Lentil mania

Lentil mania

Charmaine Millaire Author
These little legumes are vegan—and packed with nutrients. What makes them even better is they can transform and mimic some of your favourites, like shepherd’s pie and meatloaf. Here’s our quick guide to lentils!
A known cousin to peas and beans, lentils come from the legume family , and are one of the most nutritious and versatile plant-based proteins out there. Often overlooked, lentils are an inexpensive way of getting a wide range of nutrients.
They are made up of over 25% protein, making them an excellent meat alter- native for vegetarians, and are a great source of iron. They are also packed with B vitamins, zinc, magnesium, and potassium. They also contain a range of beneficial plant compounds known as phytochemicals—which can protect against heart disease and type 2 diabetes.
High in fibre, and low-fat, lentils are often included in traditional dishes like curry and soup, but also delicious blended into veggie burgers, casse- roles, and other recipes.
Lentils are a common food staple in Asian and North African cuisines, but the global production of lentils are primarily cultivated and harvested in Canada at 1.99 million, compared to 1.1 million in India, according to the International Journal of Molecular Sciences .
Unlike other legumes, lentils don’t re- quire any soaking, but should be rinsed prior to cooking to eliminate impurities, and can be cooked between 20–45 minutes (depending on the type). Once cooked, the lentils should be slightly crunchy or soft, depending on your preference. Once boiled, be sure to drain and rinse them in cold water to prevent further cooking.
A handful of lentils is perfect for add- ing more nutritional value to soup or salad or to make meals a little more fill- ing. There are four main categories of lentils: brown, green, red/yellow, and specialty.
BROWN LENTILS: These lentils are the most common variety. They have a mild, earthy flavour, and hold their shape well during cooking—making them ideal to use in stews, or as a base for veggie burgers or vegetarian meatloaf.
GREEN LENTILS: Like brown lentils, green lentils hold their shape well while cooking, but they are slightly more “peppery” than brown lentils and come in a range of sizes. These lentils are great in stews, salads or for side dishes. Tip: Green lentils are a fantastic, and less expensive, alternative for French Puy lentils.
YELLOW AND RED LENTILS: This variety of lentils range from bright yellow to orange and red. Unlike the other lentils, these lentils have a “split” nature, making them ideal to use in soups (especially as a thickener), and in curries and casseroles. Yellow and red lentils cook quickly, and are very common in Indian and Middle Eastern cuisine.
SPECIALTY LENTILS: There are many varieties of specialty lentils, but the two most common are black beluga and Puy. Black beluga lentils get their nickname from their resemblance to beluga caviar, but their flavour is full-bodied and earthy like black beans. These lentils are great in warm salads.
Puy lentils are grown in central France called Le Puy, and are known for their rich, peppery flavour. These rare lentils should be the star of the meal. They make a great base for meat or fish, and they make a great side dish.
We’ve got some great lentil recipes in our magazine and our Healthful Gourmet section of the website. Share:

Read More…

The Story Behind Mumbai’s Famous Pav Bhaji & Why This City’s Food Is Jugadu

The Story Behind Mumbai’s Famous Pav Bhaji & Why This City’s Food Is Jugadu Its food is a mirror to the life and people there. By – April 24, 2019
Mumbai is the city of dreams, Bollywood & Ambani but it is also extremely well-known for its food.
The city’s street food is perhaps best known for delicacies like Pav Bhaji, bhelpuri and more being consumed by tourists constantly.
Recently, I came across how Pav Bhaji was created originally by a local vendor for mill workers who wanted a light and quick lunch since they had to return to strenuous work afterwards.
The vendor used leftover ingredients from other dishes, mashed them all together with a sprinkle of some curry and other spices with pav replacing rice or roti.
Apparently, the first Pav Bhaji stalls were located around the Cotton Exchange where traders would wait till late at night and early morning for the New York cotton prices.
Which begs the question of why is Mumbai food the way it is? The Mix Of Culture
One cannot deny that Mumbai has a wide mix of cultures each of which bring their own style of preparing food.
From the local Maharashtrian cuisine to Parsi, from seafood of Goa and Kerala to a touch of U.P. food, there are a lot of different types of cuisines floating around the city.
Not just culture, but even history is offered in Mumbai through the stomach with the city housing some of the oldest restaurants like Delhi Darbar, Sindhudurg, Highway Gomantak, Samrat, Vitthal Bhelwala, Mahesh Lunch Home, Kailas Parbat, and Adarsh.
Mumbai is home to any Indian with a dream, be it someone from Bihar or U.P. or South or Gujarat or the North East. It is a land which attracts people from different parts of the country and with that you see diverse backgrounds, cultures, traditions, religions coming together.
Read More: The Contribution Of Mughal Dynasty To A New Variety Of Cuisine In India The Working Population
Mumbai, contributing around 6 to 7% to the Indian economy has a big hand in bringing about jobs, employment in a variety of sectors for India.
While the GDP of the city might be high, it does not mean that the local population is all that well off, with the existence of Dharavi, named as the largest slum in Asia, being evidence to how many are still living on a tight budget.
Along with that, migrants and youngsters transferring to Mumbai for jobs and a better life ensure that the working sector of the city is pretty big, directly affecting the food sector.
It is a fast & busy city, always on the move, with most people living without any domestic help and on limited budgets. Even historically Mumbai has been a trading city, more known for its economic importance.
The reason foods like Vada Pav, Pav Bhaji, Bhelpuri, Bun Maska and likes are so popular is because they are all quick, widely available, easy to consume and affordable.
Not only that, but these dishes are ones that tourists and migrants can also easily prepare since the basic ingredients are common across the country. The Complete Opposite
In contrast are cities like Lucknow and Hyderabad which are widely known for their exquisite cuisine. Their dishes take quite a while to prepare. While now in the modern time these cities operate at a more relaxed pace, their royal history perhaps greatly contributes to the way their food is still made.
The aristocratic hangover seems to continue on these cities and that is why their food is rich, luxurious, made with tons of patience, ingredients, detailed recipes and expertise of tons of cooks and helpers. Even their vessels and utensils have a certain thought and reason to them.
Luxurious dishes of Lucknow/Hyderabad like biryani, kebabs, kormas and more, are both time and labour consuming to prepare and eat, while Mumbai’s food is a healthy quick fix or jugaad.
Even the use of cardamom and saffron, typically expensive and rich spices, points to how much time, effort and care is given to each dish in these erstwhile princely states.
Where Lucknow and Hyderabad’s cuisine is a direct reflection of the city, so it is with Mumbai too where its food is a mirror to the life and people there.
Image Credits: Google Images

