park) points out, the ultimate aim is always, quite simply, to have a brilliant time. “Food brings everyone together, and a festival breaks down barriers so people can enjoy themselves in a setting that’s casual, relaxed and not at all intimidating,” he says.
Here’s our pick of the best, where you can meet your chef heroes, discover new producers, and drink and dine outdoors all day long.
The prices of the festivals listed here vary considerably, since some can include several nights’ camping and take into account the cost of music headliners, whereas others are free standard entry but involve extra costs for masterclasses, Q&As and dining experiences. BEST FOR… classes: Althorp Food & Drink Festival, Northamptonshire K en Hom – the chef credited with bringing authentic Chinese cuisine to our kitchens over 30 years ago – and Mich Turner (aka the Queen of Couture Cakes) will be hosting 90-minute masterclasses for groups of 15 at Althorp House, the childhood home of Diana, Princess of Wales. There will also be cocktail-making, falconry, vintage cars and an Animals of Althorp exhibition. “I have lots of surprises up my sleeve,” says Hom. “All within a quintessentially British setting. Wonderful!”
M ay 11-12, tickets from £9 for a fast-track advance entry ticket for one day (tours of the house and masterclasses purchased separately); spencerofalthorp.com
BEST FOR… beer: Edinburgh Craft Beer Festival The main attraction at this shindig in Leith’s Biscuit Factory, of course, is beer (from San Sebastian’s Basqueland Brewing Project to Scotland’s very own BrewDog) but Edinburgh’s Aizle and Harajuku Kitchen restaurants are also a draw – as are Chapel Down wines, and performances from Belle and Sebastian. Joyously, the “all-in” ticket includes six “festival pour” pints direct from your favourite breweries, a free glass and a festival magazine, as well as access to the music and street food bazaar. Hop to it.
May 24-25, tickets from £45 for a five-hour session, or £100 for the whole weekend (no under 18s allowed); edinburghcraftbeerfestival.co.uk
BEST FOR… atmosphere: Malton Food Lovers Festival, Yorkshire M alton has been reinvented as the “food capital of Yorkshire” in recent years, and this festival celebrates the best of the county. We’re talking more than 180 street food stalls (don’t miss the macarons from local master patissier Florian Poirot and hedgerow fruit gins from Sloemotion), plus demos from Michelin-starred chef Tommy Banks of the Black Swan Oldstead and special guest Sabrina Ghayour, who will be hosting a cookery demonstration featuring vegetarian recipes from her new Middle-Eastern cookery book Bazaar, as well as signing copies.
M ay 25-26, free entry; visitmalton.com
BEST FOR… Father’s Day: Stonor Food Festival, Oxfordshire S tonor is back in Henley-on-Thames, headlined by French chef Jean-Christophe Novelli (who runs the Novelli Academy cookery school in Hertfordshire) and Atul Kochhar of Benares (the first Indian chef to receive a Michelin star). Expect to participate in Sunday Brunch-style demos in The Festival Kitchen, as well as tastings and drinks pairings. Raymond Blanc’s Cookery School is also on hand with cooking tips.
A ticket includes entry to Stonor House and Gardens as well as the Wonder Woods adventure playground for children, and the first 1,500 dads attending will receive a bottle of Brakspear ale. Cheers!
June 15-16, day entry tickets from £10 (adults); stonor.com/stonor-food-festival
BEST FOR… restaurant lovers: Taste of London I t’s Pimms o’clock in Regent’s Park, where you can tuck into paper plates piled high with signature dishes from London’s best restaurants – including pillowy Taiwanese steamed buns filled with confit pork or lamb shoulder from Bao and shaved truffle pasta dished up by Calabrian chef Francesco Mazzei (of restaurants Sartoria in Mayfair, Radici in Islington and Fiume in Battersea).
Enjoy a glass of rosé from the Beach Bar after a masterclass with DJ BBQ at The Fire Pit, who will be cooking over the flames with Berber & Q’s Josh Katz and Roth Bar and Grill’s Steve Horrell. This year’s guest of honour is Kobus van der Merwe, whose seafood restaurant Wolfgat in South Africa was crowned Restaurant of the Year at the inaugural World Restaurant Awards. For £95, you can dine with him as he serves up a special paired menu at The Residence.
J une 19-23, tickets from £20 (entry only, for a four-hour evening or daytime session). The Diners Club VIP Feasting ticket from £68 includes VIP lounge access, masterclasses, champagne and three dishes; london.tastefestivals.com
BEST FOR… country pursuits: Irish Game Fair and Fine Food Festival, Antrim, Northern Ireland Celebrating its 40th anniversary, Ireland’s largest food festival started out as a gathering for country sports enthusiasts. You’ll still find clay pigeon shooting, whippets and lurchers, but today, food and drink is just as much of an attraction. Silfield Farm’s “slow food expert” Peter Gott is a regular, famed for his wild boar pies. Look out for Belfast hot sauce from Blackfire, cheeses from the Old Irish Creamery and award-winning Northern Irish charcuterie (and hog roast) from Corndale Farm, washed down with Kilmegan Cider from County Down – all in the scenic surrounds of the Shanes Castle Estate.
June 29-30, tickets from £10 (no camping); irishgamefair.com/finefoodfestival.asp
BEST FOR… gastropub grub: Pub in the Park, Tunbridge Wells, Kent C hef Tom Kerridge (the man behind The Hand and Flowers in Marlow – the only pub in the UK with two Michelin stars) is again bringing “world-class chefs, ace music and an awesome vibe” to eight locations across the UK, from Leeds to Bath. His minted lamb pie with mash and liquor is on the gastropub pop-up menu in Tunbridge Wells, as is a confit lamb brioche bun with wild garlic pesto from The Compasses Inn near Canterbury, and crispy monkfish tacos from The Kentish Hare.
T here’s also cooking demos, book signings, Q&As and the chance to meet top chefs such as Jason Atherton and The Telegraph’s Stephen Harris in person. “I love the sheer joy and fun of a festival. It’s a great way for people to try lots of different restaurants in one place,” says Kerridge. For him, Pub in the Park’s success and “lush vibes” can be attributed to “the right balance of chefs and entertainment.” Music acts during the festival series include Tom Odell, Will Young, Kaiser Chiefs, Basement Jaxx, All Saints, KT Tunstall and Razorlight.
July 12-14, tickets from £32.10 for general admission for day or evening sessions (VIP tickets from £83 include unlimited fizz and access to chef Q&As in the VIP lounge); pubintheparkuk.com
BEST FOR… healthy living: Foodies Festival, Tatton Park, Cheshire Credit: Mike Page T he Foodies Festival tours the length and breadth of the country, from Edinburgh to Syon Park, London. Scouting for Girls bring a dose of indie pop to Cheshire in July, and regular attractions include a chilli-eating contest, dog arena, a healthy living area and a kids’ cookery school. New for this year is a vegan beer tent, and you’ll also spot vegan chef and author Little Miss Meat-Free Katy Beskow and “Wholefood Warrior” Eva Humphries amid Tatton Park’s free-roaming deer.
J uly 12-14, tickets from £29 for general entry; foodiesfestival.com
BEST FOR… banquets: Wilderness, Oxfordshire Credit: Max Miechowski D avid Cameron’s consecutive appearances at Cornbury Park’s annual jamboree have done nothing to diminish its sparkle. The long table feasting tent, intimate chef’s tables and “field restaurants” will vie for your attention with headlining acts Robyn, Bombay Bicycle Club and Groove Armada, the wild swimming lake and the soothing post-party treatments of the lakeside spa. Dine at Petersham Nurseries, gather at a banquet hosted by Tom Aikens, and meet Telegraph columnist Angela Hartnett and her husband Neil Borthwick, who will be bringing a taste of their restaurants Cafe Murano and The French House to the party.