Read More…

What Traveling Taught Me about Life – Sushmita Banda

What Traveling Taught Me about Life Don’t sweat the small stuff Sushmita Banda 20 Travel, they said. It’ll change you, they said. Even though I don’t exactly know who ‘ they ’ are, I do think they are right. The changes aren’t always big and visible, they manifest in how a person interacts with the world after. They make their presence felt in subtle ways — the conversations with strangers on buses, the openness to a new cuisine, the extra second in a hug. For me, it was a sense of comfort that I developed over my place in the world, the strengthening of my belief that I can handle any situation and the realisation that I attract the energy that I put out into the world.
First comes courage, then comes comfort zone Travel pushes you out of your comfort zone, you’re forced to interact with people, share space, and take risks. But comfort zone is a funny thing. The more I found myself being pushed, the more I found myself creating new comfort zones. It’s like when you first jump into a lake or a river and aren’t sure how deep it is, you paddle your legs until you figure out your place and then just keep swimming . I didn’t want to get off trains and buses because after a few hours they became my cocoon and also because I was a tiny bit nervous and excited for the first moments in a new city. But as soon as got off and figured out where I was, it was go time.
A lot can happen over food I can’t emphasise the importance of food and the bonds I have created over it. Food is universal and is such a beautiful representation of one’s culture. Most of my friends and I made Indian food together and those evenings spent in their kitchens were some of my most precious memories. I felt a sense of belonging over our love for food and in showing them where I come from. I truly felt at home in those kitchens sharing and learning. The conversations that flow over dining tables break barriers and make people see another way of living. It really is the purest kind of cultural exchange.
The making of the meal. Flying Tiger Copenhagen had creative solutions to my spice shortage | The meal we put together in Romania with the spices The universe has a way of making things fall into place I like to plan things, not to an extent where I know what I’m doing at 3:27 PM the next day, but to the extent that I know what I’m doing the next day. Even before my trip started, as I was talking to my friends about visiting them, I knew that we probably couldn’t do a lot together as they weren’t on vacation, I was. I knew I would be a tourist by myself. As the trip progressed, I noticed that things had a way of working out by themselves and I did something special with each friend I visited. Besides the fact that they are all beautiful humans that made time for me, the universe played its part in making it easier for us to spend time together. When the intention is set, the universe takes care of things.
Travel is one adventure after another I remember the first time I took a subway by myself and got terribly lost in Buenos Aires. I walked around trying to figure out where I was for hours before asking a few police officers for help. After the first time, the band-aid was ripped out for life. I have gotten lost many times since and every time I take a subway, a tram, a bus for the first time in a city, I know I can get lost, but I also know it’ll be an adventure and I’ll figure my way. With each new city, it becomes a game to see how every city is similar and different at the same time.
Travel constantly keeps me thinking on my feet. Like that time I booked the wrong ticket and I had two minutes to decide whether I would take the next bus or book a ticket immediately and board that bus. The clock was ticking and I needed to think fast. I did get into that bus.
Travel makes you fall in love with the little things The love one feels while traveling is so grand that turn it into memories and guard it. Some places make you feel like you belong and some places make you see yourself living there. But it’s the little things that make the love so grand. It’s knowing the routes to and from your hostel and the neighbourhood after two days of being there, the hours of walking and being lost, sitting in a park and watching life, the connection you feel with every musician singing a Coldplay cover. It’s also when you discover a storytelling community, a new dessert, and the inexplicable sadness you feel when a city is fading away.
I’m a sucker for funny food signs and I’m always on the lookout for them (L-R: Maastricht, Prague, and Berlin) We see travel as an escape and carefully crafted photos make us long for places we’ve never been to. That is an illusion . Travel can also be ugly and sweaty. It can make you feel lonely and scared for your safety. It is important to be conscious of the good and the bad. It is not particularly pleasant when you have an 11 kg backpack on your back and a 7 kg backpack on your front and you are lost in Paris after traveling all day and your feet are killing you. It isn’t fun when you trip over a broken sidewalk with the two backpacks and can’t get up and are already running late and may miss your flight. It helps if you can laugh it off, but that helps with most things in life.
These life lessons were brought to you by the oldest university — life and one of it’s most successful courses, travel.
P.S. Travel also taught me a thing or two about people and their need to belong .