“It’s one of the dates in the diary I most look forward to,” says Hartnett. “It feels like we’re part of the family.” The roll call of famous chefs doesn’t stop there: Nieves Barragán Mohacho of Michelin-starred Spanish restaurant Sabor will be attending for the first time, as will Great British Menu’s Tom Brown, of Cornerstone in Hackney. New for this year is Dining Room Sessions, which will see panel talks with foodies paired with DJ sets.
Aug 1-4, general camping tickets for one adult from £190.75 (including three nights’ camping), child tickets (0-5 years) from £6.25 (tickets for the banqueting tent, chef’s tables and field restaurants are sold separately – do book in advance to avoid disappointment); wildernessfestival.com
BEST FOR… spice: Chilli Fiesta, West Sussex Credit: Barney Poole L ive Latin music, spicy foods from around the globe (from Moroccan tagines to Jamaican jerk chicken), condiments galore (chilli jam, ginger chilli fudge) and dancing (to the beat of Grupo Lokito, The Fontanas, Jesus Cutino and Son de Cuba) give this festival in pretty West Dean Gardens (which boasts more than 250 chilli varieties in its Victorian glasshouse) a distinctive flavour and a feel-good factor (there are five bars in total to keep you refreshed). In the Garden Theatre, Otter Farm food writer and grower Mark Diacono will be giving talks on how to grow edibles such as Szechuan pepper and Carolina allspice chillies at home, as well as creating garden cocktails from his forthcoming book, Sour. For children, there’s a funfair, an outdoor cinema showing classic films, plus three camping areas: jalapeño, pimento and bell.
Aug 9-11, general entry day tickets from £18 or £115 for an adult’s three-day pass with camping; westdean.org.uk
BEST FOR… garlic: The Garlic Festival, Isle of Wight It’s perfectly acceptable – encouraged, even – to don a string of pungent bulbs at this summer event, an homage to the island’s award-winning garlic farm near Newchurch village. Though the alliaceous plant is the focus of the festival (smothered over sweetcorn and mushrooms, or even sweet, heat-aged black garlic in fudge, ice cream, beer and Bloody Marys), there’s also live music and roving performers. Expect a nostalgic, Sixties vibe, with magic shows, live animals, Punch and Judy performances and a Garlic Festival queen.
A ug 17-18, tickets from £11.50; garlicfestival.co.uk
BEST FOR… families: The Big Feastival, Oxfordshire Credit: Giles Smith T his year’s August Bank Holiday fiesta on Blur bassist Alex James’ farm in Kingham has the Holy Trinity of food and drink (Prue Leith, Raymond Blanc and Candice Brown will be giving interactive cookery demos and talks), music (Rudimental, Jess Glynne, Jade Bird) and family-friendliness (village green games, Peppa Pig, tree climbing, circus skills) sorted, with tastings and entertainment for everyone – fuelled by Anna Mae’s mac ’n’ cheese and Smokestak brisket (and Warner’s Gin from the gin barn, of course).
August 23-25, tickets from £62 for an adult day ticket (camping packages also available), thebigfeastival.com
BEST FOR… farm fun: River Cottage Festival, Devon I n May, River Cottage’s food festival will host Yotam Ottolenghi and Kate Humble – and you’ll get yet another chance to immerse yourself in the full seasonal, ethically-produced Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall shebang in midsummer, too. Over a weekend of farm glamping, he will be serving up food for thought, music and masterclasses alongside presenters Anita Rani and Steph McGovern, plus genes-and-eating specialist Giles Yeo, to mark the 20th birthday of River Cottage. “It’s all about family – a massive party for the whole extended River Cottage family,” says Fearnley-Whittingstall.
A ug 24-25, day tickets from £25 (weekend tickets with camping from £95); rivercottage.net/festival/2019
BEST FOR…carnivores: Meatopia, London T his three-day party (brought to the UK by cult steakhouse Hawksmoor) invites all carnivores to enjoy original meaty dishes cooked by chefs over flame, with an emphasis on high-quality, well-sourced ingredients. The line-up is announced in June, but previous attendees have included Nathan Outlaw, Niklas Ekstedt and St Leonard’s duo Jackson Boxer and Andrew Clarke.
Aug 30-Sept 1, tickets from £23.85; meatopia.co.uk
BEST FOR… seafood: Food Rocks, Dorset Credit: Matt Austin T he hottest seats at this gastronomic gathering in restaurateur and founder Mark Hix’s seaside hometown of Lyme Regis are the ticketed Glenarm Estate Meat Feast and the Crab and Mackerel Supper Club (both £45 extra), though there’s street food – from hog roasts to pad Thai – for everyone. This year, Hix is joined by seafood king Mitch Tonks of The Seahorse and Rockfish mini chain, food writer Rose Prince, and Bath baker Richard Bertinet, who will be giving 40-minute cooking demos.
Sept 7-8, free entry (no camping); hixrestaurants.co.uk
BEST FOR… the great outdoors: The Good Life Experience, Flintshire, North Wales C o-founded by singer Cerys Matthews and Charlie and Caroline Gladstone (who inherited idyllic Hawarden Castle), this festival is all about craft, campfires and getting out into the wild for swimming, stargazing and canoeing – as well as learning cookery skills from guests including Honey & Co’s Itamar Srulovich and Sarit Packer, Olia Hercules, Valentine Warner and fermentation expert Sandor Katz.
S ept 12-15, tickets from £75 for an adult day ticket (three nights’ adult camping from £179); thegoodlifeexperience.co.uk
BEST FOR… local food: Ludlow Food Festival, Shropshire Credit: John Hayward G orge on Whyle House lamb and tempura from Mighty Soft Shell Crab before heading to the Wots Cooking Stage in the Inner Bailey of Ludlow Castle. Romy Gill, Bake Off star John Whaite, Great British Menu’s Richard Bainbridge of Benedicts in Norwich and TV forager James Wood will be there, alongside local producers and, naturally, plenty of cider – Gillow, Fletchers and Colcombe House, to name just three.
Sept 13-15, entry from £12 for an adult day ticket (no camping available on site); ludlowfoodfestival.co.uk
BEST FOR… diversity: Abergavenny Food Festival T he Welsh market town of Abergavenny boasts a diverse line-up this year, headed up by Asma Khan, the first British chef to feature on Netflix’s cult show Chef’s Table and the founder of Darjeeling Express. Her exploration, with The Telegraph’s Xanthe Clay, of the rise of MeToo in the hospitality industry is not to be missed – nor is a discussion of Food of the Islamic World with author and chef Anissa Helou. Do also catch demos from Michelin-starred chef Gareth Ward and Tom Hunt, author of The Natural Cook.
S ept 21-22, tickets from £10 (plus extra charges for ticketed talks and tastings); abergavennyfoodfestival.com
BEST FOR… nature: Aldeburgh Food and Drink Festival, Suffolk Snape Maltings, by the river Alde, is in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and for the past 13 years a site of pilgrimage for the foodies who flock here for the famous Adnams’ Drinks Experience and the Wild Suffolk area (where you can learn what you can find in the wild and how to cook it) each year. It’s all raw milk, sourdough, and glorious organic veg. Spanish chef José Pizarro, Chetna Makan (author of Chetna’s Healthy Indian) and Georgina Hayden (author of Taverna) will be taking centre stage on the live chef demonstration stages this year.
Sept 28-29, tickets from £9; aldeburghfoodanddrink.co.uk
BEST FOR… oysters: Falmouth Oyster Festival, Cornwall Credit: Jamie Johnson O yster dredging season means an abundance of native Fal Oysters (among other Cornish delicacies) at the champagne bar, and merrymaking in the form of a working boat race, a grand oyster parade and a shucking competition. The chef line-up is yet to be confirmed, but Michelin-starred Chris Eden of the Driftwood Hotel & Spa and Ken Symons of Oliver’s in Falmouth are regular faces.
Oct 10-13, free entry; falmouthoysterfestival.co.uk

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Dinner & Wine Special at The President Hotel

Dinner & Wine Special at The President Hotel Dinner & Wine Special at The President Hotel April 28, 2019, 9:48 pm 0 SHARES
It’s date night every night at the President Hotel.
The President Hotel welcomes you to Cape Town in breathtaking splendour, personal luxury and personal service. With the vibrant city to your right and the calming ocean to your left, there’s a perfect mix of cosmopolitan and relaxation at this five-star venue with an impressive five eateries and conference facilities.
Join their loyalty club – The President’s Club. Among receiving discounts on certain delicious deals and events, if you’re a member this May you’ll receive a complimentary bottle of wine when you order two main meals. Cosy up to a loved one while you ‘drink’ in the beautiful views. *Wink, wink*
Book online, via DinePlan or email them to book your table today. Directions to President Bantry Bay 021 434 8111 Want more stuff like this? Get the best restaurant specials straight into your inbox!
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A fine dining menu with a Vegetarian twist. We’ve been a huge fan of La Mouette since it’s opened in Sea Point a few years ago and we often come back to try out their latest menu. Recently, they started offering a vegetarian-style tasting menu as part of their fine dining experience as well. Book […] More Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Comment

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This Southeast Asian Country’s Food Brands That Are Huge Overseas

April 27, 2019 – 19:22 Jkt 1 share
According to Says.com, herewith are the 12 Malaysia’s local brand that many didn’t know huge overseas. Interesting huh? Let’s find out.
1. LIFE SAUCES Source: Image via Halal Media Japan
The largest sauce brand in Malaysia , Life Sauces are exported into the US, UK, France, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Hong Kong, Mauritius, Maldives, the Middle East, Brunei and Singapore since it was established in 1978.It comes under Region Food Industries (RFI), the parent company of the Life brand. Life Sauces which first sprouted from a humble factory in Port Klang in 2004 is now producing 26 million sauce bottles a year .Besides the basic sauces like chilli and tomato ketchup, they’ve also come up with special pastes and oriental sauces. Their mini packet sauces are probably the most commonly found used in popular fast food chains like KFC, Pizza Hut, RasaMas, and more!
2. KAWAN FOOD BERHAD Source: Image via Kawan
Kawan Food, that has been operating for more than 30-years now is most widely known as the creator of the world’s first frozen paratha but they have a huge frozen selection of other traditional Asian food delicacies.Based in Shah Alam, Selangor, Kawan Food is Malaysia’s leading exporter and largest manufacturer for food of its kind. So, we’re talking flatbreads like naan and paratha, Chinese sweet desserts and pastries, finger food products made from soy protein, to pita and tortilla breads.If you’re a fan of popiah skins, try some of these cool recipes made from Kawan brand popiah skins here !Their products have extended into US, Canada, European, Irish, UK, Middle Eastern, African, Asian and Australasian markets.
3. MUNCHY’S Source: Image via Midsummer Treat
Munchy’s is a very own leading homegrown biscuit brand that exports their food products across more than 50 countries. Their headquarters is located in Batu Pahat with several Munchy’s local offices are spread out across the country in different cities and states.There’s a variety of Munchy’s products which branch into varying categories, some of which are Munchy’s Crackers, Lexus, oat Krunch, Muzic, Captain Munch, Assorted and 7 Days.
4. BABA’S Source: Image via Spice Trail
Baba’s have a whole selection of premium spices, vegetarian curry powders, flours and other pre-mixes that make cooking easy. A study featured on the Baba’s website pinpoints a study describing that on average, at least one of three main meals consumed by Malaysian will have a product from the Baba’s range in them.BABA’s spices have broke into the foreign market for years now and can be found in North America, Canada, Europe, South Africa, Australia, most of Southeast Asia.A prime example of humble beginnings, Baba’s started in the late 70’s as a sundry van business selling spices that caters primarily to local housewives. It was by receiving customers’ feedback that helped honed the Babas spice mixes.
5. PappaRich Source: Image via PappaRich Australia/Facebook
The PappaRich restaurant promises to showcase the best of Malaysian cuisine all over the world, operating widely across different countries like Australia, Brunei, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and the US.Other than dining, they’re the only white coffee producer in Malaysia that uses Stevia (natural sweetener), the healthier option to have instead of sugar in their instant coffee brand under the same name.
6. Old Town White Coffee Source: Image via AU Review
The brand erupted in 1999 and drew inspiration from Ipoh’s special white coffee. Their pre-mixed beverages like coffee, tea, and chocolate are exported into foreign countries and cities such as Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, Brunei, Phillippines, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Shenzhen, Shanghai, Beijing, UK, Canada, USA, Australia, and New Zealand. 7. Mamee Monster Source: Image via The Loop HK
It first came about in 1972 and was labelled as a noodle snack and somehow later grouped with instant noodles. But whatever it may be, the Mamee Monster noodle snack will forever be imprinted in our childhoods.Though you’re wrong if you think it’s exclusive to Malaysians as the noodle snack is shared with those from Australia, Angola, Bahrain, Canada, Cuba, Czech Republic, Ethiopia, Fiji Island, France, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Iran, Kuwait, Maldives, Netherlands, New Zealand, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Scotland, Singapore, Solomon Island, South Africa, Switzerland, UAE and UK.
8. Mister Potato Source: Image via Mister Potato/Facebook
Then you have Mister Potato crisps maintain their number one spot for being the best potato chip brand in the country . Mister Potato was formed back in 1992 but have steadily progressed to the point of entering the markets of over 80 countries worldwide.The brand’s recent additions to potato chip flavours is a great effort for keeping potato chip fans excited.
9. BRAHIM’S Source: Image via Sunshine Kelly
Brahims’ sauces and pastes offers you the practically of making easy and authentic Asian dishes. With your favourite Malaysian, Thai and Indonesian ready-to-use sauces that are great for adding flavour to your home cooked meals.From Thai green curry to Malaysian Masak Merah and Indonesian Rendang, these sauces can be found in South-East Asia, Australia, USA, United Kingdom and Japan. You can even order Brahim’s off Amazon where you can get the Thai Green Curry packet for USD4.46 and ‘Kuah Rendang’ at USD6.
10. BERYL’S Source: Image via KLIA2
Established in 1995, Beryl’s markets premium quality chocolates at reasonable prices. It usually comes in pebbles of white, milk and dark chocolate with nut or raisin fillings. However, they also have crunchy Gaufrettes (wafers) and chocolate dusted with tiramisu.Beryl’s chocolate is exported to Singapore, Macau, Hong Kong, Japan, Philippines, Vietnam and Thailand, and is distributed across major stores and hypermarkets nationwide! Their annual estimated sales ranges between USD10 million to USD50 million .
11. SECRET RECIPE Source: Image via Secret Recipe Thailand/Facebook
The leading and largest café chain in Malaysia, Secret Recipe has been growing their café into an internationally recognised brand since 1997. Secret Recipe cakes and fusion-style food have arrived at Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, China, Brunei, Cambodia, Myanmar and Maldives, totalling to more than 300 outlets throughout the region.
12. LINGHAM’S Source: Image via Lingham’s Chilli Sauce/Facebook
Lingham’s was founded by an Indian migrant in 1908 and it is believed to be one of the earliest brands to enter foreign markets. Later on after World War II in 1945, Lingham’s was transferred to a Chinese owner but before then the sauce was even popular among the British during the colonial era for some added spice to their meals.Now sold in over 20 countries, worldwide distribution of Lingam’s chilli sauce includes the United Kingdom, Holland, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Switzerland, United States of America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Pakistan, United Arab Emirates, Thailand, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Chile, Ukraine, Singapore and South Africa.