Read More…

Indian food and film festival to begin in Saudi Arabia

Home » Indian food and film festival to begin in Saudi Arabia Indian food and film festival to begin in Saudi Arabia There will also be a musical fiesta on both days of the festival. Category: News , NRIs Corner Posted by safoora 3:55 3:55 pm IST
RIYADH: The Consulate General of India, in association with the Saudi Indian Business Network (SIBN), is organising an Indian Food and Film Festival in Jeddah. The two-day event will kick off on Thursday evening on the consulate premises on Prince Muhammad Bin Abdulaziz (Tahliah) Street.
Mir Gazanfar Ali Zaki, General Secretary of SIBN, said that the fourth edition of the food festival would be organised along with the first film festival. Indian Consul General Md Noor Rahman Sheikh will inaugurate the event at 7 p.m. Thursday and consuls general and diplomats of several countries, as well as prominent Saudi officials and business leaders will attend the inaugural ceremony, reports Saudi Gazette.
“Since assuming the office as the Consul General and Vice Patron of SIBN, Sheikh has been extending full support to SIBN enabling it to organise more than 100 events and activities within a short span of time,” Zaki said.
“More than 15 popular Indian restaurants based in Jeddah have confirmed their participation to offer their unique and mouth-watering array of delicacies at one venue,” Zaki said.
Along with the delicious cuisine, entertainment will be adding flavour to the evening. Bollywood blockbusters Tiger Zinda Hai, Bahubali 2 and Raazi will be screened as part of the film festival.
There will also be a musical fiesta on both days of the festival.
The event will be open to Saudi and Indian nationals (families only) on April 25 and 26 from 6:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Source: IANS

Read More…

Three Fold’s Riverdale project set to progress; owners also plan pop-up chicken shop

ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT RESTAURANT TRANSITIONS: Three Fold’s Riverdale project set to progress; new opening for Spa City steakhouse; Arkansas Literary Festival specials by Eric E. Harrison | Today at 4:30 a.m. The owners of Three Fold Noodles + Dumpling Co. will add a Riverdale location in two to three years and an iterim pop-up chicken restaurant by the end of May. Democrat-Gazette file photo
The owners of Little Rock’s Three Fold Noodles + Dumpling Co. are proceeding with plans to redevelop the property at 1509 Rebsamen Park Road, Little Rock, formerly the Marshall Clements Antique Store, into a restaurant with an outdoor dining space, a bar and a sake brewery.
Owner Lisa Zhang says they have adjusted the site plan they are submitting to the Little Rock Board of Adjustment to reduce the size of the proposed building from 10,000 square feet to 8,000 square feet and eliminating a six- to seven-foot grade on the property to provide at least 48 parking spaces.
That’s the principal source of concern for neighboring businesses that led the board to defer for a month — to a meeting on Monday — its decision whether or not to approve the proposal. Zhang says the change should satisfy neighbors that the facility’s customers won’t be parking on their lots.
Zhang says she envisions a two- to three-year timeline for the new facility, based on how long it will take to raise the necessary funding. “We don’t want to put ourselves into deep debt,” she explained. The facility, the name of which is still to be determined, will create Asian pickles, cure meats, bake pastries and brew sake, a Japanese rice spirit with apparently Chinese origins. It represents a second Chinese cuisine project for Three Fold, which has steadfastly concentrated on a limited menu of dumplings, noodles and buns, both in its original location, 215 Center St., and its current spot, 611 Main St. Hours will be the same as Three Fold: 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Saturday.
Meanwhile, Zhang plans to open a pop-up restaurant in what was its original Center Street location, which Hanaroo , a Japanese-Korean-sushi restaurant took over in December 2017, but closed April 20. She says she’d known about the closing for about a month but it had not otherwise been announced. Hanaroo had moved to Center Street from 205 W. Capitol Ave., where it had operated since 2005.
Zhang said the new restaurant, to be named Haybird Chicken , will serve Asian-style fried chicken, lighter than the traditional American Southern-style, consisting of seasoned, marinated, boneless chicken breasts (white meat) and full legs (dark meat), cut into portions of manageable size and served with a side of sauce in three spice levels (nonspicy, spicy and “poison”), either on a plate or a toasted/steamed whole-wheat bun. A gluten-based vegetarian “chicken” and lightly fried vegetables, tofu and wood-ear fungi would be available for vegetarians.
Thin “hay” fries, house-made pickled daikon, cucumbers and carrots, deep-fried mini-buns and gizzards will be available as side items. As at Three Fold, the beverage list will include fountain-dispensed soft drinks and iced tea, hot tea, Mountain Valley bottled water, bubble tea and draft and bottled beer.
Target to open, assuming all permits are in place date, will be May 25-28. Zhang said she has signed a one-year lease on the space, with an option for a second year; if the concept becomes popular and profitable, it can be made permanent, either at that location or a new one.
Zhang said Three Fold is continuing to do well since it moved to Main Street in the fall of 2017 — the move made it possible to prepare more items to order and slightly expand the menu — to the point at which it occasionally runs out of one or more of its three menu items. Zhang said the new facility will also have space to make additional noodles and dumplings to supplement the Main Street kitchen.
Three Fold’s phone number is (501) 372-1739.
Meanwhile, we have confirmed the closing of Hanaroo via this April 19 post on their Facebook page: “We are no longer do business. It’s been 12 years, so we want to say thank you so much for everything!” The phone number, (501) 301-7900, had not yet been disconnected by our deadline, but only rang without answer during business hours.