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French Bistro, PAUL launched in India

French Bistro, PAUL launched in India Published on : Monday, April 29, 2019
With the flagship outlet, PAULl-Bakery, Restaurant and Bar in Gurugram, Haryana the internationally acclaimed French Bistro, Paul has entered the Indian market.
After a master franchise business agreement with Cogent Hospitality (P) Ltd, PAUL has set its footprint across the country. It will be offering authentic traditional European cuisines and French patisserie items to the Indian consumers in the first outlet opened in Ambience Mall, Gurugram.
Christian RAIMBAULT, Managing Director of Operations and Franchise Development, PAUL International said that India has showcased a huge appetite for authentic international delicacies and they were proud to foray into the country today. PAUL has the first-mover advantage to bring the globally renowned authentic European cuisine in India. They will be able to create the desired impact in the Indian casual dining restaurant industry, as they did across 45 countries over 130 years.
Vivek Mishra,Marketing Head at PAUL India stated that Indian food and beverage industry has been witnessing growth lately. Owing to the popularity of international brands, people in metros are becoming more experimental in trying out new concept restaurants&cuisines and their world class services. There is a huge market for authentic European cuisine in India that is still untapped. Hence, it is our endeavor to bridge this gap through PAUL’s globally acclaimed delicacies and baked specialties.
Paul

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BRITS ABROAD: What do you EAT, WATCH and DRINK on holiday in Spain?

BENIDORM: Why do you go – for the Brit things? File image. Photo credit: Shutterstock
A FACEBOOK group for Benidorm with 98,000 members has gone into meltdown after one questioned: “Why do people go to Spain to eat traditional English food, watch English TV in English pubs and drink English beer? It baffles me.”
The original post by Adam E on the Benidorm Seriously group provoked a barrage of responses until an admin turned off comments as she had “better things to do than to keep deleting comments with swearing.”
Group member Jane answered the post with: “Because it’s cheap and hot I don’t go abroad to taste different foods or beer I can do that at home. I go for the sun and to have time off away from home.”
Lee-Anne explained: “I’m a very fussy eater and we save very hard for our holiday and spends so If I paid for something and didn’t like it I’d then have to spend again for food I do like. I will try certain things tapas paella, stuff like that but tend to stick with what I know and why shouldn’t I. My holiday to do with what I like really. I’m not doing anything wrong or hurting you. Each to there own I say. Happy hols. x”
Vicky reasoned: “It’s up to each individual whether they eat traditional English food or try Spanish food. At the end of the day it’s the person themselves paid for the holiday and it’s up to them to enjoy it whatever they want.”
But some Brits took issues with the original poster’s comments.
Gary B said: “We don’t we love trying al the Spanish food and the tapas etc.”
Mark also added: “I always go local and avoid English places when I can. But I do like some of the English places.”
Margaret Williams chipped in with: “I love the old town, drinking sangria and eating tapas.”
“Each to their own. Not everyone likes Spanish cuisine, same as not everyone likes Indian or Chinese etc. Everyone can eat what they want. I personally eat a variety of English, Indian, Tex Mex etc. I don’t really go for Spanish food as not really to my taste, ” said Steph R.
And Christine B rounded things off by saying: “I don’t like Spanish food, Spanish telly and Spanish beer but I like the Spanish sun!”
Related

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Coastal Ghanaian Fare Pops Up in Cambridge (and More Spring Food Events)