We’ve gotten several reports from eagle-eyed observers that the Asher Dairy Bar , 7105 Colonel Glenn Road, Little Rock, which closed in the fall of 2016, has been razed. No word on what, if anything, will take its place.
The former Rodney’s HandleBar & Grill, 9110 Interstate 30, Little Rock, is now Ginger’s Handlebar Grill . The namesake is Ginger Roberts, wife of co-owner Daniel Roberts, Rodney’s son, who describes it as now more of a restaurant and less of a bar, serving “most everything made from scratch,” he says — that is the work of chef Chris Busick, who describes his menu as “traditional America from burgers, salads and steaks to dessert and daily lunch specials.” (Those daily specials include a smoked turkey salad wrap today and a country fried steak sandwich on Friday.) Hours are 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Thursday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday. The phone number is (501) 476-3155; visit the Facebook page, facebook.com/GINGERs-HandleBar-GRILL-655161298249647.
Co-owner Dean Jennings says he’s now looking at the first week of June for the opening of the Little Rock branch of the Spa City’s Bones Chophouse in the space at 27 Rahling Circle that formerly housed Arthur’s Prime Steakhouse. The kitchen, he says, is pretty much complete and he’s working on the dining room this week, and plans to do some soft-opening service the last week of May. The core menu will be the same as he serves at 3920 Central Ave. in Hot Springs, with some different appetizers and a few different dinner features. Hours will be 4-9 or 4-10 p.m. daily, and he’ll serve Sunday brunch. The phone number is (501) 821-5800.
Milano’s Italian Grill has, according to its Facebook page (facebook.com/MilanoItalianGrillLittleRock) opened at 6100 Stones Road at Cantrell Road, Little Rock, next door to the Casa Manana outlet at 18317 Cantrell. The space in the past had housed the Pizza Joint and is in fact the spot that the farthest-west-reach of Layla’s Gyros & Pizza had vacated last fall, having moved there from 8201 Ranch Blvd. This is the second restaurant of that name from the folks who run Verona Italian Restaurant, 190 Skyline Drive, Conway; the first opened a few months ago at 1800 Club Manor Drive, Maumelle. Hours are 4-9 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. The phone number is (501) 367-8255.
Kosuke Hibachi & Sushi has opened in a set of storefronts at 1900 Club Manor Drive., Maumelle, that previously, briefly, housed Kendo Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi, and before that, Sashimi Japanese Steakhouse. Hours are 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 4:30-9:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 4:30-10 p.m. Friday-Saturday; the phone number is (501) 734-8434 and the Facebook page is facebook.com/Kosuke-Japanese-Steakhouse-and-Sushi-2181020478614017.
And Wednesday is the target for the opening of South Boulevard (the sign says SoBo), in the former GiGi’s Soul Food Cafe and Lounge/Nashville Bar and Grill space, 10840 Maumelle Boulevard, North Little Rock, next to Morningside Bagel . Owner Jermaine Burton, who also owns Lucky’s Sports Bar & Grill, 1101 Murphy Drive, Maumelle, says he’s looking at a fusion menu that will include steaks and Korean barbecue; the Facebook page, facebook.com/South-Boulevard-400867444061333, also promises a SoBo Original Burger, an Alaskan Pollock Po-boy, a Spring Strawberry Fields salad and desserts including “Gluten Free Turtle Cheesecake from Cinnalightful,” as well as limited Sunday brunch menu. Kitchen hours are tentative — we’re told 11 a.m.-10 p.m. weekdays, possibly open a little later on weekends, with the bar staying open somewhat later than that. The phone number is (501) 414-8870.
We’ve been told, although we haven’t been able to confirm, that the opening of Magnolia Skillet in the the former White Pig Inn, 5231 E. Broadway in North Little Rock’s Rose City, has been delayed after somebody stole their air conditioning unit.
The last week of May is the target for the opening of the Little Rock franchise outlet of Plano, Texas-based Bawarchi Biryanis outlet in the Market Place Shopping Center, 11121 N. Rodney Parham, Little Rock. The space, storefront 36B, has housed four previous Indian restaurants — Flavor of India, Amruth, Curry in a Hurry and Kebab & Curry (it’s also notable for its proximity to the popular Taj Mahal , just half a block away on Market Street). There is also an outlet in Bentonville. Hours will be 11 a.m.-11 p.m. daily; the phone number is (501) 213-8065; you can check out the surprisingly broad menu — nearly two dozen versions of biryani (an Indian rice dish); vegetarian and nonvegetarian entrees; North and South Indian items (including several versions of the crepe-like dosa); and even “Indo Chinese” fusions of Indian and Chinese cuisine — at the website, still in progress, bawarchilittlerock.com.

As part of the Arkansas Literary Festival, five Little Rock restaurants are offering specials inspired by books by four of the festival’s authors for “Lit Feast,” through Sunday:
Allsopp & Chapple Restaurant + Bar , 311 Main St.: barbecued pork chops and ham slices served with deviled eggs, baked beans with thick cut bacon and jalapeno cornbread, inspired by Rick Bragg’s memoir, The Best Cook in the World: Tales From My Momma’s Table
Capers , 14502 Cantrell Road, German chocolate cake, and Copper Grill , 300 E. Third St., red beans and rice, inspired by Jeff Henderson’s If You Can See It, You Can Be It
Ciao Baci , 605 Beechwood St., small plates of Polpettine Fritte (fried meatballs), Mortadella e Peperoni and Uova con Acciughe (egg with anchovy), inspired by Elizabeth Minchilli’s The Italian Table
The Root Cafe , 1500 Main St., tomato tart with mustard and ricotta (breakfast only), lettuce soup (lunch and dinner), soy-sauce egg with sticky rice and apple custard crisp (dinner only), inspired by Dorie Greenspan’s Everyday Dorie .

Speaking of The Root Cafe , it’s teaming up with nearby Rock Town Distillery for a 6 p.m. Tuesday dinner of five courses, with chef Jonathan Arrington preparing “dishes articulating familiar flavors in rethought presentations,” according to a news release, each with a cocktail pairing. Cost is $70; visit centralarkansastickets.com. The cafe phone number: (501) 414-0423.
Abstract paintings by Brad Wreyford, painting, modern design and craft instructor at the Arkansas School for Mathematics, Science and the Arts, will be the “art” part of this month’s Art & Wine Dinner, 7 p.m. Sunday at The Avenue , inside The Waters hotel, 340 Central Ave., Hot Springs. Executive chef Casey Copeland is preparing a five-course dinner — including pickled watermelon rind, coconut shrimp with peach and lemongrass salsa, smoked beef tenderloin and blueberry buttermilk pie — with wine pairings (see the complete menu online at tinyurl.com/y5zl69rr). Price is $85 per person; call (501) 625-3850 for reservations. The paintings will be on display through the rest of the month. The Capital Bar & Grill is pairing five courses with cocktails made with Patron or Reposado tequila for a May 5 Cinco de Mayo “Patron Dinner.” Chattanooga Times Free Press file photo
The Capital Hotel’s Capital Bar & Grill , 111 W. Markham St., Little Rock, will hold a Cinco de Mayo “Patron Dinner,” 6:15 p.m. May 5. Chef James Hale is preparing five courses, including tuna ceviche, jicama slaw and shrimp, duck enchiladas and chorizo grit cake, all paired with cocktails made with Patron or Reposado tequila. Cost is $120. Visit tinyurl.com/yxd9ju28.
Has a restaurant opened — or closed — near you in the last week or so? Does your favorite eatery have a new menu? Is there a new chef in charge? Drop us a line. Call (501) 399-3667 or send a note to Restaurants, Weekend Section, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, P.O. Box 2221, Little Rock, Ark. 72203. Send email to:
eharrison@arkansasonline.com
Weekend on 04/25/2019 Print Headline: RESTAURANT TRANSITIONS: Three Fold’s Riverdale project set to progress; new opening for Spa City steakhouse; Arkansas Literary Festival specials Sponsor Content

Read More…

Nevada Blooms with Adventure this Spring

Nevada Blooms with Adventure this Spring Thursday, April 25, 2019 2:15 PM
Search for Gems, See Baby Wildlife, Bag a Peak or Road Trip in Nevada
CARSON CITY, NV / ACCESSWIRE / April 25, 2019 / Rockhounds, nature-lovers and adventure-seekers have their fun cut out for them this spring in the Silver State. Rounding out the recreation: a tasty food and beverage scene and a calendar full of festivals. All you need for spring in Nevada is a map, a buddy and a knockout playlist for your road trip. Here, TravelNevada offers suggestions for an epic experience.
Hunt for gold and garnets – Nevada is known as the Silver State because of its prolific silver mines of the late 19 th and early 20 th centuries. These days, the state is a major gold producer – Nevada mines generated 5.6 million ounces of gold in 2017, according to the Nevada Division of Minerals – with much of the mining activity in the Elko /northern Nevada area. For information on mine tours, visit the Elko Convention and Visitors Authority web page here . For more hidden gems, head to Garnet Hill outside of Ely. At this federally managed rockhounding site, hunt for garnets in the area’s volcanic outcroppings. For more information, visit the Bureau of Land Management’s Garnet Hill page here .
Spot a baby animal – Nevada has vast swaths of public land: beautiful landscapes supporting various mammal and bird species. Spot gangly spring ponies in the Carson Valley , Bighorn lambs roaming Valley of Fire , or find baby burros throughout the Black Rock Desert . Birders may want to visit the Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge near Fallon, where over 300 species of birds can be found across 79,000 acres of marshes and desert landscapes.
Hike the Nevada Big Five – With 320 named mountain ranges, more than 172 summits and eight ultra-prominent peaks, Nevada is the most mountainous state in the lower 48. With sunny days and mild temperatures, the state’s five tallest peaks are well worth the climb. Hit the road this spring to discover them all. Mount Charleston, 11,916′ (part of the Spring Mountains National Recreation Area ) Mount Jefferson, 11949′ (part of the Alta Toquima Wilderness in central Nevada) Mount Moriah, 12,073′ (part of the Mount Moriah Wilderness north of Ely) Boundary Peak, 13,147′ (inside Boundary Peak Wilderness near Dyer)
Cin Cin! Treat yourself to Italian cuisine and farm-to-flask distilleries – Eataly Las Vegas has opened a new location in Las Vegas at the Park MGM. The gastronomic marketplace brings Italian culture to southern Nevada with 40,000 square feet of cafes, bars, chef’s counters, markets and restaurants. Inspired by the motto “anything is possible,” Eataly Las Vegas is open 24 hours and features cooking classes, wine on tap, street food from Rome, three pizza kitchens, fresh pasta and a Nutella bar. In northern Nevada, the newly opened Bently Heritage Estate Distillery in Minden embraces a farm-to-flask culture, with liquor made from grains grown on the nearby Bently Ranch. The distillery is one of four estate distilleries in the country and occupies the 100-year-old Minden flour mill.
Spring Road Trip: The Lake Tahoe Loop. Nevada is 110,572 square miles – the seventh largest state in the Union. It is made for road tripping, and TravelNevada has developed 10 signature road trips that take travelers from mountains to deserts, through ghost towns and on byways. Drive the Lake Tahoe Loop this spring, starting in the hip, eclectic and growing city of Reno . Enjoy the burgeoning Midtown and Riverwalk districts, with boutique shopping, craft beer, farm-to-table restaurants and a Burning Man-inspired art scene. Then head to North Lake Tahoe for some alpine adventure and mountain culture. Rediscover the glamour of the 1950s at the Tahoe Biltmore or the Crystal Bay Casino – two historical lakefront properties. In Stateline, enjoy a round of golf at Edgewood Tahoe – the golf resort’s newly opened Lodge at Edgewood Tahoe was named No. 1 Resort Hotel in the U.S. by Travel + Leisure in 2018. Explore the past at the Genoa Bar in Genoa ; which dates back to 1853 and claims to be “Nevada’s oldest thirst parlor,” or check out the Transcontinental Railroad Exhibit commemorating the 150 th anniversary of the Transcontinental Railroad at the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Carson City.
Celebrate spring, Nevada-style. Embrace Nevada’s unique and quirky festivals, dirt bike races through haunted ghost towns and Dutch oven cooking. See below for a list of upcoming events. Genoa Western Heritage Days, April 26-28 . Nevada’s oldest settlement celebrates its history with cowboy poetry, American Indian demonstrations, live music and Dutch oven cooking. Virginia City Grand Prix, April 27-28 . Dirt bikers race through the mountains, old mining roads and the historic and haunted Virginia City. Wild West Extravaganza, May 3-5. A youth rodeo, outhouse races, trail rides and more are scheduled for this event celebrating southern Nevada’s Wild West heritage in Pahrump. Reno River Festival, May 11-12 . Music, craft beer vendors, and an adventure park with rides are part of the fun at this event in downtown Reno.
About TravelNevada The Nevada Division of Tourism (TravelNevada) is part of the Nevada Department of Tourism and Cultural Affairs. It promotes and markets Nevada as a tourism destination for domestic and international leisure and business travelers through its marketing and advertising programs and by coordinating partnerships between public and private entities. TravelNevada also administers grant programs for local entities to market travel and tourism offerings and publishes Nevada Magazine.
EDITORS: Download high-resolution photos here .
Contact:

Read More…

How to use a rice cooker – Reviewed Kitchen & Cooking

Difficulty:
Easy
Rice is a universal side dish that pairs well with pretty much all your favorite foods, from chicken to beef to tofu. If you’re like us, you can’t get enough of it—and you’ll never turn down an easier way to prepare it. That’s why we love rice cookers .
Anything that brings us closer to fluffy, perfect rice gets an A+ in our book. But what makes rice cookers work? And do you follow the same steps for every type of rice? The quick answers are “divine intervention” and “no,” but read on to get all the specifics. The Best Rice Cookers of 2019 What is a rice cooker?
Think of your rice cooker as a smaller, uni-tasking Instant Pot that only cooks rice—and sometimes dumplings. These appliances use air pressure to boil water and steam rice, and they have built-in temperature gauges to alert you as soon as the rice is ready, typically once the cooker hits 212℉. How to use a rice cooker
Different types of rice require specific water-to-rice ratios and cooking times. Additionally, your rice cooker may come with unique features, such as automatic timers, warming controls or settings for different types of rice. For this reason, we recommend reading the gadget’s manual before diving in.
However, to get you started, we’ve outlined the general steps for cooking white rice below. Seriously, it’s so easy you’ll wonder why you waited so long to invest in a rice maker! Step 1: Rinse rice
Pour 1 cup rice into a sifter, then run it under cold water. Rinsing rice removes excess starch from the surface and helps make the end result fluffier. Step 2: Combine rice and water—and any add-ins
Open the top of your rice cooker and add the rice and 1-1/2 cups of water directly into the pot. If you want to add any spices or butter, now’s the time. Once you’ve added everything you want, go ahead and close the lid. Step 3: Set it and forget it
Set your cooker to the appropriate setting, then turn it on. With white rice, you’ll be waiting for about 20 to 25 minutes for it to cook. Your rice cooker will automatically switch to the warming setting when the rice is done. Step 4: Let it rest then dig in
Let your rice rest for an additional five to 10 minutes before enjoying. This allows any excess steam to absorb into the rice for optimal fluff.
Finally, remove your rice from the cooker and serve it with something delicious. Or eat it on it’s own; it’s your life! How to use a rice cooker for different types of rice Credit: Zojirushi
Some rice cookers have settings for different types of rice.
If you’re a rice enthusiast, you know that no two grains are made equal. The steps above are for white, medium-grain rice, but if you find yourself craving one of the following varieties, tweak the steps as indicated. Brown rice
As its name suggests, brown rice is, well, brown. However, this whole-grain variety has significantly more fiber and nutrients than white rice, making it a popular choice for those striving to eat healthier. Ratio: 2 cups water to 1 cup rice Cook time: 25–30 minutes Additional directions: If you enjoy the nuttier flavor of brown rice, we recommend an additional step between 1 and 2: toasting. After rinsing the brown rice, heat a tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat, then add the uncooked rice. Toast it for about 1 to 2 minutes, stirring constantly, until you smell a nutty aroma. Add your toasted rice to the cooker with water, starting at step 3. Quinoa
Packed with fiber and low on carbohydrates, quinoa is a favorite of health-conscious foodies. It’s gluten-free and mixes well with spices, vegetables and butter—just like rice. Ratio: 2 cups water to 1 cup quinoa Cook time: 15 minutes Directions: Follow steps outlined above. Jasmine rice
This long-grain rice is perfect for pairing with stir fry and soup. Jasmine rice cooks more quickly than conventional white rice, and it has a softer, lighter texture. Ratio: 1-3/4 cups water to 1 cup rice Cook time: 15 minutes Directions: Follow steps outlined above. Sushi rice
Surprise, surprise, this short-grain sticky rice is perfect for sushi, as it easily clings to the surface during rolling. In Japan, it’s known as Japanese rice, and fun fact—it’s also used to make sake! (But please don’t do that in your rice cooker.) Ratio: 1 cup water to 1 cup rice Cook time: 15 minutes Additional directions: Follow steps outlined above until you hit step 6. Let the rice rest as noted, but while it’s resting, combine 1 Tbsp. rice vinegar, 1 Tbsp. sugar, and 1/2 tsp. salt in a small bowl, then heat in the microwave for 30 seconds. Transfer the cooked rice to a large bowl, combine with the vinegar mixture, then allow it to come to room temperature before rolling sushi. Basmati rice
Popular in Indian cuisine, Basmati rice has a distinctive aroma and flavor that separates it from other types. This long-grain rice cooks quickly and pairs well with your favorite Indian dishes. Ratio: 1 3/4 cups water to 1 cup rice Cook time: 15 minutes Directions: Follow steps outlined above. Serve with ghee. Sticky rice
Also known as glutinous rice, sticky rice is a favorite in Thai cuisine. It clumps together easily, meaning you can shovel more into your mouth without flicking pieces around. Ratio: 1-3/4 cups water to 1 cup rice Cook time: 2 hours and 15 minutes Additional directions: Instead of rinsing your rice in step 1, combine water and rice in a large bowl and allow it to soak for 2 hours. Sticky rice needs to be pre-softened before steaming. After the time has passed, pour the mixture into your rice cooker and start back up at step 3. How to clean a rice cooker
After you’ve enjoyed every morsel of your perfectly steamed rice, it’s time to lovingly clean your rice cooker and put her away for the next time.
First, unplug the rice cooker. Allow it to come to room temperature before cleaning it—running the pot under water while it’s still hot can warp the pan. When the pan is cool, brush off any remaining dried pieces of rice, then remove the insert and clean it with warm, soapy water. If the pot doesn’t have a removable insert, simply use a sponge to wipe it down. Let it dry, then put it away until next time.
Happy steaming! The Best Rice Cookers of 2019 Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives. Share: What’s Your Take? All Comments Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives. Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Read More…