Flipboard Welcome to the Eater Boston food event round-up. Updated weekly, this guide highlights a few select events coming up in the weeks ahead, from special dinners and festivals to fundraisers and parties. Read on to see what’s on deck for the last few days of April and early May. Want to tell the Eater team about an event for potential inclusion in this round-up? Email . APRIL April 29 The Chop Bar at Parsnip What: Chefs Kwasi Kwaa and Shelley Nason will bring a five-course tasting menu to Parsnip (This is a change from the previously announced location, Night Market , which was Parsnip’s sibling but closed earlier this month .) With the Chop Bar pop-up , the pair will draw on the coastal fare of Ghana, including items like crispy fried okra, spicy goat dumplings, and grilled sardines. Where: Parsnip, 91 Winthrop St., Harvard Square, Cambridge Details: Tickets available online for $55, and there are multiple seatings available (the 6 p.m. seating is already sold out.) April 30 Turn Up the Heat Boston What: This event fundraises for the Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance. Attendees will be able to sample food and drink from a lineup of local restaurants, including Bar Mezzana , Catalyst , Sarma , Villa Mexico Cafe , and more. Where: Catalyst, 300 Technology Sq., Cambridge Details: Tickets available online for purchase at various tiers ($100 for general admission). MAY May 2 Chili Pepper Eating Contest What: El Pelon Taqueria hosts its 18th annual chili pepper eating contest. “A test of endurance and stamina and poor judgment,” as the event page says, the contest involves a chili-by-chili trial where competitors have two minutes to eat each pepper before moving on. The winner gets a trophy and a free burrito every day for a year. Where: El Pelon, 92 Peterborough St., Fenway, Boston Details: Sign up online as space is limited. May 4 Taza’s Annual Block Party What: Somerville’s resident chocolate factory will throw its annual block party on May 4 (rain date: May 5), featuring food vendors, a Notch Brewing beer garden, Far From the Tree Cider, free hot chocolate, and entertainment. Food vendors will include Honeycomb Creamery (with choco tacos), Bartleby’s Seitan Stand , and more. Where: In front of Taza Chocolate, 561 Windsor St., near Union Square, Somerville Details: Entry is free, and food and beverages can be purchased onsite. Spring Kickoff on the Greenway What: A bevy of Boston food trucks will line the Greenway this weekend to celebrate warmer weather. The food truck festival marks opening day for the Greenway’s season, ushering in its open-air market for artists and crafters. Food trucks at the event will include Bibim Box , Daddy’s Bonetown Burgers , Frozen Hoagies , Hometown Poké , Moyzilla , North East of the Border , Shuck Food Truck , Stoked Wood Fired Pizza Co. , Tea Station, the Chicken & Rice Guys , the Cookie Monstah , the Dining Car , and the Whoo(pie) Wagon . Where: Rose Kennedy Greenway at Atlantic Avenue and High Street Details: Free to attend; food truck items available for purchase a la carte. Event runs from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Samosa Workshop at Masala Square Indian Kitchen What: A new restaurant in Somerville’s Union Square will hold a samosa-making workshop for participants to learn tips for preparing and shaping the pastries. Those in attendance will be able to snack on samosas with channa masala and chutneys and will have a choice of chai or mango lassi. Where: Masala Square Indian Kitchen, 23 Union Sq., Somerville Details: Workshop costs $25 per person, and space is limited to 15 people. Reserve space by calling or texting 617-651-7913 or sending the restaurant a direct message on Facebook . May 5 Pindrop at Aeronaut What: Aeronaut Brewery has partnered with WGBH for an event series called the Pindrop Sessions. The season finale involves Tasting Counter as well — a high-end restaurant located inside Aeronaut’s Somerville Space. The May 5 event is being billed as a “multi-sensory smorgasbord of music, color, and taste” and includes music by Mary Bichner, a local composer whose synesthesia means that she hears sounds when she sees color and vice versa. Those who dine at Tasting Counter will find three courses of small plates inspired by the musical composition. And there will be beer, of course: Aeronaut will introduce its Strawberry Vanilla Milkshake IPA for the occasion. Where: Aeronaut Brewing, 14 Tyler St., Somerville Details: Tickets available online for $20 to $55, depending on whether you just want to attend the event or if you also want glassware and/or Tasting Counter’s three-course meal. Event runs from 7 to 10 p.m. Oyster Invitational What: A big annual oyster celebration thrown by B&G Oysters returns in May. The block party takes place on Waltham Street in the South End and features several restaurant stations with raw bars, beverages, specialty cocktails, a DJ, a shucking competition, and an auction that will benefit the Barbara Lynch Foundation. Other participating restaurants include Select Oyster , Island Creek Oyster Bar , Waypoint , and more. Where: 550 Tremont St./Waltham Street, South End, Boston Details: Tickets available online for $135 for general admission or $185 for VIP admission. Event runs from 12 or 1 to 5 p.m. depending on ticket type, and includes three beverages, all-you-can-eat oysters, and other snacks. Polish Fest What: This celebration of Poland will feature entertainment and food from vendors such as Jaju Pierogi , Spoko Polish Street Food, DJ’s European Market and Deli , Bernat’s Polish Deli, and others. Where: Polish American Citizens Club, 82 Boston St., Dorchester Details: Event runs from 12 to 6 p.m. May 11 Boston Night Market What: Paying homage to night markets in Asia, Boston Night Market will feature food, games, entertainment, and a raffle, with participating food vendors including Moyzilla, Tom’s Bao Bao, Yoki Express, Sa Pa, Wow BBQ, Japonaise Bakery, Shaking Crab, Littleburg, Dakzen, and ICENY, among many others. Where: City Hall Plaza, 1 City Hall Sq., Boston Details: Tickets available online . The event runs from 4 to 11 p.m. May 19 Treadbetter’s Dali-Inspired Pop-Up What: Bartender Sam Treadway and chef Emmett Ledbetter continue their monthly “adventurous dining experience” series with a menu inspired by Spanish cuisine and artist Salvador Dali. Where: Field & Vine , 9 Sanborn Ct., Union Square, Somerville Details: The dinner takes place from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. (to leave time for you to get home for the Game of Thrones finale). Tickets are available online for $150/person. Eater Boston Sign up for our newsletter. Enter your email address Subscribe By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy.

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18 Fabulous Events In Southern California This Week