Taj Mahal Restaurant serves up traditional Indian dishes in Schenectady

Quote: “Hard work does not kill anybody.” Restaurant type: Indian with vegan and gluten-free options available. Quote about restaurant’s origins: “We’ve always had such great respect for the American spirit of entrepreneurship. My wife is a born chef. I wanted to give her the opportunity,” said M.A. Waheed. Most famous diner: Bradley Cooper and Ryan Gosling when they were in town shooting “The Place Beyond the Pines.” One evening, a party of eight walked in as the Waheeds were closing up. The couple had no idea who they were when they agreed to re-open the kitchen and serve them. The customers perused the menu and started talking about different dishes to order. “Bradley Cooper took charge,” Waheed said. “He said, ‘Listen, this guy was closing his restaurant and going. When he opens the restaurant to serve us, all of you just shut up and whatever he brings, let’s have that.’” He then told Waheed to bring whatever they could, because they were hungry and just wanted food. Contact information: (518) 370-3664, tmahalrestaurant.com
SCHENECTADY — Shammi Waheed has always loved cooking. Even though she didn’t have any formal culinary training, she was known from her childhood days for her ability to effortlessly rustle up a high-quality dinner for a crowd of 50 people. Now, she has been doing that seven days a week for 11 years at Taj Mahal Restaurant in Schenectady.
After friends got a taste of her cooking, they encouraged her and her husband, M.A. Waheed, to open a restaurant. The couple, who had immigrated from India twelve years prior, didn’t really give it serious consideration, because they didn’t know anything about the challenges of the industry. A friend contacted them when he saw a restaurant go up for sale. “Before we could realize it, we became owners of a restaurant,” Waheed said. “And Shammi took to it like a duck takes to water.”
The move to the United States was a difficult one. Waheed gave up a posh, high-level executive position in advertising. In the U.S. he could not find a comparable job, despite his expertise and experience. He began working in the hotel industry, and Shammi, who had not had to work in India, also had to find a job in order for the couple to support themselves and their five children. She worked as a caregiver, and at one point, was working three different jobs.
When they had the opportunity to purchase a restaurant, Waheed wanted to give his wife the opportunity to do what she loved so much and the independence that would accompany it.
Culturally, there is a big difference in entrepreneurial opportunities between India and the United States. “The infrastructure is so positive here,” Waheed said. “In India, it’s so difficult for people of no means to start something.” That was not the case here. “We got a lot of support from the community,” he said.
People offered encouragement and guidance. His children’s high school teachers came to help them do their taxes. When his son’s scoutmaster stopped by and saw the family sitting on the floor to have dinner (like they might have done in India) because they didn’t have any furniture, he had a teakwood table that seated eight people delivered the next morning. “People helped us like you would not believe,” he said. PETER R. BARBER/GAZETTE PHOTOGRAPHER Chef Saba, left, M.A. Waheed, and Chef Safa in the kitchen of the Taj Mahal Restaurant Thursday, April 18, 2019.
Taj Mahal offers a lunch buffet Monday through Friday, serving dishes from Hyderabad, a city in India that has what Waheed describes as “a very good confluence of north, south, eat and west” Indian cuisine.
For $8.99 plus tax, customers can eat in or even take out if they’re in a hurry to get back to work, dishes like chicken tandoori and chicken curry, as well as vegan and gluten-free dishes like saag paneer (homemade cheese cooked with spinach) and a carrot and potato in a mild sauce. There is also salad and Indian desserts such as cottage cheese balls in sweet syrup. The buffet is served with a sweet, hot tea.
Waheed likes to keep the price reasonable. “I want it to be like anybody can walk in and under $10 have food that is a very good option,” he said.
The dinner menu features a variety of traditional Indian cuisine including the restaurant’s signature dish, Biryani. This specialty dish is made of basmati rice with deep fried onions, yogurt, ginger and garlic, with a choice of having it with vegetables, shrimp, chicken, lamb or a mix of all four.