by Christine N. Ziemba in Arts & Entertainment on April 29, 2019 6:00 AM Rustic Canyon holds a pop-up dinner with SF’s Foreign Cinema this week. (Image: Courtesy of RC Family)
We hope your tummies are ready for the coming week. Chefs collaborate at pop-ups at Otium, Rustic Canyon and Puesto; the L.A. Times’ Food Bowl begins and the Night Market at Yamashiro returns. The Silver Lake Chorus holds a music release show, t he Asian Pacific American Film Festival opens, Hot Chip is a hot ticket and Le Creuset holds a factory sale.
MONDAY, APRIL 29 – TUESDAY, APRIL 30 Foreign Cinema Now Serving — 727 North Broadway, downtown L.A. Rustic Canyon — 1119 Wilshire Blvd., Santa Monica Longtime San Francisco restaurant owners Gayle Pirie and John Clark celebrate their cookbook, The Foreign Cinema Cookbook , at two events in L.A. On Monday at 7:30 p.m., the duo join writer and educator Julie Wolfson (who’s also an LAist contributor ) for a conversation. On Tuesday, from 5:30 to 10:30 p.m., they collaborate with Rustic Canyon’s chef de cuisine, Andy Doubrava, on a five-course, family-style meal featuring dishes and drinks from the book. COST: Monday’s event is FREE with , $105 for the dinner; MORE INFO
MONDAY, APRIL 29; 5:30 – 9 p.m. Chefs Collab Dinner Otium — 222 S. Hope St., downtown L.A. Chef Timothy Hollingsworth of Otium teams with chef Amninder Sandhu of Mumbai’s Arth restaurant and chefs Arjun and Nakul Mahendro of Badmaash in DTLA to create an inventive four-course menu. Expect Indian flavors and influences blending with each chef’s style. Ellen Marie Bennett, founder of Hedley & Bennett, co-hosts the event. Choose from one of five seating times. Ticket prices do not include taxes, tip or drinks. COST: $75 per person; MORE INFO
MONDAY, APRIL 29; 5 – 10 p.m. Bayside Graduation Dinner Saved By The Max — 7100 Santa Monica Blvd, West Hollywood The Saved By The Bell Pop-Up closes on April 30, and there’s a graduation dinner hosted by Tori Scott (Zack Morris’s girlfriend who’s not Kelly Kapowski). Other cast members may drop by as well. The graduation dinner includes an appetizer and entree.
TUESDAY, APRIL 30; 1 p.m. Pink Flamingos Bing Theater at LACMA — 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Mid-Wilshire Make Tuesday a ditch day and catch the classic John Waters 1972 film about a large woman (Divine) and her misfit family, who compete with a Baltimore couple for the crown of filthiest people around. COST: $2 – $4; MORE INFO
TUESDAY, APRIL 30; 4 – 9:30 p.m. The Collective Foodie Angel City Brewery — 216 S. Alameda St., downtown L.A. This mini-conference for food-lovers, food-preneurs and influencers focuses on “Navigating The Business Of Food.” There are panel discussions, keynotes, networking opportunities and, of course, snacks, bites and beverages. COST: $59 – $129; MORE INFO View this post on Instagram Apr 22, 2019 at 8:40pm PDT
TUESDAY, APRIL 30; 6 p.m. Mesamérica L.A. & DFiesta Various locations in downtown L.A. The Los Angeles Times Food Bowl kicks off a month-long series of food events with a three-part party. It opens with Mesamérica L.A. at the Million Dollar Theater, which marks the first time chef Enrique Olvera’s celebrated symposium will be held outside of Mexico. The program examines the culinary and cultural connections between Mexico City and L.A. to celebrate the sister cities’ 50-year anniversary. The multimedia discussion, which includes videos and songs, covers art, architecture, identity and tacos. The symposium is followed by festivities at Grand Central Market and La Cita Bar. COST: $35 – $85; MORE INFO
TUESDAY, APRIL 30; 8:30 p.m. So, You Do Comedy…? UCBT Sunset — 5419 W. Sunset Blvd., East Hollywood Each month, host Chris Witaske sits down with well-known comedians to chat about how they got started in the biz. In the hot seat this week is actor, director and writer Matt Walsh who’s best known for his role as Mike McLintock in Veep .
WEDNESDAY, MAY 1; 9 p.m. Hot Chip El Rey Theatre — 5515 Wilshire Blvd., Mid-Wilshire The U.K. electronic-pop band plays The Shrine in the fall but brings its highly danceable tunes to the El Rey in advance of its upcoming release, A Bath Full of Ecstasy (out June 21). Black Peaches opens. COST: Tickets: $45; MORE INFO
WEDNESDAY, MAY 1; 6 p.m. (reception), 7 p.m. talk Shoshana Zuboff: The Age of Surveillance Capitalism Orange County Museum of Art — 1661 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana Zuboff, professor emerita of the Harvard Business School and author of The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power , discusses the form of power called “surveillance capitalism” and the ways corporations try to predict and control our behavior. (We’re talking about you, Facebook.)
WEDNESDAY, MAY 1; 6 – 7 p.m. Body Percussion with Dorrance Dance Julianne and George Argyros Plaza at the Segerstrom Center — 600 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa The center offers a series of free, all-ages outdoor events throughout the month. They kick off with a workshop led by Nicholas Van Young, who teaches participants on how to use the entire body to create a wide variety of rhythmic sounds. Using the body as instrument, the workshop focuses on the relationship between music and movement. COST: FREE; MORE INFO The Silver Lake Chorus returns with new music at a release show at the Hi-Hat. (Photo: Courtesy of the Silver Lake Chorus)
WEDNESDAY, MAY 1; 8 p.m. Silver Lake Chorus Release Show The Hi-Hat — 5043 York Blvd., Highland Park The group, which recreates indie music for chorale, releases two new tracks written exclusively for the chorus by Van Dyke Parks and Lucius. They’re joined by Diā and Tim Carr for the show.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 1; Beginning at 5 p.m. Mole & Mezcal Dinner Puesto Park Place — 3311 Michelson Dr, Irvine The restaurant group, best known for its Mexico City-style tacos, holds a special pop-up dinner with acclaimed Oaxacan chefs at their Irvine location. Chefs Olga Cabrera from Casa del Sol and Aurora Toledo from Restaurante Zandunga work with the Puesto team to create a special four-course, prix-fixe dinner menu. COST: $30, $20 drink pairing (optional); MORE INFO
THURSDAYS – SUNDAYS; 11 a.m. – 9 p.m. Samskara Wisdome — 1147 Palmetto St., downtown L.A. In this exhibition, the VR and 360 immersive art park presents more than 70 works from Android Jones in nine different formats, including digital canvases, “Microdose VR,” dynamic sculptures, shows, live performances and films in a spherical movie theater. COST: $9 – $29; MORE INFO Straight from Dublin is Roddy Doyle’s play about two men, sitting in a pub, waxing poetic about life and little things. (Photo: Courtesy of Abbey Theatre)
THURSDAY, MAY 2 – SUNDAY, MAY 5 Abbey Theatre’s Two Pints The Red Room, Chapter One — 227 N. Broadway, Santa Ana Santa Ana Sites, which develops community engagement programs, presents Roddy Doyle’s play about two Irish gents, talking about their Da’s, death, Nigella, North Korea and the afterlife. The work started out as a Facebook conversation, and now it’s a play set in a pub. COST: $12 – $25; MORE INFO
THURSDAY, MAY 2 – THURSDAY, SEPT. 29; 5 – 10 p.m. Hollywood Night Market Yamashiro Restaurant — 1999 N. Sycamore Ave., Hollywood The popular, weekly open-air market returns for its 10th summer. It hosts 30 of L.A.’s finest food vendors with local live music while the Pagoda bar serves up cocktails for those 21+ until 10 p.m. With incredible views, it makes a great date night. COST: FREE admission; MORE INFO A still from “Yellow Rose,” starring Eva Noblezada, which opens the Los Angeles Asian Pacific American Film Festival. (Photo: August Thurmer)
THURSDAY, MAY 2 – FRIDAY, MAY 10 LA Asian Pacific Film Festival Several venues in Downtown L.A. The film festival presents more than 100 screenings for its 35th edition. It opens with the world premiere of Yellow Rose, written and directed by first time feature filmmaker Diane Paragas. The film, about a headstrong Filipino girl from a small Texas town who’s chasing her country music dreams while facing the threat of deportation. It stars Eva Noblezada and Lea Salonga. COST: Individual tickets start at $15, $135 – $400 (passes); MORE INFO
THURSDAY, MAY 2; 10 p.m. Subsuelo The Virgil — 4519 Santa Monica Blvd., Virgil Village The global bass crew presents a night of cumbia, salsa, reggaeton, hip-hop, flamenco, Afro-house, dancehall, merengue, tropical funk, moombahton and Latin trap in both rooms.
THURSDAY, MAY 2 – SUNDAY, MAY 5 Factory to Table Sale Barker Hangar — 3021 Airport Ave., Santa Monica Le Creuset cookware teams with top L.A. chefs for a sale that features food, music, drinks and live cooking demos by chefs including Sarah Hendrix of Lady & Larder, Nguyen Tran of Starry Kitchen and Button Mash and Dave Woodall of Red Herring. A portion of ticket proceeds go toward local nonprofit After School All Stars, an organization that serves low-income middle school youth, as well as Meals on Wheels. The VIP sessions start Thursday, followed by three additional sessions. You must reserve a ticket for a specified shopping session. COST: $15 – $40; MORE INFO
How are you spending your week? Let us know on Twitter @christineziemba and @LeoHasACat .

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FRIDAY
6:30pm – This is not your typical nature trip beginning, but we’re on Peachtree Street preparing to see a musical. But in a strange turn of events, said musical (“Dear Evan Hansen”, a recent Broadway smash) talks a surprising amount about trees. (Thankfully that’s where the similarities between the show’s plot line and our weekend ended.) Incidentally all of my favorite close-proximity pre-show restaurants were booked up by the time I learned I would be going to this event but a little extra searching and I had no problem getting a table at Blue India down at Peachtree & 8th – and it was a lovely night to walk up and down Peachtree. An auspicious beginning for the weekend then!
12:30am – As the show ended we did the opposite of what we typically do – instead of driving down I-85 to Peachtree City we drive up I-85 to Commerce. Getting out of the Red Lot took almost as much time as the drive, but in any case we ended up at a Red Roof Inn just off the interstate on 441. It was cheap and gets good reviews & I can see they take care of the place.
SATURDAY
9:30am – After checking out of the Red Roof Inn (does anybody else ever hear Nick Cave sing “RED ROOF INN” when you drive by one of these?) and making the mental note to return to Commerce one day so I can eat at a place named Pinky’s Indian Cuisine (housed next to a gas station on top of that) we have driven up 441 to our first stop, Tallulah Gorge State Park . The skies are electric blue and cloudless & the temps are in the upper 60s – it’s a great time to be alive. But to tell the truth we’re not going hiking here – we’ve been here before and done the full rim hikes. At the same time it’s a shame to just drive by the place, so we go to the closest overlooks to peer down into the chasm along with a trip inside the well-done museum (one of the best for the Georgia State Parks) to brush up on the Victorian heyday of the area.
10:30am – Highway 441 starts to become pretty enjoyable from Tallulah Gorge northward as you’re approaching the mountains. I toy with the idea of crossing the state line and visiting some North Carolina waterfalls but we’ve got a packed day already – so we literally drive up to Black Rock Mountain State Park – and make no mistake, the drive up to the Visitor Center is an attraction in itself. I’ve been here before (5 years to the day, Facebook reminded me, oddly enough) but my kid hasn’t. We spot a turkey on the drive and a forest full of glowing green-leaves trees that is playing a game of shadows and light with the sun – just gorgeous. I buy a nice t-shirt for cheap in the VC and we gaze out at the viewpoints facing south towards Clayton & the one facing north and eastward which is a little more attractive in my opinion. We then begin the Tennessee Rock trail which is apparently a popular choice today given the parking lot. I’ll be frank with my opinion – it’s a lovely view when you make it to the lookout (and we can certainly see all there is to see on this crystal clear morning) but otherwise the walk through the woods doesn’t do a lot for me (aside from our timing since again the leaves are a special shade of green that just make life worthwhile in itself). I could be clouded due to my daughter who typically isn’t a fan of hikes with steady ascents – were I to do it again I would probably go contra the recommendation and take it clockwise, which would give a really short, really steep ascent at the beginning but a pretty easy steady drop for the remaining 1.5 miles or so. 13-year-old bummer attitudes had us on this hike longer than expected, but I didn’t want to leave without at least checking out Black Rock Lake which I hadn’t seen before – it was gorgeous too today, the lake a shade of aquamarine nestled within the trees. No full hike around it, but a couple of minutes basking at it was enough to make me happy again and was worth the slightly questionable (at spots) gravel drive to get there (my Prius is unavailable for comment).
1:00pm – Downtown Clayton is PACKED! It turns out there is an arts festival going on today – so that’s where the music we could hear from the Black Rock lookout was coming from. (Apparently there were festivals all over up here – Blairsville had an oyster roast and there was a trout festival in Blue Ridge – I can only assume Hemptown took the weekend off given they must have had a killer 4/20 last weekend.) This wasn’t how I expected my debut at Fortify Pi to be, but I’ve waited to come here so long that I guess I can wait a little longer – we put our names on the list and wander around the stalls and the shops around Clayton, and thankfully as soon as we both said “let’s just sit and wait” we were called to our seats. The wild mushroom pasta with shaved parmagiano-reggiano was amazing, well worth the hype and the wait (and it should be said there was very little wait once seated – prompt service). We also order a couple of pizzas to go – a margherita & one with a pair of unusual locally sourced toppings, feta & yellow tomatoes – for dinner later on.
3:00pm – What a day to drive on GA-76, the best day of the year to do so if I may say – it’s a real challenge as to what is bluer, the sky or Lake Burton as we drove by it, and the mountains are still blooming so there are shades of colors all in the background. We take scenic GA-197 (really, it’s all scenic up here) and drive down to our third state park of the day, Moccasin Creek SP. This is a new one for me, and to be honest I picked it out solely because it was near us and there was a waterfall trail listed. And let me say – Moccasin Creek is only 32 acres and is essentially little more than a campsite on Lake Burton with this trail (the 2-mile Hemlock Falls Trail), but at this moment it’s my favorite state park. We LOVED this easy forest hike that runs alongside the surprisingly forceful creek. Of course the day helped – the most naturally fluorescent photo I’ve ever taken in my life was captured here (I’ll link to my photo album at the end of this for proof). But regardless this was just such a perfect chilled-out shady Saturday afternoon hike, culminating in the cool breezes drifting from Hemlock Falls as we sat on a log taking it all in.
4:59pm – After a photo-op at Lake Burton, a return to beautiful GA-76, and a diversion South at Hiawassee we are at the entrance gate to Brasstown one minute before “everything is closed” per the guard. But “everything” doesn’t include the 0.6 mile Summit Trail leading up to the Observation Tower, which frankly is EVERYTHING as far as I’m concerned. (My daughter, though game, is a bit less enthusiastic.) But she can do it – we just went below the rim for a bit at the Grand Canyon a few weeks ago, as I remind her. And sure enough, we get up there and while a few clouds are out now the sky has been tarnished to a mere 98% perfection rate – we managed. Three states easily seen and at a gorgeous time of year. I also saw they do stargazing nights on Fridays and I’d love to check that out sometime. Surprisingly this was only the second time I’ve ever been here and my first since I was a kid – I’m going to do something about that. (Don’t tell my kid.)
6:15pm – I originally wanted to head back up to Hiawassee and continue the drive west on 76 but the time was a bit later than I liked – so instead we headed off on another wild ride, the twisty GA-180 west until it terminates at Suches on US-60. Dogwoods are blooming all over which I’m checking out when I’m not doing elevation-changing hairpin curves. My family hails from Suches, and my parents have set up a camper on some family land which is where we’ll be spending the night. They’re there also along with some additional family. And I’ve gotta say, driving to the campsite feels a bit like a state park in itself. We arrive just after 7 and they’re grilling out burgers while we’re eating the pizzas from Fortify Pi – we’re all winners. We then meander around the creek that runs through the land and the meadows surrounding, and the family disperses shortly after the first wave of constellations in the night sky are identified. Dare I say it was a better celestial show than the one I got from the ceiling at the Fox the night before.
SUNDAY
9:30am – A leisurely rise (for some) as I have coffee with my parents and chat by the campfire. It’s supposed to be an overcast day but there’s still a decent bit of blue sky so all is well – time for another hike then! We leave the site around this time and head back generally from whence we came, down US-60 to Ga-180 again, twirling all around Lake Winfield Scott and continuing east.
10:00am – We enter Vogel State Park , which I went to all the time in my youth but it’s my first time here in 30+ years. I didn’t grow up in a hiking family though (I grew up in a “go to a pretty place, make a fire, and then sit by it” family, as evidenced by this morning) so I’d never been on any trails here but that will change. So after the quick overlook at Trahlyta Falls from the main road, we walk to the trailhead for the 4.1 mile Bear Hair Gap Trail. The woods at Vogel just look different than elsewhere – the trail guide says that Vogel has more varieties of trees than you can find at Yellowstone, so maybe there’s something to that. It just makes for a scenic walk even if I can’t describe fully what makes this so much richer than a number of state park hikes through the woods. It is a steady ascent though but surprisingly my daughter is cool with it (once it generally plateaus) and to my surprise she later declared this her favorite hike of the weekend. Perhaps it was for the multiple times we had to cross creeks, or maybe it was for the grand lookout of Lake Trahlyta through the trees – she exclaimed a rare-for-13 “Wow” when she saw it. “This looks like the opening shot of a movie where they’ll zoom in on someone from this view” – I get that.
12:30pm – I’ve been to the Southwest quite a bit recently, and one of my favorite things to do there is look for petroglyphs. Well imagine my surprise when I learned that not far from Vogel is a collection of significant ancient petroglyphs! It promised to be a quick trip and we drove through some stunning scenery to get there, but alas the small parking lot was double-parked when we got there so I took it as a sign it wasn’t to be for this trip. Which is easy to say since my parents have this camper up here – I see all sorts of future excursions in my future.
1:00pm – So we’re in the Blairsville square for lunch instead. Blairsville isn’t quite Clayton when it comes to the restaurant scene, but we wind up at Hole In The Wall – we’re pescatarians and neither of us care for southern food, but they have all-day breakfast for my daughter and there’s a clam strip po-boy for me (local? They did have an oyster roast up here last night) and it was good. We head out and glimpse at the lovely courthouse and I think back to my youth – I came to Suches monthly all through my upbringing, but it wasn’t until I was 12 that my aunt drove me here for lunch. I remembered seeing the square and it was like, “you mean there’s civilization up in these parts?” The glory of it is that much of the vicinity could still make that a feeling for a contemporary kid today.
1:30pm – The inevitable drive home begins, and I decide to take GA-76 west to Ellijay , but once we get there I decide I don’t want to drive I-575 yet again and instead stay on 76 until I get to 411 around Chatsworth. And really, the glory of 76 is from Blairsville east, but there are still some nice scenes along the way. As for 411, I can’t say that I’d driven it before on this long stretch down to Cartersville and I-75, and to tell the truth I wasn’t expecting much, but it was such a calming drive after the mountain driving of the weekend – I was chilled to the world and it was probably the equivalent of Hemlock Falls for my car, just slow and steady down the road. Alas I destroyed this vibe completely by heading to a Costco – on a Sunday afternoon! – which is one of the more soul-crushing ways to reenter the mundanities of life but hey, we had some good times along the way.