Read More…

Nordic nuances

April 25, 2019 16:21 16:21 IST more-in Claus Meyer, co-founder of Michelin star restaurant Noma and founder of the New Nordic Cuisine philosophy, talks to chefs about contemporising traditional, local meals
Around a table laden with local varieties of organically grown produce of Kerala — yellow and green pumpkins, cucumbers, kovaka , banana flower, jack fruit, uncured cardamom, pepper, lemongrass, coconut, pineapple and more — stands chef, food activist, culinary author and founder of the New Nordic Cuisine philosophy, Claus Meyer.
Meyer was interacting with the chefs of CGH group at its farm kitchen in Mararikulam, Alappuzha. For a brief moment, he looks challenged by the bounty in front of him.
“This looks like a lot of Nature, but the Indian buffet does not reflect that,” he says, toying with ways to transpose elements of his food philosophy — local, seasonal, cultural, natural — to an Indian meal. In the course of his 10-day trip to the hotel group’s different properties that are spread across Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Puducherry, he noticed room for a salad in the South Indian meal. Then ideas began to take shape.
He snapped up a kovakka (ivy gourd), broke the little gherkin and was charmed by its pale orange insides. He bit it raw and savoured its crunchiness. “You can finely slice this vegetable, 50 slivers, and spread it on a plate, like an Indian carpaccio (a Venetian appetiser). Maybe add a mix of pineapple, mango, papaya, baby corn and drizzle some dressing on top; it will look like a Picasso painting,” he says, coming up with a possible dressing of vinegar made with equal parts of coconut oil, passion fruit juice, a hint of jiggery and coconut sap. A fresh take
His exchange with the chefs was to usher in innovations in a cuisine that is rooted to tradition and has resisted change.
“It is because you have a rich food culture. But there is room for innovation and introduction of contemporary dishes,” he says, chewing on a green cinnamon leaf, and inhaling the scents of mango-ginger leaves commonly used to wrap pearl spots for grilling.
He recommends steps to help conceptualise a new line of thought: to work with gardeners and to come up with new flavours; to travel to culinary destinations and learn from the exchange; to look for simplicity and develop dishes with just one or two ingredients.
Though not a fan of the curry, sadya or the Indian thali and inept at eating with fingers, he is nevertheless touched by Indian cuisine — he speaks emotionally of the roasted eggplant, baigan bharta that drew him into its depths and of the rumali roti that found a way into the menu of his semi-Indian restaurant, Nam Nam in Copenhagen. The bigger picture
The New Nordic Cuisine is a philosophy that expresses the ethics of the region. The meal would reflect the different seasons and foster local agriculture. It is about combining good taste with health aspects and strongly promotes Nordic produce, the knowledge and culture behind it.
For a highly successful chef and an entrepreneur, Meyer says that the philosophy that brought him to this height, is the thought of using all the resources that one has in life to create the most wonderful thing. “The Nordic cuisine was the result of this thinking.”
Raised on a diet of canned meat, frozen vegetables, bread crumbs, deep fried meats in margarine in childhood, Meyer’s food concept changed after he trained under a French master chef, his mentor Guy Sverzut. Meyer moved on to altruistic pursuits through food. He founded in 2010 The Melting Pot Foundation in Bolivia that trains thousands of children from the slums to engage with the food industry. “I am using the Nordic food Manifesto to fight poverty,” he says.
Based on Meyer’s philosophy, a group of chefs from the Nordic countries even brought out a New Nordic Food Manifesto in 2004 to initiate the movement. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DAILY NEWSLETTER Submit

Read More…

Highest rated food within 5 minute walk of each Skytrain station

(According to Google Maps, with at least 10 reviews each)
They vary from restaurants to nondescript hole-in-the-walls. I didn’t include downtown food trucks because some are a bit transient. WCE stations and Lonsdale Quay are here, too.
Station Name Type Rating Aberdeen Sushi @ Tea-Mo Japanese 4.6 Braid N/A N/A N/A Brentwood Town Centre Roasty Jack American 4.8 Bridgeport Asaka Ramen Japanese 4.1 Broadway-City Hall CafeTica Cafe 4.8 Burquitlam Donair Town Turkish 4.4 Burrard Kari Kitchen Thai 4.6 Columbia Columbia Street Sandwich Company Sandwiches 4.8 Commercial-Broadway The Sweet Greek Greek 4.7 Coquitlam Central N/A N/A N/A Edmonds N/A N/A N/A Gateway Curry Bistro Indian 4.5 Gilmore Suzette’s Deli Deli 4.6 Granville Did’s Pizza Pizza 4.7 Holdom White Lotus Cafe Vietnamese 4.6 Inlet Centre JJ Bean Coffee Roasters Cafe 4.4 Joyce-Collingwood Sushi Taku Japanese 4.5 King Edward Sushi TonTon Japanese 4.3 King George Surrey Central Pizza Point Pizza 4.2 Lafarge Lake-Douglas TiTi Home Made Food Persian 4.4 Lake City Way N/A N/A N/A Langara 49th Avenue N/A N/A N/A Lansdowne Freshslice Pizza Pizza 4.4 Lincoln Steve’s Poké Bar Hawaiian 4.9 Lonsdale Quay Poke & Co Hawaiian 4.8 Lougheed Town Centre Steve’s Poké Bar Hawaiian 5.0 Main Street-Science World Pizzaria Farina Pizza 4.4 Maple Meadows N/A N/A N/A Marine Drive A&W American 4.0 Metrotown Shanghai Fortune Cuisine Chinese 4.6 Mission Bee Thai Cuisine Thai 4.7 Moody Centre Pizza Station Pizza 4.9 Nanaimo N/A N/A N/A New Westminster Banh Mi Bar Vietnamese 4.8 Oakridge 41st Avenue Mimibuloveme Japanese 4.2 Olympic Village Sweetery Cafe + Dessert Cafe 4.2 Patterson Gokudo Shabu Shabu Hot Pot Hot Pot 4.6 Pitt Meadows Foamers’ Folly Brewing Co Pub 4.5 Port Coquitlam Pho T&T Vietnamese 4.4 Port Haney Billy Miner Pub Pub 4.3 Production Way-University The Caterer Café Cafe 4.5 Renfrew Riz Sushi Bar Japanese 4.6 Richmond-Brighouse HaiDiLao Hot Pot Hot Pot 4.3 Royal Oak Tiny Kitchen Chinese 3.9 Rupert Pho Herbs Vietnamese 4.4 Sapperton N/A N/A N/A Scott Road N/A N/A N/A Sea Island Centre N/A N/A N/A Sperling-Burnaby Lake N/A N/A N/A Stadium-Chinatown Caveman Cafe Cafe 4.7 Surrey Central Potemia Poutine 4.5 Templeton N/A N/A N/A Vancouver City Centre Did’s Pizza Pizza 4.7 VCC-Clark Blenz Coffee Cafe 4.0 Waterfront Pholicious Vietnamese 4.7 Yaletown-Roundhouse Manoush’eh Lebanese 4.8 YVR-Airport Jetside Bar Pub 4.4 22nd Street N/A N/A N/A 29th Avenue N/A N/A N/A

Read More…