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Eating Edmonton: Coriander Cuisine

0 2 minutes read Jessica Tang
At the cross-section of 112th Street and 76th Avenue is a small business duplex that has been through many proprietors in recent years. It once was a combination pharmacy/post office, then a half-café half-nothing that went out of business. What has emerged in its place is a new Indian “fusion” restaurant called Coriander Cuisine. Seems like a gamble of a location for a new restaurant considering how many businesses have tried and failed in just this one place. That’s probably why they’re open every day of the week sans Mondays. After seeing the previous business go under without sampling its goods, I decided to try this one out. Here are the findings. The Katchumber Salad ($4.99) is a medium sized bowl piled with finely chopped tomatoes, cucumber, onion, and more, not that I could make any of them out through the overpowering sauce (a lemon vinaigrette, according to the site). While not bad, I’m not one who typically enjoys the taste of one’s vegetables biting back. Even the rice, provided alongside other dishes, did little to cull its edge. But it’s still a nice culinary experiment I look forward to sampling again — just with more water next time. The Beef Boti Kebab ($14.99) consists of several pieces of beef served still simmering on a circular frying pan, it had the familiar taste and texture of a thick meatball. This is by no means a point against the dish — just a pleasant little oddity. If anything, it’s a point against my own limited tastes as the second the meat touched my tongue, I could practically hear my tastebuds scream for a ketchup packet. The Butter Chicken ($13.99) had a strong flavourful milky sauce that, in comparison with the rest of the food, was much tamer in spice level. The silky soft orange soup made for a good pairing with the rice. Ultimately, this was the best dish of the lot. The Beef Vindaloo ($13.99) is supposedly a dish containing beef and potatoes. While the beef was at least identifiable by sight, the existence of potatoes in the sauce at all remained only a theory. Even attempting to identify the potatoes by taste is ill-advised as the sauce quickly tends to drown your tongue in pure fire. Read: You need rice with this one. The Garlic Naan Bread ($2.49) is a side dish we elected to sample that tasted like lighter-than-normal garlic bread with less punch. The Bhojpuri Bhalle ($6.99) is basically a lentil donut in bread batter. On its own it was spicy as heck, but once dipped in the light or dark brown sauces it was somehow made neutrally bland. I have no idea how that works, chemically. The Palak & Kale Chaat ($7.99) is made up of spinach kale wrapped in batter and crisped to crunchy perfection. It worked with all the sauces and proved to be my mom’s favourite dish of the evening, owing mostly to its crunchiness. The Chicken Biriyani ($12.99) consists of spicy chicken served with equally spicy rice mixed with some shrimp-shell looking stuff I didn’t recognize. It had my burning tongue diving desperately back into the butter chicken many times for some hope of rescue. The Mango Lassi ($5.99) is an overpoweringly sweet glass of yogurt that thankfully did help with cutting the spice. But was too thick and sugary to invite the rhythmic chugging needed to truly fulfill its duty. Still, I imagine cutting it with a bit of milk would help for much smoother ingestion.
Overall, I have to say the place left a very positive impression with me. For a relaxing lunch out with family or group of friends, this is a fine choice for consideration. A word of caution, though: I have to recommend ordering the plain rice before anything else. Share

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